Posts

Language Detecting with sklearn by determining Letter Frequencies

Of course, there are better and more efficient methods to detect the language of a given text than counting its lettes. On the other hand this is a interesting little example to show the impressing ability of todays machine learning algorithms to detect hidden patterns in a given set of data.

For example take the sentence:

“Ceci est une phrase française.”

It’s not to hard to figure out that this sentence is french. But the (lowercase) letters of the same sentence in a random order look like this:

“eeasrsçneticuaicfhenrpaes”

Still sure it’s french? Regarding the fact that this string contains the letter “ç” some people could have remembered long passed french lessons back in school and though might have guessed right. But beside the fact that the french letter “ç” is also present for example in portuguese, turkish, catalan and a few other languages, this is still a easy example just to explain the problem. Just try to guess which language might have generated this:

“ogldviisnntmeyoiiesettpetorotrcitglloeleiengehorntsnraviedeenltseaecithooheinsnstiofwtoienaoaeefiitaeeauobmeeetdmsflteightnttxipecnlgtetgteyhatncdisaceahrfomseehmsindrlttdthoaranthahdgasaebeaturoehtrnnanftxndaeeiposttmnhgttagtsheitistrrcudf”

While this looks simply confusing to the human eye and it seems practically impossible to determine the language it was generated from, this string still contains as set of hidden but well defined patterns from which the language could be predictet with almost complete (ca. 98-99%) certainty.

First of all, we need a set of texts in the languages our model should be able to recognise. Luckily with the package NLTK there comes a big set of example texts which actually are protocolls of the european parliament and therefor are publicly availible in 11 differen languages:

  •  Danish
  •  Dutch
  •  English
  •  Finnish
  •  French
  •  German
  •  Greek
  •  Italian
  •  Portuguese
  •  Spanish
  •  Swedish

Because the greek version is not written with the latin alphabet, the detection of the language greek would just be too simple, so we stay with the other 10 languages availible. To give you a idea of the used texts, here is a little sample:

“Resumption of the session I declare resumed the session of the European Parliament adjourned on Friday 17 December 1999, and I would like once again to wish you a happy new year in the hope that you enjoyed a pleasant festive period.
Although, as you will have seen, the dreaded ‘millennium bug’ failed to materialise, still the people in a number of countries suffered a series of natural disasters that truly were dreadful.”

Train and Test

The following code imports the nessesary modules and reads the sample texts from a set of text files into a pandas.Dataframe object and prints some statistics about the read texts:

Above you see a sample set of random rows of the created Dataframe. After removing very short text snipplets (less than 200 chars) we are left with 56481 snipplets. The function clean_eutextdf() then creates a lower case representation of the texts in the coloum ‘ltext’ to facilitate counting the chars in the next step.
The following code snipplet now extracs the features – in this case the relative frequency of each letter in every text snipplet – that are used for prediction:

Now that we have calculated the features for every text snipplet in our dataset, we can split our data set in a train and test set:

After doing that, we can train a k-nearest-neigbours classifier and test it to get the percentage of correctly predicted languages in the test data set. Because we do not know what value for k may be the best choice, we just run the training and testing with different values for k in a for loop:

As you can see in the output the reliability of the language classifier is generally very high: It starts at about 97.5% for k = 1, increases for with increasing values of k until it reaches a maximum level of about 98.5% at k ≈ 10.

Using the Classifier to predict languages of texts

Now that we have trained and tested the classifier we want to use it to predict the language of example texts. To do that we need two more functions, shown in the following piece of code. The first one extracts the nessesary features from the sample text and predict_lang() predicts the language of a the texts:

With this classifier it is now also possible to predict the language of the randomized example snipplet from the introduction (which is acutally created from the first paragraph of this article):

The KNN classifier of sklearn also offers the possibility to predict the propability with which a given classification is made. While the probability distribution for a specific language is relativly clear for long sample texts it decreases noticeably the shorter the texts are.

Background and Insights

Why does a relative simple model like counting letters acutally work? Every language has a specific pattern of letter frequencies which can be used as a kind of fingerprint: While there are almost no y‘s in the german language this letter is quite common in english. In french the letter k is not very common because it is replaced with q in most cases.

For a better understanding look at the output of the following code snipplet where only three letters already lead to a noticable form of clustering:

 

Even though every single letter frequency by itself is not a very reliable indicator, the set of frequencies of all present letters in a text is a quite good evidence because it will more or less represent the letter frequency fingerprint of the given language. Since it is quite hard to imagine or visualize the above plot in more than three dimensions, I used a little trick which shows that every language has its own typical fingerprint of letter frequencies:

What more?

Beside the fact, that letter frequencies alone, allow us to predict the language of every example text (at least in the 10 languages with latin alphabet we trained for) with almost complete certancy there is even more information hidden in the set of sample texts.

As you might know, most languages in europe belong to either the romanian or the indogermanic language family (which is actually because the romans conquered only half of europe). The border between them could be located in belgium, between france and germany and in swiss. West of this border the romanian languages, which originate from latin, are still spoken, like spanish, portouguese and french. In the middle and northern part of europe the indogermanic languages are very common like german, dutch, swedish ect. If we plot the analysed languages with a different colour sheme this border gets quite clear and allows us to take a look back in history that tells us where our languages originate from:

As you can see the more common letters, especially the vocals like a, e, i, o and u have almost the same frequency in all of this languages. Far more interesting are letters like q, k, c and w: While k is quite common in all of the indogermanic languages it is quite rare in romanic languages because the same sound is written with the letters q or c.
As a result it could be said, that even “boring” sets of data (just give it a try and read all the texts of the protocolls of the EU parliament…) could contain quite interesting patterns which – in this case – allows us to predict quite precisely which language a given text sample is written in, without the need of any translation program or to speak the languages. And as an interesting side effect, where certain things in history happend (or not happend): After two thousand years have passed, modern machine learning techniques could easily uncover this history because even though all these different languages developed, they still have a set of hidden but common patterns that since than stayed the same.

Sentiment Analysis using Python

One of the applications of text mining is sentiment analysis. Most of the data is getting generated in textual format and in the past few years, people are talking more about NLP. Improvement is a continuous process and many product based companies leverage these text mining techniques to examine the sentiments of the customers to find about what they can improve in the product. This information also helps them to understand the trend and demand of the end user which results in Customer satisfaction.

As text mining is a vast concept, the article is divided into two subchapters. The main focus of this article will be calculating two scores: sentiment polarity and subjectivity using python. The range of polarity is from -1 to 1(negative to positive) and will tell us if the text contains positive or negative feedback. Most companies prefer to stop their analysis here but in our second article, we will try to extend our analysis by creating some labels out of these scores. Finally, a multi-label multi-class classifier can be trained to predict future reviews.

Without any delay let’s deep dive into the code and mine some knowledge from textual data.

There are a few NLP libraries existing in Python such as Spacy, NLTK, gensim, TextBlob, etc. For this particular article, we will be using NLTK for pre-processing and TextBlob to calculate sentiment polarity and subjectivity.

The dataset is available here for download and we will be using pandas read_csv function to import the dataset. I would like to share an additional information here which I came to know about recently. Those who have already used python and pandas before they probably know that read_csv is by far one of the most used function. However, it can take a while to upload a big file. Some folks from  RISELab at UC Berkeley created Modin or Pandas on Ray which is a library that speeds up this process by changing a single line of code.

After importing the dataset it is recommended to understand it first and study the structure of the dataset. At this point we are interested to know how many columns are there and what are these columns so I am going to check the shape of the data frame and go through each column name to see if we need them or not.

 

There are so many columns which are not useful for our sentiment analysis and it’s better to remove these columns. There are many ways to do that: either just select the columns which you want to keep or select the columns you want to remove and then use the drop function to remove it from the data frame. I prefer the second option as it allows me to look at each column one more time so I don’t miss any important variable for the analysis.

Now let’s dive deep into the data and try to mine some knowledge from the remaining columns. The first step we would want to follow here is just to look at the distribution of the variables and try to make some notes. First, let’s look at the distribution of the ratings.

Graphs are powerful and at this point, just by looking at the above bar graph we can conclude that most people are somehow satisfied with the products offered at Amazon. The reason I am saying ‘at’ Amazon is because it is just a platform where anyone can sell their products and the user are giving ratings to the product and not to Amazon. However, if the user is satisfied with the products it also means that Amazon has a lower return rate and lower fraud case (from seller side). The job of a Data Scientist relies not only on how good a model is but also on how useful it is for the business and that’s why these business insights are really important.

Data pre-processing for textual variables

Lowercasing

Before we move forward to calculate the sentiment scores for each review it is important to pre-process the textual data. Lowercasing helps in the process of normalization which is an important step to keep the words in a uniform manner (Welbers, et al., 2017, pp. 245-265).

