Posts

Determining Your Data Pipeline Architecture and Its Efficacy

Data analytics has become a central part of how many businesses operate. If you hope to stay competitive in today’s market, you need to take advantage of all your available data. For that, you’ll need an efficient data pipeline, which is often easier said than done.

If your pipeline is too slow, your data will be all but useless by the time it’s usable. Successful analytics require an optimized pipeline, and that looks different for every company. No matter your specific circumstances, though, a traditional approach will result in inefficiencies.

Creating the most efficient pipeline architecture will require you to change how you look at the process. By understanding each stage’s role and how they serve your goals, you can optimize your data analytics.

Understanding Your Data Needs

You can’t build an optimal data pipeline if you don’t know what you need from your data. If you spend too much time collecting and organizing information you won’t use, you’ll take time away from what you need. Similarly, if you only work to meet one team’s needs, you’ll have to go back and start over to help others.

Data analytics involves multiple stakeholders, all with individual needs and expectations that you should consider. Your data engineers need your pipeline to be accessible and scalable, while analysts require visual, relevant datasets. If you consider these aspects from the beginning, you can build a pipeline that works for everyone.

Start at the earliest stage — collection. You may be collecting data from every channel you can, which could result in an information overload. Focus instead on gathering things from the most relevant sources. At the same time, ensure you can add more channels if necessary in the future.

As you reorganize your pipeline, remember that analytics are only as good as your datasets. If you put more effort into organizing and scrubbing data, helpful analytics will follow. Focus on preparing data well, and the last few stages will be smoother.

Creating a Collaborative Pipeline

When structuring your pipeline, it’s easy to focus too much on the individual stages. While seeing things as rigid steps can help you visualize them, you need something more fluid in practice. If you want the process to run as smoothly as possible, it needs to be collaborative.

Look at the software development practice of DevOps, which doubles a team’s likelihood of exceeding productivity goals. This strategy focuses on collaboration across separate teams instead of passing things back and forth between them. You can do the same thing with your data pipeline.

Instead of dividing steps between engineers and analysts, make it a single, cohesive process. Teams will still focus on different areas according to their expertise, but they’ll reduce disruption by working together instead of independently. If workers can collaborate along every step, they don’t have to go back and forth.

Simultaneously, everyone should have clearly defined responsibilities. Collaboration doesn’t mean overstepping your areas of expertise. The goal here isn’t to make everyone handle everything but to ensure they understand each other’s needs.

Eliminating the time between steps also applies to your platform. Look for or build software that integrates both refinement and data preparation. If you have to export data to various programs, it will cause unnecessary bottlenecks.

Enabling Continuous Improvement

Finally, understand that restructuring your data pipeline isn’t a one-and-done job. Another principle you can adopt from DevOps is continuous development across all sides of the process. Your engineers should keep looking for better ways to structure data as your analysts search for new applications for this information.

Make sure you always measure your throughput and efficiency. If you tweak something and you notice the process starts to slow, revert to the older method. If your changes improve the pipeline, try something similar in another area.

Optimize Your Data Pipeline

Remember to start slow when optimizing your data pipeline. Changing too much at once can cause more disruptions than it avoids, so start small with an emphasis on scalability.

The specifics of your pipeline will vary depending on your needs and circumstances. No matter what these are, though, you can benefit from collaboration and continuous development. When you start breaking down barriers between different steps and teams, you unclog your pipeline.

Closing the AI-skills gap with Upskilling

Closing the AI-skills gap with Upskilling

Artificial Intelligent or as it is fancily referred as AI, has garnered huge popularity worldwide.  And given the career prospects it has, it definitely should. Almost everyone interested in technology sector has them rushing towards it, especially young and motivated fresh computer science graduates. Compared to other IT-related jobs AI pays way higher salary and have opportunities. According to a Glassdoor report, Data Scientist, one of the many related jobs, is the number one job with good salary, job openings and more. AI-related jobs include Data Scientists, Analysts, Machine Learning Engineer, NLP experts etc.

AI has found applications in almost every industry and thus it has picked up demand. Home assistants – Siri, Ok Google, Amazon Echo — chatbots, and more some of the popular applications of AI.

Increasing adoption of AI across Industry

The advantages of AI like increased productivity has increased its adoption among companies. According to Gartner, 37 percent of enterprise currently use AI in one way or the other. In fact, in the last four year adoption of AI technologies among companies has increased by 270 percent. In telecommunications, for instance, 52 percent of companies have chatbots deployed for better and smoother customer experience. Now, about 49 percent of businesses are now on their way to alter business models to integrate and adopt AI-driven processes. Further, industry leaders have gone beyond and voiced their concerns about companies that are lagging in AI adoption.

Unfortunately, it has been extremely difficult for employers to find right skilled or qualified candidates for AI-related positions. A reports suggests that there are total 300,000 AI professionals are available worldwide, while there’s demand for millions. In a recent survey conducted by Ernst & Young, 51 percent AI professionals told that lack of talent was the biggest impediment in AI adoption.

Further, O’Reilly, in 2018 conducted a survey, which found the lack of AI skills, among other things, was the major reason that was holding companies back from implementing AI.
The major reason for this is the lack of skills among people who aspire to get into AI-related jobs. According to a report, there demand for millions for jobs in AI. However, only a handful of qualified people are available.

Bridging the skill gap in AI-related jobs

Top companies and government around the world have taken up initiatives to close this gap. Google and Amazon, for instance, have dedicated facilities which trains in AI skills.  Google’s Brain Toronto is a dedicated facility to expand their talent in AI.  Similarly, Amazon has facility near University of Cambridge which is dedicated to AI. Most companies either already have a facility or are in the process of setting up one.

In addition to this, governments around the world are also taking initiatives to address the skill gap. For instance, government across the world are pushing towards AI advancement and are develop collaborative plans which aims at delivering more AI skilled professionals. Recently, the white house launched ai.gov which is further helping to promote AI in the US. The website will offer updates related to AI projects across different sectors.

Other than these, companies have taken this upon themselves to reskills their employees and prepare them for future roles. According to a report from Towards Data Science, about 63 percent of companies have in-house training programs to train employees in AI-related skills.

Overall, though there is demand for AI professionals, lack of skilled talent is a major problem.

Roles in Artificial Intelligence
Artificial Intelligence is the most dominant role for which companies hire across artificial Intelligence. Other than that, following are some of the popular roles:

  1. Machine learning Engineer: These are the people who make machines learn with complex algorithms. On advance level, Machine learning engineers are required to have good knowledge of computer vision. According to Indeed, in the last year, demand for Machine Learning Engineer has grown by 344 percent.
  2. NLP Experts: These experts are equipped with the understanding of making machines computer understand human language. Their expertise includes knowledge of how machines understand human language. Text-to-speech technologies are the common areas which require NLP experts. Demand for engineers who can program computers to understand human speech is growing continuously. It was the fast growing skills in Upwork’s list of in-demand freelancing skills. In Q4, 2016, it had grown 200 percent and since then has been on continuously growing.
  3. Big Data Engineers: This is majorly an analytics role. These gather huge amount of data available from sources and analyze it to derive insights and understand patter, which may be further used for machine learning, prediction modelling, natural language processing. In Mckinsey annual report 2018, it had reported that there was shortage of 190,000 big data professionals in the US alone.

