Simple RNN

Simple RNN: the first foothold for understanding LSTM

*In this article “Densely Connected Layers” is written as “DCL,” and “Convolutional Neural Network” as “CNN.”

In the last article, I mentioned “When it comes to the structure of RNN, many study materials try to avoid showing that RNNs are also connections of neurons, as well as DCL or CNN.” Even if you manage to understand DCL and CNN, you can be suddenly left behind once you try to understand RNN because it looks like a different field. In the second section of this article, I am going to provide a some helps for more abstract understandings of DCL/CNN , which you need when you read most other study materials.

My explanation on this simple RNN is based on a chapter in a textbook published by Massachusetts Institute of Technology, which is also recommended in some deep learning courses of Stanford University.

First of all, you should keep it in mind that simple RNN are not useful in many cases, mainly because of vanishing/exploding gradient problem, which I am going to explain in the next article. LSTM is one major type of RNN used for tackling those problems. But without clear understanding forward/back propagation of RNN, I think many people would get stuck when they try to understand how LSTM works, especially during its back propagation stage. If you have tried climbing the mountain of understanding LSTM, but found yourself having to retreat back to the foot, I suggest that you read through this article on simple RNNs. It should help you to gain a solid foothold, and you would be ready for trying to climb the mountain again.

*This article is the second article of “A gentle introduction to the tiresome part of understanding RNN.”

1, A brief review on back propagation of DCL.

Simple RNNs are straightforward applications of DCL, but if you do not even have any ideas on DCL forward/back propagation, you will not be able to understand this article. If you more or less understand how back propagation of DCL works, you can skip this first section.

Deep learning is a part of machine learning. And most importantly, whether it is classical machine learning or deep learning, adjusting parameters is what machine learning is all about. Parameters mean elements of functions except for variants. For example when you get a very simple function f(x)=a + bx + cx^2 + dx^3, then x is a variant, and a, b, c, d are parameters. In case of classical machine learning algorithms, the number of those parameters are very limited because they were originally designed manually. Such functions for classical machine learning is useful for features found by humans, after trial and errors(feature engineering is a field of finding such effective features, manually). You adjust those parameters based on how different the outputs(estimated outcome of classification/regression) are from supervising vectors(the data prepared to show ideal answers).

In the last article I said neural networks are just mappings, whose inputs are vectors, matrices, or sequence data. In case of DCLs, inputs are vectors. Then what’s the number of parameters ? The answer depends on the the number of neurons and layers. In the example of DCL at the right side, the number of the connections of the neurons is the number of parameters(Would you like to try to count them? At least I would say “No.”). Unlike classical machine learning you no longer need to do feature engineering, but instead you need to design networks effective for each task and adjust a lot of parameters.

*I think the hype of AI comes from the fact that neural networks find features automatically. But the reality is difficulty of feature engineering was just replaced by difficulty of designing proper neural networks.

It is easy to imagine that you need an efficient way to adjust those parameters, and the method is called back propagation (or just backprop). As long as it is about DCL backprop, you can find a lot of well-made study materials on that, so I am not going to cover that topic precisely in this article series. Simply putting, during back propagation, in order to adjust parameters of a layer you need errors in the next layer. And in order calculate the errors of the next layer, you need errors in the next next layer.

*You should not think too much about what the “errors” exactly mean. Such “errors” are defined in this context, and you will see why you need them if you actually write down all the mathematical equations behind backprops of DCL.

The red arrows in the figure shows how errors of all the neurons in a layer propagate backward to a neuron in last layer. The figure shows only some sets of such errors propagating backward, but in practice you have to think about all the combinations of such red arrows in the whole back propagation(this link would give you some ideas on how DCLs work).

These points are minimum prerequisites for continuing reading this  RNN this article. But if you are planning to understand RNN forward/back propagation at  an abstract/mathematical level that you can read academic papers,  I highly recommend you to actually write down all the equations of DCL backprop. And if possible you should try to implement backprop of three-layer DCL.

2, Forward propagation of simple RNN

*For better understandings of the second and third section, I recommend you to download an animated PowerPoint slide which I prepared. It should help you understand simple RNNs.

In fact the simple RNN which we are going to look at in this article has only three layers. From now on imagine that inputs of RNN come from the bottom and outputs go up. But RNNs have to keep information of earlier times steps during upcoming several time steps because as I mentioned in the last article RNNs are used for sequence data, the order of whose elements is important. In order to do that, information of the neurons in the middle layer of RNN propagate forward to the middle layer itself. Therefore in one time step of forward propagation of RNN, the input at the time step propagates forward as normal DCL, and the RNN gives out an output at the time step. And information of one neuron in the middle layer propagate forward to the other neurons like yellow arrows in the figure. And the information in the next neuron propagate forward to the other neurons, and this process is repeated. This is called recurrent connections of RNN.

*To be exact we are just looking at a type of recurrent connections. For example Elman RNNs have simpler recurrent connections. And recurrent connections of LSTM are more complicated.

Whether it is a simple one or not, basically RNN repeats this process of getting an input at every time step, giving out an output, and making recurrent connections to the RNN itself. But you need to keep the values of activated neurons at every time step, so virtually you need to consider the same RNNs duplicated for several time steps like the figure below. This is the idea of unfolding RNN. Depending on contexts, the whole unfolded DCLs with recurrent connections is also called an RNN.

In many situations, RNNs are simplified as below. If you have read through this article until this point, I bet you gained some better understanding of RNNs, so you should little by little get used to this more abstract, blackboxed  way of showing RNN.

You have seen that you can unfold an RNN, per time step. From now on I am going to show the simple RNN in a simpler way,  based on the MIT textbook which I recomment. The figure below shows how RNN propagate forward during two time steps (t-1), (t).

The input \boldsymbol{x}^{(t-1)}at time step(t-1) propagate forward as a normal DCL, and gives out the output \hat{\boldsymbol{y}} ^{(t)} (The notation on the \boldsymbol{y} ^{(t)} is called “hat,” and it means that the value is an estimated value. Whatever machine learning tasks you work on, the outputs of the functions are just estimations of ideal outcomes. You need to adjust parameters for better estimations. You should always be careful whether it is an actual value or an estimated value in the context of machine learning or statistics). But the most important parts are the middle layers.

*To be exact I should have drawn the middle layers as connections of two layers of neurons like the figure at the right side. But I made my figure closer to the chart in the MIT textbook, and also most other study materials show the combinations of the two neurons before/after activation as one neuron.

\boldsymbol{a}^{(t)} is just linear summations of \boldsymbol{x}^{(t)} (If you do not know what “linear summations” mean, please scroll this page a bit), and \boldsymbol{h}^{(t)} is a combination of activated values of \boldsymbol{a}^{(t)} and linear summations of \boldsymbol{h}^{(t-1)} from the last time step, with recurrent connections. The values of \boldsymbol{h}^{(t)} propagate forward in two ways. One is normal DCL forward propagation to \hat{\boldsymbol{y}} ^{(t)} and \boldsymbol{o}^{(t)}, and the other is recurrent connections to \boldsymbol{h}^{(t+1)} .

These are equations for each step of forward propagation.

  • \boldsymbol{a}^{(t)} = \boldsymbol{b} + \boldsymbol{W} \cdot \boldsymbol{h}^{(t-1)} + \boldsymbol{U} \cdot \boldsymbol{x}^{(t)}
  • \boldsymbol{h}^{(t)}= g(\boldsymbol{a}^{(t)})
  • \boldsymbol{o}^{(t)} = \boldsymbol{c} + \boldsymbol{V} \cdot \boldsymbol{h}^{(t)}
  • \hat{\boldsymbol{y}} ^{(t)} = f(\boldsymbol{o}^{(t)})

*Please forgive me for adding some mathematical equations on this article even though I pledged not to in the first article. You can skip the them, but for some people it is on the contrary more confusing if there are no equations. In case you are allergic to mathematics, I prescribed some treatments below.

*Linear summation is a type of weighted summation of some elements. Concretely, when you have a vector \boldsymbol{x}=(x_0, x_1, x_2), and weights \boldsymbol{w}=(w_0,w_1, w_2), then \boldsymbol{w}^T \cdot \boldsymbol{x} = w_0 \cdot x_0 + w_1 \cdot x_1 +w_2 \cdot x_2 is a linear summation of \boldsymbol{x}, and its weights are \boldsymbol{w}.