Special characters

Special characters are non-alphabetic and non-numeric values such as {!,@#$%^ *()~;:/<>\|+_-[]?}. Dealing with numbers is straightforward but special characters can be sometimes tricky. During tokenization, special characters create their own tokens and again not helpful for any algorithm, likewise, numbers.

Stopwords

Stop-words being most commonly used in the English language; however, these words have no predictive power in reality. Words such as I, me, myself, he, she, they, our, mine, you, yours etc.

Stemming

Stemming algorithm is very useful in the field of text mining and helps to gain relevant information as it reduces all words with the same roots to a common form by removing suffixes such as -action, ing, -es and -ses. However, there can be problematic where there are spelling errors.

This step is extremely useful for pre-processing textual data but it also depends on your goal. Here our goal is to calculate sentiment scores and if you look closely to the above code words like ‘inexpensive’ and ‘thrilled’ became ‘inexpens’ and ‘thrill’ after applying this technique. This will help us in text classification to deal with the curse of dimensionality but to calculate the sentiment score this process is not useful.

Sentiment Score

It is now time to calculate sentiment scores of each review and check how these scores look like.

As it can be observed there are two scores: the first score is sentiment polarity which tells if the sentiment is positive or negative and the second score is subjectivity score to tell how subjective is the text. The whole code is available here.

In my next article, we will extend this analysis by creating labels based on these scores and finally we will train a classification model.

Einstieg in Natural Language Processing – Teil 2: Preprocessing von Rohtext mit Python

Dies ist der zweite Artikel der Artikelserie Einstieg in Natural Language Processing.

In diesem Artikel wird das so genannte Preprocessing von Texten behandelt, also Schritte die im Bereich des NLP in der Regel vor eigentlichen Textanalyse durchgeführt werden.

Tokenizing

Um eingelesenen Rohtext in ein Format zu überführen, welches in der späteren Analyse einfacher ausgewertet werden kann, sind eine ganze Reihe von Schritten notwendig. Ganz allgemein besteht der erste Schritt darin, den auszuwertenden Text in einzelne kurze Abschnitte – so genannte Tokens – zu zerlegen (außer man bastelt sich völlig eigene Analyseansätze, wie zum Beispiel eine Spracherkennung anhand von Buchstabenhäufigkeiten ect.).

Was genau ein Token ist, hängt vom verwendeten Tokenizer ab. So bringt NLTK bereits standardmäßig unter anderem BlankLine-, Line-, Sentence-, Word-, Wordpunkt- und SpaceTokenizer mit, welche Text entsprechend in Paragraphen, Zeilen, Sätze, Worte usw. aufsplitten. Weiterhin ist mit dem RegexTokenizer ein Tool vorhanden, mit welchem durch Wahl eines entsprechenden Regulären Ausdrucks beliebig komplexe eigene Tokenizer erstellt werden können.

Üblicherweise wird ein Text (evtl. nach vorherigem Aufsplitten in Paragraphen oder Sätze) schließlich in einzelne Worte und Interpunktionen (Satzzeichen) aufgeteilt. Hierfür kann, wie im folgenden Beispiel z. B. der WordTokenizer oder die diesem entsprechende Funktion word_tokenize() verwendet werden.

Stemming & Lemmatizing

Andere häufig durchgeführte Schritte sind Stemming sowie Lemmatizing. Hierbei werden die Suffixe der einzelnen Tokens des Textes mit Hilfe eines Stemmers in eine Form überführt, welche nur den Wortstamm zurücklässt. Dies hat den Zweck verschiedene grammatikalische Formen des selben Wortes (welche sich oft in ihrer Endung unterscheiden (ich gehe, du gehst, er geht, wir gehen, …) ununterscheidbar zu machen. Diese würden sonst als mehrere unabhängige Worte in die darauf folgende Analyse eingehen.

Neben bereits fertigen Stemmern bietet NLTK auch für diesen Schritt die Möglichkeit sich eigene Stemmer zu programmieren. Da verschiedene Stemmer Suffixe nach unterschiedlichen Regeln entfernen, sind nur die Wortstämme miteinander vergleichbar, welche mit dem selben Stemmer generiert wurden!

Im forlgenden Beispiel werden verschiedene vordefinierte Stemmer aus dem Paket NLTK auf den bereits oben verwendeten Beispielsatz angewendet und die Ergebnisse der gestemmten Tokens in einer Art einfachen Tabelle ausgegeben:

Sehr ähnlich den Stemmern arbeiten Lemmatizer: Auch ihre Aufgabe ist es aus verschiedenen Formen eines Wortes die jeweilige Grundform zu bilden. Im Unterschied zu den Stemmern ist das Lemma eines Wortes jedoch klar als dessen Grundform definiert.

Vokabular

Auch das Vokabular, also die Menge aller verschiedenen Worte eines Textes, ist eine informative Kennzahl. Bezieht man die Größe des Vokabulars eines Textes auf seine gesamte Anzahl verwendeter Worte, so lassen sich hiermit Aussagen zu der Diversität des Textes machen.

Außerdem kann das auftreten bestimmter Worte später bei der automatischen Einordnung in Kategorien wichtig werden: Will man beispielsweise Nachrichtenmeldungen nach Themen kategorisieren und in einem Text tritt das Wort „DAX“ auf, so ist es deutlich wahrscheinlicher, dass es sich bei diesem Text um eine Meldung aus dem Finanzbereich handelt, als z. B. um das „Kochrezept des Tages“.

Dies mag auf den ersten Blick trivial erscheinen, allerdings können auch mit einfachen Modellen, wie dem so genannten „Bag-of-Words-Modell“, welches nur die Anzahl des Auftretens von Worten prüft, bereits eine Vielzahl von Informationen aus Texten gewonnen werden.

Das reine Vokabular eines Textes, welcher in der Variable “rawtext” gespeichert ist, kann wie folgt in der Variable “vocab” gespeichert werden. Auf die Ausgabe wurde in diesem Fall verzichtet, da diese im Falle des oben als Beispiel gewählten Satzes den einzelnen Tokens entspricht, da kein Wort öfter als ein Mal vorkommt.

Stopwords

Unter Stopwords werden Worte verstanden, welche zwar sehr häufig vorkommen, jedoch nur wenig Information zu einem Text beitragen. Beispiele in der beutschen Sprache sind: der, und, aber, mit, …

Sowohl NLTK als auch cpaCy bringen vorgefertigte Stopwordsets mit. 

Vorsicht: NLTK besitzt eine Stopwordliste, welche erst in ein Set umgewandelt werden sollte um die lookup-Zeiten kurz zu halten – schließlich muss jedes einzelne Token des Textes auf das vorhanden sein in der Stopworditerable getestet werden!

POS-Tagging

POS-Tagging steht für „Part of Speech Tagging“ und entspricht ungefähr den Aufgaben, die man noch aus dem Deutschunterricht kennt: „Unterstreiche alle Subjekte rot, alle Objekte blau…“. Wichtig ist diese Art von Tagging insbesondere, wenn man später tatsächlich strukturiert Informationen aus dem Text extrahieren möchte, da man hierfür wissen muss wer oder was als Subjekt mit wem oder was als Objekt interagiert.

Obwohl genau die selben Worte vorkommen, bedeutet der Satz „Die Katze frisst die Maus.“ etwas anderes als „Die Maus frisst die Katze.“, da hier Subjekt und Objekt aufgrund ihrer Reihenfolge vertauscht sind (Stichwort: Subjekt – Prädikat – Objekt ).

Weniger wichtig ist dieser Schritt bei der Kategorisierung von Dokumenten. Insbesondere bei dem bereits oben erwähnten Bag-of-Words-Modell, fließen POS-Tags überhaupt nicht mit ein.

Und weil es so schön einfach ist: Die obigen Schritte mit spaCy

Die obigen Methoden und Arbeitsschritte, welche Texte die in natürlicher Sprache geschrieben sind, allgemein computerzugänglicher und einfacher auswertbar machen, können beliebig genau den eigenen Wünschen angepasst, einzeln mit dem Paket NLTK durchgeführt werden. Dies zumindest einmal gemacht zu haben, erweitert das Verständnis für die funktionsweise einzelnen Schritte und insbesondere deren manchmal etwas versteckten Komplexität. (Wie muss beispielsweise ein Tokenizer funktionieren der den Satz “Schwierig ist z. B. dieser Satz.” korrekt in nur einen Satz aufspaltet, anstatt ihn an jedem Punkt welcher an einem Wortende auftritt in insgesamt vier Sätze aufzuspalten, von denen einer nur aus einem Leerzeichen besteht?) Hier soll nun aber, weil es so schön einfach ist, auch das analoge Vorgehen mit dem Paket spaCy beschrieben werden:

Dieser kurze Codeabschnitt liest den an spaCy übergebenen Rohtext in ein spaCy Doc-Object ein und führt dabei automatisch bereits alle oben beschriebenen sowie noch eine Reihe weitere Operationen aus. So stehen neben dem immer noch vollständig gespeicherten Originaltext, die einzelnen Sätze, Worte, Lemmas, Noun-Chunks, Named Entities, Part-of-Speech-Tags, ect. direkt zur Verfügung und können.über die Methoden des Doc-Objektes erreicht werden. Des weiteren liegen auch verschiedene weitere Objekte wie beispielsweise Vektoren zur Bestimmung von Dokumentenähnlichkeiten bereits fertig vor.