Other roles like Data Scientists, Analysts, and more also in great demand. Then, again due to insufficient talent in the market, companies are struggling to hire for these roles.

Self-learning and upskilling
Artificial Intelligence is a continuously growing field and it has been advancing at a very fast pace, and it makes extremely difficult to keep up with in-demand skills. Hence, it is imperative to keep yourself up with demand of the industry, or it is just a matter of time before one becomes redundant.

On an individual level, learning new skills is necessary. One has to be agile and keep learning, and be ready to adapt new technologies. For this, AI training programs and certifications are ideal.  There are numerous AI programs which individuals can take to further learn new skills. AI certifications can immensely boost career opportunities. Certification programs offer a structured approach to learning which benefits in learning mostly practical and executional skills while keeping fluff away. It is more hands-on. Plus, certifications programs qualify only when one has passed practical test which is very advantageous in tech. AI certifications like AIE (Artificial Intelligence Engineer) are quite popular.

Online learning platforms also offer good a resource to learn artificial intelligence. Most schools haven’t yet adapted their curriculum to skill for AI, while most universities and grad schools are in their way to do so. In the meantime, online learning platforms offer a good way to learn AI skills, where one can start from basic and reach to advance skills.

Interview – Künstliche Intelligenz im Unternehmen & der Mangel an IT-Fachkräften

Interview mit Sebastian van der Meer über den Einsatz von künstlicher Intelligenz im Unternehmen und dem Mangel an IT-Fachkräften

Sebastian van der Meer

Sebastian van der Meer ist Managing Partner der lexoro Gruppe, einem Technologie- und Beratungsunternehmen in den Zukunftsmärkten: Data-Science, Machine-Learning, Big-Data, Robotics und DevOps. Das Leistungsspektrum ist vielschichtig. Sie vermitteln Top-Experten an Unternehmen (Perm & IT-Contracting), arbeiten mit eigenen Teams für innovative Unternehmen an spannenden IT-Projekten und entwickeln zugleich eigene Produkte und Start-Ups in Zukunftsmärkten. Dabei immer im Mittelpunkt: Menschen und deren Verbindung mit exzellenter Technologiekompetenz.

Data Science Blog: Herr van der Meer, wenn man Google News mit den richtigen Stichwörtern abruft, scheinen die Themen Künstliche Intelligenz, Data Science und Machine Learning bei vielen Unternehmen bereits angekommen zu sein – Ist das so?

Das ist eine sehr gute Frage! Weltweit, vor allem in der USA und China, sind diese bereits „angekommen“, wenn man es so formulieren kann. Allerdings sind wir in Europa leider weit hinterher. Dazu gibt es ja bereits viele Studien und Umfragen, die dies beweisen. Vereinzelt gibt es große mittelständische- und Konzernunternehmen in Deutschland, die bereits eigene Einheiten und Teams in diesen Bereich und auch neue Geschäftsbereiche dadurch ermöglicht haben. Hier gibt es bereits tolle Beispiele, was mit K.I. erreichbar ist. Vor allem die Branchen Versicherungs- und Finanzdienstleistungen, Pharma/Life Science und Automotive sind den anderen in Deutschland etwas voraus.

Data Science Blog: Wird das Thema Data Science oder Machine Learning früher oder später für jedes Unternehmen relevant sein? Muss jedes Unternehmen sich mit K.I. befassen?

Data Science, Machine Learning, künstliche Intelligenz – das sind mehr als bloße Hype-Begriffe und entfernte Zukunftsmusik! Wir stecken mitten in massiven strukturellen Veränderungen. Die Digitalisierungswelle der vergangenen Jahre war nur der Anfang. Jede Branche ist betroffen. Schnell kann ein Gefühl von Bedrohung und Angst vor dem Unbekannten aufkommen. Tatsächlich liegen aber nie zuvor dagewesene Chancen und Potentiale vor unseren Füßen. Die Herausforderung ist es diese zu erkennen und dann die notwendigen Veränderungen umzusetzen. Daher sind wir der Meinung, dass jedes Unternehmen sich damit befassen muss und soll, wenn es in der Zukunft noch existieren will.

Wir unterstützen Unternehmen dabei ihre individuellen Herausforderungen, Hürden und Möglichkeiten zu identifizieren, die der große Hype „künstliche Intelligenz“ mit sich bringt. Hier geht es darum genau zu definieren, welche KI-Optionen überhaupt für das Unternehmen existieren. Mit Use-Cases zeigen wir, welchen Mehrwert sie dem Unternehmen bieten. Wenn die K.I. Strategie festgelegt ist, unterstützen wir bei der technischen Implementierung und definieren und rekrutieren bei Bedarf die relevanten Mitarbeiter.

Data Science Blog: Die Politik strebt stets nach Vollbeschäftigung. Die K.I. scheint diesem Leitziel entgegen gerichtet zu sein. Glauben Sie hier werden vor allem Ängste geschürt oder sind die Auswirkungen auf den Arbeitsmarkt durch das Vordringen von K.I. wirklich so gravierend?

Zu diesem Thema gibt es bereits viele Meinungen und Studien, die veröffentlicht worden sind. Eine interessante Studie hat vorhergesagt, dass in den nächsten 5 Jahren, weltweit 1.3 Millionen Stellen/Berufe durch K.I. wegfallen werden. Dafür aber in den gleichen Zeitnahmen 1.7 Millionen neue Stellen und Berufe entstehen werden. Hier gehen die Meinungen aber ganz klar auseinander. Die Einen sehen die Chancen, die Möglichkeiten und die Anderen sehen die Angst oder das Ungewisse. Eins steht fest, der Arbeitsmarkt wird sich in den nächsten 5 bis 10 Jahren komplett verändern und anpassen. Viele Berufe werden wegfallen, dafür werden aber viele neue Berufe hinzukommen. Vor einigen Jahren gab es noch keinen „Data Scientist“ Beruf und jetzt ist es einer der best bezahltesten IT Stellen in Unternehmen. Allein das zeigt doch auch, welche Chancen es in der Zukunft geben wird.

Data Science Blog: Wie sieht der Arbeitsmarkt in den Bereichen Data Science, Machine Learning und Künstliche Intelligenz aus?

