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A Gentle Introduction to Precision and Recall.

The idea of this blog is to give an intuitive understanding of Precision and Recall for a binary classification problem. I will shy away from explaining it in a textbook way but rather will try to give an intuition. Nevertheless, let me write the textbook formula first:

The problem with this nomenclature is that despite being correct, it can be a bit confusing, especially for beginners. For example ‘False Positives’ could be understood from a classifier point of view or from a population point of view.

Visualizing with an example

Let’s suppose we have a classifier to differentiate jeans from a T-shirts in a lot of cloths. This lot has 100 pieces altogether with 70 jeans and 30 T-shirts. Let us see this visually. Until this point, we just have a collection of clothes and have no classifier.

We already know that altogether we truly have 70 Jeans and 30 T-shirts.

Now let’s run the classifier to identify the jeans from T-shirts. We can assume the result of the classifier is following (number inside the box is the result of classifier):

We see that out of 70 jeans the classifier identifies 63 correctly as jeans and the remaining 7 as non-Jeans. Out of 30 T-shirts, the classifier identifies 11 falsely as jeans the remaining 19 correctly as non-Jeans.

So Recall is nothing but the proportion of identified jeans out of total jeans, which is

Recall = 63 / 70

Precision is the true jeans identified out of the total number of classified jeans. Which is:

Precision = 63 / (63+11)

Hence we see, in a way Recall has to do with the ability of classifier to deal with jeans and precision has to do with ability to deal with both Jeans and Non-Jeans.

This seems to provide better intuition than the textbook formula.

Diving Deeper with another example

Let us go through one more example to cement the idea. Let’s imagine there is a village which has a notoriously high number of criminals. A special cop arrives to tackle the law and order situation. He interviews every resident and locks some residents based on hunches.

If there are still many criminals roaming on the street the recall is bad, as recall deals with the ability to deal with the quantity which classifier is supposed to find (in this case criminals).

If there are too many innocents rotting in jail the precision is bad. As precision has also to do with the ability to deal with ‘others‘ that is not the quantity which the classifier is supposed to find (in this case these are the innocents).

Now we see, we don’t want too many criminals roaming on the street nor do we want many innocents rotting in the jail. Hence we need both recall and precision to be high or in other words, their mean to be high. But this cannot be arithmetic mean. Let’s see why using an example.

If for a village of 2000 residents there are 100 criminals. And if the cop straight away locks all 2000 residents, the confusion matrix looks like this:

 

Recall= 100/ (100+0) = 1

Precision = 100/ (100+1900) = 0.05

Arithmetic mean for Precision and Recall = (1+.05)/2 = 0.525

This would look like a pretty good classifier even though we know that in reality it’s a bad classifier (or a bad cop who just locks up every person he meets). It can be shown that the same happens in reverse. If the cop does not lock up anyone, the arithmetic mean does not show the true picture again.

That’s why we use harmonic mean. We call it F1 Score and it is calculated as follows: (2 * 1 * 0.05) / (1 + 0.05) = 0.0952

Now, this looks like a more realistic score. So, the performance of a classifier can be judged with a harmonic mean between precision and recall.

Let’s try to understand one more thing.

Often, classifiers work by returning probabilities of positives and negatives. One way to turn them into a confusion matrix is to use a threshold of 0.5. This means that if the probability of being positive is more than 0.5, we consider the case as positive (in our case a criminal). Otherwise, it is a negative.

But there might be cases where we want our recall to be very high. For example, if there is a classifier for identifying Ebola. We do not want any of the cases to be missed because otherwise we are risking an outbreak of the decease with disastrous consequences.

In this case, the threshold needs to be kept really low (maybe near .1 or smaller) so that we raise a flag for every case that has at least 10 % probability and get this person retested. This is an important measure in order to prevent an outbreak, despite the fact that there are a lot of false cases that needs to be rechecked.

There might be other cases where there are many false alarms (maybe fraud transaction in banks) which may be of low risk and it would be expensive to investigate all those cases. In those case, we might want to have a threshold higher than 0.5.

This gives us a taste of things to come. A classifiers efficiency can be plotted for different thresholds which gives us something called a ROC curve. But let’s save that for another post.

How is automation changing data science and machine learning?

We have come a long way since the introduction of data science and machine learning. The recent study has found that the volume of business data doubles in less than 14 months. Today, the collection of data is no longer a problem, but the filtration, analysis, and maintenance of relevant information is a bigger issue.

We need to hire data science professionals, and they demand over $100k annually. Paying that sort of money for a professional is not feasible for every single organization, especially small and middle-sized companies. Google recently announced that it is going to make machine learning technology possible for every business.

The access to machine learning technology is now possible, even for small businesses due to automation. Google, Microsoft, and other companies have come up with automated machine learning tools that enable small businesses to use machine learning technology to enhance their business performance and profit.

Image Source: Google Cloud

With that said, the world still needs a lot of machine learning professionals. Many machine learning professionals prefer Python for machine learning due to its features and a wide range of libraries.

According to the Gartner report, around 40% of data science tasks will be automated by 2020. The data science tools can automate some parts of data science processes, but it is not complete automation.

With that said, it has been helping a lot to accelerate the tasks. We still need data science professionals to deal with real-world problems. The algorithms are not yet able to handle messy data. The significant chunk of data science professionals often prefers performing with data science with Python for sophisticated tasks.

Automation in Data Science

Let me show you the figure right at the beginning before moving forward.

Image Source: Wikipedia

If I had to use only one word to describe the entire data science process, I would use the word “headache.” According to the recent report, the median salary of data scientists easily surpasses $100k annually. The pay will be higher in the time to come.

One needs to pay a lot of money and invest a lot of time to get insights from the collected data. The data scientists need to spend almost 50-60% of their time in data processing and the rest of their time in modeling and deployment.

The cloud platforms like Amazon Web Services, Google, Microsoft Azure, and so on make the job more comfortable, but there is still a lot of work to maintain and extract useful insights from the collected data.

The data science process has lots of inefficiencies. At first, they need to spend over 50% of their total time on processing messy real-world data. After that, there could be a need to customize models, according to specific problems.

The significant contribution of automation is making a significant portion of data processing parts automated. Secondly, the automated platforms can make tracking of various models easier from multiple parameters. The time needed to launch the algorithm is minimal.

One example of an extensive tool to handle a data science project is Alteryx. IT has come up with powerful automated solutions that can drastically reduce the data processing and model development time for smoothening the entire data science workflow. The data science platform, Alteryx, is so amazing that its share price doubled in a span of little more than a year.

Some other great tools that can help you in data science automation are Rapidminer, H20.ai, KNIME, and so on. However, the lack of skilled data scientists can create a problem despite these tools. It is where the role of automated machine learning pops in.

How is Machine Learning Transformed with the entrance of Automation?

The traditional machine learning process was too complicated. One requires to have a lot of expensive machine learning professionals working for months to come up with models to process machine learning tasks.

Image Source: Medium

To make traditional machine learning work, one needs to gather data, standardize data, process features, create and train the machine learning model from problems, validate the models, and deploy the models at last.