*When you see a product of a matrix and a vector, for example a product of \boldsymbol{W} and \boldsymbol{v}, you should clearly make an image of connections between two layers of a neural network. You can also say each element of \boldsymbol{u}} is a linear summations all the elements of \boldsymbol{v}} , and \boldsymbol{W} gives the weights for the summations.

A very important point is that you share the same parameters, in this case \boldsymbol{\theta \in \{\boldsymbol{U}, \boldsymbol{W}, \boldsymbol{b}, \boldsymbol{V}, \boldsymbol{c} \}}, at every time step. 

And you are likely to see this RNN in this blackboxed form.

3, The steps of back propagation of simple RNN

In the last article, I said “I have to say backprop of RNN, especially LSTM (a useful and mainstream type or RNN), is a monster of chain rules.” I did my best to make my PowerPoint on LSTM backprop straightforward. But looking at it again, the LSTM backprop part still looks like an electronic circuit, and it requires some patience from you to understand it. If you want to understand LSTM at a more mathematical level, understanding the flow of simple RNN backprop is indispensable, so I would like you to be patient while understanding this step (and you have to be even more patient while understanding LSTM backprop).

This might be a matter of my literacy, but explanations on RNN backprop are very frustrating for me in the points below.

  • Most explanations just show how to calculate gradients at each time step.
  • Most study materials are visually very poor.
  • Most explanations just emphasize that “errors are back propagating through time,” using tons of arrows, but they lack concrete instructions on how actually you renew parameters with those errors.

If you can relate to the feelings I mentioned above, the instructions from now on could somewhat help you. And with the animated PowerPoint slide I prepared, you would have clear understandings on this topic at a more mathematical level.

Backprop of RNN , as long as you are thinking about simple RNNs, is not so different from that of DCLs. But you have to be careful about the meaning of errors in the context of RNN backprop. Back propagation through time (BPTT) is one of the major methods for RNN backprop, and I am sure most textbooks explain BPTT. But most study materials just emphasize that you need errors from all the time steps, and I think that is very misleading and confusing.

You need all the gradients to adjust parameters, but you do not necessarily need all the errors to calculate those gradients. Gradients in the context of machine learning mean partial derivatives of error functions (in this case J) with respect to certain parameters, and mathematically a gradient of J with respect to \boldsymbol{\theta \in \{\boldsymbol{U}, \boldsymbol{W}, \boldsymbol{b}^{(t)}, \boldsymbol{V}, \boldsymbol{c} \}}is denoted as ( \frac{\partial J}{\partial \boldsymbol{\theta}}  ). And another confusing point in many textbooks, including the MIT one, is that they give an impression that parameters depend on time steps. For example some study materials use notations like \frac{\partial J}{\partial \boldsymbol{\theta}^{(t)}}, and I think this gives an impression that this is a gradient with respect to the parameters at time step (t). In my opinion this gradient rather should be written as ( \frac{\partial J}{\partial \boldsymbol{\theta}} )^{(t)} . But many study materials denote gradients of those errors in the former way, so from now on let me use the notations which you can see in the figures in this article.

In order to calculate the gradient \frac{\partial J}{\partial \boldsymbol{x}^{(t)}} you need errors from time steps s (s \geq t) \quad (as you can see in the figure, in order to calculate a gradient in a colored frame, you need all the errors in the same color).

*To be exact, in the figure above I am supposed prepare much more arrows in \tau + 1 different colors  to show the whole process of RNN backprop, but that is not realistic. In the figure I displayed only the flows of errors necessary for calculating each gradient at time step 0, t, \tau.

*Another confusing point is that the \frac{\partial J}{\partial \boldsymbol{\ast ^{(t)}}}, \boldsymbol{\ast} \in \{\boldsymbol{a}^{(t)}, \boldsymbol{h}^{(t)}, \boldsymbol{o}^{(t)}, \dots \} are correct notations, because \boldsymbol{\ast} are values of neurons after forward propagation. They depend on time steps, and these are very values which I have been calling “errors.” That is why parameters do not depend on time steps, whereas errors depend on time steps.

As I mentioned before, you share the same parameters at every time step. Again, please do not assume that parameters are different from time step to time step. It is gradients/errors (you need errors to calculate gradients) which depend on time step. And after calculating errors at every time step, you can finally adjust parameters one time, and that’s why this is called “back propagation through time.” (It is easy to imagine that this method can be very inefficient. If the input is the whole text on a Wikipedia link, you need to input all the sentences in the Wikipedia text to renew parameters one time. To solve this problem there is a backprop method named “truncated BPTT,” with which you renew parameters based on a part of a text. )

And after calculating those gradients \frac{\partial J}{\partial \boldsymbol{\theta}^{(t)}} you can take a summation of them: \frac{\partial J}{\partial \boldsymbol{\theta}}=\sum_{t=0}^{t=\tau}{\frac{\partial J}{\partial \boldsymbol{\theta}^{(t)}}}. With this gradient \frac{\partial J}{\partial \boldsymbol{\theta}} , you can finally renew the value of \boldsymbol{\theta} one time.

At the beginning of this article I mentioned that simple RNNs are no longer for practical uses, and that comes from exploding/vanishing problem of RNN. This problem was one of the reasons for the AI winter which lasted for some 20 years. In the next article I am going to write about LSTM, a fancier type of RNN, in the context of a history of neural network history.

* I make study materials on machine learning, sponsored by DATANOMIQ. I do my best to make my content as straightforward but as precise as possible. I include all of my reference sources. If you notice any mistakes in my materials, including grammatical errors, please let me know (email: yasuto.tamura@datanomiq.de). And if you have any advice for making my materials more understandable to learners, I would appreciate hearing it.

Simple RNN

A gentle introduction to the tiresome part of understanding RNN

Just as a normal conversation in a random pub or bar in Berlin, people often ask me “Which language do you use?” I always answer “LaTeX and PowerPoint.”

I have been doing an internship at DATANOMIQ and trying to make straightforward but precise study materials on deep learning. I myself started learning machine learning in April of 2019, and I have been self-studying during this one-year-vacation of mine in Berlin.

Many study materials give good explanations on densely connected layers or convolutional neural networks (CNNs). But when it comes to back propagation of CNN and recurrent neural networks (RNNs), I think there’s much room for improvement to make the topic understandable to learners.

Many study materials avoid the points I want to understand, and that was as frustrating to me as listening to answers to questions in the Japanese Diet, or listening to speeches from the current Japanese minister of the environment. With the slightest common sense, you would always get the feeling “How?” after reading an RNN chapter in any book.

This blog series focuses on the introductory level of recurrent neural networks. By “introductory”, I mean prerequisites for a better and more mathematical understanding of RNN algorithms.

I am going to keep these posts as visual as possible, avoiding equations, but I am also going to attach some links to check more precise mathematical explanations.

This blog series is composed of five contents.:

  1. Prerequisites for understanding RNN at a more mathematical level
  2. Simple RNN: the first foothold for understanding LSTM
  3. LSTM: “A New Hope in AI Winter” (to be published soon)
  4. LSTM and its forward propagation (to be published soon)
  5. LSTM and Its back propagation (to be published soon)

 

Matrix search: Finding the blocks of neighboring fields in a matrix with Python

Task

In this article we will look at a solution in python to the following grid search task:

Find the biggest block of adjoining elements of the same kind and into how many blocks the matrix is divided. As adjoining blocks, we will consider field touching by the sides and not the corners.

Input data

For the ease of the explanation, we will be looking at a simple 3×4 matrix with elements of three different kinds, 0, 1 and 2 (see above). To test the code, we will simulate data to achieve different matrix sizes and a varied number of element types. It will also allow testing edge cases like, where all elements are the same or all elements are different.

To simulate some test data for later, we can use the numpy randint() method:

The code

How the code works

In summary, the algorithm loops through all fields of the matrix looking for unseen fields that will serve as a starting point for a local exploration of each block of color – the find_blocks() function. The local exploration is done by looking at the neighboring fields and if they are within the same kind, moving to them to explore further fields – the explore_block() function. The fields that have already been seen and counted are stored in the visited list.

find_blocks() function:

  1. Finds a starting point of a new block
  2. Runs a the explore_block() function for local exploration of the block
  3. Appends the size of the explored block
  4. Updates the list of visited points
  5. Returns the result, once all fields of the matrix have been visited.

explore_block() function:

  1. Takes the coordinates of the starting field for a new block and the list of visited points
  2. Creates the queue set with the starting point
  3. Sets the size of the current block (field_count) to 1
  4. Starts a while loop that is executed for as long as the queue is not empty
    1. Takes an element of the queue and uses its coordinates as the current location for further exploration
    2. Adds the current field to the visited list
    3. Explores the neighboring fields and if they belong to the same block, they are added to the queue
    4. The fields are taken off the queue for further exploration one by one until the queue is empty
  5. Returns the field_count of the explored block and the updated list of visited fields

Execute the function

The returned result is biggest block: 4, number of blocks: 4.