Der Markt ist sehr intransparent. Jeder definiert einen Data Scientist anders. Zudem wird sich der Beruf und seine Anforderungen aufgrund des technischen Fortschritts stetig verändern. Der heutige Data Scientist wird sicher nicht der gleiche Data Scientist in 5 oder 10 Jahren sein. Die Anforderungen sind enorm hoch und die Konkurrenz, der sogenannte „War of Talents“ ist auch in Deutschland angekommen. Der Anspruch an Veränderungsbereitschaft und technisch stets up to date und versiert zu sein, ist extrem hoch. Das gleiche gilt auch für die anderen K.I. Berufe von heute, wie z.B. den Computer Vision Engineer, der Robotics Spezialist oder den DevOps Engineer.

Data Science Blog: Worauf sollten Unternehmen vor, während und nach der Einstellung von Data Scientists achten?

Das Allerwichtigste ist der Anfang. Es sollte ganz klar definiert sein, warum die Person gesucht wird, was die Aufgaben sind und welche Ergebnisse sich das Unternehmen mit der Einstellung erwartet bzw. erhofft. Oftmals hören wir von Unternehmen, dass sie Spezialisten in dem Bereich Data Science / Machine Learning suchen und große Anforderungen haben, aber diese gar nicht umgesetzt werden können, weil z.B. die Datengrundlage im Unternehmen fehlt. Nur 5% der Data Scientists in unserem Netzwerk sind der Ansicht, dass vorhandene Daten in ihrem Unternehmen bereits optimal verwertet werden. Der Data Scientist sollte schnell ins Unternehmen integriert werde um schnellstmöglich Ergebnisse erzielen zu können. Um die wirklich guten Leute für sich zu gewinnen, muss ein Unternehmen aber auch bereit sein finanziell tiefer in die Tasche zu greifen. Außerdem müssen die Unternehmen den top Experten ein technisch attraktives Umfeld bieten, daher sollte auch die Unternehmen stets up-to-date sein mit der heutigen Technologie.

Data Science Blog: Was macht einen guten Data Scientist eigentlich aus?

Ein guter Data Scientist sollte in folgenden Bereichen sehr gut aufgestellt sein: Präsentations- und Kommunikationsfähigkeiten, Machine Learning Kenntnisse, Programmiersprachen und ein allgemeines Business-Verständnis. Er sollte sich stets weiterentwickeln und von den Trends up to date sein. Auf relevanten Blogs, wie dieser Data Science Blog, aktiv sein und sich auf Messen/Meetups etc bekannt machen.

Außerdem sollte er sich mit uns in Verbindung setzen. Denn ein weiterer, wie wir finden, sehr wichtiger Punkt, ist es sich gut verkaufen zu können. Hierzu haben wir uns in dem letzten Jahr sehr viel Gedanken gemacht und auch Studien durchgeführt. Wir wollen es jedem K.I. -Experten ermöglichen einen eigenen Fingerabdruck zu haben. Bei uns ist dies als der SkillPrint bekannt. Hierfür haben wir eine holistische Darstellung entwickelt, die jeden Kandidaten einen individuellen Fingerabdruck seiner Kompetenzen abbildet. Hierfür durchlaufen die Kandidaten einen Online-Test, der von uns mit top K.I. Experten entwickelt wurde. Dieser bildet folgendes ab: Methoden Expertise, Applied Data Science Erfahrung, Branchen know-how, Technology & Tools und Business knowledge. Und die immer im Detail in 3 Ebenen.

Der darauf entstehende SkillPrint/Fingerprint ist ein Qualitätssigel für den Experten und damit auch für das Unternehmen, das den Experten einstellt.

Interesse an einem Austausch zu verschiedenen Karriereperspektiven im Bereich Data Science/ Machine Learning? Dann registrieren Sie sich direkt auf dem lexoro Talent Check-In und ein lexoro-Berater wird sich bei Ihnen melden.

Data Science Survey by lexoro.ai

Ergebnisse unserer zweiten Data Science Survey

Künstliche Intelligenz, Data Science, Machine Learning – über die Bedeutung dieser Themen für einzelne Unternehmen und Branchen herrscht weiterhin viel Unsicherheit und Unklarheit. Zudem stellt sich die Frage: Welche Fähigkeiten und Kompetenzen braucht ein guter Data Scientist eigentlich?

Es lässt sich kaum bestreiten, dass wir vor einem Paradigmenwechsel stehen, vorangetrieben durch einen technologischen Fortschritt dessen Geschwindigkeit exponentiell zunimmt.
Der Arbeitsmarkt im Speziellen sieht sich auch einem starken Veränderungsprozess unterworfen. Es entstehen neue Jobs, neue Rollen und neue Verantwortungsbereiche. Data Scientist, Machine Learning Expert, RPA Developer – die Trend-Jobs der Stunde. Aber welche Fähigkeiten und Skills verbergen sich eigentlich hinter diesen Jobbeschreibungen? Hier scheint es noch eine große Divergenz zu geben.

Unser zweiter Data Science Leaks-Survey soll hier für mehr Transparenz und Aufklärung sorgen. Die Ergebnisse fließen zudem in die Entwicklung unseres SkillPrint ein, einer individuellen Analyse der Kompetenzen eines jeden Daten-Experten. Eine erste Version davon wird in Kürze fertiggestellt sein.

Link zu den Ergebnissen der zweiten Data Science Survey by lexoro.ai

Viel Spaß beim Lesen unserer Ministudie zum Thema: Data Science… mehr als Python, TensorFlow & Neural Networks

 

Interesse an einem Austausch zu verschiedenen Karriereperspektiven im Bereich Data Science/ Machine Learning? Dann registrieren Sie sich direkt auf dem lexoro Talent Check-In und ein lexoro-Berater wird sich bei Ihnen melden.

Lexoro Data Science Survey

Wir von lexoro möchten die Community mit informativen Beiträgen fördern und erstellen dazu regelmäßige Mini-Studien. Die aktuelle Umfrage finden Sie in diesen Artikel eingebettet (siehe unten) oder mit einem Klick auf diesen Direktlink.

Data Science…more than Python, TensorFlow & Neural Networks

Künstliche Intelligenz, Data Science, Machine Learning – das sind die Schlagwörter der Stunde. Man kann sich den Berichten und Artikeln über die technologischen Entwicklungen, Trends und die Veränderungen, die uns bevorstehen kaum entziehen. Viele sind sich einig: Wir stehen vor einem Paradigmenwechsel vorangetrieben durch einen technologischen Fortschritt, dessen Geschwindigkeit – auch wenn es vielen zu schnell geht – exponentiell zunimmt. Und auch wenn wir noch am Anfang dieses neuen Zeitalters stehen, so sind die Veränderungen jetzt schon zu spüren – in den Unternehmen, in unserem Alltag, in unserer Kommunikation…

Der Arbeitsmarkt im Speziellen sieht sich auch einem starken Veränderungsprozess unterworfen. Berufe, die noch vor nicht allzu langer Zeit als nicht durch Maschinen ersetzbar galten, sind dabei zu verschwinden oder zumindest sich zu verändern. Gleichzeitig entstehen neue Jobs, neue Rollen, neue Verantwortungsbereiche. Kaum ein Unternehmen kommt daran vorbei sich den Herausforderungen dieses technologischen Wandels zu stellen. Neue Strukturen, Abteilungen, Arbeitsmodelle und Jobs entstehen.