You must have heard of how machine learning is only for corporations in the past. But, that has drastically changed in recent time, and it is all due to automation. Keep in mind that the above machine learning model is a simple one. There is a lot of extra works for complicated models. Even for the simple ones, you need to spend a lot of time and money, which makes it impossible for small and medium companies.

The automation in machine learning is all about automating the entire process to make machine learning easier. The only thing you need to do is feed data to the system (not a massive volume of data). You do not need even to cross the three-figure number of images to continue with automated machine learning platforms.

Microsoft has its automl platform along with Google. Other automl platforms can do the trick for you. Using those platforms do not cost you an arm and a leg. If you check out the price, you will be surprised.

There is no need for you to create or deploy models or even test the models. The algorithm will do the job for you. It takes examples and models of historical models to process the data and use a machine learning algorithm.

Even non-statistician can implement machine learning technology with limited data, thanks to automation in machine learning. You can make use of predictive analytics and can get easy solutions for simple prediction problems without scratching your head. Numerous libraries can assist you in the automated generation of machine learning pipelines.

How are the jobs of data scientists simplified by the introduction of automation in machine learning and data science?

It is true that the introduction of automation has drastically reduced the time for completing the tasks for data scientists. They no longer have to spend their valuable time in time-consuming, monotonous works that are necessary but do not provide a lot of value.

However, the need for skilled data scientists still exist, and it will always be there in the time to come. There are challenging works for data scientists that we cannot replace with machines, such as listening to clients, figuring out the root cause of business issues, development and selection of the right solution for the specific business problem.

Just like in other types of jobs, the advancement of automation technologies will modify the tasks that data scientists need to perform. They will be able to allocate more time on things that matter rather than monotonous tasks.

Final Verdict

The automation of machine learning and data science are in the beginning stage. However, they are already making a massive impact on the business world. The huge corporations are investing in Big Data and Machine Learning technologies. We can expect a considerable improvement in these technologies shortly.

Sooner, the competitive advantage of a business will depend on how well they can use the technologies, instead of access to machine learning or Big Data technologies.  I hope this article was valuable to you. If you want to add something or express your thoughts, feel free to leave a comment. I will gladly read and reply to your comment.

A common trap when it comes to sampling from a population that intrinsically includes outliers

I will discuss a common fallacy concerning the conclusions drawn from calculating a sample mean and a sample standard deviation and more importantly how to avoid it.

Suppose you draw a random sample x_1, x_2, … x_N of size N and compute the ordinary (arithmetic) sample mean  x_m and a sample standard deviation sd from it.  Now if (and only if) the (true) population mean µ (first moment) and population variance (second moment) obtained from the actual underlying PDF  are finite, the numbers x_m and sd make the usual sense otherwise they are misleading as will be shown by an example.

By the way: The common correlation coefficient will also be undefined (or in practice always point to zero) in the presence of infinite population variances. Hopefully I will create an article discussing this related fallacy in the near future where a suitable generalization to Lévy-stable variables will be proposed.

 Drawing a random sample from a heavy tailed distribution and discussing certain measures

As an example suppose you have a one dimensional random walker whose step length is distributed by a symmetric standard Cauchy distribution (Lorentz-profile) with heavy tails, i.e. an alpha-stable distribution with alpha being equal to one. The PDF of an individual independent step is given by p(x) = \frac{\pi^{-1}}{(1 + x^2)} , thus neither the first nor the second moment exist whereby the first exists and vanishes at least in the sense of a principal value due to symmetry.

Still let us generate N = 3000 (pseudo) standard Cauchy random numbers in R* to analyze the behavior of their sample mean and standard deviation sd as a function of the reduced sample size n \leq N.

*The R-code is shown at the end of the article.

Here are the piecewise sample mean (in blue) and standard deviation (in red) for the mentioned Cauchy sampling. We see that both the sample mean and sd include jumps and do not converge.

Especially the mean deviates relatively largely from zero even after 3000 observations. The sample sd has no target due to the population variance being infinite.

If the data is new and no prior distribution is known, computing the sample mean and sd will be misleading. Astonishingly enough the sample mean itself will have the (formally exact) same distribution as the single step length p(x). This means that the sample mean is also standard Cauchy distributed implying that with a different Cauchy sample one could have easily observed different sample means far of the presented values in blue.

What sense does it make to present the usual interval x_m \pm sd / \sqrt{N} in such a case? What to do?

The sample median, median absolute difference (mad) and Inter-Quantile-Range (IQR) are more appropriate to describe such a data set including outliers intrinsically. To make this plausible I present the following plot, whereby the median is shown in black, the mad in green and the IQR in orange.

This example shows that the median, mad and IQR converge quickly against their assumed values and contain no major jumps. These quantities do an obviously better job in describing the sample. Even in the presence of outliers they remain robust, whereby the mad converges more quickly than the IQR. Note that a standard Cauchy sample will contain half of its sample in the interval median \pm mad meaning that the IQR is twice the mad.

Drawing a random sample from a PDF that has finite moments

Just for comparison I also show the above quantities for a standard normal (pseudo) sample labeled with the same color as before as a counter example. In this case not only do both the sample mean and median but also the sd and mad converge towards their expected values (see plot below). Here all the quantities describe the data set properly and there is no trap since there are no intrinsic outliers. The sample mean itself follows a standard normal, so that the sd in deed makes sense and one could calculate a standard error \frac{sd}{\sqrt{N}} from it to present the usual stochastic confidence intervals for the sample mean.

A careful observation shows that in contrast to the Cauchy case here the sampled mean and sd converge more quickly than the sample median and the IQR. However still the sampled mad performs about as well as the sd. Again the mad is twice the IQR.

And here are the graphs of the prementioned quantities for a pseudo normal sample:

The take-home-message:

Just be careful when you observe outliers and calculate sample quantities right away, you might miss something. At best one carefully observes how the relevant quantities change with sample size as demonstrated in this article.

Such curves should become of broader interest in order to improve transparency in the Data Science process and reduce fallacies as well.

Thank you for reading.

P.S.: Feel free to play with the set random seed in the R-code below and observe how other quantities behave with rising sample size. Of course you can also try different PDFs at the beginning of the code. You can employ a Cauchy, Gaussian, uniform, exponential or Holtsmark (pseudo) random sample.

 

QUIZ: Which one of the recently mentioned random samples contains a trap** and why?

**in the context of this article

 

R-code used to generate the data and for producing plots:

 

 

Fehler-Rückführung mit der Backpropagation

Dies ist Artikel 4 von 6 der Artikelserie –Einstieg in Deep Learning.

Das Gradienten(abstiegs)verfahren ist der Schlüssel zum Training einzelner Neuronen bzw. deren Gewichtungen zu den Neuronen der vorherigen Schicht. Wer dieses Prinzip verstanden hat, hat bereits die halbe Miete zum Verständnis des Trainings von künstlichen neuronalen Netzen.

Der Gradientenabstieg wird häufig fälschlicherweise mit der Backpropagation gleichgesetzt, jedoch ist das nicht ganz richtig, denn die Backpropagation ist mehr als die Anwendung des Gradientenabstiegs.