Die Folgende Übersicht soll eine kurze (aber noch lange nicht vollständige) Übersicht über die automatisch von spaCy generierten Objekte und Methoden zur Textanalyse geben:

Diese „Vollautomatisierung“ der Vorabschritte zur Textanalyse hat jedoch auch seinen Preis: spaCy geht nicht gerade sparsam mit Ressourcen wie Rechenleistung und Arbeitsspeicher um. Will man einen oder einige Texte untersuchen so ist spaCy oft die einfachste und schnellste Lösung für das Preprocessing. Anders sieht es aber beispielsweise aus, wenn eine bestimmte Analyse wie zum Beispiel die Einteilung in verschiedene Textkategorien auf eine sehr große Anzahl von Texten angewendet werden soll. In diesem Fall, sollte man in Erwägung ziehen auf ressourcenschonendere Alternativen wie zum Beispiel gensim auszuweichen.

Wer beim lesen genau aufgepasst hat, wird festgestellt haben, dass ich im Abschnitt POS-Tagging im Gegensatz zu den anderen Abschnitten auf ein kurzes Codebeispiel verzichtet habe. Dies möchte ich an dieser Stelle nachholen und dabei gleich eine Erweiterung des Pakets spaCy vorstellen: displaCy.

Displacy bietet die Möglichkeit, sich Zusammenhänge und Eigenschaften von Texten wie Named Entities oder eben POS-Tagging graphisch im Browser anzeigen zu lassen.

Nach ausführen des obigen Codes erhält man eine Ausgabe die wie folgt aussieht:

Nun öffnet man einen Browser und ruft die URL ‘http://127.0.0.1:5000’ auf (Achtung: localhost anstatt der IP funktioniert – warum auch immer – mit displacy nicht). Im Browser sollte nun eine Seite mit einem SVG-Bild geladen werden, welches wie folgt aussieht

Die Abbildung macht deutlich was POS-Tagging genau ist und warum es von Nutzen sein kann wenn man Informationen aus einem Text extrahieren will. Jedem Word (Token) ist eine Wortart zugeordnet und die Beziehung der einzelnen Worte durch Pfeile dargestellt. Dies ermöglicht es dem Computer zum Beispiel in dem Satzteil “der grüne Apfel”, das Adjektiv “grün” auf das Nomen “Apfel” zu beziehen und diesem somit als Eigenschaft zuzuordnen.

Nachdem dieser Artikel wichtige Schritte des Preprocessing von Texten beschrieben hat, geht es im nächsten Artikel darum was man an Texten eigentlich analysieren kann und welche Analysemöglichkeiten die verschiedenen für Python vorhandenen Module bieten.

I. Einführung in TensorFlow: Einleitung und Inhalt

 

 

 

1. Einleitung und Inhalt

Früher oder später wird jede Person, welche sich mit den Themen Daten, KI, Machine Learning und Deep Learning auseinander setzt, mit TensorFlow in Kontakt geraten. Für diejenigen wird der Zeitpunkt kommen, an dem sie sich damit befassen möchten/müssen/wollen.

Und genau für euch ist diese Artikelserie ausgelegt. Gemeinsam wollen wir die ersten Schritte in die Welt von Deep Learning und neuronalen Netzen mit TensorFlow wagen und unsere eigenen Beispiele realisieren. Dabei möchten wir uns auf das Wesentlichste konzentrieren und die Thematik Schritt für Schritt in 4 Artikeln angehen, welche wie folgt aufgebaut sind:

  1. In diesem und damit ersten Artikel wollen wir uns erst einmal darauf konzentrieren, was TensorFlow ist und wofür es genutzt wird.
  2. Im zweiten Artikel befassen wir uns mit der grundlegenden Handhabung von TensorFlow und gehen den theoretischen Ablauf durch.
  3. Im dritten Artikel wollen wir dann näher auf die Praxis eingehen und ein Perzeptron – ein einfaches künstliches Neuron – entwickeln. Dabei werden wir die Grundlagen anwenden, die wir im zweiten Artikel erschlossen haben.
  4. Im vierten Artikel werden wir dann endlich unser erstes neuronales Netz aufbauen. Auch hier bilden die vorherigen Artikel ein gutes Fundament der Verständlichkeit um die kommende Aufgabe zu meistern.

Wenn ihr die Praxisbeispiele in den Artikeln 3 & 4 aktiv mit bestreiten wollt, dann ist es vorteilhaft, wenn ihr bereits mit Python gearbeitet habt und die Grundlagen dieser Programmiersprache beherrscht. Jedoch werden alle Handlungen und alle Zeilen sehr genau kommentiert, so dass es leicht verständlich bleibt.

Neben den Programmierfähigkeiten ist es hilfreich, wenn ihr euch mit der Funktionsweise von neuronalen Netzen auskennt, da wir im späteren Verlauf diese modellieren wollen. Jedoch gehen wir vor der Programmierung  kurz auf die Theorie ein und werden das Wichtigste nochmal erwähnen.

Zu guter Letzt benötigen wir für unseren Theorie-Teil ein Mindestmaß an Mathematik um die Grundlagen der neuronalen Netze zu verstehen. Aber auch hier sind die Anforderungen nicht hoch und wir sind vollkommen gut  damit bedient, wenn wir unser Wissen aus dem Abitur noch nicht ganz vergessen haben.

2. Ziele dieser Artikelserie

Diese Artikelserie ist speziell an Personen gerichtet, welche einen ersten Schritt in die große und interessante Welt von Deep Learning wagen möchten, die am Anfang nicht mit zu vielen Details überschüttet werden wollen und lieber an kleine und verdaulichen Häppchen testen wollen, ob dies das Richtige für sie ist. Unser Ziel wird sein, dass wir ein Grundverständnis für TensorFlow entwickeln und die Grundlagen zur Nutzung beherrschen, um mit diesen erste Modelle zu erstellen.

3. Was ist TensorFlow?

Viele von euch haben bestimmt von TensorFlow in Verbindung mit Deep Learning bzw. neuronalen Netzen gehört. Allgemein betrachtet ist TensorFlow ein Software-Framework zur numerischen Berechnung von Datenflussgraphen mit dem Fokus maschinelle Lernalgorithmen zu beschreiben. Kurz gesagt: Es ist ein Tool um Deep Learning Modelle zu realisieren.

Zusatz: Python ist eine Programmiersprache in der wir viele Paradigmen (objektorientiert, funktional, etc.) verwenden können. Viele Tutorials im Bereich Data Science nutzen das imperative Paradigma; wir befehlen Python also Was gemacht und Wie es ausgeführt werden soll. TensorFlow ist dahingehend anders, da es eine datenstrom-orientierte Programmierung nutzt. In dieser Form der Programmierung wird ein Datenfluss-Berechnungsgraph (kurz: Datenflussgraph) erzeugt, welcher durch die Zusammensetzung von Kanten und Knoten charakterisiert wird. Die Kanten enthalten Daten und können diese an Knoten weiterleiten. In den Knoten werden Operationen wie z. B. Addition, Multiplikation oder auch verschiedenste Variationen von Funktionen ausgeführt. Bekannte Programme mit datenstrom-orientierten Paradigmen sind Simulink, LabView oder Knime.

Für das Verständnis von TensorFlow verrät uns der Name bereits erste Informationen über die Funktionsweise. In neuronalen Netzen bzw. in Deep-Learning-Netzen können Eingangssignale, Gewichte oder Bias verschiedene Erscheinungsformen haben; von Skalaren, zweidimensionalen Tabellen bis hin zu mehrdimensionalen Matrizen kann alles dabei sein. Diese Erscheinungsformen werden in Deep-Learning-Anwendungen allgemein als Tensoren bezeichnet, welche durch ein Datenflussgraph ‘fließen’. [1]

Abb.1 Namensbedeutung von TensorFlow: Links ein Tensor in Form einer zweidimensionalen Matrix; Rechts ein Beispiel für einen Datenflussgraph

 

4. Warum TensorFlow?

Wer in die Welt der KI einsteigen und Deep Learning lernen will, hat heutzutage die Qual der Wahl. Neben TensorFlow gibt es eine Vielzahl von Alternativen wie Keras, Theano, Pytorch, Torch, Caffe, Caffe2, Mxnet und vielen anderen. Warum also TensorFlow?