Doch um auf die anfangs genannten Hype-Begriffe zurückzukommen – was verbirgt sich eigentlich hinter Data Science, Machine Learning und Artificial Intelligence?! Was macht einen guten Data Scientist eigentlich aus?

Die Antwort scheint aus Sicht vieler Manager einfach: im Studium Python lernen, regelmäßig Big Data Tools von Hadoop nutzen, sich in TensorFlow einarbeiten und etwas über Neural Networks lesen – und fertig ist der Data Scientist. Doch so einfach ist es leider nicht. Oder eher zum Glück?! Neue Job-Rollen erfordern auch neue Denkweisen im Recruiting! Wir entfernen uns von einem strikten Rollen-basiertem Recruiting und fokussieren uns immer mehr auf die individuellen Kompetenzen und Stärken der einzelnen Personen. Wir sind davon überzeugt, dass die treibenden Köpfe hinter der bereits laufenden Datenrevolution deutlich facettenreicher und vielschichtiger sind als sich das so mancher vielleicht wünschen mag.

Diesem Facettenreichtum und dieser Vielschichtigkeit wollen wir auf den Grund gehen und dieser Survey soll einen Beitrag dazu leisten. Welche Kompetenzen sollte ein guter Data Scientist aus Ihrer Sicht mitbringen? In welchen Bereichen würden Sie persönlich sich gerne weiterentwickeln? Haben Sie die Möglichkeiten dazu? Sind Sie auf dem richtigen Weg sich zu einem Data Scientist oder Machine Learning Expert zu entwickeln? Oder suchen Sie nach einem ganz anderen Karriereweg?
Mit einem Zeit-Investment von nur 5 Minuten leisten Sie einen wertvollen Beitrag zur Entwicklung unseres A.I.-Skillprints, der es ermöglichen wird, eine automatische, datengestützte Analyse Ihrer A.I.-bezogenen Fähigkeiten durchzuführen und Empfehlungen für eine optimale Karriereentwicklung zu erhalten.

Vielen Dank im Voraus für Ihre Teilnahme!

Das lexoro-Team


My Desk for Data Science

In my last post I anounced a blog parade about what a data scientist’s workplace might look like.

Here are some photos of my desk and my answers to the questions:

How many monitors do you use (or wish to have)?

I am mostly working at my desk in my office with a tower PC and three monitors.
I definitely need at least three monitors to work productively as a data scientist. Who does not know this: On the left monitor the data model is displayed, on the right monitor the data mapping and in the middle I do my work: programming the analysis scripts.

What hardware do you use? Apple? Dell? Lenovo? Others?

I am note an Apple guy. When I need to work mobile, I like to use ThinkPad notebooks. The ThinkPads are (in my experience) very robust and are therefore particularly good for mobile work. Besides, those notebooks look conservative and so I’m not sad if there comes a scratch on the notebook. However, I do not solve particularly challenging analysis tasks on a notebook, because I need my monitors for that.

Which OS do you use (or prefer)? MacOS, Linux, Windows? Virtual Machines?

As a data scientist, I have to be able to communicate well with my clients and they usually use Microsoft Windows as their operating system. I also use Windows as my main operating system. Of course, all our servers run on Linux Debian, but most of my tasks are done directly on Windows.
For some notebooks, I have set up a dual boot, because sometimes I need to start native Linux, for all other cases I work with virtual machines (Linux Ubuntu or Linux Mint).

What are your favorite databases, programming languages and tools?

I prefer the Microsoft SQL Server (T-SQL), C# and Python (pandas, numpy, scikit-learn). This is my world. But my customers are kings, therefore I am working with Postgre SQL, MongoDB, Neo4J, Tableau, Qlik Sense, Celonis and a lot more. I like to get used to new tools and technologies again and again. This is one of the benefits of being a data scientist.

Which data dou you analyze on your local hardware? Which in server clusters or clouds?

There have been few cases yet, where I analyzed really big data. In cases of analyzing big data we use horizontally scalable systems like Hadoop and Spark. But we also have customers analyzing middle-sized data (more than 10 TB but less than 100 TB) on one big server which is vertically scalable. Most of my customers just want to gather data to answer questions on not so big amounts of data. Everything less than 10TB we can do on a highend workstation.

If you use clouds, do you prefer Azure, AWS, Google oder others?

Microsoft Azure! I am used to tools provided by Microsoft and I think Azure is a well preconfigured cloud solution.

Where do you make your notes/memos/sketches. On paper or digital?

My calender is managed digital, because I just need to know everywhere what appointments I have. But my I prefer to wirte down my thoughts on paper and that´s why I have several paper-notebooks.

Now it is your turn: Join our Blog Parade!

So what does your workplace look like? Show your desk on your blog until 31/12/2017 and we will show a short introduction of your post here on the Data Science Blog!

 

Show your Data Science Workplace!

The job of a data scientist is often a mystery to outsiders. Of course, you do not really need much more than a medium-sized notebook to use data science methods for finding value in data. Nevertheless, data science workplaces can look so different and, let’s say, interesting. And that’s why I want to launch a blog parade – which I want to start with this article – where you as a Data Scientist or Data Engineer can show your workplace and explain what tools a data scientist in your opinion really needs.

I am very curious how many monitors you prefer, whether you use Apple, Dell, HP or Lenovo, MacOS, Linux or Windows, etc., etc. And of course, do you like a clean or messy desk?

What is a Blog Parade?

A blog parade is a call to blog owners to report on a specific topic. Everyone who participates in the blog parade, write on their blog a contribution to the topic. The organizer of the blog parade collects all the articles and will recap those articles in a short form together, of course with links to the articles.

How can I participate?

Write an article on your blog! Mention this blog parade here, show and explain your workplace (your desk with your technical equipment) in an article. If you’re missing your own blog, articles can also be posted directly to LinkedIn (LinkedIn has its own blogging feature that every LinkedIn member can use). Alternative – as a last resort – it would also be possible to send me your article with a photo about your workplace directly to: redaktion@data-science-blog.com.
Please make me aware of an article, via e-mail or with a comment (below) on this article.

Who can participate?

Any data scientist or anyone close to Data Science: Everyone concerned with topics such as data analytics, data engineering or data security. Please do not over-define data science here, but keep it in a nutshell, so that all professionals who manage and analyze data can join in with a clear conscience.