Bevor wir die Backpropagation erläutern, nochmal kurz zurück zur Forward-Propagation, die die eigentliche Prädiktion über ein künstliches neuronales Netz darstellt:

Forward-Propagation

Abbildung 1: Ein simples kleines künstliches neuronales Netz mit zwei Schichten (+ Eingabeschicht) und zwei Neuronen pro Schicht.

In einem kleinen künstlichen neuronalen Netz, wie es in der Abbildung 1 dargestellt ist, und das alle Neuronen über die Sigmoid-Funktion aktiviert, wird jedes Neuron eine Nettoeingabe z berechnen…

z = w^{T} \cdot x

… und diese Nettoeingabe in die Sigmoid-Funktion einspeisen…

\phi(z) = sigmoid(z) = \frac{1}{1 + e^{-z}}

… die dann das einzelne Neuron aktiviert. Die Aktivierung erfolgt also in der mittleren Schicht (N-Schicht) wie folgt:

N_{j} = \frac{1}{1 + e^{- \sum (w_{ij} \cdot x_{i}) }}

Die beiden Aktivierungsausgaben N werden dann als Berechnungsgrundlage für die Ausgaben der Ausgabeschicht o verwendet. Auch die Ausgabe-Neuronen berechnen ihre jeweilige Nettoeingabe z und aktivieren über Sigmoid(z).

Ausgabe eines Ausgabeknotens als Funktion der Eingänge und der Verknüpfungsgewichte für ein dreischichtiges neuronales Netz, mit nur zwei Knoten je Schicht, kann also wie folgt zusammen gefasst werden:

O_{k} = \frac{1}{1 + e^{- \sum (w_{jk} \cdot \frac{1}{1 + e^{- \sum (w_{ij} \cdot x_{i}) }}) }}

Abbildung 2: Forward-Propagation. Aktivierung via Sigmoid-Funktion.

Sollte dies die erste Forward-Propagation gewesen sein, wird der Output noch nicht auf den Input abgestimmt sein. Diese Abstimmung erfolgt in Form der Gewichtsanpassung im Training des neuronalen Netzes, über die zuvor erwähnte Gradientenmethode. Die Gradientenmethode ist jedoch von einem Fehler abhängig. Diesen Fehler zu bestimmen und durch das Netz zurück zu führen, das ist die Backpropagation.

Back-Propagation

Um die Gewichte entgegen des Fehlers anpassen zu können, benötigen wir einen möglichst exakten Fehler als Eingabe. Der Fehler berechnet sich an der Ausgabeschicht über eine Fehlerfunktion (Loss Function), beispielsweise über den MSE (Mean Squared Error) oder über die sogenannte Kreuzentropie (Cross Entropy). Lassen wir es in diesem Beispiel einfach bei einem simplen Vergleich zwischen dem realen Wert (Sollwert o_{real}) und der Prädiktion (Ausgabe o) bleiben:

e_{o} = o_{real} - o

Der Fehler e ist also einfach der Unterschied zwischen dem Ziel-Wert und der Prädiktion. Jedes Training ist eine Wiederholung von Prädiktion (Forward) und Gewichtsanpassung (Back). Im ersten Schritt werden üblicherweise die Gewichtungen zufällig gesetzt, jede Gewichtung unterschiedlich nach Zufallszahl. So ist die Wahrscheinlichkeit, gleich zu Beginn die “richtigen” Gewichtungen gefunden zu haben auch bei kleinen neuronalen Netzen verschwindend gering. Der Fehler wird also groß sein und kann über den Gradientenabstieg durch Gewichtsanpassung verkleinert werden.

In diesem Beispiel berechnen wir die Fehler e_{1} und e_{2} und passen danach die Gewichte w_{j,k} (w_{1,1} & w_{2,1} und w_{1,2} & w_{2,2}) der Schicht zwischen dem Hidden-Layer N und dem Output-Layer o an.

Abbildung 3: Anpassung der Gewichtungen basierend auf dem Fehler in der Ausgabe-Schicht.

Die Frage ist nun, wie die Gewichte zwischen dem Input-Layer X und dem Hidden-Layer N anzupassen sind. Es stellt sich die Frage, welchen Einfluss diese auf die Fehler in der Ausgabe-Schicht haben?

Um diese Gewichtungen anpassen zu können, benötigen wir den Fehler-Anteil der beiden Neuronen N_{1} und N_{2}. Dieser Anteil am Fehler der jeweiligen Neuronen ergibt sich direkt aus den Gewichtungen w_{j,k} zum Output-Layer:

e_{N_{1}} = e_{o1} \cdot \frac{w_{1,1}}{w_{1,1} + w_{1,2}} + e_{o2} \cdot \frac{w_{1,2}}{w_{1,1} + w_{1,2}}

e_{N_{2}} = e_{o1} \cdot \frac{w_{2,1}}{w_{2,1} + w_{2,2}} + e_{o2} \cdot \frac{w_{2,2}}{w_{2,1} + w_{2,2}}

Wenn man das nun generalisiert:

    \[ e_{N} = \left(\begin{array}{rr} \frac{w_{1,1}}{w_{1,1} + w_{1,2}} & \frac{w_{1,2}}{w_{1,1} + w_{1,2}} \\ \frac{w_{2,1}}{w_{2,1} + w_{2,2}} & \frac{w_{2,2}}{w_{2,1} + w_{2,2}} \end{array}\right) \cdot \left(\begin{array}{c} e_{1} \\ e_{2} \end{array}\right) \qquad \]

Dabei ist es recht aufwändig, die Gewichtungen stets ins Verhältnis zu setzen. Diese Berechnung können wir verkürzen, indem ganz einfach direkt nur die Gewichtungen ohne Relativierung zur Kalkulation des Fehleranteils benutzt werden. Die Relationen bleiben dabei erhalten!

    \[ e_{N} = \left(\begin{array}{rr} w_{1,1} & w_{1,2} \\ w_{2,1} & w_{2,2} \end{array}\right) \cdot \left(\begin{array}{c} e_{1} \\ e_{2} \end{array}\right) \qquad \]

Oder folglich in Kurzform: e_{N} = w^{T} \cdot e_{o}

Abbildung 4: Vollständige Gewichtsanpassung auf Basis der Fehler in der Ausgabeschicht und der Fehleranteile in der verborgenden Schicht.

Und nun können, basierend auf den Fehleranteilen der verborgenden Schicht N, die Gewichtungen w_{i,j} zwischen der Eingabe-Schicht I und der verborgenden Schicht N angepasst werden, entgegen dieser Fehler e_{N}.

Die Backpropagation besteht demnach aus zwei Schritten:

  1. Fehler-Berechnung durch Abgleich der Soll-Werte mit den Prädiktionen in der Ausgabeschicht und durch Fehler-Rückführung zu den Neuronen der verborgenden Schichten (Hidden-Layer)
  2. Anpassung der Gewichte entgegen des Gradientenanstiegs der Fehlerfunktion (Loss Function)

Buchempfehlungen

Die folgenden zwei Bücher haben mir sehr beim Verständnis und beim Verständlichmachen der Backpropagation in künstlichen neuronalen Netzen geholfen.