Das wohl wichtigste Argument besteht darin, dass TensorFlow eine der besten Dokumentationen hat. Google – Herausgeber von TensorFlow – hat TensorFlow stets mit neuen Updates beliefert. Sicherlich aus genau diesen Gründen ist es das meistgenutzte Framework. Zumindest erscheint es so, wenn wir die Stars&Forks auf Github betrachten. [3] Das hat zur Folge, dass neben der offiziellen Dokumentation auch viele Tutorials und Bücher existieren, was die Doku nur noch besser macht.

Natürlich haben alle Frameworks ihre Vor- und Nachteile. Gerade Pytorch von Facebook erfreut sich derzeit großer Beliebtheit, da die Berechnungsgraphen dynamischer Natur sind und damit einige Vorteile gegenüber TensorFlow aufweisen.[2] Auch Keras wäre für den Einstieg eine gute Alternative, da diese Bibliothek großen Wert auf eine einsteiger- und nutzerfreundliche Handhabung legt. Keras kann man sich als eine Art Bedienoberfläche über unsere Frameworks vorstellen, welche vorgefertigte neuronale Netze bereitstellt und uns einen Großteil der Arbeit abnimmt.

Möchte man jedoch ein detailreiches und individuelles Modell bauen und die Theorie dahinter nachvollziehen können, dann ist TensorFlow der beste Einstieg in Deep Learning! Es wird einige Schwierigkeiten bei der Gestaltung unserer Modelle geben, aber durch die gute Dokumentation, der großen Community und der Vielzahl an Beispielen, werden wir gewiss eine Lösung für aufkommende Problemstellungen finden.

 

Abb.2 Beliebtheit von DL-Frameworks basierend auf Github Stars & Forks (10.06.2018)

 

5. Zusammenfassung und Ausblick

Fassen wir das Ganze nochmal zusammen: TensorFlow ist ein Framework, welches auf der datenstrom-orientierten Programmierung basiert und speziell für die Implementierung von Machine/Deep Learning-Anwendungen ausgelegt ist. Dabei fließen unsere Daten durch eine mehr oder weniger komplexe Anordnung von Berechnungen, welche uns am Ende ein Ergebnis liefert.

Die wichtigsten Argumente zur Wahl von TensorFlow als Einstieg in die Welt des Deep Learnings bestehen darin, dass TensorFlow ausgezeichnet dokumentiert ist, eine große Community besitzt und relativ einfach zu lesen ist. Außerdem hat es eine Schnittstelle zu Python, welches durch die meisten Anwender im Bereich der Datenanalyse bereits genutzt wird.

Wenn ihr es bis hier hin geschafft habt und immer noch motiviert seid den Einstieg mit TensorFlow zu wagen, dann seid gespannt auf den nächsten Artikel. In diesem werden wir dann auf die Funktionsweise von TensorFlow eingehen und einfache Berechnungsgraphen aufbauen, um ein Grundverständnis von TensorFlow zu bekommen. Bleibt also gespannt!

Quellen

[1] Hope, Tom (2018): Einführung in TensorFlow: DEEP-LEARNING-SYSTEME PROGRAMMIEREN, TRAINIEREN, SKALIEREN UND DEPLOYEN, 1. Auflage

[2] https://www.marutitech.com/top-8-deep-learning-frameworks/

[3] https://github.com/mbadry1/Top-Deep-Learning

[4] https://www.bigdata-insider.de/was-ist-keras-a-726546/

How To Remotely Send R and Python Execution to SQL Server from Jupyter Notebooks

Introduction

Did you know that you can execute R and Python code remotely in SQL Server from Jupyter Notebooks or any IDE? Machine Learning Services in SQL Server eliminates the need to move data around. Instead of transferring large and sensitive data over the network or losing accuracy on ML training with sample csv files, you can have your R/Python code execute within your database. You can work in Jupyter Notebooks, RStudio, PyCharm, VSCode, Visual Studio, wherever you want, and then send function execution to SQL Server bringing intelligence to where your data lives.

This tutorial will show you an example of how you can send your python code from Juptyter notebooks to execute within SQL Server. The same principles apply to R and any other IDE as well. If you prefer to learn through videos, this tutorial is also published on YouTube here:


 

Environment Setup Prerequisites

  1. Install ML Services on SQL Server

In order for R or Python to execute within SQL, you first need the Machine Learning Services feature installed and configured. See this how-to guide.

  1. Install RevoscalePy via Microsoft’s Python Client

In order to send Python execution to SQL from Jupyter Notebooks, you need to use Microsoft’s RevoscalePy package. To get RevoscalePy, download and install Microsoft’s ML Services Python Client. Documentation Page or Direct Download Link (for Windows).

After downloading, open powershell as an administrator and navigate to the download folder. Start the installation with this command (feel free to customize the install folder): .\Install-PyForMLS.ps1 -InstallFolder “C:\Program Files\MicrosoftPythonClient”

Be patient while the installation can take a little while. Once installed navigate to the new path you installed in. Let’s make an empty folder and open Jupyter Notebooks: mkdir JupyterNotebooks; cd JupyterNotebooks; ..\Scripts\jupyter-notebook

Create a new notebook with the Python 3 interpreter:

 

To test if everything is setup, import revoscalepy in the first cell and execute. If there are no error messages you are ready to move forward.

Database Setup (Required for this tutorial only)

For the rest of the tutorial you can clone this Jupyter Notebook from Github if you don’t want to copy paste all of the code. This database setup is a one time step to ensure you have the same data as this tutorial. You don’t need to perform any of these setup steps to use your own data.

  1. Create a database

Modify the connection string for your server and use pyodbc to create a new database.

  1. Import Iris sample from SkLearn

Iris is a popular dataset for beginner data science tutorials. It is included by default in sklearn package.

  1. Use RecoscalePy APIs to create a table and load the Iris data

(You can also do this with pyodbc, sqlalchemy or other packages)

Define a Function to Send to SQL Server

Write any python code you want to execute in SQL. In this example we are creating a scatter matrix on the iris dataset and only returning the bytestream of the .png back to Jupyter Notebooks to render on our client.

Send execution to SQL

Now that we are finally set up, check out how easy sending remote execution really is! First, import revoscalepy. Create a sql_compute_context, and then send the execution of any function seamlessly to SQL Server with RxExec. No raw data had to be transferred from SQL to the Jupyter Notebook. All computation happened within the database and only the image file was returned to be displayed.

While this example is trivial with the Iris dataset, imagine the additional scale, performance, and security capabilities that you now unlocked. You can use any of the latest open source R/Python packages to build Deep Learning and AI applications on large amounts of data in SQL Server. We also offer leading edge, high-performance algorithms in Microsoft’s RevoScaleR and RevoScalePy APIs. Using these with the latest innovations in the open source world allows you to bring unparalleled selection, performance, and scale to your applications.

Learn More

Check out SQL Machine Learning Services Documentation to learn how you can easily deploy your R/Python code with SQL stored procedures making them accessible in your ETL processes or to any application. Train and store machine learning models in your database bringing intelligence to where your data lives.

Other YouTube Tutorials:

R oder Python – Die Sprache der Wahl in einem Data Science Weiterbildungskurs

Die KDnuggets, ein einflussreicher Newletter zu Data Mining und inzwischen auch zu Data Science, überraschte kürzlich mit der Meldung „Python eats away at R: Top Software for Analytics, Data Science, Machine Learning in 2018. Trends and Analysis“.[1] Grundlage war eine Befragung, an der mehr als 2300 KDNuggets Leser teilnahmen. Nach Bereinigung um die sogenannten „Lone Voters“, gingen insgesamt 2052 Stimmen in die Auswertung ein.

Demnach stieg der Anteil der Python-Nutzer von 2017 bis 2018 um 11% auf 65%, während mit 48% weniger als die Hälfte der Befragungsteilnehmer noch R nannten. Gegenüber 2017 ging der Anteil von R um 14% zurück. Dies ist umso bemerkenswerter, als dass bei keinem der übrigen Top Tools eine Verminderung des Anteils gemessen wurde.

Wir verzichten an dieser Stelle darauf, die Befragungsergebnisse selbst in Frage zu stellen oder andere Daten herbeizuziehen. Stattdessen nehmen wir erst einmal die Zahlen wie sie sind und konzedieren einen gewissen Python Hype. Das Python Konjunktur hat, zeigt sich z.B. in der wachsenden Zahl von Buchtiteln zu Python und Data Science oder in einem Machine Learning Tutorial der Zeitschrift iX, das ebenfalls auf Python fußt. Damit stellt sich die Frage, ob ein Weiterbildungskurs zu Data Science noch guten Gewissens auf R als Erstsprache setzen kann.