Run the test matrices:

Visualization

The matrices for the article were visualized with the seaborn heatmap() method.

Programmierung für OttoNormalVerbraucher

Facebook und Co. arbeiten daran Nachrichten so aufzubereiten, dass sie emotional noch mehr ansprechen, als ob die gesellschaftliche Situation nicht schon aufgeheizt genug ist. Wir arbeiten daran dem Endnutzer Werkzeuge bereitzustellen um seine rationale Urteilskraft mit Hilfe des Computers zu stärken. Dafür benötigt man möglichst einfache aber dennoch leistungsstarke Programmiersprachen und umfangreiche, vertrauenswürdige, öffentlich zugängliche Informationen in Form von vielgestaltigen großen Tabellen und Dokumenten ähnlich der Wikipedia. 

Auch wenn die entwickelte Sprache so einfach wie möglich ist, wird sie im Gegensatz zum Facebookansatz einen gewissen Lernaufwand erfordern. 

Eine solche Programmiersprache in Kombination mit vertrauensvollen Daten könnte ein großer Schritt in Richtung einer weiteren Demokratisierung der Gesellschaft werden. Viele Falschnachrichten könnten leicht von jedermann durch entsprechende Fakten oder statistischen Auswertungen paralysiert werden. 

Vielleicht kann man die Schaffung einer solchen Programmiersprache mit der Schaffung des ersten Alphabets durch die Phönizier oder der Schaffung des ersten Alphabets mit Vokalen durch die Griechen vergleichen. Hätten diese Völker solche Leistungen vollbringen können ohne diese Voraussetzungen. Ich vermute ohne dieses Alphabet hätte es keine griechische Wissenschaft und Kultur gegeben; vielleicht auch keine griechische Demokratie.  

Entwurfskriterien für eine solche Sprache:

  1. Eine mathematische Fundierung ist erforderlich.
  2. Methodisch-didaktische und pragmatische Fragen stehen zunächst vor Effizienzproblemen.
  3. Kurze, lesbare Programme; die wichtigsten Schlüsselworte sollten kurz sein
  4. Einfache, unstrukturierte Programme; Schleifen und allgemeine Rekursionen führen häufig zu schwer lesbaren und schwer änderbaren Programmen; 
  5. Universelle Anwendbarkeit; sie muss nicht nur für Relationen (flache einfache Tabellen) sondern auch für strukturierte Tabellen und Dokumente nutzbar sein; sie muss nicht nur für Anfragen an die wichtigsten Systeme sondern auch für vielfältige Berechnungen geeignet sein
  6. Um im Schulunterricht einsetzbar zu sein, muss sie die verschiedenen mathematische Teilgebiete unterstützen, sowie Nutzen für die anderen Fächer bieten
  7. Sie sollte so mächtig sein, dass sie andere Systeme und Sprachen wie Tabellenkalkulation und SQL ersetzen kann. 
  8. Aus Endnutzersicht darf es nur ein einheitliches System mit einheitlicher Syntax (Schreibweise) für die Verarbeitung von Massendaten geben, genau wie die Operationen der Einzeldatenverarbeitung (+ – * : sin) standardisiert sind. 

 

Einführung in o++o: 

A. Merkel „Jeder Schüler soll neben lesen, rechnen und schreiben auch programmieren können.“ 

o++o (ausführlich ottoPS) ist eine tabellenorientierte Programmiersprache mit funktionalen Möglichkeiten, die auf Schleifen verzichtet. Dennoch ist o++o sehr ausdrucksstark und man kann mit ihr nicht nur kompakte Anfragen sondern auch vielfältige Berechnungen für strukturierte Tabellen und strukturierte Dokumente bewerkstelligen.

o++o benutzt viele mathematische Konzepte, daher sehen wir die Hauptvorteile der Vermittlung im Mathematikunterricht, genau wie die wesentlichen Fähigkeiten für die Nutzung des Taschenrechners in Mathematik vermittelt werden. o++o verwendet insbesondere folgende Konzepte: Kollektion (Menge, Multimenge, Liste); Gleichheit und Inklusionsbeziehungen dieser; Tupel; leistungsfähige Operationen zum Selektieren; Berechnen; Restrukturieren; Sortieren und Aggregieren (Summe; Durchschnitt; …),… .

Tabellenkalkulationsprogramme wie EXCEL und die Datenbankstandardabfragesprache SQL kennen keine strukturierten Schemen und Tabellen. Erste Tests mit Vorschulkindern lassen vermuten, dass man mit strukturierten Tabellen leichter rechnen kann als mit Dezimalzahlen. Wir wollen einige o++o-Beispielprogramme anfügen:

1. Berechne den Wert eines einfachen Terms.

2*3+4

* und + haben jeweils 2 Inputwerte. Zunächst wird 2*3 (6) berechnet. Die 6 ist erster Inputwert von +, so dass sich insgesamt 24 ergibt. Hier wird also einfach von links nach rechts gerechnet.

 

2. Schreibe den Term cos³(sin²(3.14159)) in o++o.

pi sin hoch 2 cos hoch 3

 

Unserer Meinung nach ist der Ausgangsterm für Otto Normalverbraucher schwer zu lesen. Man beginnt mit pi geht nach links bis zum sin dann nach rechts zum hoch 2 jetzt bewegt man sich wieder nach links zum cos und abschließend nach rechts zum hoch 3. Diese Schreibweise wurde sicher eingeführt um Klammern zu sparen. Eigentlich müsste der Ausgangsterm um unmissverständlich zu sein, folgendes Aussehen haben: 

(cos((sin(3.14159))²))³ 

Das ist sicher noch schwerer zu lesen und man bewegt sich noch mehr von links nach rechts und umgekehrt. 

 

3. Schreibe den Term sin²(x)+cos³(y)  in o++o.

X sin hoch 2 + (Y cos hoch 3) 

oder 

X sin hoch 2

+ Y cos hoch 3

Man könnte alle Terme in o++o ohne Klammern schreiben, allerdings müssten dann bestimmte Terme mehrzeilig geschrieben werden.  

 

4. Wie berechnet man den Term 2+3:4*5 ?

2+(3:(4*5))=2 3/20

2+((3:4)*5)=5 ¾

o++o: ((2+3):4)*5=6 1/4

 

Man erkennt, dass man mit der Schulweisheit Punktrechnung geht vor Strichrechnung noch nicht auskommt. Man benötigt die Regel „von links nach rechts“ zusätzlich.

 

5. Berechne den Durchschnitt mehrerer Noten.

1 2 3 1 2 ++:

 

Vom methodischen Standpunkt kann man dieses Programm noch verbessern, indem man die Klammern für Listen hinzufügt: [1 2 3 1 2] ++:

Man erkennt jetzt, dass die Durchschnittsoperation ++: einen Inputwert, nämlich eine Liste besitzt und dass ++: diesem einen Inputwert nachgestellt wird. Da die Nutzer in der Regel nicht viel tippen wollen, gehen wir davon aus, dass die erste Notation in Praxis häufiger benutzt werden wird.

 

6. Berechne die Durchschnitte einer strukturierten Tabelle noten.tab für jedes Fach.

noten.tab

DUR:=NOTEl ++:

noten.tab könnte so aussehen:

FACH,NOTEl l
Ma       1 2 1 3 1 2
Phy      4 3 2 2 1

 

Hierbei kürzt l Liste ab. D.h., noten.tab ist eine einfache strukturierte Tabelle (Liste), die zu jedem Fach eine Liste von Noten enthält. Um Platz zu sparen, wählen wir auch hier die methodisch nicht optimale Darstellung. Wie FACH ist auch NOTE ein Spaltenname, so dass noten.tab eigentlich so dargestellt werden müsste:

FACH,NOTEl l

Ma       1 2 1 3 1 2
Phy      4 3 2 2 1

 

Das Ergebnis der Anfrage wieder im „tab-Format“:

FACH, DUR, NOTEl l
Ma 1.66666666667 1 2 1 3 1 2
Phy 2.4 4 3 2 2 1

7. Bilde die Summe der Zahlen von 1 bis 100 (Aufgabe von Gauß Klasse 5).

1 .. 100 ++

Wie die Addition und die Multiplikation besitzt  .. zwei Inputwerte (1 und 100). Als Zwischenergebnis entsteht die Liste

ZAHLl
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43
44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63
64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83
84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100

,deren Zahlen dann aufsummiert werden, so dass sich 5050 ergibt. 