Neuronale Netze selbst programmieren: Ein verständlicher Einstieg mit Python Deep Learning. Das umfassende Handbuch: Grundlagen, aktuelle Verfahren und Algorithmen, neue Forschungsansätze (mitp Professional)

Training eines Neurons mit dem Gradientenverfahren

Dies ist Artikel 3 von 6 der Artikelserie –Einstieg in Deep Learning.

Das Training von neuronalen Netzen erfolgt nach der Forward-Propagation über zwei Schritte:

  1. Fehler-Rückführung über aller aktiver Neuronen aller Netz-Schichten, so dass jedes Neuron “seinen” Einfluss auf den Ausgabefehler kennt.
  2. Anpassung der Gewichte entgegen den Gradienten der Fehlerfunktion

Beide Schritte werden in der Regel zusammen als Backpropagation bezeichnet. Machen wir erstmal einen Schritt vor und betrachten wir, wie ein Neuron seine Gewichtsverbindungen zu seinen Vorgängern anpasst.

Gradientenabstiegsverfahren

Der Gradientenabstieg ist ein generalisierbarer Algorithmus zur Optimierung, der in vielen Verfahren des maschinellen Lernens zur Anwendung kommt, jedoch ganz besonders als sogenannte Backpropagation im Deep Learning den Erfolg der künstlichen neuronalen Netze erst möglich machen konnte.

Der Gradientenabstieg lässt sich vom Prinzip her leicht erklären: Angenommen, man stünde im Gebirge im dichten Nebel. Das Tal, und somit der Weg nach Hause, ist vom Nebel verdeckt. Wohin laufen wir? Wir können das Ziel zwar nicht sehen, tasten uns jedoch so heran, dass unser Gehirn den Gradienten (den Unterschied der Höhen beider Füße) berechnet, somit die Steigung des Bodens kennt und sich entgegen dieser Steigung unser Weg fortsetzt.

Konkret funktioniert der Gradientenabstieg so: Wir starten bei einem zufälligen Theta \theta (Random Initialization). Wir berechnen die Ausgabe (Forwardpropogation) und vergleichen sie über eine Verlustfunktion (z. B. über die Funktion Mean Squared Error) mit dem tatsächlich korrekten Wert. Auf Grund der zufälligen Initialisierung haben wir eine nahe zu garantierte Falschheit der Ergebnisse und somit einen Verlust. Für die Verlustfunktion berechnen wir den Gradienten für gegebene Eingabewerte. Voraussetzung dafür ist, dass die Funktion ableitbar ist. Wir bewegen uns entgegen des Gradienten in Richtung Minimum der Verlustfunktion. Ist dieses Minimum (fast) gefunden, spricht man auch davon, dass der Lernalgorithmus konvergiert.

Das Gradientenabstiegsverfahren ist eine Möglichkeit der Gradientenverfahren, denn wollten wir maximieren, würden wir uns entlang des Gradienten bewegen, was in anderen Anwendungen sinnvoll ist.

Ob als “Cost Function” oder als “Loss Function” bezeichnet, in jedem Fall ist es eine “Error Function”, aber auf die Benennung kommen wir später zu sprechen. Jedenfalls versuchen wir die Fehlerrate zu senken! Leider sind diese Funktionen in der Praxis selten so einfach konvex (zwei Berge mit einem Tal dazwischen).

 

Aber Achtung: Denn befinden wir uns nur zwischen zwei Bergen, finden wir das Tal mit Sicherheit über den Gradienten. Befinden wir uns jedoch in einem richtigen Gebirge mit vielen Bergen und Tälern, gilt es, das richtige Tal zu finden. Bei der Optimierung der Gewichtungen von künstlichen neuronalen Netzen wollen wir die besten Gewichtungen finden, die uns zu den geringsten Ausgaben der Verlustfunktion führen. Wir suchen also das globale Minimum unter den vielen (lokalen) Minima.

Programmier-Beispiel in Python

Nachfolgend ein Beispiel des Gradientenverfahrens zur Berechnung einer Regression. Wir importieren numpy und matplotlib.pyplot und erzeugen uns künstliche Datenpunkte:

Nun wollen wir einen Lernalgorithmus über das Gradientenverfahren erstellen. Im Grunde haben wir hier es bereits mit einem linear aktivierten Neuron zutun:

Bei der linearen Regression, die wir durchführen wollen, nehmen wir zwei-dimensionale Daten (wobei wir die Regression prinzipiell auch mit x-Dimensionen durchführen können, dann hätte unser Neuron weitere Eingänge). Wir empfangen einen Bias (w_0) der stets mit einer Eingangskonstante multipliziert und somit als Wert erhalten bleibt. Der Bias ist das Alpha \alpha in einer Schulmathe-tauglichen Formel wie y = \beta \cdot x + \alpha.

Beta \beta ist die Steigung, der Gradient, der Funktion.

Sowohl \alpha als auch \beta sind uns unbekannt, versuchen wir jedoch über die Betrachtung unserer Prädiktion durch Berechnung der Formel \^y = \beta \cdot x + \alpha und den darauffolgenden Abgleich mit dem tatsächlichen y herauszufinden. Anfangs behaupten wir beispielsweise einfach, sowohl \beta als auch \alpha seien 0.00. Folglich wird \^y = \beta \cdot x + \alpha ebenfalls gleich 0.00 sein und die Fehlerfunktion (Loss Function) wird maximal sein. Dies war der erste Durchlauf des Trainings, die sogenannte erste Epoche!

Die Epochen (Durchläufe) und dazugehörige Fehlergrößen. Wenn die Fehler sinken und mit weiteren Epochen nicht mehr wesentlich besser werden, heißt es, das der Lernalogorithmus konvergiert.

Als Fehlerfunktion verwenden wir bei der Regression die MSE-Funktion (Mean Squared Error):

MSE = \sum(\^y_i - y_i)^2

Um diese Funktion wird sich nun alles drehen, denn diese beschreibt den Fehler und gibt uns auch die Auskunft darüber, ob wie stark und in welche Richtung sie ansteigt, so dass wir uns entgegen der Steigung bewegen können. Wer die Regeln der Ableitung im Kopf hat, weiß, dass die Ableitung der Formel leichter wird, wenn wir sie vorher auf halbe Werte runterskalieren. Da die Proportionen dabei erhalten bleiben und uns quadrierte Fehlerwerte unserem menschlichen Verstand sowieso nicht so viel sagen (unser Gehirn denkt nunmal nicht exponential), stört das nicht:

MSE = \frac{\frac{1}{2} \cdot \sum(\^y_i - y_i)^2}{n}

MSE = \frac{\frac{1}{2} \cdot \sum(w^T \cdot x_i - y_i)^2}{n}

Wenn die Mathematik der partiellen Ableitung (Ableitung einer Funktion nach jedem Gradienten) abhanden gekommen ist, bitte nochmal folgende Regeln nachschlagen, um die nachfolgende Ableitung verstehen zu können:

  • Allgemeine partielle Ableitung
  • Kettenregel

Ableitung der MSD-Funktion nach dem einen Gewicht w bzw. partiell nach jedem vorhandenen w_j:

\frac{\partial}{\partial w_j}MSE = \frac{\partial}{\partial w} \frac{1}{2} \cdot \sum(\^y - y_i)^2

\frac{\partial}{\partial w_j}MSE = \frac{\partial}{\partial w} \frac{1}{2} \cdot \sum(w^T \cdot x_i - y_i)^2

\frac{\partial}{\partial w_j}MSE = \frac{2}{n} \cdot \sum(w^T \cdot x_i - y_i) \cdot x_{ij}

Woher wir das x_{ij} am Ende her haben? Das ergibt sie aus der Kettenregel: Die äußere Funktion wurde abgeleitet, so wurde aus \frac{1}{2} \cdot \sum(w^T \cdot x_i - y_i)^2 dann \frac{2}{n} \cdot \sum(w^T \cdot x_i - y_i). Jedoch muss im Sinne eben dieser Kettenregel auch die innere Funktion abgeleitet werden. Da wir nach w_j ableiten, bleibt nur x_ij erhalten.

Damit können wir arbeiten! So kompliziert ist die Formel nun auch wieder nicht: \frac{2}{n} \cdot \sum(w^T \cdot x_i - y_i) \cdot x_{ij}

Mit dieser Formel können wir unsere Gewichte an den Fehler anpassen: (f\nabla ist der Gradient der Funktion!)

w_j = w_j - \nabla MSE(w_j)

Initialisieren der Gewichtungen

Die Gewichtungen \alpha und \beta müssen anfänglich mit Werten initialisiert werden. In der Regression bietet es sich an, die Gewichte anfänglich mit 0.00 zu initialisieren.

Bei vielen neuronalen Netzen, mit nicht-linearen Aktivierungsfunktionen, ist das jedoch eher ungünstig und zufällige Werte sind initial besser. Gut erprobt sind normal-verteilte Zufallswerte.

Lernrate

Nur eine Kleinigkeit haben wir bisher vergessen: Wir brauchen einen Faktor, mit dem wir anpassen. Hier wäre der Faktor 1. Das ist in der Regel viel zu groß. Dieser Faktor wird geläufig als Lernrate (Learning Rate) \eta (eta) bezeichnet:

w_j = w_j - \eta \cdot \nabla MSE(w_j)

Die Lernrate \eta ist ein Knackpunkt und der erste Parameter des Lernalgorithmus, den es anzupassen gilt, wenn das Training nicht konvergiert.

Die Lernrate \eta darf nicht zu groß klein gewählt werden, da das Training sonst zu viele Epochen benötigt. Ungeduldige erhöhen die Lernrate möglicherweise aber so sehr, dass der Lernalgorithmus im Minimum der Fehlerfunktion vorbeiläuft und diesen stets überspringt. Hier würde der Algorithmus also sozusagen konvergieren, weil nicht mehr besser werden, aber das resultierende Modell wäre weit vom Optimum entfernt.

Beginnen wir mit der Implementierung als Python-Klasse:

Die Klasse sollte so funktionieren, bevor wir sie verwenden, sollten wir die Input-Werte standardisieren:

Bei diesem Beispiel mit künstlich erzeugten Werten ist das Standardisieren bzw. das Fehlen des Standardisierens zwar nicht kritisch, aber man sollte es sich zur Gewohnheit machen. Testweise es einfach mal weglassen 🙂

Kommen wir nun zum Einsatz der Klasse, die die Regression via Gradientenabstieg absolvieren soll:

Was tut diese Instanz der Klasse LinearRegressionGD nun eigentlich?

Bildlich gesprochen, legt sie eine Gerade auf den Boden des Koordinatensystems, denn die Gewichtungen werden mit 0.00 initialisiert, y ist also gleich 0.00, egal welche Werte in x enthalten sind. Der Fehler ist dann aber sehr groß (sollte maximal sein, im Vergleich zu zukünftigen Epochen). Die Gewichte werden also angepasst, die Gerade somit besser in die Punktwolke platziert. Mit jeder Epoche wird die Gerade erneut in die Punktwolke gelegt, der Gesamtfehler (über alle x, da wir es hier mit dem Batch-Verfahren zutun haben) berechnet, die Werte angepasst… bis die vorgegebene Zahl an Epochen abgelaufen ist.

Schauen wir uns das Ergebnis des Trainings an:

Die Linie sieht passend aus, oder? Da wir hier nicht zu sehr in die Theorie der Regressionsanalyse abdriften möchten, lassen wir das testen und prüfen der Akkuratesse mal aus, hier möchte ich auf meinen Artikel Regressionsanalyse in Python mit Scikit-Learn verweisen.

Prüfen sollten wir hingegen mal, wie schnell der Lernalgorithmus mit der vorgegebenen Lernrate eta konvergiert:

Hier die Verlaufskurve der Cost Function:

Die Kurve zeigt uns, dass spätestens nach 40 Epochen kaum noch Verbesserung (im Sinne der Gesamtfehler-Minimierung) erreicht wird.

Wichtige Hinweise

Natürlich war das nun nur ein erster kleiner Einstieg und wer es verstanden hat, hat viel gewonnen. Denn erst dann kann man sich vorstellen, wie ein einzelnen Neuron eines künstlichen neuronalen Netzes grundsätzlich trainiert werden kann.

Folgendes sollte noch beachtet werden:

  • Lernrate \eta:
    Die Lernrate ist ein wichtiger Parameter. Wer das Programmier-Beispiel bei sich zum Laufen gebracht hat, einfach mal die Lernrate auf Werte zwischen 10.00 und 0.00000001 setzen, schauen was passiert 🙂
  • Globale Minima vs lokale Minima:
    Diese lineare zwei-dimensionale Regression ist ziemlich einfach. Neuronale Netze sind hingegen komplexer und haben nicht einfach nur eine simple konvexe Fehlerfunktion. Hier gibt es mehrere Hügel und Täler in der Fehlerfunktion und die Gefahr ist groß, in einem lokalen, nicht aber in einem globalen Minimum zu landen.
  • Stochastisches Gradientenverfahren:
    Wir haben hier das sogenannte Batch-Verfahren verwendet. Dieses ist grundsätzlich besser als die stochastische Methode. Denn beim Batch verwenden wir den gesamten Stapel an x-Werten für die Fehlerbestimmung. Allerdings ist dies bei großen Daten zu rechen- und speicherintensiv. Dann werden kleinere Unter-Stapel (Sub-Batches) zufällig aus den x-Werten ausgewählt, der Fehler daraus bestimmt (was nicht ganz so akkurat ist, wie als würden wir den Fehler über alle x berechnen) und der Gradient bestimmt. Dies ist schon Rechen- und Speicherkapazität, erfordert aber meistens mehr Epochen.