Der Beantwortung dieser Frage seien zwei Bemerkungen vorangestellt:

  1. Ob die eine Sprache „besser“ als die andere ist, lässt sich nicht abschließend beantworten. Mit Blick auf die Teilarbeitsgebiete des Data Scientists, also Datenzugriff, Datenmanipulation und Transformation, statistische Analysen und visuelle Aufbereitung zeigt sich jedenfalls keine prinzipielle Überlegenheit der einen über die andere Sprache.
  2. Beide Sprachen sind quicklebendig und werden bei insgesamt steigenden Nutzerzahlen dynamisch weiterentwickelt.

Das Beispiel der kürzlich gegründeten Ursa Labs[2] zeigt überdies, dass es zukünftig weniger darum gehen wird „Werkzeuge für eine einzelne Sprache zu bauen…“ als darum „…portable Bibliotheken zu entwickeln, die in vielen Programmiersprachen verwendet werden können“[3].

Die zunehmende Anwendung von Python in den Bereichen Data Science und Machine Learning hängt auch damit zusammen, dass Python ursprünglich als Allzweck-Programmiersprache konzipiert wurde. Viele Entwickler und Ingenieure arbeiteten also bereits mit Python ohne dabei mit analytischen Anwendungen in Kontakt zu kommen. Wenn diese Gruppen gegenwärtig mehr und mehr in den Bereichen Datenanalyse, Statistik und Machine Learning aktiv werden, dann greifen sie naturgemäß zu einem bekannten Werkzeug, in diesem Fall zu einer bereits vorhandenen Python Implementation.

Auf der anderen Seite sind Marketingfachleute, Psychologen, Controller und andere Analytiker eher mit SPSS und Excel vertraut. In diesen Fällen kann die Wahl der Data Science Sprache freier erfolgen. Für R spricht dann zunächst einmal seine Kompaktheit. Obwohl inzwischen mehr als 10.000 Erweiterungspakete existieren, gibt es mit www.r-project.org immer noch eine zentrale Anlaufstelle, von der über einen einzigen Link der Download eines monolithischen Basispakets erreichbar ist.

Demgegenüber existieren für Python mit Python 2.7 und Python 3.x zwei nach wie vor aktive Entwicklungszweige. Fällt die Wahl z.B. auf Python 3.x, dann stehen mit Python3 und Ipython3 wiederum verschiedene Interpreter zur Auswahl. Schließlich gibt es noch Python Distributionen wie Anaconda. Anaconda selbst ist in zwei „Geschmacksrichtungen“ (flavors) verfügbar als Miniconda und eben als Anaconda.

R war von Anfang an als statistische Programmiersprache konzipiert. Nach allen subjektiven Erfahrungen eignet es sich allein schon deshalb besser zur Erläuterung statistischer Methoden. Noch vor wenigen Jahren galt R als „schwierig“ und Statistikern vorbehalten. In dem Maße, in dem wissenschaftlich fundierte Software Tools in den Geschäftsalltag vordringen wird klar, dass viele der zunächst als „schwierig“ empfundenen Konzepte letztlich auf Rationalität und Arbeitsersparnis abzielen. Fehler, Bugs und Widersprüche finden sich in R so selbstverständlich wie in allen anderen Programmiersprachen. Bei der raschen Beseitigung dieser Schwächen kann R aber auf eine große und wache Gemeinschaft zurückgreifen.

Die Popularisierung von R erhielt durch die Gründung des R Consortiums zu Beginn des Jahres 2015 einen deutlichen Schub. Zu den Initiatoren dieser Interessengruppe gehörte auch Microsoft. Tatsächlich unterstützt Microsoft R auf vielfältige Weise unter anderem durch eine eigene Distribution unter der Bezeichnung „Microsoft R Open“, die Möglichkeit R Code in SQL Anweisungen des SQL Servers absetzen zu können oder die (angekündigte) Weitergabe von in Power BI erzeugten R Visualisierungen an Excel.

Der Vergleich von R und Python in einem fiktiven Big Data Anwendungsszenario liefert kein Kriterium für die Auswahl der Unterrichtssprache in einem Weiterbildungskurs. Aussagen wie x ist „schneller“, „performanter“ oder „besser“ als y sind nahezu inhaltsleer. In der Praxis werden geschäftskritische Big Data Anwendungen in einem Umfeld mit vielen unterschiedlichen Softwaresystemen abgewickelt und daher von vielen Parametern beeinflusst. Wo es um Höchstleistungen geht, tragen R und Python häufig gemeinsam zum Ergebnis bei.

Der Zertifikatskurs „Data Science“ der AWW e. V. und der Technischen Hochschule Brandenburg war schon bisher nicht auf R beschränkt. Im ersten Modul geben wir z.B. auch eine Einführung in SQL und arbeiten mit ETL-Tools. Im gerade zu Ende gegangenen Kurs wurde Feature Engineering auf der Grundlage eines Python Lehrbuchs[4] behandelt und die Anweisungen in R übersetzt. In den kommenden Durchgängen werden wir dieses parallele Vorgehen verstärken und wann immer sinnvoll auch auf Lösungen in Python hinweisen.

Im Vertiefungsmodul „Machine Learning mit Python“ schließlich ist Python die Sprache der Wahl. Damit tragen wir der Tatsache Rechnung, dass es zwar Sinn macht in die grundlegenden Konzepte mit einer Sprache einzuführen, in der Praxis aber Mehrsprachigkeit anzutreffen ist.

[1] https://www.kdnuggets.com/2018/05/poll-tools-analytics-data-science-machine-learning-results.html

[2] https://ursalabs.org/

[3] Statement auf der Ursa Labs Startseite, eigene Übersetzung.

[4] Sarkar, D et al. Practical Machine Learning with Python, S. 177ff.

Bringing intelligence to where data lives: Python & R embedded in T-SQL

Introduction

Did you know that you can write R and Python code within your T-SQL statements? Machine Learning Services in SQL Server eliminates the need for data movement. Instead of transferring large and sensitive data over the network or losing accuracy with sample csv files, you can have your R/Python code execute within your database. Easily deploy your R/Python code with SQL stored procedures making them accessible in your ETL processes or to any application. Train and store machine learning models in your database bringing intelligence to where your data lives.

You can install and run any of the latest open source R/Python packages to build Deep Learning and AI applications on large amounts of data in SQL Server. We also offer leading edge, high-performance algorithms in Microsoft’s RevoScaleR and RevoScalePy APIs. Using these with the latest innovations in the open source world allows you to bring unparalleled selection, performance, and scale to your applications.

If you are excited to try out SQL Server Machine Learning Services, check out the hands on tutorial below. If you do not have Machine Learning Services installed in SQL Server,you will first want to follow the getting started tutorial I published here: 

How-To Tutorial

In this tutorial, I will cover the basics of how to Execute R and Python in T-SQL statements. If you prefer learning through videos, I also published the tutorial on YouTube.

Basics

Open up SQL Server Management Studio and make a connection to your server. Open a new query and paste this basic example: (While I use Python in these samples, you can do everything with R as well)

Sp_execute_external_script is a special system stored procedure that enables R and Python execution in SQL Server. There is a “language” parameter that allows us to choose between Python and R. There is a “script” parameter where we can paste R or Python code. If you do not see an output print 7, go back and review the setup steps in this article.

Parameter Introduction

Now that we discussed a basic example, let’s start adding more pieces:

Machine Learning Services provides more natural communications between SQL and R/Python with an input data parameter that accepts any SQL query. The input parameter name is called “input_data_1”.
You can see in the python code that there are default variables defined to pass data between Python and SQL. The default variable names are “OutputDataSet” and “InputDataSet” You can change these default names like this example:

As you executed these examples, you might have noticed that they each return a result with “(No column name)”? You can specify a name for the columns that are returned by adding the WITH RESULT SETS clause to the end of the statement which is a comma separated list of columns and their datatypes.

Input/Output Data Types

Alright, let’s discuss a little more about the input/output data types used between SQL and Python. Your input SQL SELECT statement passes a “Dataframe” to python relying on the Python Pandas package. Your output from Python back to SQL also needs to be in a Pandas Dataframe object. If you need to convert scalar values into a dataframe here is an example:

Variables c and d are both scalar values, which you can add to a pandas Series if you like, and then convert them to a pandas dataframe. This one shows a little bit more complicated example, go read up on the python pandas package documentation for more details and examples:

You now know the basics to execute Python in T-SQL!