And yes, I will participate too. I will propably be the first who write an article about my workplace (I just need a new photo of my desk).

When does the article have to be finished?

By 31/12/2017, the article must have been published on your blog (or LinkedIn or wherever) and the release has to be reported to me.
But beware: Anyone who has previously written an article will also be linked earlier. After all, reporting on your article will take place immediately after I hear about it.
If you publish an artcile tomorrow, it will be shown the day after tomorrow here on the Data Science Blog.

What is in it for me to join?

Nothing! Except perhaps the fun factor of sharing your idea of ​​a nice desk for a data expert with others, so as to share creativity or a certain belief in what a data scientist needs.
Well and for bloggers: There is a great backlink from this data science blog for you 🙂

What should I write? What are the minimum requirements of content?

The article does not have to (but may be) particularly long. Anyway, here on this data science blog only a shortened version of your article will appear (with a link, of course).

Minimum requirments:

  • Show a photo (at least one!) of your workplace desk!
  • And tell us something about:
    • How many monitors do you use (or wish to have)?
    • What hardware do you use? Apple? Dell? Lenovo? Others?
    • Which OS do you use (or prefer)? MacOS, Linux, Windows? Virtual Machines?
    • What are your favorite databases, programming languages and tools? (e.g. Python, R, SAS, Postgre, Neo4J,…)
    • Which data dou you analyze on your local hardware? Which in server clusters or clouds?
    • If you use clouds, do you prefer Azure, AWS, Google oder others?
    • Where do you make your notes/memos/sketches. On paper or digital?

Not allowed:
Of course, please do not provide any information, which could endanger your company`s IT security.

Absolutly allowed:
Bringing some joke into the matter 🙂 We are happy to vote in the comments on the best or funniest desk for election, there may be also a winner later!


The resulting Blog Posts: https://data-science-blog.com/data-science-insights/show-your-desk/


 

Data Science vs Data Engineering

The job of the Data Scientist is actually a fairly new trend, and yet other job titles are coming to us. “Is this really necessary?”, Some will ask. But the answer is clear: yes!

There are situations, every Data Scientist know: a recruiter calls, speaks about a great new challenge for a Data Scientist as you obviously claim on your LinkedIn profile, but in the discussion of the vacancy it quickly becomes clear that you have almost none of the required skills. This mismatch is mainly due to the fact that under the job of the Data Scientist all possible activity profiles, method and tool knowledge are summarized, which a single person can hardly learn in his life. Many open jobs, which are to be called under the name Data Science, describe rather the professional image of the Data Engineer.


Read this article in German:
“Data Science vs Data Engineering – Wo liegen die Unterschiede?“


What is a Data Engineer?

Data engineering is primarily about collecting or generating data, storing, historicalizing, processing, adapting and submitting data to subsequent instances. A Data Engineer, often also named as Big Data Engineer or Big Data Architect, models scalable database and data flow architectures, develops and improves the IT infrastructure on the hardware and software side, deals with topics such as IT Security , Data Security and Data Protection. A Data Engineer is, as required, a partial administrator of the IT systems and also a software developer, since he or she extends the software landscape with his own components. In addition to the tasks in the field of ETL / Data Warehousing, he also carries out analyzes, for example, to investigate data quality or user access. A Data Engineer mainly works with databases and data warehousing tools.

A Data Engineer is talented as an educated engineer or computer scientist and rather far away from the actual core business of the company. The Data Engineer’s career stages are usually something like:

  1. (Big) Data Architect
  2. BI Architect
  3. Senior Data Engineer
  4. Data Engineer

What makes a Data Scientist?

Although there may be many intersections with the Data Engineer’s field of activity, the Data Scientist can be distinguished by using his working time as much as possible to analyze the available data in an exploratory and targeted manner, to visualize the analysis results and to convert them into a red thread (storytelling). Unlike the Data Engineer, a data scientist rarely sees into a data center, because he picks up data via interfaces provided by the Data Engineer or provides by other resources.

A Data Scientist deals with mathematical models, works mainly with statistical procedures, and applies them to the data to generate knowledge. Common methods of Data Mining, Machine Learning and Predictive Modeling should be known to a Data Scientist. Data Scientists basically work close to the department and need appropriate expertise. Data Scientists use proprietary tools (e.g. Tools by IBM, SAS or Qlik) and program their own analyzes, for example, in Scala, Java, Python, Julia, or R. Using such programming languages and data science libraries (e.g. Mahout, MLlib, Scikit-Learn or TensorFlow) is often considered as advanced data science.

Data Scientists can have diverse academic backgrounds, some are computer scientists or engineers for electrical engineering, others are physicists or mathematicians, not a few have economical backgrounds. Common career levels could be:

  1. Chief Data Scientist
  2. Senior Data Scientist
  3. Data Scientist
  4. Data Analyst oder Junior Data Scientist

Data Scientist vs Data Analyst

I am often asked what the difference between a Data Scientist and a Data Analyst would be, or whether there would be a distinction criterion at all:

In my experience, the term Data Scientist stands for the new challenges for the classical concept of Data Analysts. A Data Analyst performs data analysis like a Data Scientist. More complex topics such as predictive analytics, machine learning or artificial intelligence are topics for a Data Scientist. In other words, a Data Scientist is a Data Analyst++ (one step above the Data Analyst).

And how about being a Business Analyst?

Business Analysts can (but need not) be Data Analysts. In any case, they have a very strong relationship with the core business of the company. Business Analytics is about analyzing business models and business successes. The analysis of business success is usually carried out by IT, and many business analysts are starting a career as Data Analyst now. Dashboards, KPIs and SQL are the tools of a good business analyst, but there might be a lot business analysts, who are just analysing business models by reading the newspaper…

Data Science Knowledge Stack – Abstraction of the Data Science Skillset

What must a Data Scientist be able to do? Which skills does as Data Scientist need to have? This question has often been asked and frequently answered by several Data Science Experts. In fact, it is now quite clear what kind of problems a Data Scientist should be able to solve and which skills are necessary for that. I would like to try to bring this consensus into a visual graph: a layer model, similar to the OSI layer model (which any data scientist should know too, by the way).
I’m giving introductory seminars in Data Science for merchants and engineers and in those seminars I always start explaining what we need to work out together in theory and practice-oriented exercises. Against this background, I came up with the idea for this layer model. Because with my seminars the problem already starts: I am giving seminars for Data Science for Business Analytics with Python. So not for medical analyzes and not with R or Julia. So I do not give a general knowledge of Data Science, but a very specific direction.