Buchempfehlung

Die folgenden zwei Bücher haben mir bei der Erstellung dieses Beispiels geholfen und kann ich als hilfreiche und deutlich weiterführende Lektüre empfehlen:

 

Machine Learning mit Python und Scikit-Learn und TensorFlow: Das umfassende Praxis-Handbuch für Data Science, Predictive Analytics und Deep Learning (mitp Professional) Hands-On Machine Learning with Scikit-Learn and TensorFlow: Concepts, Tools, and Techniques for Building Intelligent Systems

 

Predictive maintenance in Semiconductor Industry: Part 1

The process in the semiconductor industry is highly complicated and is normally under consistent observation via the monitoring of the signals coming from several sensors. Thus, it is important for the organization to detect the fault in the sensor as quickly as possible. There are existing traditional statistical based techniques however modern semiconductor industries have the ability to produce more data which is beyond the capability of the traditional process.

For this article, we will be using SECOM dataset which is available here.  A lot of work has already done on this dataset by different authors and there are also some articles available online. In this article, we will focus on problem definition, data understanding, and data cleaning.

This article is only the first of three parts, in this article we will discuss the business problem in hand and clean the dataset. In second part we will do feature engineering and in the last article we will build some models and evaluate them.

Problem definition

This data which is collected by these sensors not only contains relevant information but also a lot of noise. The dataset contains readings from 590. Among the 1567 examples, there are only 104 fail cases which means that out target variable is imbalanced. We will look at the distribution of the dataset when we look at the python code.

NOTE: For a detailed description regarding this cases study I highly recommend to read the following research papers:

  •  Kerdprasop, K., & Kerdprasop, N. A Data Mining Approach to Automate Fault Detection Model Development in the Semiconductor Manufacturing Process.
  • Munirathinam, S., & Ramadoss, B. Predictive Models for Equipment Fault Detection in the Semiconductor Manufacturing Process.

Data Understanding and Preparation

Let’s start exploring the dataset now. The first step as always is to import the required libraries.

There are several ways to import the dataset, you can always download and then import from your working directory. However, I will directly import using the link. There are two datasets: one contains the readings from the sensors and the other one contains our target variable and a timestamp.

The first step before doing the analysis would be to merge the dataset and we will us pandas library to merge the datasets in just one line of code.

Now let’s check out the distribution of the target variable

Figure 1: Distribution of Target Variable

From Figure 1 it can be observed that the target variable is imbalanced and it is highly recommended to deal with this problem before the model building phase to avoid bias model. Xgboost is one of the models which can deal with imbalance classes but one needs to spend a lot of time to tune the hyper-parameters to achieve the best from the model.

The dataset in hand contains a lot of null values and the next step would be to analyse these null values and remove the columns having null values more than a certain percentage. This percentage is calculated based on 95th quantile of null values.

Figure 2: Missing percentge in each column

Now we calculate the 95th percentile of the null values.

Figure 3: Missing percentage after removing columns with more then 45% Na

From figure 3 its visible that there are still missing values in the dataset and can be dealt by using many imputation methods. The most common method is to impute these values by mean, median or mode. There also exist few sophisticated techniques like K-nearest neighbour and interpolation.  We will be applying interpolation technique to our dataset. 

To prepare our dataset for analysis we should remove some more unwanted columns like columns with near zero variance. For this we can calulate number of unique values in each column and if there is only one unique value we can delete the column as it holds no information.

We have applied few data cleaning techniques and reduced the features from 590 to 444. However, In the next article we will apply some feature engineering techniques and adress problems like the curse of dimensionality and will also try to balance the target variable.

Bleiben Sie dran!!

The Inside Out of ML Based Prescriptive Analytics

With the constantly growing number of data, more and more companies are shifting towards analytic solutions. Analytic solutions help in extracting the meaning from the huge amount of data available. Thus, improving decision making.

Decision making is an important aspect of businesses, and technologies like Machine Learning are enhancing it further. The growing use of Machine Learning has changed the way of prescriptive analytics. In order to optimize the efforts, companies need to be more accurate with the historical and present data. This is because the historical and present data are the essentials of analytics. This article helps describe the inside out of Machine Learning-based prescriptive analytics.

Phases of business analytics

Descriptive analytics, predictive analytics, and prescriptive analytics are the three phases of business analytics. Descriptive analytics, being the first one, deals with past performance. Historical data is mined to understand past performance. This serves as a way to look for the reasons behind past success and failure. It is a kind of post-mortem analysis and most management reporting like sales, marketing, operations, and finance etc. make use of this.

The second one is a predictive analysis which answers the question of what is likely to happen. The historical data is now combined with rules, algorithms etc. to determine the possible future outcome or likelihood of a situation occurring.

The final phase, well known to everyone, is prescriptive analytics. It can continually take in new data and re-predict and re-prescribe. This improves the accuracy of the prediction and prescribes better decision options.  Professional services or technology or their combination can be chosen to perform all the three analytics.

More about prescriptive analytics

The analysis of business activities goes through many phases. Prescriptive analytics is one such. It is known to be the third phase of business analytics and comes after descriptive and predictive analytics. It entails the application of mathematical and computational sciences. It makes use of the results obtained from descriptive and predictive analysis to suggest decision options. It goes beyond predicting future outcomes and suggests actions to benefit from the predictions. It shows the implications of each decision option. It anticipates on what will happen when it will happen as well as why it will happen.

ML-based prescriptive analytics

Being just before the prescriptive analytics, predictive analytics is often confused with it. What actually happens is predictive analysis leads to prescriptive analysis. Thus, a Machine Learning based prescriptive analytics goes through an ML-based predictive analysis first. Therefore, it becomes necessary to consider the ML-based predictive analysis first.

ML-based predictive analytics:

A lot of things prevent businesses from achieving predictive analysis capabilities.  Machine Learning can be a great help in boosting Predictive analytics. Use of Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence algorithms helps businesses in optimizing and uncovering the new statistical patterns. These statistical patterns form the backbone of predictive analysis. E-commerce, marketing, customer service, medical diagnosis etc. are some of the prospective use cases for Machine Learning based predictive analytics.

In E-commerce, machine learning can help in predicting the usual choices of the customer. Thus, presenting him/her according to his/her likes and dislikes. It can also help in predicting fraudulent transaction. Similarly, B2B marketing also makes good use of Machine learning based predictive analytics. Customer services and medical diagnosis also benefit from predictive analytics. Thus, a prediction and a prescription based on machine learning can boost various business functions.

Organizations and software development companies are making more and more use of machine learning based predictive analytics. The advancements like neural networks and deep learning algorithms are able to uncover hidden information. This all requires a well-researched approach. Big data and progressive IT systems also act as important factors in this.

Language Detecting with sklearn by determining Letter Frequencies

Of course, there are better and more efficient methods to detect the language of a given text than counting its lettes. On the other hand this is a interesting little example to show the impressing ability of todays machine learning algorithms to detect hidden patterns in a given set of data.

For example take the sentence:

“Ceci est une phrase française.”