Did you know you can also write your R and Python code in your favorite IDE like RStudio and Jupyter Notebooks and then remotely send the execution of that code to SQL Server? Check out these documentation links to learn more: https://aka.ms/R-RemoteSQLExecution https://aka.ms/PythonRemoteSQLExecution

Check out the SQL Server Machine Learning Services documentation page for more documentation, samples, and solutions. Check out these E2E tutorials on github as well.

Would love to hear from you! Leave a comment below to ask a question, or start a discussion!

Interview – Python as productive data science environment

Miroslav Šedivý is a Senior Software Architect at UBIMET GmbH, using Python to make the sun shine and the wind blow. He is an enthusiast of both human and programming languages and found Python as his language of choice to setup very productive environments. Mr. Šedivý was born in Czechoslovakia, studied in France and is now living in Germany. Furthermore, he helps in the organization of the events PyCon.DE and Polyglot Gathering.


On 26th June 2018 he will explain at the Python@DWX conference why “Lifelong Text Hackers Use Vim and Python”. Insert the promotion code PY18science to unlock your 10% discount on all tickets. More info and tickets on python-con.com.


Data Science Blog: Mr. Šedivý, how did you find the way to Python as your favorite programming language?

Apart from traditional languages taught at school (Basic, Pascal, C, Java), some twenty years ago I learned Perl to hack a dynamic web site and used it to automate my daily tasks. Later I used it professionally for scientific calculations in the production. This was later replaced by Python, its newer versions and more advanced libraries. Nowadays Python has almost completely replaced Perl as my principal language and I use Perl just to hack some command line filters and to impress colleagues.

Data Science Blog: Python is one of the most popular programming language for data scientists. This is remarkable as it is originally not designed for doing data science with it. What made it a competitor to languages like R or Julia?

Python is the most powerful programming language that is still legible. This appeals to data scientists who can enter each line interactively, and immediately see what happens, because each line actually does something. They can inspect their data easily and build automating systems to process their data transparently.

Data Science Blog: Is there anything you could do better with another programming language?

Sometimes I’m playing with some functional languages that would allow me to write code that is easier to test and parallelize.

Data Science Blog: Which libraries are the most important ones for your daily business?

The whole Pandas ecosystem with Numpy and Scipy. Matplotlib for plots, PyTables and Psycopg2 for storage. I’m also importing a few async libs for webservices and similar network-based software.

I also enjoy discovering the world of Unicode and Timezones – both of them are the spots where the programmers absolutely have to obey the chaotic reality of the outside world.

Data Science Blog: Which editor do you use? And how to set it up as a productive environment?

I tried several editors and IDEs, but always came back to Vi or Vim. This is an extremely powerful editor that is around since over forty years, which was probably before most of today’s active developers learned to type. I’m using it for all text editing tasks, which I’m actually going to show in my talk at DWX [Lifelong Text Hackers Use Vim and Python]. Steep learning curve is not an argument against a tool you can grok during your entire career.

Data Science Blog: In your opinion: For all developers and data scientists, who are used to Java, Scala, R oder Perl, is Python easy to learn? Could it be too late to switch for somebody?

Python is a great general language that can be learned rapidly to a usable level. It’s different from the aforementioned languages. I remember my switching process from Perl to Python over ten years ago with a book “Perl to Python Migration”, which forced me to switch my way of thinking. From the question “Why do I have to import ‘re’ for regular expressions if Perl uses them natively?” to “Actually, I can solve this problem without regular expressions.”.

Applying Data Science Techniques in Python to Evaluate Ionospheric Perturbations from Earthquakes

Multi-GNSS (Galileo, GPS, and GLONASS) Vertical Total Electron Content Estimates: Applying Data Science techniques in Python to Evaluate Ionospheric Perturbations from Earthquakes

1 Introduction

Today, Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) observations are routinely used to study the physical processes that occur within the Earth’s upper atmosphere. Due to the experienced satellite signal propagation effects the total electron content (TEC) in the ionosphere can be estimated and the derived Global Ionosphere Maps (GIMs) provide an important contribution to monitoring space weather. While large TEC variations are mainly associated with solar activity, small ionospheric perturbations can also be induced by physical processes such as acoustic, gravity and Rayleigh waves, often generated by large earthquakes.

In this study Ionospheric perturbations caused by four earthquake events have been observed and are subsequently used as case studies in order to validate an in-house software developed using the Python programming language. The Python libraries primarily utlised are Pandas, Scikit-Learn, Matplotlib, SciPy, NumPy, Basemap, and ObsPy. A combination of Machine Learning and Data Analysis techniques have been applied. This in-house software can parse both receiver independent exchange format (RINEX) versions 2 and 3 raw data, with particular emphasis on multi-GNSS observables from GPS, GLONASS and Galileo. BDS (BeiDou) compatibility is to be added in the near future.

Several case studies focus on four recent earthquakes measuring above a moment magnitude (MW) of 7.0 and include: the 11 March 2011 MW 9.1 Tohoku, Japan, earthquake that also generated a tsunami; the 17 November 2013 MW 7.8 South Scotia Ridge Transform (SSRT), Scotia Sea earthquake; the 19 August 2016 MW 7.4 North Scotia Ridge Transform (NSRT) earthquake; and the 13 November 2016 MW 7.8 Kaikoura, New Zealand, earthquake.

Ionospheric disturbances generated by all four earthquakes have been observed by looking at the estimated vertical TEC (VTEC) and residual VTEC values. The results generated from these case studies are similar to those of published studies and validate the integrity of the in-house software.

2 Data Cleaning and Data Processing Methodology

Determining the absolute VTEC values are useful in order to understand the background ionospheric conditions when looking at the TEC perturbations, however small-scale variations in electron density are of primary interest. Quality checking processed GNSS data, applying carrier phase leveling to the measurements, and comparing the TEC perturbations with a polynomial fit creating residual plots are discussed in this section.

Time delay and phase advance observables can be measured from dual-frequency GNSS receivers to produce TEC data. Using data retrieved from the Center of Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) site (ftp://ftp.unibe.ch/aiub/CODE), the differential code biases are subtracted from the ionospheric observables.

2.1 Determining VTEC: Thin Shell Mapping Function

The ionospheric shell height, H, used in ionosphere modeling has been open to debate for many years and typically ranges from 300 – 400 km, which corresponds to the maximum electron density within the ionosphere. The mapping function compensates for the increased path length traversed by the signal within the ionosphere. Figure 1 demonstrates the impact of varying the IPP height on the TEC values.

Figure 1 Impact on TEC values from varying IPP heights. The height of the thin shell, H, is increased in 50km increments from 300 to 500 km.

2.2 Phase Smoothing

For dual-frequency GNSS users TEC values can be retrieved with the use of dual-frequency measurements by applying calculations. Calculation of TEC for pseudorange measurements in practice produces a noisy outcome and so the relative phase delay between two carrier frequencies – which produces a more precise representation of TEC fluctuations – is preferred. To circumvent the effect of pseudorange noise on TEC data, GNSS pseudorange measurements can be smoothed by carrier phase measurements, with the use of the carrier phase smoothing technique, which is often referred to as carrier phase leveling.

Figure 2 Phase smoothed code differential delay

2.3 Residual Determination

For the purpose of this study the monitoring of small-scale variations in ionospheric electron density from the ionospheric observables are of particular interest. Longer period variations can be associated with diurnal alterations, and changes in the receiver- satellite elevation angles. In order to remove these longer period variations in the TEC time series as well as to monitor more closely the small-scale variations in ionospheric electron density, a higher-order polynomial is fitted to the TEC time series. This higher-order polynomial fit is then subtracted from the observed TEC values resulting in the residuals. The variation of TEC due to the TID perturbation are thus represented by the residuals. For this report the polynomial order applied was typically greater than 4, and was chosen to emulate the nature of the arc for that particular time series. The order number selected is dependent on the nature of arcs displayed upon calculating the VTEC values after an initial inspection of the VTEC plots.

3 Results

3.1 Tohoku Earthquake

For this particular report, the sampled data focused on what was retrieved from the IGS station, MIZU, located at Mizusawa, Japan. The MIZU site is 39N 08′ 06.61″ and 141E 07′ 58.18″. The location of the data collection site, MIZU, and the earthquake epicenter can be seen in Figure 3.