A Data Scientist must deal with problems at different levels in any Data Science project, for example, the data access does not work as planned or the data has a different structure than expected. A Data Scientist can spend hours debating its own source code or learning the ropes of new DataScience packages for its chosen programming language. Also, the right algorithms for data evaluation must be selected, properly parameterized and tested, sometimes it turns out that the selected methods were not the optimal ones. Ultimately, we are not doing Data Science all day for fun, but for generating value for a department and a data scientist is also faced with special challenges at this level, at least a basic knowledge of the expertise of that department is a must have.


Read this article in German:
“Data Science Knowledge Stack – Was ein Data Scientist können muss“


Data Science Knowledge Stack

With the Data Science Knowledge Stack, I would like to provide a structured insight into the tasks and challenges a Data Scientist has to face. The layers of the stack also represent a bidirectional flow from top to bottom and from bottom to top, because Data Science as a discipline is also bidirectional: we try to answer questions with data, or we look at the potentials in the data to answer previously unsolicited questions.

The DataScience Knowledge Stack consists of six layers:

Database Technology Knowledge

A Data Scientist works with data which is rarely directly structured in a CSV file, but usually in one or more databases that are subject to their own rules. In particular, business data, for example from the ERP or CRM system, are available in relational databases, often from Microsoft, Oracle, SAP or an open source alternative. A good Data Scientist is not only familiar with Structured Query Language (SQL), but is also aware of the importance of relational linked data models, so he also knows the principle of data table normalization.

Other types of databases, so-called NoSQL databases (Not only SQL) are based on file formats, column or graph orientation, such as MongoDB, Cassandra or GraphDB. Some of these databases use their own programming languages ​​(for example JavaScript at MongoDB or the graph-oriented database Neo4J has its own language called Cypher). Some of these databases provide alternative access via SQL (such as Hive for Hadoop).

A data scientist has to cope with different database systems and has to master at least SQL – the quasi-standard for data processing.

Data Access & Transformation Knowledge

If data are given in a database, Data Scientists can perform simple (and not so simple) analyzes directly on the database. But how do we get the data into our special analysis tools? To do this, a Data Scientist must know how to export data from the database. For one-time actions, an export can be a CSV file, but which separators and text qualifiers should be used? Possibly, the export is too large, so the file must be split.
If there is a direct and synchronous data connection between the analysis tool and the database, interfaces like REST, ODBC or JDBC come into play. Sometimes a socket connection must also be established and the principle of a client-server architecture should be known. Synchronous and asynchronous encryption methods should also be familiar to a Data Scientist, as confidential data are often used, and a minimum level of security is most important for business applications.

Many datasets are not structured in a database but are so-called unstructured or semi-structured data from documents or from Internet sources. And again we have interfaces, a frequent entry point for Data Scientists is, for example, the Twitter API. Sometimes we want to stream data in near real-time, let it be machine data or social media messages. This can be quite demanding, so the data streaming is almost a discipline with which a Data Scientist can come into contact quickly.

Programming Language Knowledge

Programming languages ​​are tools for Data Scientists to process data and automate processing. Data Scientists are usually no real software developers and they do not have to worry about software security or economy. However, a certain basic knowledge about software architectures often helps because some Data Science programs can be going to be integrated into an IT landscape of the company. The understanding of object-oriented programming and the good knowledge of the syntax of the selected programming languages ​​are essential, especially since not every programming language is the most useful for all projects.

At the level of the programming language, there is already a lot of snares in the programming language that are based on the programming language itself, as each has its own faults and details determine whether an analysis is done correctly or incorrectly: for example, whether data objects are copied or linked as reference, or how NULL/NaN values ​​are treated.

Data Science Tool & Library Knowledge

Once a data scientist has loaded the data into his favorite tool, for example, one of IBM, SAS or an open source alternative such as Octave, the core work just began. However, these tools are not self-explanatory and therefore there is a wide range of certification options for various Data Science tools. Many (if not most) Data Scientists work mostly directly with a programming language, but this alone is not enough to effectively perform statistical data analysis or machine learning: We use Data Science libraries (packages) that provide data structures and methods as a groundwork and thus extend the programming language to a real Data Science toolset. Such a library, for example Scikit-Learn for Python, is a collection of methods implemented in the programming language. The use of such libraries, however, is intended to be learned and therefore requires familiarization and practical experience for reliable application.

When it comes to Big Data Analytics, the analysis of particularly large data, we enter the field of Distributed Computing. Tools (frameworks) such as Apache Hadoop, Apache Spark or Apache Flink allows us to process and analyze data in parallel on multiple servers. These tools also provide their own libraries for machine learning, such as Mahout, MLlib and FlinkML.

Data Science Method Knowledge

A Data Scientist is not simply an operator of tools, he uses the tools to apply his analysis methods to data he has selected for to reach the project targets. These analysis methods are, for example, descriptive statistics, estimation methods or hypothesis tests. Somewhat more mathematical are methods of machine learning for data mining, such as clustering or dimensional reduction, or more toward automated decision making through classification or regression.

Machine learning methods generally do not work immediately, they have to be improved using optimization methods like the gradient method. A Data Scientist must be able to detect under- and overfitting, and he must prove that the prediction results for the planned deployment are accurate enough.

Special applications require special knowledge, which applies, for example, to the fields of image recognition (Visual Computing) or the processing of human language (Natural Language Processiong). At this point, we open the door to deep learning.

Expertise

Data Science is not an end in itself, but a discipline that would like to answer questions from other expertise fields with data. For this reason, Data Science is very diverse. Business economists need data scientists to analyze financial transactions, for example, to identify fraud scenarios or to better understand customer needs, or to optimize supply chains. Natural scientists such as geologists, biologists or experimental physicists also use Data Science to make their observations with the aim of gaining knowledge. Engineers want to better understand the situation and relationships between machinery or vehicles, and medical professionals are interested in better diagnostics and medication for their patients.

In order to support a specific department with his / her knowledge of data, tools and analysis methods, every data scientist needs a minimum of the appropriate skills. Anyone who wants to make analyzes for buyers, engineers, natural scientists, physicians, lawyers or other interested parties must also be able to understand the people’s profession.

Engere Data Science Definition

While the Data Science pioneers have long established and highly specialized teams, smaller companies are still looking for the Data Science Allrounder, which can take over the full range of tasks from the access to the database to the implementation of the analytical application. However, companies with specialized data experts have long since distinguished Data Scientists, Data Engineers and Business Analysts. Therefore, the definition of Data Science and the delineation of the abilities that a data scientist should have, varies between a broader and a more narrow demarcation.


A closer look at the more narrow definition shows, that a Data Engineer takes over the data allocation, the Data Scientist loads it into his tools and runs the data analysis together with the colleagues from the department. According to this, a Data Scientist would need no knowledge of databases or APIs, neither an expertise would be necessary …

In my experience, DataScience is not that narrow, the task spectrum covers more than just the core area. This misunderstanding comes from Data Science courses and – for me – I should point to the overall picture of Data Science again and again. In courses and seminars, which want to teach Data Science as a discipline, the focus will of course be on the core area: programming, tools and methods from mathematics & statistics.