It’s not to hard to figure out that this sentence is french. But the (lowercase) letters of the same sentence in a random order look like this:

“eeasrsçneticuaicfhenrpaes”

Still sure it’s french? Regarding the fact that this string contains the letter “ç” some people could have remembered long passed french lessons back in school and though might have guessed right. But beside the fact that the french letter “ç” is also present for example in portuguese, turkish, catalan and a few other languages, this is still a easy example just to explain the problem. Just try to guess which language might have generated this:

“ogldviisnntmeyoiiesettpetorotrcitglloeleiengehorntsnraviedeenltseaecithooheinsnstiofwtoienaoaeefiitaeeauobmeeetdmsflteightnttxipecnlgtetgteyhatncdisaceahrfomseehmsindrlttdthoaranthahdgasaebeaturoehtrnnanftxndaeeiposttmnhgttagtsheitistrrcudf”

While this looks simply confusing to the human eye and it seems practically impossible to determine the language it was generated from, this string still contains as set of hidden but well defined patterns from which the language could be predictet with almost complete (ca. 98-99%) certainty.

First of all, we need a set of texts in the languages our model should be able to recognise. Luckily with the package NLTK there comes a big set of example texts which actually are protocolls of the european parliament and therefor are publicly availible in 11 differen languages:

  •  Danish
  •  Dutch
  •  English
  •  Finnish
  •  French
  •  German
  •  Greek
  •  Italian
  •  Portuguese
  •  Spanish
  •  Swedish

Because the greek version is not written with the latin alphabet, the detection of the language greek would just be too simple, so we stay with the other 10 languages availible. To give you a idea of the used texts, here is a little sample:

“Resumption of the session I declare resumed the session of the European Parliament adjourned on Friday 17 December 1999, and I would like once again to wish you a happy new year in the hope that you enjoyed a pleasant festive period.
Although, as you will have seen, the dreaded ‘millennium bug’ failed to materialise, still the people in a number of countries suffered a series of natural disasters that truly were dreadful.”

Train and Test

The following code imports the nessesary modules and reads the sample texts from a set of text files into a pandas.Dataframe object and prints some statistics about the read texts:

Above you see a sample set of random rows of the created Dataframe. After removing very short text snipplets (less than 200 chars) we are left with 56481 snipplets. The function clean_eutextdf() then creates a lower case representation of the texts in the coloum ‘ltext’ to facilitate counting the chars in the next step.
The following code snipplet now extracs the features – in this case the relative frequency of each letter in every text snipplet – that are used for prediction:

Now that we have calculated the features for every text snipplet in our dataset, we can split our data set in a train and test set:

After doing that, we can train a k-nearest-neigbours classifier and test it to get the percentage of correctly predicted languages in the test data set. Because we do not know what value for k may be the best choice, we just run the training and testing with different values for k in a for loop:

As you can see in the output the reliability of the language classifier is generally very high: It starts at about 97.5% for k = 1, increases for with increasing values of k until it reaches a maximum level of about 98.5% at k ≈ 10.

Using the Classifier to predict languages of texts

Now that we have trained and tested the classifier we want to use it to predict the language of example texts. To do that we need two more functions, shown in the following piece of code. The first one extracts the nessesary features from the sample text and predict_lang() predicts the language of a the texts:

With this classifier it is now also possible to predict the language of the randomized example snipplet from the introduction (which is acutally created from the first paragraph of this article):

The KNN classifier of sklearn also offers the possibility to predict the propability with which a given classification is made. While the probability distribution for a specific language is relativly clear for long sample texts it decreases noticeably the shorter the texts are.

Background and Insights

Why does a relative simple model like counting letters acutally work? Every language has a specific pattern of letter frequencies which can be used as a kind of fingerprint: While there are almost no y‘s in the german language this letter is quite common in english. In french the letter k is not very common because it is replaced with q in most cases.

For a better understanding look at the output of the following code snipplet where only three letters already lead to a noticable form of clustering:

 

Even though every single letter frequency by itself is not a very reliable indicator, the set of frequencies of all present letters in a text is a quite good evidence because it will more or less represent the letter frequency fingerprint of the given language. Since it is quite hard to imagine or visualize the above plot in more than three dimensions, I used a little trick which shows that every language has its own typical fingerprint of letter frequencies:

What more?

Beside the fact, that letter frequencies alone, allow us to predict the language of every example text (at least in the 10 languages with latin alphabet we trained for) with almost complete certancy there is even more information hidden in the set of sample texts.

As you might know, most languages in europe belong to either the romanian or the indogermanic language family (which is actually because the romans conquered only half of europe). The border between them could be located in belgium, between france and germany and in swiss. West of this border the romanian languages, which originate from latin, are still spoken, like spanish, portouguese and french. In the middle and northern part of europe the indogermanic languages are very common like german, dutch, swedish ect. If we plot the analysed languages with a different colour sheme this border gets quite clear and allows us to take a look back in history that tells us where our languages originate from:

As you can see the more common letters, especially the vocals like a, e, i, o and u have almost the same frequency in all of this languages. Far more interesting are letters like q, k, c and w: While k is quite common in all of the indogermanic languages it is quite rare in romanic languages because the same sound is written with the letters q or c.
As a result it could be said, that even “boring” sets of data (just give it a try and read all the texts of the protocolls of the EU parliament…) could contain quite interesting patterns which – in this case – allows us to predict quite precisely which language a given text sample is written in, without the need of any translation program or to speak the languages. And as an interesting side effect, where certain things in history happend (or not happend): After two thousand years have passed, modern machine learning techniques could easily uncover this history because even though all these different languages developed, they still have a set of hidden but common patterns that since than stayed the same.

Sentiment Analysis using Python

One of the applications of text mining is sentiment analysis. Most of the data is getting generated in textual format and in the past few years, people are talking more about NLP. Improvement is a continuous process and many product based companies leverage these text mining techniques to examine the sentiments of the customers to find about what they can improve in the product. This information also helps them to understand the trend and demand of the end user which results in Customer satisfaction.

As text mining is a vast concept, the article is divided into two subchapters. The main focus of this article will be calculating two scores: sentiment polarity and subjectivity using python. The range of polarity is from -1 to 1(negative to positive) and will tell us if the text contains positive or negative feedback. Most companies prefer to stop their analysis here but in our second article, we will try to extend our analysis by creating some labels out of these scores. Finally, a multi-label multi-class classifier can be trained to predict future reviews.

Without any delay let’s deep dive into the code and mine some knowledge from textual data.

There are a few NLP libraries existing in Python such as Spacy, NLTK, gensim, TextBlob, etc. For this particular article, we will be using NLTK for pre-processing and TextBlob to calculate sentiment polarity and subjectivity.

The dataset is available here for download and we will be using pandas read_csv function to import the dataset. I would like to share an additional information here which I came to know about recently. Those who have already used python and pandas before they probably know that read_csv is by far one of the most used function. However, it can take a while to upload a big file. Some folks from  RISELab at UC Berkeley created Modin or Pandas on Ray which is a library that speeds up this process by changing a single line of code.

After importing the dataset it is recommended to understand it first and study the structure of the dataset. At this point we are interested to know how many columns are there and what are these columns so I am going to check the shape of the data frame and go through each column name to see if we need them or not.