Figure 3 MIZU IGS station and Tohoku earthquake epicenter [generated using the Python library, Basemap]

Figure 4 displays the ionospheric delay in terms of vertical TEC (VTEC), in units of TECU (1 TECU = 1016 el m-2). The plot is split into two smaller subplots, the upper section displaying the ionospheric delay (VTEC) in units of TECU, the lower displaying the residuals. The vertical grey-dashed lined corresponds to the epoch of the earthquake at 05:46:23 UT (2:46:23 PM local time) on March 11 2011. In the upper section of the plot, the blue line corresponds to the absolute VTEC value calculated from the observations, in this case L1 and L2 on GPS, whereby the carrier phase leveling technique was applied to the data set. The VTEC values are mapped from the STEC values which are calculated from the LOS between MIZU and the GPS satellite PRN18 (on Figure 4 denoted G18). For this particular data set as seen in Figure 4, a polynomial fit of  five degrees was applied, which corresponds to the red-dashed line. As an alternative to polynomial fitting, band-pass filtering can be employed when TEC perturbations are desired. However for the scope of this report polynomial fitting to the time series of TEC data was the only method used. In the lower section of Figure 4 the residuals are plotted. The residuals are simply the phase smoothed delay values (the blue line) minus the polynomial fit line (the red-dashed line). All ionosphere delay plots follow the same layout pattern and all time data is represented in UT (UT = GPS – 15 leap seconds, whereby 15 leap seconds correspond to the amount of leap seconds at the time of the seismic event). The time series shown for the ionosphere delay plots are given in terms of decimal of the hour, so that the format follows hh.hh.

Figure 4 VTEC and residual plot for G18 at MIZU on March 11 2011

3.2 South Georgia Earthquake

In the South Georgia Island region located in the North Scotia Ridge Transform (NSRT) plate boundary between the South American and Scotia plates on 19 August 2016, a magnitude of 7.4 MW earthquake struck at 7:32:22 UT. This subsection analyses the data retrieved from KEPA and KRSA. As well as computing the GPS and GLONASS TEC values, four Galileo satellites (E08, E14, E26, E28) are also analysed. Figure 5 demonstrates the TEC perturbations as computed for the Galileo L1 and L5 carrier frequencies.

Figure 5 VTEC and residual plots at KRSA on 19 August 2016. The plots are from the perspective of the GNSS receiver at KRSA, for four Galileo satellites (a) E08; (b) E14; (c) E24; (d) E26. The y-axes and x-axes in all plots do not conform with one another but are adjusted to fit the data. The y-axes for the residual section of each plot is consistent with one another.

Figure 6 Geometry of the Galileo (E08, E14, E24 and E26) satellites’ projected ground track whereby the IPP is set to 300km altitude. The orange lines correspond to tectonic plate boundaries.

4 Conclusion

The proximity of the MIZU site and magnitude of the Tohoku event has provided a remarkable – albeit a poignant – opportunity to analyse the ocean-ionospheric coupling aftermath of a deep submarine seismic event. The Tohoku event has also enabled the observation of the origin and nature of the TIDs generated by both a major earthquake and tsunami in close proximity to the epicenter. Further, the Python software developed is more than capable of providing this functionality, by drawing on its mathematical packages, such as NumPy, Pandas, SciPy, and Matplotlib, as well as employing the cartographic toolkit provided from the Basemap package, and finally by utilizing the focal mechanism generation library, Obspy.

Pre-seismic cursors have been investigated in the past and strongly advocated in particular by Kosuke Heki. The topic of pre-seismic ionospheric disturbances remains somewhat controversial. A potential future study area could be the utilization of the Python program – along with algorithmic amendments – to verify the existence of this phenomenon. Such work would heavily involve the use of Scikit-Learn in order to ascertain the existence of any pre-cursors.

Finally, the code developed is still retained privately and as of yet not launched to any particular platform, such as GitHub. More detailed information on this report can be obtained here:

Download as PDF

Lineare Regression in Python mit Scitkit-Learn

Die lineare Regressionsanalyse ist ein häufiger Einstieg ins maschinelle Lernen um stetige Werte vorherzusagen (Prediction bzw. Prädiktion). Hinter der Regression steht oftmals die Methode der kleinsten Fehlerquadrate und die hat mehr als eine mathematische Methode zur Lösungsfindung (Gradientenverfahren und Normalengleichung). Alternativ kann auch die Maximum Likelihood-Methode zur Regression verwendet werden. Wir wollen uns in diesem Artikel nicht auf die Mathematik konzentrieren, sondern uns direkt an die Anwendung mit Python Scikit-Learn machen:

Haupt-Lernziele:

  • Einführung in Machine Learning mit Scikit-Learn
  • Lineare Regression mit Scikit-Learn

Neben-Lernziele:

  • Datenvorbereitung (Data Preparation) mit Pandas und Scikit-Learn
  • Datenvisualisierung mit der Matplotlib direkt und indirekt (über Pandas)

Was wir inhaltlich tun:

Der Versuch einer Vorhersage eines Fahrzeugpreises auf Basis einer quantitativ-messbaren Eigenschaft eines Fahrzeuges.


Die Daten als Download

Für dieses Beispiel verwende ich die Datei “Automobil_data.txt” von Kaggle.com. Die Daten lassen sich über folgenden Link downloaden, nur leider wird ein (kostenloser) Account benötigt:
https://www.kaggle.com/toramky/automobile-dataset/downloads/automobile-dataset.zip
Sollte der Download-Link unerwartet mal nicht mehr funktionieren, freue ich mich über einen Hinweis als Kommentar 🙂

Die Entwicklungsumgebung

Ich verwende hier die Python-Distribution Anaconda 3 und als Entwicklungs-Umgebung Spyder (in Anaconda enthalten). Genauso gut funktionieren jedoch auch Jupyter Notebook, Eclipse mit PyDev oder direkt die IPython QT-Console.


Zuerst einmal müssen wir die Daten in unsere Python-Session laden und werden einige Transformationen durchführen müssen. Wir starten zunächst mit dem Importieren von drei Bibliotheken NumPy und Pandas, deren Bedeutung ich nicht weiter erläutern werde, somit voraussetze.

Wir nutzen die Pandas-Bibliothek, um die “Automobile_data.txt” in ein pd.DataFrame zu laden.

Schauen wir uns dann die ersten fünf Zeilen in IPython via dataSet.head().

Hinweis: Der Datensatz hat viele Spalten, so dass diese in der Darstellung mit einem Backslash \ umgebrochen werden.

Gleich noch eine weitere Ausgabe dataSet.info(), die uns etwas über die Beschaffenheit der importierten Daten verrät:

Einige Spalten entsprechen hinsichtlich des Datentypes nicht der Erwartung. Für die Spalten ‘horsepower’ und ‘peak-rpm’ würde ich eine Ganzzahl (Integer) erwarten, für ‘price’ hingegen eine Fließkommazahl (Float), allerdings sind die drei Spalten als Object deklariert. Mit Trick 17 im Data Science, der Anzeige der Minimum- und Maximum-Werte einer zu untersuchenden Datenreihe, kommen wir dem Übeltäter schnell auf die Schliche:

Datenbereinigung

Für eine Regressionsanalyse benötigen wir nummerische Werte (intervall- oder ratioskaliert), diese möchten wir auch durch richtige Datentypen-Deklaration herstellen. Nun wird eine Konvertierung in den gewünschten Datentyp jedoch an den (mit ‘?’ aufgefüllten) Datenlücken scheitern.

Schauen wir uns doch einmal die Datenreihen an, in denen in der Spalte ‘peak-rpm’ Fragezeichen stehen:

Zwei Datenreihen sind vorhanden, bei denen ‘peak-rpm’ mit einem ‘?’ aufgefüllt wurde. Nun könnten wir diese Datenreihen einfach rauslöschen. Oder mit sinnvollen (im Sinne von wahrscheinlichen) Werten auffüllen. Vermutlichen haben beide Einträge – beide sind OHC-Motoren mit 4 Zylindern – eine ähnliche Drehzahl-Angabe wie vergleichbare Motoren. Mit folgendem Quellcode, gruppieren wir die Spalten ‘engine-type’ und ‘num-of-cylinders’ und bilden für diese Klassen den arithmetischen Mittelwert (.mean()) für die ‘peak-rpm’.

Und schauen wir uns das Ergebnis an:

Ein Vier-Zylinder-OHC-Motor hat demnach durchschnittlich einen Drehzahl-Peak von 5155 Umdrehungen pro Minute. Ohne nun (fahrlässigerweise) auf die Verteilung in dieser Klasse zu achten, nehmen wir einfach diesen Schätzwert, um die zwei fehlende Datenpunkte zu ersetzen.