Data Science Knowledge Stack – Was ein Data Scientist können muss

Was muss ein Data Scientist können? Diese Frage wurde bereits häufig gestellt und auch häufig beantwortet. In der Tat ist man sich mittlerweile recht einig darüber, welche Aufgaben ein Data Scientist für Aufgaben übernehmen kann und welche Fähigkeiten dafür notwendig sind. Ich möchte versuchen, diesen Konsens in eine Grafik zu bringen: Ein Schichten-Modell, ähnlich des OSI-Layer-Modells (welches übrigens auch jeder Data Scientist kennen sollte).
Ich gebe Einführungs-Seminare in Data Science für Kaufleute und Ingenieure und bei der Erläuterung, was wir in den Seminaren gemeinsam theoretisch und mit praxisnahen Übungen erarbeiten müssen, bin ich auf die Idee für dieses Schichten-Modell gekommen. Denn bei meinen Seminaren fängt es mit der Problemstellung bereits an, ich gebe nämlich Seminare für Data Science für Business Analytics mit Python. Also nicht beispielsweise für medizinische Analysen und auch nicht mit R oder Julia. Ich vermittle also nicht irgendein Data Science, sondern eine ganz bestimmte Richtung.

Ein Data Scientist muss bei jedem Data Science Vorhaben Probleme auf unterschiedlichsten Ebenen bewältigen, beispielsweise klappt der Datenzugriff nicht wie geplant oder die Daten haben eine andere Struktur als erwartet. Ein Data Scientist kann Stunden damit verbringen, seinen eigenen Quellcode zu debuggen oder sich in neue Data Science Pakete für seine ausgewählte Programmiersprache einzuarbeiten. Auch müssen die richtigen Algorithmen zur Datenauswertung ausgewählt, richtig parametrisiert und getestet werden, manchmal stellt sich dabei heraus, dass die ausgewählten Methoden nicht die optimalen waren. Letztendlich soll ein Mehrwert für den Fachbereich generiert werden und auch auf dieser Ebene wird ein Data Scientist vor besondere Herausforderungen gestellt.


english-flagRead this article in English:
“Data Science Knowledge Stack – Abstraction of the Data Scientist Skillset”


Data Science Knowledge Stack

Mit dem Data Science Knowledge Stack möchte ich einen strukturierten Einblick in die Aufgaben und Herausforderungen eines Data Scientists geben. Die Schichten des Stapels stellen zudem einen bidirektionalen Fluss dar, der von oben nach unten und von unten nach oben verläuft, denn Data Science als Disziplin ist ebenfalls bidirektional: Wir versuchen gestellte Fragen mit Daten zu beantworten oder wir schauen, welche Potenziale in den Daten liegen, um bisher nicht gestellte Fragen zu beantworten.

Der Data Science Knowledge Stack besteht aus sechs Schichten:

Database Technology Knowledge

Ein Data Scientist arbeitet im Schwerpunkt mit Daten und die liegen selten direkt in einer CSV-Datei strukturiert vor, sondern in der Regel in einer oder in mehreren Datenbanken, die ihren eigenen Regeln unterliegen. Insbesondere Geschäftsdaten, beispielsweise aus dem ERP- oder CRM-System, liegen in relationalen Datenbanken vor, oftmals von Microsoft, Oracle, SAP oder eine Open-Source-Alternative. Ein guter Data Scientist beherrscht nicht nur die Structured Query Language (SQL), sondern ist sich auch der Bedeutung relationaler Beziehungen bewusst, kennt also auch das Prinzip der Normalisierung.

Andere Arten von Datenbanken, sogenannte NoSQL-Datenbanken (Not only SQL)  beruhen auf Dateiformaten, einer Spalten- oder einer Graphenorientiertheit, wie beispielsweise MongoDB, Cassandra oder GraphDB. Einige dieser Datenbanken verwenden zum Datenzugriff eigene Programmiersprachen (z. B. JavaScript bei MongoDB oder die graphenorientierte Datenbank Neo4J hat eine eigene Sprache namens Cypher). Manche dieser Datenbanken bieten einen alternativen Zugriff über SQL (z. B. Hive für Hadoop).

Ein Data Scientist muss mit unterschiedlichen Datenbanksystemen zurechtkommen und mindestens SQL – den Quasi-Standard für Datenverarbeitung – sehr gut beherrschen.

Data Access & Transformation Knowledge

Liegen Daten in einer Datenbank vor, können Data Scientists einfache (und auch nicht so einfache) Analysen bereits direkt auf der Datenbank ausführen. Doch wie bekommen wir die Daten in unsere speziellen Analyse-Tools? Hierfür muss ein Data Scientist wissen, wie Daten aus der Datenbank exportiert werden können. Für einmalige Aktionen kann ein Export als CSV-Datei reichen, doch welche Trennzeichen und Textqualifier können verwendet werden? Eventuell ist der Export zu groß, so dass die Datei gesplittet werden muss.
Soll eine direkte und synchrone Datenanbindung zwischen dem Analyse-Tool und der Datenbank bestehen, kommen Schnittstellen wie REST, ODBC oder JDBC ins Spiel. Manchmal muss auch eine Socket-Verbindung hergestellt werden und das Prinzip einer Client-Server-Architektur sollte bekannt sein. Auch mit synchronen und asynchronen Verschlüsselungsverfahren sollte ein Data Scientist vertraut sein, denn nicht selten wird mit vertraulichen Daten gearbeitet und ein Mindeststandard an Sicherheit ist zumindest bei geschäftlichen Anwendungen stets einzuhalten.

Viele Daten liegen nicht strukturiert in einer Datenbank vor, sondern sind sogenannte unstrukturierte oder semi-strukturierte Daten aus Dokumenten oder aus Internetquellen. Auch hier haben wir es mit Schnittstellen zutun, ein häufiger Einstieg für Data Scientists stellt beispielsweise die Twitter-API dar. Manchmal wollen wir Daten in nahezu Echtzeit streamen, beispielsweise Maschinendaten. Dies kann recht anspruchsvoll sein, so das Data Streaming beinahe eine eigene Disziplin darstellt, mit der ein Data Scientist schnell in Berührung kommen kann.

Programming Language Knowledge

Programmiersprachen sind für Data Scientists Werkzeuge, um Daten zu verarbeiten und die Verarbeitung zu automatisieren. Data Scientists sind in der Regel keine richtigen Software-Entwickler, sie müssen sich nicht um Software-Sicherheit oder -Ergonomie kümmern. Ein gewisses Basiswissen über Software-Architekturen hilft jedoch oftmals, denn immerhin sollen manche Data Science Programme in eine IT-Landschaft integriert werden. Unverzichtbar ist hingegen das Verständnis für objektorientierte Programmierung und die gute Kenntnis der Syntax der ausgewählten Programmiersprachen, zumal nicht jede Programmiersprache für alle Vorhaben die sinnvollste ist.