 

There are so many columns which are not useful for our sentiment analysis and it’s better to remove these columns. There are many ways to do that: either just select the columns which you want to keep or select the columns you want to remove and then use the drop function to remove it from the data frame. I prefer the second option as it allows me to look at each column one more time so I don’t miss any important variable for the analysis.

Now let’s dive deep into the data and try to mine some knowledge from the remaining columns. The first step we would want to follow here is just to look at the distribution of the variables and try to make some notes. First, let’s look at the distribution of the ratings.

Graphs are powerful and at this point, just by looking at the above bar graph we can conclude that most people are somehow satisfied with the products offered at Amazon. The reason I am saying ‘at’ Amazon is because it is just a platform where anyone can sell their products and the user are giving ratings to the product and not to Amazon. However, if the user is satisfied with the products it also means that Amazon has a lower return rate and lower fraud case (from seller side). The job of a Data Scientist relies not only on how good a model is but also on how useful it is for the business and that’s why these business insights are really important.

Data pre-processing for textual variables

Lowercasing

Before we move forward to calculate the sentiment scores for each review it is important to pre-process the textual data. Lowercasing helps in the process of normalization which is an important step to keep the words in a uniform manner (Welbers, et al., 2017, pp. 245-265).

Special characters

Special characters are non-alphabetic and non-numeric values such as {!,@#$%^ *()~;:/<>\|+_-[]?}. Dealing with numbers is straightforward but special characters can be sometimes tricky. During tokenization, special characters create their own tokens and again not helpful for any algorithm, likewise, numbers.

Stopwords

Stop-words being most commonly used in the English language; however, these words have no predictive power in reality. Words such as I, me, myself, he, she, they, our, mine, you, yours etc.

Stemming

Stemming algorithm is very useful in the field of text mining and helps to gain relevant information as it reduces all words with the same roots to a common form by removing suffixes such as -action, ing, -es and -ses. However, there can be problematic where there are spelling errors.

This step is extremely useful for pre-processing textual data but it also depends on your goal. Here our goal is to calculate sentiment scores and if you look closely to the above code words like ‘inexpensive’ and ‘thrilled’ became ‘inexpens’ and ‘thrill’ after applying this technique. This will help us in text classification to deal with the curse of dimensionality but to calculate the sentiment score this process is not useful.

Sentiment Score

It is now time to calculate sentiment scores of each review and check how these scores look like.

As it can be observed there are two scores: the first score is sentiment polarity which tells if the sentiment is positive or negative and the second score is subjectivity score to tell how subjective is the text. The whole code is available here.

In my next article, we will extend this analysis by creating labels based on these scores and finally we will train a classification model.

Dem Wettbewerb voraus mit Künstlicher Intelligenz

Was KI schon heute kann und was bis 2020 auf deutsche Unternehmen zukommt

Künstliche Intelligenz ist für die Menschheit wichtiger als die Erfindung von Elektrizität oder die Beherrschung des Feuers – davon sind der Google-CEO Sundar Pichai und viele weitere Experten überzeugt. Doch was steckt wirklich dahinter? Welche Anwendungsfälle funktionieren schon heute? Und was kommt bis 2020 auf deutsche Unternehmen zu?

Big Data war das Buzzword der vergangenen Jahre und war – trotz mittlerweile etablierter Tools wie SAP Hana, Hadoop und weitere – betriebswirtschaftlich zum Scheitern verurteilt. Denn Big Data ist ein passiver Begriff und löst keinesfalls alltägliche Probleme in den Unternehmen.

Dabei wird völlig verkannt, dass Big Data die Vorstufe für den eigentlichen Problemlöser ist, der gemeinhin als Künstliche Intelligenz (KI) bezeichnet wird. KI ist ein Buzzword, dessen langfristiger Erfolg und Aktivismus selbst von skeptischen Experten nicht infrage gestellt wird. Daten-Ingenieure sprechen im Kontext von KI hier aktuell bevorzugt von Deep Learning; wissenschaftlich betrachtet ein Teilgebiet der KI.

Was KI schon heute kann

Deep Learning Algorithmen laufen bereits heute in Nischen-Anwendungen produktiv, beispielsweise im Bereich der Chatbots oder bei der Suche nach Informationen. Sie übernehmen ferner das Rating für die Kreditwürdigkeit und sperren Finanzkonten, wenn sie erlernte Betrugsmuster erkennen. Im Handel findet Deep Learning bereits die optimalen Einkaufsparameter sowie den besten Verkaufspreis.

Getrieben wird Deep Learning insbesondere durch prestigeträchtige Vorhaben wie das autonome Fahren, dabei werden die vielfältigen Anwendungen im Geschäftsbereich oft vergessen.

Die Grenzen von Deep Learning

Und Big Data ist das Futter für Deep Learning. Daraus resultiert auch die Grenze des Möglichen, denn für strategische Entscheidungen eignet sich KI bestenfalls für das Vorbereitung einer Datengrundlage, aus denen menschliche Entscheider eine Strategie entwickeln. KI wird zumindest in dieser Dekade nur auf operativer Ebene Entscheidungen treffen können, insbesondere in der Disposition, Instandhaltung, Logistik und im Handel auch im Vertrieb – anfänglich jeweils vor allem als Assistenzsystem für die Menschen.

Genau wie das autonome Fahren mit Assistenzsystemen beginnt, wird auch im Unternehmen immer mehr die KI das Steuer übernehmen.

Was sich hinsichtlich KI bis 2020 tun wird

Derzeit stehen wir erst am Anfang der Möglichkeiten, die Künstliche Intelligenz uns bietet. Das Markt-Wachstum für KI-Systeme und auch die Anwendungen erfolgt exponentiell. Entsprechend wird sich auch die Arbeitsweise für KI-Entwickler ändern müssen. Mit etablierten Deep Learning Frameworks, die mehrheitlich aus dem Silicon Valley stammen, zeichnet sich der Trend ab, der für die Zukunft noch weiter professionalisiert werden wird: KI-Frameworks werden Enterprise-fähig und Distributionen dieser Plattformen werden es ermöglichen, dass KI-Anwendungen als universelle Kernintelligenz für das operative Geschäft für fast alle Unternehmen binnen weniger Monate implementierbar sein werden.

Wir können bis 2020 also mit einer Alexa oder Cortana für das Unternehmen rechnen, die Unternehmensprozesse optimiert, Risiken berichtet und alle alltäglichen Fragen des Geschäftsführers beantwortet – in menschlich-verbal formulierten Sätzen.

Der Einsatz von Künstlicher Intelligenz zur Auswertung von Geschäfts- oder Maschinendaten ist auch das Leit-Thema der zweitägigen Data Leader Days 2018 in Berlin. Am 14. November 2018 sprechen renommierte Data Leader über Anwendungsfälle, Erfolge und Chancen mit Geschäfts- und Finanzdaten. Der 15. November 2018 konzentriert sich auf Automotive- und Maschinendaten mit hochrangigen Anwendern aus der produzierenden Industrie und der Automobilzuliefererindustrie. Seien Sie dabei und nutzen Sie die Chance, sich mit führenden KI-Anwendern auszutauschen.

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