Wir möchten jedoch die Original-Daten erhalten und legen ein neues DataSet (dataSet_c) an, in welches wir die Korrekturen vornehmen:

Nun können wir die fehlenden Peak-RPM-Einträge mit unserem Schätzwert ersetzen:

Was bei einer Drehzahl-Angabe noch funktionieren mag, ist für anderen Spalten bereits etwas schwieriger: Die beiden Spalten ‘price’ und ‘horsepower’ sind ebenfalls vom Typ Object, da sie ‘?’ enthalten. Verzichten wir einfach auf die betroffenen Zeilen:

Datenvisualisierung mit Pandas

Wir wollen uns nicht lange vom eigentlichen Ziel ablenken, dennoch nutzen wir die Visualisierungsfähigkeiten der Pandas-Library (welche die Matplotlib inkludiert), um uns dann die Anzahlen an Einträgen nach Hersteller der Fahrzeuge (Spalte ‘make’) anzeigen zu lassen:

Oder die durchschnittliche PS-Zahl nach Hersteller:

Vorbereitung der Regressionsanalyse

Nun kommen wir endlich zur Regressionsanalyse, die wir mit Scikit-Learn umsetzen möchten. Die Regressionsanalyse können wir nur mit intervall- oder ratioskalierten Datenspalten betreiben, daher beschränken wir uns auf diese. Die “price”-Spalte nehmen wir jedoch heraus und setzen sie als unsere Zielgröße fest.

Interessant ist zudem die Betrachtung vorab, wie die einzelnen nummerischen Attribute untereinander korrelieren. Dafür nehmen wir auch die ‘price’-Spalte wieder in die Betrachtung hinein und hinterlegen auch eine Farbskala mit dem Preis (höhere Preise, hellere Farben).

Die lineare Korrelation ist hier sehr interessant, da wir auch nur eine lineare Regression beabsichtigen.

Wie man in dieser Scatter-Matrix recht gut erkennen kann, scheinen einige Größen-Paare nahezu perfekt zu korrelieren, andere nicht.

Korrelation…

  • …nahezu perfekt linear: highway-mpg vs city-mpg (mpg = Miles per Gallon)
  • … eher nicht gegeben: highway-mpg vs height
  • … nicht linear, dafür aber nicht-linear: highway-mpg vs price

Nun, wir wollen den Preis eines Fahrzeuges vorhersagen, wenn wir eine andere quantitative Größe gegeben haben. Auf den Preis bezogen, erscheint mir die Motorleistung (Horsepower) einigermaßen linear zu korrelieren. Versuchen wir hier die lineare Regression und setzen somit die Spalte ‘horsepower’ als X und ‘price’ als y fest.

Die gängige Konvention ist übrigens, X groß zu schreiben, weil hier auch mehrere x-Dimensionen enthalten sein dürfen (multivariate Regression). y hingegen, ist stets nur eine Zielgröße (eine Dimension).

Die lineare Regression ist ein überwachtes Verfahren des maschinellen Lernens, somit müssen wir unsere Prädiktionsergebnisse mit Test-Daten testen, die nicht für das Training verwendet werden dürfen. Scitkit-Learn (oder kurz: sklearn) bietet hierfür eine Funktion an, die uns das Aufteilen der Daten abnimmt:

Zu beachten ist dabei, dass die Daten vor dem Aufteilen in Trainings- und Testdaten gut zu durchmischen sind. Auch dies übernimmt die train_test_split-Funktion für uns, nur sollte man im Hinterkopf behalten, dass die Ergebnisse (auf Grund der Zufallsauswahl) nach jedem Durchlauf immer wieder etwas anders aussehen.

Lineare Regression mit Scikit-Learn

Nun kommen wir zur Durchführung der linearen Regression mit Scitkit-Learn, die sich in drei Zeilen trainieren lässt:

Aber Vorsicht! Bevor wir eine Prädiktion durchführen, wollen wir festlegen, wie wir die Güte der Prädiktion bewerten wollen. Die gängigsten Messungen für eine lineare Regression sind der MSE und R².

MSE = \frac{\sum_{i=1}^n (y_i - \hat{y_i})^2}{n}

Ein großer MSE ist schlecht, ein kleiner gut.

R^2 = 1 - \frac{MSE}{Var(y)}= \frac{\frac{1}{n} \cdot \sum_{i=1}^n (y_i - \hat{y_i})^2}{\frac{1}{n} \cdot \sum_{i=1}^n (y_i - \hat{\mu_y})^2}

Ein kleines R² ist schlecht, ein großes R² gut. Ein R² = 1.0 wäre theoretisch perfekt (da der Fehler = 0.00 wäre), jedoch in der Praxis unmöglich, da dieser nur bei absolut perfekter Korrelation auftreten würde. Die Klasse LinearRegression hat eine R²-Messmethode implementiert (score(x, y)).

Die Ausgabe (ein Beispiel!):

Nach jedem Durchlauf ändert sich mit der Datenaufteilung (train_test_split()) das Modell etwas und auch R² schwankt um eine gewisse Bandbreite. Berauschend sind die Ergebnisse dabei nicht, und wenn wir uns die Regressionsgerade einmal ansehen, wird auch klar, warum:

Bei kleineren Leistungsbereichen, etwa bis 100 PS, ist die Preis-Varianz noch annehmbar gering, doch bei höheren Leistungsbereichen ist die Spannweite deutlich größer. (Nachträgliche Anmerkung vom 06.05.2018: relativ betrachtet, bleibt der Fehler über alle Wertebereiche ungefähr gleich [relativer Fehler]. Die absoluten Fehlerwerte haben jedoch bei größeren x-Werten so eine Varianz der möglichen y-Werte, dass keine befriedigenden Prädiktionen zu erwarten sind.)

Egal wie wir eine Gerade in diese Punktwolke legen, wir werden keine befriedigende Fehlergröße erhalten.

Nehmen wir einmal eine andere Spalte für X, bei der wir vor allem eine nicht-lineare Korrelation erkannt haben: “highway-mpg”

Wenn wir dann das Training wiederholen:

Die R²-Werte sind nicht gerade berauschend, und das erklärt sich auch leicht, wenn wir die Trainings- und Testdaten sowie die gelernte Funktionsgerade visualisieren:

Die Gerade lässt sich nicht wirklich gut durch diese Punktwolke legen, da letztere eher eine Kurve als eine Gerade bildet. Im Grunde könnte eine Gerade noch einigermaßen gut in den Bereich von 22 bis 43 mpg passen und vermutlich annehmbare Ergebnisse liefern. Die Wertebereiche darunter und darüber jedoch verzerren zu sehr und sorgen zudem dafür, dass die Gerade auch innerhalb des mittleren Bereiches zu weit nach oben verschoben ist (ggf. könnte hier eine Ridge-/Lasso-Regression helfen).

Richtig gute Vorhersagen über nicht-lineare Verhältnisse können jedoch nur mit einer nicht-linearen Regression erreicht werden.

Nicht-lineare Regression mit Scikit-Learn

Nicht-lineare Regressionsanalysen erlauben es uns, nicht-lineare korrelierende Werte-Paare als Funktion zu erlernen. Im folgenden Scatter-Plot sehen wir zum einen die gewohnte lineare Regressionsgerade (y = a * x + b) in rot, eine polinominale Regressionskurve dritten Grades (y = a * x³ + b * x² + c * x + d) in violet sowie einen Entscheidungsweg einer Entscheidungsbaum-Regression in gelb.

Nicht-lineare Regressionsanalysen passen sich dem Verlauf der Punktwolke sehr viel besser an und können somit in der Regel auch sehr gute Vorhersageergebnisse liefern. Ich ziehe hier nun jedoch einen Gedankenstrich, liefere aber den Quellcode für die lineare Regression als auch für die beiden nicht-linearen Regressionen mit:

Python Script Regression via Scikit-Learn

Weitere Anmerkungen

  • Bibliotheken wie Scitkit-Learn erlauben es, machinelle Lernverfahren schnell und unkompliziert anwenden zu können. Allerdings sollte man auch verstehen, wei diese Verfahren im Hintergrund mathematisch arbeiten. Diese Bibliotheken befreien uns also nicht gänzlich von der grauen Theorie.
  • Statt der “reinen” lineare Regression (LinearRegression()) können auch eine Ridge-Regression (Ridge()), Lasso-Regression (Lasso()) oder eine Kombination aus beiden als sogenannte ElasticNet-Regression (ElasticNet()). Bei diesen kann über Parametern gesteuert werden, wie stark Ausreißer in den Daten berücksichtigt werden sollen.
  • Vor einer Regression sollten die Werte skaliert werden, idealerweise durch Standardisierung der Werte (sklearn.preprocessing.StandardScaler()) oder durch Normierung (sklearn.preprocessing.Normalizer()).
  • Wir haben hier nur zwei-dimensional betrachtet. In der Praxis ist das jedoch selten ausreichend, auch der Fahrzeug-Preis ist weder von der Motor-Leistung, noch von dem Kraftstoffverbrauch alleine abhängig – Es nehmen viele Größen auf den Preis Einfluss, somit benötigen wir multivariate Regressionsanalysen.

Events

Nothing Found

Sorry, no posts matched your criteria