 

8. Berechne näherungsweise das Maximum der Sinus-Funktion im Intervall [1 2].

1 … 2!0.001 sin max 

… benötigt 3 Inputwerte: 1. den Anfangswert 1, den Endwert 2 und die Schrittweite 0.001. Es entstehen hierbei die Zahlen 1 1.001 1.002 1.003 …1.999 2.

Auf jede der Zahlen wird die Sinusfunktion angewandt, sodass wieder 1001 Zahlen entstehen. Auf diese Liste wird dann die Funktion max (Maximum) angewandt. Obwohl es sich hierbei um ein Näherungsverfahren handelt, kommt der exakte Wert 1 heraus, wenn die Schrittweite weiter verfeinert wird. sin und max haben jeweils einen Inputwert (hier eine Liste) aber der Outputwert von sin ist wieder eine Liste und max erzeugt lediglich eine Zahl, da es sich hier um eine Aggregationsfunktion handelt. Der zweite und der dritte Inputwert einer dreistelligen Operation (oben  …) wird jeweils durch ein „!“ getrennt. Das ist in o++o nötig, da das Komma für die Paarbildung bereits vergeben ist und das Leerzeichen bereits Listenelemente trennt. 

 

9. Berechne näherungsweise das Minimum des Polynoms X³ + 4 X² -3 X+2 im Intervall [0 2] mit zugehörigem X-Wert.

[X! 0 … 2!0.001] 

Y:= X polynom [1 4 -3 2] 

MINI:= Yl min

avec Y = MINI

avec ist französisch und bezeichnet eine Selektion. Ein konkretes Polynom von einer Variablen X  hat stets nur einen Inputwert, der für X eingesetzt wird. polynom in Zeile 2 ist dagegen allgemeiner und hat 2 Inputwerte: 

  1. Den Inputwert für X, der hier alle Zahlen, die in der ersten Zeile generiert wurden, annimmt.
  2. Eine Liste von Zahlen, die den Koeffizienten des konkreten Polynoms entspricht.

Durch die ersten Zeile entsteht eine Liste von Zahlen, die alle den Namen X bekommen haben. Das erkennt man am besten in der xml bzw. ment-Repräsentation:

<X>0.</X>

<X>0.001</X>

<X>0.002</X>

Gesamtergebnis:
MINI,             (X, Y     l)

1.481482037 0.333 1.481482037

10. Berechne eine Nullstelle der Cosinus Funktion im Intervall [1 2] näherungsweise.

[X! 1 … 2!0.0001]

avec X cos < 0

avec X pos = 1  

Hier verbleiben nach der ersten Selektion nur die X-Werte mit Funktionswert kleiner 0. Von diesen wird im zweiten Schritt der erste Wert ausgewählt. Da wir wissen, dass cos nur eine Nullstelle im betrachteten Intervall besitzt, wird diese durch das Ergebnis angenähert. pos kürzt Position ab, so dass das erste Paar der verbliebenen Paare selektiert wird. 

11. Berechne das Gesamtwachstum, wenn 5 Jahreswachstumszahlen gegeben sind. Runde das Ergebnis auf eine Stelle nach dem Komma.

[W! 0 1.5 2.1 1.3 0.4 1.2]

ACCU:= first 100. next ACCU pred *(W:100+1) at W

rnd 1

Die Ergebnistabelle:

[W! 0 1.5 2.1 1.3 0.4 1.2]
ACCU:= first 100. next ACCU pred *(W:100+1) at W
rnd 1
Die Ergebnistabelle:
W, ACCU l
0. 100.
1.5 101.5
2.1 103.6
1.3 105.
0.4 105.4
1.2 106.7

Der erste ACCU-Wert ergibt sich durch den Ausdruck hinter first (100.). Für den zweiten Wert wird für ACCU pred der Wert 100. eingesetzt und der Term nach next bewertet. Es ergibt sich 101.5. Diese Zahl wird wieder in ACCU pred eingesetzt und der next-Term erneut berechnet (rund 103.6),…  bis der letzte W-Wert erreicht ist. pred ist der predecessor (Vorgänger).

 

12. Berechne die Fläche unter der Sinuskurve im Intervall [0, pi] näherungsweise.

0 … pi!0.0001 sin * 0.0001 ++

Hierbei werden nacheinander alle Zahlen zwischen 0 und pi generiert, dann von jeder Zahl der Sinus berechnet und anschließend jede Zahl mit 0.0001 multipliziert. Es entstehen 31415 Rechteckflächen, die abschließend addiert werden.

 

13. Berechne den DurchschnittsBMI pro Alter und den BMI pro Person und Alter für alle Personen über 20.

<TAB!
NAME, LAENGE, (ALTER, GEWICHT l) l
Klaus        1.68     18      61     30     65     56     80
Rolf           1.78      40     72
Kathi         1.70       18      55     40     70
Walleri     1.00      3      16
Viktoria   1.61      13      51
Bert          1.72      18      66     30     70
!TAB>

avec NAME! 20&lt;ALTER
BMI:= GEWICHT : LAENGE : LAENGE
gib ALTER,BMIAVG,(NAME,BMI m) m BMIAVG:= BMI ! ++:
rnd 2 #rundet alle Zahlen der Tabelle auf 2 Stellen nach dem Punkt

Die TAB-Klammern deuten an, dass die eingeschlossenen Daten der TAB-Darstellung entsprechen. 

Die obige Bedingung selektiert Personen-Sätze, d.h. NAME,LAENGE,(ALTER,GEWICHT l) Tupel (strukturierte Tupel bzw. Strupel). Da eine Personen mehrere ALTER-Angaben besitzt, muss quantifiziert werden. NAME! 20 <ALTER selektiert demnach alle Personen, die einen entsprechenden Alterseintrag besitzen. D.h., der Existenzquantor wird nicht geschrieben, gehört aber zu jeder Bedingung.  In diesem kleinen Beispiel könnte man die Selektion natürlich auch per Hand realisieren.

Resultat:

ALTER, BMIAVG, (NAME, BMI  m) m

18     20.98   Bert 22.31

                       Kathi 19.03

                       Klaus 21.61

30     23.35   Bert 23.66

                       Klaus 23.03

40     23.47   Kathi 24.22

                       Rolf  22.72

56     28.34   Klaus 28.34

Das Endergebnis kann beispielsweise durch einfaches Klicken als Säulendiagramm dargestellt werden. Das Beispiel zeigt, dass man eine Hierarchie einfach durch Angabe des gewünschten Schemas umkehren kann. Im Ergebnis ist der Name dem Alter untergeordnet.

 Es wird insbesondere deutlich, dass die Aufgaben ohne Kenntnisse der Differential- und Integral-rechnung gelöst werden können. Mit o++o kann der Mathematikunterricht in vielfältiger Weise unterstützt werden. Das reicht von Klasse 7 oder tiefer bis zur Klassenstufe 12. Es betrifft: Rechnen mit natürlichen Zahlen, Dezimalzahlen, näherungsweise Berechnung von Nullstellen beliebiger Funktionen, Ableitung, Flächen unter Kurven, Extremwerte (kann wahrscheinlich bereits in der Sekundarschule gelehrt werden), Wahrscheinlichkeitsrechnung, … . Mit o++o können Dinge in einfacher Weise berechnet werden, die sonst nur theoretisch abgehandelt werden. Dadurch kann das Verständnis der Konzepte wesentlich verbessert, erweitert und vertieft werden. Weitere Informationen zu o++o finden Sie unter ottops.de (Z.B. „o++o auf 8 Seiten“ ist eine kurze Einführung).

Wir glauben, dass o++o besondere Vorteile für den Mathematik- und Informatikunterricht bietet aber auch in den anderen Fächern sinnvoll genutzt werden kann.

Simple Linear Regression: Mathematics explained with implementation in numpy

Simple Linear Regression

Being in the field of data science, we all are familiar with at least some of the measures shown in figure 1.1 (generated in python using statsmodels). But do we really understand how these measures are being calculated? or what is the math behind these measures? In this article, I hope that I can answer these questions for you. This article will start from the fundamentals of simple linear regression but by the end of this article, you will get an idea of how to program this in numpy (python library).