Auf dem Level der Programmiersprache gibt es beim Arbeitsalltag eines Data Scientists bereits viele Fallstricke, die in der Programmiersprache selbst begründet sind, denn jede hat ihre eigenen Tücken und Details entscheiden darüber, ob eine Analyse richtig oder falsch abläuft: Beispielsweise ob Datenobjekte als Kopie oder als Referenz übergeben oder wie NULL-Werte behandelt werden.

Data Science Tool & Library Knowledge

Hat ein Data Scientist seine Daten erstmal in sein favorisiertes Tool geladen, beispielsweise in eines von IBM, SAS oder in eine Open-Source-Alternative wie Octave, fängt seine Kernarbeit gerade erst an. Diese Tools sind allerdings eher nicht selbsterklärend und auch deshalb gibt es ein vielfältiges Zertifizierungsangebot für diverse Data Science Tools. Viele (wenn nicht die meisten) Data Scientists arbeiten überwiegend direkt mit einer Programmiersprache, doch reicht diese alleine nicht aus, um effektiv statistische Datenanalysen oder Machine Learning zu betreiben: Wir verwenden Data Science Bibliotheken, also Pakete (Packages), die uns Datenstrukturen und Methoden als Vorgabe bereitstellen und die Programmiersprache somit erweitern, damit allerdings oftmals auch neue Tücken erzeugen. Eine solche Bibliothek, beispielsweise Scikit-Learn für Python, ist eine in der Programmiersprache umgesetzte Methodensammlung und somit ein Data Science Tool. Die Verwendung derartiger Bibliotheken will jedoch gelernt sein und erfordert für die zuverlässige Anwendung daher Einarbeitung und Praxiserfahrung.

Geht es um Big Data Analytics, also die Analyse von besonders großen Daten, betreten wir das Feld von Distributed Computing (Verteiltes Rechnen). Tools (bzw. Frameworks) wie Apache Hadoop, Apache Spark oder Apache Flink ermöglichen es, Daten zeitlich parallel auf mehren Servern zu verarbeiten und auszuwerten. Auch stellen diese Tools wiederum eigene Bibliotheken bereit, für Machine Learning z. B. Mahout, MLlib und FlinkML.

Data Science Method Knowledge

Ein Data Scientist ist nicht einfach nur ein Bediener von Tools, sondern er nutzt die Tools, um seine Analyse-Methoden auf Daten anzuwenden, die er für die festgelegten Ziele ausgewählt hat. Diese Analyse-Methoden sind beispielweise Auswertungen der beschreibenden Statistik, Schätzverfahren oder Hypothesen-Tests. Etwas mathematischer sind Verfahren des maschinellen Lernens zum Data Mining, beispielsweise Clusterung oder Dimensionsreduktion oder mehr in Richtung automatisierter Entscheidungsfindung durch Klassifikation oder Regression.

Maschinelle Lernverfahren funktionieren in der Regel nicht auf Anhieb, sie müssen unter Einsatz von Optimierungsverfahren, wie der Gradientenmethode, verbessert werden. Ein Data Scientist muss Unter- und Überanpassung erkennen können und er muss beweisen, dass die Vorhersageergebnisse für den geplanten Einsatz akkurat genug sind.

Spezielle Anwendungen bedingen spezielles Wissen, was beispielsweise für die Themengebiete der Bilderkennung (Visual Computing) oder der Verarbeitung von menschlicher Sprache (Natural Language Processiong) zutrifft. Spätestens an dieser Stelle öffnen wir die Tür zum Deep Learning.

Fachexpertise

Data Science ist kein Selbstzweck, sondern eine Disziplin, die Fragen aus anderen Fachgebieten mit Daten beantworten möchte. Aus diesem Grund ist Data Science so vielfältig. Betriebswirtschaftler brauchen Data Scientists, um Finanztransaktionen zu analysieren, beispielsweise um Betrugsszenarien zu erkennen oder um die Kundenbedürfnisse besser zu verstehen oder aber, um Lieferketten zu optimieren. Naturwissenschaftler wie Geologen, Biologen oder Experimental-Physiker nutzen ebenfalls Data Science, um ihre Beobachtungen mit dem Ziel der Erkenntnisgewinnung zu machen. Ingenieure möchten die Situation und Zusammenhänge von Maschinenanlagen oder Fahrzeugen besser verstehen und Mediziner interessieren sich für die bessere Diagnostik und Medikation bei ihren Patienten.

Damit ein Data Scientist einen bestimmten Fachbereich mit seinem Wissen über Daten, Tools und Analyse-Methoden ergebnisorientiert unterstützen kann, benötigt er selbst ein Mindestmaß an der entsprechenden Fachexpertise. Wer Analysen für Kaufleute, Ingenieure, Naturwissenschaftler, Mediziner, Juristen oder andere Interessenten machen möchte, muss eben jene Leute auch fachlich verstehen können.

Engere Data Science Definition

Während die Data Science Pioniere längst hochgradig spezialisierte Teams aufgebaut haben, suchen beispielsweise kleinere Unternehmen eher den Data Science Allrounder, der vom Zugriff auf die Datenbank bis hin zur Implementierung der analytischen Anwendung das volle Aufgabenspektrum unter Abstrichen beim Spezialwissen übernehmen kann. Unternehmen mit spezialisierten Daten-Experten unterscheiden jedoch längst in Data Scientists, Data Engineers und Business Analysts. Die Definition für Data Science und die Abgrenzung der Fähigkeiten, die ein Data Scientist haben sollte, schwankt daher zwischen der breiteren und einer engeren Abgrenzung.

Die engere Betrachtung sieht vor, dass ein Data Engineer die Datenbereitstellung übernimmt, der Data Scientist diese in seine Tools lädt und gemeinsam mit den Kollegen aus dem Fachbereich die Datenanalyse betreibt. Demnach bräuchte ein Data Scientist kein Wissen über Datenbanken oder APIs und auch die Fachexpertise wäre nicht notwendig…

In der beruflichen Praxis sieht Data Science meiner Erfahrung nach so nicht aus, das Aufgabenspektrum umfasst mehr als nur den Kernbereich. Dieser Irrtum entsteht in Data Science Kursen und auch in Seminaren – würde ich nicht oft genug auf das Gesamtbild hinweisen. In Kursen und Seminaren, die Data Science als Disziplin vermitteln wollen, wird sich selbstverständlich auf den Kernbereich fokussiert: Programmierung, Tools und Methoden aus der Mathematik & Statistik.