 

Fig. 1.1

Simple linear regression is a very simple approach for supervised learning where we are trying to predict a quantitative response Y based on the basis of only one variable x. Here x is an independent variable and Y is our dependent variable. Assuming that there is a linear relationship between our independent and dependent variable we can represent this relationship as:

 

Y = mx+c

 

where m and c are two unknown constants that represent the slope and the intercept of our linear model. Together, these constants are also known as parameters or coefficients. If you want to visualize these parameters see figure 1.2.

Fig. 1.2

Please note that we can only calculate the estimates of these parameters thus we have to rewrite our linear equation like:

 

\widehat{y} = \widehat{m}x + \widehat{c}

 

 

here y-hat represents a prediction of Y (actual value) based on x. Once we have found the estimates of these parameters, the equation can be used to predict the future value of Y provided a new/test value of x.

How to find the estimate of these parameters?

Let’s assume we have ‘n’ observations and for each independent variable value we have a value for dependent variable like this:

(x1,y1), (x2,y2),……,(xn,yn). Our goal is to find the best values of these parameters so the line in fig 1.1 should be as close as possible to the data points and we will be using the most common approach of Ordinary least squares to do that.  This best fit is found by minimizing the residual sum of squared errors which can be calculated as below:

 

RSS = {(y_1-\widehat{y1}})^2+{(y_2-\widehat{y2}})^2 +…..+{(y_n-\widehat{yn}})^2

 

 

or

RSS = {(y_1-\widehat{c}-{\widehat m_1x_1})}^2+ {(y_2-\widehat{c}-{\widehat m_1x_2})}^2 +…..+{(y_n-\widehat{c}-{\widehat m_1x_n})}^2

 

 

where

m_1 = \frac{\sum_i^n (x_i-\bar x)(y_i-\bar y)}{\sum_i^n (x_i-\bar x)^{2}}

 

 

and

\widehat{c} = \bar y - \widehat{m_1} \bar x

 

 

Measures to evaluate our regression model

We can use two measures to evaluate our simple linear regression model:

Residual Standard Error (RSE)

According to the book An Introduction to Statistical Learning with Applications in R (James, et al., 2013, pp. 68-71) explains RSE as an estimate of the standard deviation of the error ϵ and can be calculated as:

 

RSE = \sqrt{\frac{1}{n-2}\sum_i^n(y_i-\widehat y_i)^2}

 

 

R square

It is not always clear what is a good score for RSE so we use R square as an alternative to measuring the performance of our model. Please note that there are other measures also which we will discuss in my next article about multiple linear regression. We will also cover the difference between the R square and adjusted R square. The formula for R square can be seen below.

 

R^2 =1- \frac{\sum_i^n(y_i-\widehat y_i)^2}{(y_i-\bar y)^2}

 

Now that we have covered the theoretical part of simple linear regression, let’s write these formulas in python (numpy).

 

Python implementation

To implement this in python first we need a dataset on which we can work on. The dataset that we are going to use in this article is Advertising data and can be downloaded from here. Before we start the analysis we will use pandas library to load the dataset as a dataframe (see code below).

**Please check your path of the advertising file.

To show the first five rows of the dataset use df.head() and you will see output like this:

 

Let me try to explain what are we have to do here, we have the dataset of an ad company which has three different advertising channels TV, radio and newspaper. This company regularly invests in these channels and track their sales over time. However, the time variable is not present in this csv file. Anyway, this company wants to know how much sales will be impacted if they spent a certain amount on any of their advertising channels. As this is the case for simple linear regression we will be using only one predictor TV to fit our model. From here we will go step by step.

Step 1: Define the dependent and independent variable

Step 2: Define a function to find the slope (m)

So, when we applied the function in our current dataset we got a slope of 0.0475.

Step 3: Define a function to find the intercept (c)

and an intercept of 7.0325

Once we have the values for slope and intercept, it is now time to define functions to calculate the residual sum of squares (RSS) and the metrics we will use to evaluate our linear model i.e. residual standard error (RSE) and R-square.

Step 4: Define a function to find residual sum of squares (RSS)

As we discussed in the theory section that it is very hard to evaluate a model based on RSS as we can never generalize the thresholds for RSS and hence we need to settle for other measures.

Step 5: Define a function to calculate residual standard error (RSE)

Step 6: Define a function to find R-square

Here, we see that R-square offers an advantage over RSE as it always lies between 0 and 1, which makes it easier to evaluate our linear model. If you want to understand more about what constitutes a good measure of R-square you can read the explanation given in the book An introduction to statistical learning (mentioned this above also).

The final step now would be to define a function which can be used to predict our sales on the amount of budget spend on TV.

Now, let’s say if the advertising budget for TV is 1500 USD, what would be their sales?

Our linear model predicted that if the ad company would spend 1500 USD they will see an increase of 78 units. If you want to go through the whole code you can find the jupyter notebook here. In this notebook, I have also made a class wrapper at the end of this linear model. It will be really hard to explain the whole logic why I did it here, so I will keep that for another post.In the next article, I will explain the mathematics behind Multiple Linear Regression and how we can implement that in python. Please let me know if you have any question in the comments section. Thank you for reading !!

Fehler-Rückführung mit der Backpropagation

Dies ist Artikel 4 von 6 der Artikelserie –Einstieg in Deep Learning.

Das Gradienten(abstiegs)verfahren ist der Schlüssel zum Training einzelner Neuronen bzw. deren Gewichtungen zu den Neuronen der vorherigen Schicht. Wer dieses Prinzip verstanden hat, hat bereits die halbe Miete zum Verständnis des Trainings von künstlichen neuronalen Netzen.

Der Gradientenabstieg wird häufig fälschlicherweise mit der Backpropagation gleichgesetzt, jedoch ist das nicht ganz richtig, denn die Backpropagation ist mehr als die Anwendung des Gradientenabstiegs.

Bevor wir die Backpropagation erläutern, nochmal kurz zurück zur Forward-Propagation, die die eigentliche Prädiktion über ein künstliches neuronales Netz darstellt:

Forward-Propagation

Abbildung 1: Ein simples kleines künstliches neuronales Netz mit zwei Schichten (+ Eingabeschicht) und zwei Neuronen pro Schicht.

In einem kleinen künstlichen neuronalen Netz, wie es in der Abbildung 1 dargestellt ist, und das alle Neuronen über die Sigmoid-Funktion aktiviert, wird jedes Neuron eine Nettoeingabe z berechnen…

z = w^{T} \cdot x

… und diese Nettoeingabe in die Sigmoid-Funktion einspeisen…

\phi(z) = sigmoid(z) = \frac{1}{1 + e^{-z}}

… die dann das einzelne Neuron aktiviert. Die Aktivierung erfolgt also in der mittleren Schicht (N-Schicht) wie folgt:

N_{j} = \frac{1}{1 + e^{- \sum (w_{ij} \cdot x_{i}) }}

Die beiden Aktivierungsausgaben N werden dann als Berechnungsgrundlage für die Ausgaben der Ausgabeschicht o verwendet. Auch die Ausgabe-Neuronen berechnen ihre jeweilige Nettoeingabe z und aktivieren über Sigmoid(z).

Ausgabe eines Ausgabeknotens als Funktion der Eingänge und der Verknüpfungsgewichte für ein dreischichtiges neuronales Netz, mit nur zwei Knoten je Schicht, kann also wie folgt zusammen gefasst werden:

O_{k} = \frac{1}{1 + e^{- \sum (w_{jk} \cdot \frac{1}{1 + e^{- \sum (w_{ij} \cdot x_{i}) }}) }}

Abbildung 2: Forward-Propagation. Aktivierung via Sigmoid-Funktion.

Sollte dies die erste Forward-Propagation gewesen sein, wird der Output noch nicht auf den Input abgestimmt sein. Diese Abstimmung erfolgt in Form der Gewichtsanpassung im Training des neuronalen Netzes, über die zuvor erwähnte Gradientenmethode. Die Gradientenmethode ist jedoch von einem Fehler abhängig. Diesen Fehler zu bestimmen und durch das Netz zurück zu führen, das ist die Backpropagation.

Back-Propagation

Um die Gewichte entgegen des Fehlers anpassen zu können, benötigen wir einen möglichst exakten Fehler als Eingabe. Der Fehler berechnet sich an der Ausgabeschicht über eine Fehlerfunktion (Loss Function), beispielsweise über den MSE (Mean Squared Error) oder über die sogenannte Kreuzentropie (Cross Entropy). Lassen wir es in diesem Beispiel einfach bei einem simplen Vergleich zwischen dem realen Wert (Sollwert o_{real}) und der Prädiktion (Ausgabe o) bleiben:

e_{o} = o_{real} - o

Der Fehler e ist also einfach der Unterschied zwischen dem Ziel-Wert und der Prädiktion. Jedes Training ist eine Wiederholung von Prädiktion (Forward) und Gewichtsanpassung (Back). Im ersten Schritt werden üblicherweise die Gewichtungen zufällig gesetzt, jede Gewichtung unterschiedlich nach Zufallszahl. So ist die Wahrscheinlichkeit, gleich zu Beginn die “richtigen” Gewichtungen gefunden zu haben auch bei kleinen neuronalen Netzen verschwindend gering. Der Fehler wird also groß sein und kann über den Gradientenabstieg durch Gewichtsanpassung verkleinert werden.

In diesem Beispiel berechnen wir die Fehler e_{1} und e_{2} und passen danach die Gewichte w_{j,k} (w_{1,1} & w_{2,1} und w_{1,2} & w_{2,2}) der Schicht zwischen dem Hidden-Layer N und dem Output-Layer o an.

Abbildung 3: Anpassung der Gewichtungen basierend auf dem Fehler in der Ausgabe-Schicht.

Die Frage ist nun, wie die Gewichte zwischen dem Input-Layer X und dem Hidden-Layer N anzupassen sind. Es stellt sich die Frage, welchen Einfluss diese auf die Fehler in der Ausgabe-Schicht haben?

Um diese Gewichtungen anpassen zu können, benötigen wir den Fehler-Anteil der beiden Neuronen N_{1} und N_{2}. Dieser Anteil am Fehler der jeweiligen Neuronen ergibt sich direkt aus den Gewichtungen w_{j,k} zum Output-Layer:

e_{N_{1}} = e_{o1} \cdot \frac{w_{1,1}}{w_{1,1} + w_{1,2}} + e_{o2} \cdot \frac{w_{1,2}}{w_{1,1} + w_{1,2}}

e_{N_{2}} = e_{o1} \cdot \frac{w_{2,1}}{w_{2,1} + w_{2,2}} + e_{o2} \cdot \frac{w_{2,2}}{w_{2,1} + w_{2,2}}

Wenn man das nun generalisiert:

    \[ e_{N} = \left(\begin{array}{rr} \frac{w_{1,1}}{w_{1,1} + w_{1,2}} & \frac{w_{1,2}}{w_{1,1} + w_{1,2}} \\ \frac{w_{2,1}}{w_{2,1} + w_{2,2}} & \frac{w_{2,2}}{w_{2,1} + w_{2,2}} \end{array}\right) \cdot \left(\begin{array}{c} e_{1} \\ e_{2} \end{array}\right) \qquad \]

Dabei ist es recht aufwändig, die Gewichtungen stets ins Verhältnis zu setzen. Diese Berechnung können wir verkürzen, indem ganz einfach direkt nur die Gewichtungen ohne Relativierung zur Kalkulation des Fehleranteils benutzt werden. Die Relationen bleiben dabei erhalten!

    \[ e_{N} = \left(\begin{array}{rr} w_{1,1} & w_{1,2} \\ w_{2,1} & w_{2,2} \end{array}\right) \cdot \left(\begin{array}{c} e_{1} \\ e_{2} \end{array}\right) \qquad \]

Oder folglich in Kurzform: e_{N} = w^{T} \cdot e_{o}

Abbildung 4: Vollständige Gewichtsanpassung auf Basis der Fehler in der Ausgabeschicht und der Fehleranteile in der verborgenden Schicht.

Und nun können, basierend auf den Fehleranteilen der verborgenden Schicht N, die Gewichtungen w_{i,j} zwischen der Eingabe-Schicht I und der verborgenden Schicht N angepasst werden, entgegen dieser Fehler e_{N}.

Die Backpropagation besteht demnach aus zwei Schritten:

  1. Fehler-Berechnung durch Abgleich der Soll-Werte mit den Prädiktionen in der Ausgabeschicht und durch Fehler-Rückführung zu den Neuronen der verborgenden Schichten (Hidden-Layer)
  2. Anpassung der Gewichte entgegen des Gradientenanstiegs der Fehlerfunktion (Loss Function)

Buchempfehlungen

Die folgenden zwei Bücher haben mir sehr beim Verständnis und beim Verständlichmachen der Backpropagation in künstlichen neuronalen Netzen geholfen.

Neuronale Netze selbst programmieren: Ein verständlicher Einstieg mit Python Deep Learning. Das umfassende Handbuch: Grundlagen, aktuelle Verfahren und Algorithmen, neue Forschungsansätze (mitp Professional)

Training eines Neurons mit dem Gradientenverfahren

Dies ist Artikel 3 von 6 der Artikelserie –Einstieg in Deep Learning.

Das Training von neuronalen Netzen erfolgt nach der Forward-Propagation über zwei Schritte:

  1. Fehler-Rückführung über aller aktiver Neuronen aller Netz-Schichten, so dass jedes Neuron “seinen” Einfluss auf den Ausgabefehler kennt.
  2. Anpassung der Gewichte entgegen den Gradienten der Fehlerfunktion

Beide Schritte werden in der Regel zusammen als Backpropagation bezeichnet. Machen wir erstmal einen Schritt vor und betrachten wir, wie ein Neuron seine Gewichtsverbindungen zu seinen Vorgängern anpasst.

Gradientenabstiegsverfahren

Der Gradientenabstieg ist ein generalisierbarer Algorithmus zur Optimierung, der in vielen Verfahren des maschinellen Lernens zur Anwendung kommt, jedoch ganz besonders als sogenannte Backpropagation im Deep Learning den Erfolg der künstlichen neuronalen Netze erst möglich machen konnte.

Der Gradientenabstieg lässt sich vom Prinzip her leicht erklären: Angenommen, man stünde im Gebirge im dichten Nebel. Das Tal, und somit der Weg nach Hause, ist vom Nebel verdeckt. Wohin laufen wir? Wir können das Ziel zwar nicht sehen, tasten uns jedoch so heran, dass unser Gehirn den Gradienten (den Unterschied der Höhen beider Füße) berechnet, somit die Steigung des Bodens kennt und sich entgegen dieser Steigung unser Weg fortsetzt.

Konkret funktioniert der Gradientenabstieg so: Wir starten bei einem zufälligen Theta \theta (Random Initialization). Wir berechnen die Ausgabe (Forwardpropogation) und vergleichen sie über eine Verlustfunktion (z. B. über die Funktion Mean Squared Error) mit dem tatsächlich korrekten Wert. Auf Grund der zufälligen Initialisierung haben wir eine nahe zu garantierte Falschheit der Ergebnisse und somit einen Verlust. Für die Verlustfunktion berechnen wir den Gradienten für gegebene Eingabewerte. Voraussetzung dafür ist, dass die Funktion ableitbar ist. Wir bewegen uns entgegen des Gradienten in Richtung Minimum der Verlustfunktion. Ist dieses Minimum (fast) gefunden, spricht man auch davon, dass der Lernalgorithmus konvergiert.

Das Gradientenabstiegsverfahren ist eine Möglichkeit der Gradientenverfahren, denn wollten wir maximieren, würden wir uns entlang des Gradienten bewegen, was in anderen Anwendungen sinnvoll ist.

Ob als “Cost Function” oder als “Loss Function” bezeichnet, in jedem Fall ist es eine “Error Function”, aber auf die Benennung kommen wir später zu sprechen. Jedenfalls versuchen wir die Fehlerrate zu senken! Leider sind diese Funktionen in der Praxis selten so einfach konvex (zwei Berge mit einem Tal dazwischen).

 

Aber Achtung: Denn befinden wir uns nur zwischen zwei Bergen, finden wir das Tal mit Sicherheit über den Gradienten. Befinden wir uns jedoch in einem richtigen Gebirge mit vielen Bergen und Tälern, gilt es, das richtige Tal zu finden. Bei der Optimierung der Gewichtungen von künstlichen neuronalen Netzen wollen wir die besten Gewichtungen finden, die uns zu den geringsten Ausgaben der Verlustfunktion führen. Wir suchen also das globale Minimum unter den vielen (lokalen) Minima.

Programmier-Beispiel in Python

Nachfolgend ein Beispiel des Gradientenverfahrens zur Berechnung einer Regression. Wir importieren numpy und matplotlib.pyplot und erzeugen uns künstliche Datenpunkte:

Nun wollen wir einen Lernalgorithmus über das Gradientenverfahren erstellen. Im Grunde haben wir hier es bereits mit einem linear aktivierten Neuron zutun:

Bei der linearen Regression, die wir durchführen wollen, nehmen wir zwei-dimensionale Daten (wobei wir die Regression prinzipiell auch mit x-Dimensionen durchführen können, dann hätte unser Neuron weitere Eingänge). Wir empfangen einen Bias (w_0) der stets mit einer Eingangskonstante multipliziert und somit als Wert erhalten bleibt. Der Bias ist das Alpha \alpha in einer Schulmathe-tauglichen Formel wie y = \beta \cdot x + \alpha.

Beta \beta ist die Steigung, der Gradient, der Funktion.

Sowohl \alpha als auch \beta sind uns unbekannt, versuchen wir jedoch über die Betrachtung unserer Prädiktion durch Berechnung der Formel \^y = \beta \cdot x + \alpha und den darauffolgenden Abgleich mit dem tatsächlichen y herauszufinden. Anfangs behaupten wir beispielsweise einfach, sowohl \beta als auch \alpha seien 0.00. Folglich wird \^y = \beta \cdot x + \alpha ebenfalls gleich 0.00 sein und die Fehlerfunktion (Loss Function) wird maximal sein. Dies war der erste Durchlauf des Trainings, die sogenannte erste Epoche!

Die Epochen (Durchläufe) und dazugehörige Fehlergrößen. Wenn die Fehler sinken und mit weiteren Epochen nicht mehr wesentlich besser werden, heißt es, das der Lernalogorithmus konvergiert.

Als Fehlerfunktion verwenden wir bei der Regression die MSE-Funktion (Mean Squared Error):

MSE = \sum(\^y_i - y_i)^2

Um diese Funktion wird sich nun alles drehen, denn diese beschreibt den Fehler und gibt uns auch die Auskunft darüber, ob wie stark und in welche Richtung sie ansteigt, so dass wir uns entgegen der Steigung bewegen können. Wer die Regeln der Ableitung im Kopf hat, weiß, dass die Ableitung der Formel leichter wird, wenn wir sie vorher auf halbe Werte runterskalieren. Da die Proportionen dabei erhalten bleiben und uns quadrierte Fehlerwerte unserem menschlichen Verstand sowieso nicht so viel sagen (unser Gehirn denkt nunmal nicht exponential), stört das nicht:

MSE = \frac{\frac{1}{2} \cdot \sum(\^y_i - y_i)^2}{n}

MSE = \frac{\frac{1}{2} \cdot \sum(w^T \cdot x_i - y_i)^2}{n}

Wenn die Mathematik der partiellen Ableitung (Ableitung einer Funktion nach jedem Gradienten) abhanden gekommen ist, bitte nochmal folgende Regeln nachschlagen, um die nachfolgende Ableitung verstehen zu können:

  • Allgemeine partielle Ableitung
  • Kettenregel

Ableitung der MSD-Funktion nach dem einen Gewicht w bzw. partiell nach jedem vorhandenen w_j:

\frac{\partial}{\partial w_j}MSE = \frac{\partial}{\partial w} \frac{1}{2} \cdot \sum(\^y - y_i)^2

\frac{\partial}{\partial w_j}MSE = \frac{\partial}{\partial w} \frac{1}{2} \cdot \sum(w^T \cdot x_i - y_i)^2

\frac{\partial}{\partial w_j}MSE = \frac{2}{n} \cdot \sum(w^T \cdot x_i - y_i) \cdot x_{ij}

Woher wir das x_{ij} am Ende her haben? Das ergibt sie aus der Kettenregel: Die äußere Funktion wurde abgeleitet, so wurde aus \frac{1}{2} \cdot \sum(w^T \cdot x_i - y_i)^2 dann \frac{2}{n} \cdot \sum(w^T \cdot x_i - y_i). Jedoch muss im Sinne eben dieser Kettenregel auch die innere Funktion abgeleitet werden. Da wir nach w_j ableiten, bleibt nur x_ij erhalten.

Damit können wir arbeiten! So kompliziert ist die Formel nun auch wieder nicht: \frac{2}{n} \cdot \sum(w^T \cdot x_i - y_i) \cdot x_{ij}

Mit dieser Formel können wir unsere Gewichte an den Fehler anpassen: (f\nabla ist der Gradient der Funktion!)

w_j = w_j - \nabla MSE(w_j)

Initialisieren der Gewichtungen

Die Gewichtungen \alpha und \beta müssen anfänglich mit Werten initialisiert werden. In der Regression bietet es sich an, die Gewichte anfänglich mit 0.00 zu initialisieren.

Bei vielen neuronalen Netzen, mit nicht-linearen Aktivierungsfunktionen, ist das jedoch eher ungünstig und zufällige Werte sind initial besser. Gut erprobt sind normal-verteilte Zufallswerte.

Lernrate

Nur eine Kleinigkeit haben wir bisher vergessen: Wir brauchen einen Faktor, mit dem wir anpassen. Hier wäre der Faktor 1. Das ist in der Regel viel zu groß. Dieser Faktor wird geläufig als Lernrate (Learning Rate) \eta (eta) bezeichnet:

w_j = w_j - \eta \cdot \nabla MSE(w_j)

Die Lernrate \eta ist ein Knackpunkt und der erste Parameter des Lernalgorithmus, den es anzupassen gilt, wenn das Training nicht konvergiert.

Die Lernrate \eta darf nicht zu groß klein gewählt werden, da das Training sonst zu viele Epochen benötigt. Ungeduldige erhöhen die Lernrate möglicherweise aber so sehr, dass der Lernalgorithmus im Minimum der Fehlerfunktion vorbeiläuft und diesen stets überspringt. Hier würde der Algorithmus also sozusagen konvergieren, weil nicht mehr besser werden, aber das resultierende Modell wäre weit vom Optimum entfernt.

Beginnen wir mit der Implementierung als Python-Klasse:

Die Klasse sollte so funktionieren, bevor wir sie verwenden, sollten wir die Input-Werte standardisieren:

Bei diesem Beispiel mit künstlich erzeugten Werten ist das Standardisieren bzw. das Fehlen des Standardisierens zwar nicht kritisch, aber man sollte es sich zur Gewohnheit machen. Testweise es einfach mal weglassen 🙂

Kommen wir nun zum Einsatz der Klasse, die die Regression via Gradientenabstieg absolvieren soll:

Was tut diese Instanz der Klasse LinearRegressionGD nun eigentlich?

Bildlich gesprochen, legt sie eine Gerade auf den Boden des Koordinatensystems, denn die Gewichtungen werden mit 0.00 initialisiert, y ist also gleich 0.00, egal welche Werte in x enthalten sind. Der Fehler ist dann aber sehr groß (sollte maximal sein, im Vergleich zu zukünftigen Epochen). Die Gewichte werden also angepasst, die Gerade somit besser in die Punktwolke platziert. Mit jeder Epoche wird die Gerade erneut in die Punktwolke gelegt, der Gesamtfehler (über alle x, da wir es hier mit dem Batch-Verfahren zutun haben) berechnet, die Werte angepasst… bis die vorgegebene Zahl an Epochen abgelaufen ist.

Schauen wir uns das Ergebnis des Trainings an:

Die Linie sieht passend aus, oder? Da wir hier nicht zu sehr in die Theorie der Regressionsanalyse abdriften möchten, lassen wir das testen und prüfen der Akkuratesse mal aus, hier möchte ich auf meinen Artikel Regressionsanalyse in Python mit Scikit-Learn verweisen.

Prüfen sollten wir hingegen mal, wie schnell der Lernalgorithmus mit der vorgegebenen Lernrate eta konvergiert:

Hier die Verlaufskurve der Cost Function:

Die Kurve zeigt uns, dass spätestens nach 40 Epochen kaum noch Verbesserung (im Sinne der Gesamtfehler-Minimierung) erreicht wird.

Wichtige Hinweise

Natürlich war das nun nur ein erster kleiner Einstieg und wer es verstanden hat, hat viel gewonnen. Denn erst dann kann man sich vorstellen, wie ein einzelnen Neuron eines künstlichen neuronalen Netzes grundsätzlich trainiert werden kann.

Folgendes sollte noch beachtet werden:

  • Lernrate \eta:
    Die Lernrate ist ein wichtiger Parameter. Wer das Programmier-Beispiel bei sich zum Laufen gebracht hat, einfach mal die Lernrate auf Werte zwischen 10.00 und 0.00000001 setzen, schauen was passiert 🙂
  • Globale Minima vs lokale Minima:
    Diese lineare zwei-dimensionale Regression ist ziemlich einfach. Neuronale Netze sind hingegen komplexer und haben nicht einfach nur eine simple konvexe Fehlerfunktion. Hier gibt es mehrere Hügel und Täler in der Fehlerfunktion und die Gefahr ist groß, in einem lokalen, nicht aber in einem globalen Minimum zu landen.
  • Stochastisches Gradientenverfahren:
    Wir haben hier das sogenannte Batch-Verfahren verwendet. Dieses ist grundsätzlich besser als die stochastische Methode. Denn beim Batch verwenden wir den gesamten Stapel an x-Werten für die Fehlerbestimmung. Allerdings ist dies bei großen Daten zu rechen- und speicherintensiv. Dann werden kleinere Unter-Stapel (Sub-Batches) zufällig aus den x-Werten ausgewählt, der Fehler daraus bestimmt (was nicht ganz so akkurat ist, wie als würden wir den Fehler über alle x berechnen) und der Gradient bestimmt. Dies ist schon Rechen- und Speicherkapazität, erfordert aber meistens mehr Epochen.

Buchempfehlung

Die folgenden zwei Bücher haben mir bei der Erstellung dieses Beispiels geholfen und kann ich als hilfreiche und deutlich weiterführende Lektüre empfehlen:

 

Machine Learning mit Python und Scikit-Learn und TensorFlow: Das umfassende Praxis-Handbuch für Data Science, Predictive Analytics und Deep Learning (mitp Professional) Hands-On Machine Learning with Scikit-Learn and TensorFlow: Concepts, Tools, and Techniques for Building Intelligent Systems

 

Funktionsweise künstlicher neuronaler Netze

Künstliche neuronale Netze sind ein Spezialbereich des maschinellen Lernens, der sogar einen eigenen Trendbegriff hat: Deep Learning.
Doch wie funktioniert ein künstliches neuronales Netz überhaupt? Und wie wird es in Python realisiert? Dies ist Artikel 2 von 6 der Artikelserie –Einstieg in Deep Learning.

Gleich vorweg, wir beschränken uns hier auf die künstlichen neuronalen Netze des überwachten maschinellen Lernens. Dafür ist es wichtig, dass das Prinzip des Trainings und Testens von überwachten Verfahren verstanden ist. Künstliche neuronale Netze können aber auch zur unüberwachten Dimensionsreduktion und zum Clustering eingesetzt werden. Das bekannteste Verfahren ist das AE-Net (Auto Encoder Network), das hier aus der Betrachtung herausgenommen wird.

Beginnen wir mit einfach künstlichen neuronalen Netzen, die alle auf dem Perzeptron als Kernidee beruhen. Das Vorbild für künstliche neuronale Netze sind natürliche neuronale Netze, wie Sie im menschlichen Gehirn zu finden sind.

Perzeptron

Das Perzeptron (engl. Perceptron) ist ein „Klassiker“ unter den künstlichen neuronalen Netzen. Wenn von einem neuronalen Netz gesprochen wird, ist meistens ein Perzeptron oder eine Variation davon gemeint. Perzeptrons sind mehrschichtige Netze ohne Rückkopplung, mit festen Eingabe- und Ausgabeschichten. Es gibt keine absolut einheitliche Definition eines Perzeptrons, in der Regel ist es jedoch ein reines FeedForward-Netz mit einer Input-Schicht (auch Abtast-Schicht oder Retina genannt) mit statisch oder dynamisch gewichteten Verbindungen zur Ausgabe-Schicht, die (als Single-Layer-Perceptron) aus einem einzigen Neuron besteht. Das eine Neuron setzt sich aus zwei mathematischen Funktionen zusammen: Einer Berechnung der Nettoeingabe und einer Aktivierungsfunktion, die darüber entscheidet, ob die berechnete Nettoeingabe im Brutto nun “feuert” oder nicht. Es ist in seiner Ausgabe folglich binär: Man kann es sich auch als kleines Lämpchen vorstellen, so dass abhängig von den Eingabewerten und den Gewichtungen eine Nettoeingabe (Summe) bildet und eine Sprungfunktion darüber entscheidet, ob am Ende das Lämpchen leuchtet oder nicht. Dieses Konzept der Ausgabeerzeugung wird Forward-Propagation genannt.

Single-Layer-Perceptron

Auch wenn “Netz” für ein einzelnes Perzeptron mit seinem einen Neuron etwas übertrieben wirken mag, ist es doch die Grundlage für viele größere und mehrschichtige Netze.

Betrachten wir nun die Mathematik der Forward-Propagation.

Wir haben eine Menge an Eingabewerten x_0, x_1 \dots x_n. Wobei für x_0 als Bias-Input stets gilt: x_0 = 1,0. Der Bias-Input ist nur ein Platzhalter für das wichtige Bias-Gewicht.

    \[ x = \begin{bmatrix} x_0\\ x_1\\ x_2\\ x_3\\ \vdots\\ x_n \end{bmatrix} \]


Für jede Eingabevariable wird eine Gewichtsvariable benötigt: w_0, w_1 \dots w_n

    \[ w = \begin{bmatrix} w_0\\ w_1\\ w_2\\ w_3\\ \vdots\\ w_n \end{bmatrix} \]

Jedes Produkt aus Eingabewert und Gewichtung soll in Summe die Nettoeingabe z bilden. Hier zeigt sich z als lineare mathematische Funktion, die zwei-dimensional leicht als z = w_0 + w_1 \cdot x_1 mit w_0 als Y-Achsenschnitt wenn x_1 = 0.

    \[ z = w_0 \cdot x_0 + w_1 \cdot x_1 + \dots + w_n \cdot x_n \]

Die lineare Funktion wird nur durch die Sprungfunktion als sogenannte Aktivierungsfunktion zu einer binären Klasseneinteilung (siehe hierzu: Machine Learning – Regression vs Klassifikation), denn wenn z einen festzulegenden Schwellwert \theta überschreitet, liefert die Sprungfunktion \phi mit der Eingabe z einen anderen Wert als wenn dieser Schwellwert nicht überschritten wird.

(1)   \begin{equation*} \phi(z) = \begin{cases} 1 & \text{wenn } z \le \theta \\ -1 & \text{wenn } z < \theta \\ \end{cases} \end{equation*}

Die Definition dieser Aktivierungsfunktion ist der Kern der Klassifikation und viele erweiterte künstliche neuronale Netze unterscheiden sich im Wesentlichen vom Perzeptron dadurch, dass die Aktivierungsfunktion komplexer ist, als eine reine Sprungfunktion, beispielsweise als Sigmoid-Funktion (basierend auf der logistischen Funktion) oder die Tangens hyperbolicus (tanh) -Funktion. Mehr darüber dann im nächsten Artikel dieser Artikelserie, bleiben wir also bei der einfachen Sprungfunktion.

Künstliche neuronale Netze sind im Grunde nichts anderes als viel-dimensionale, mathematische Funktionen, die durch Schaltung als Neuronen nebeneinander (Neuronen einer Schicht) und hintereinander (mehrere Schichten) eine enorme Komplexität erfassen können. Die Gewichtungen sind dabei die Stellschraube, die die Form der mathematischen Funktion gestaltet, aus Geraden und Kurven, um eine Punktwolke zu beschreiben (Regression) oder um Klassengrenzen zu identifizieren (Klassifikation).

Eine andere Sichtweise auf künstliche neuronale ist die des Filters: Ein künstliches neuronales Netz nimmt alle Eingabe-Variablen entgegen (z. B. alle Pixel eines Bildes) und über ein Training werden die Gewichtungen (die Form des Filters) so gestaltet, dass der Filter immer zu richtigen Klasse (im Kontext der Bildklassifikation: die Objektklasse) führt.


Kommen wir nochmal kurz zurück zu der Berechnung der Nettoeingabe z. Da diese Schreibweise…

    \[ z = w_0 \cdot x_0 + w_1 \cdot x_1 + \dots + w_n \cdot x_n \]

… recht anstrengend ist, schreiben Fortgeschrittene der linearen Algebra lieber z = w^T \cdot x.

    \[ z = w^T \cdot x \]

Das hochgestellte T steht dabei für transponieren. Transponieren bedeutet, dass Spalten zu Zeilen werden – oder umgekehrt.

Beispielsweise befüllen wir zwei Vektoren x und w mit beispielhaften Inhalten:

Eingabewerte:

    \[ x = \begin{bmatrix} 5\\ 12\\ 30\\ 2 \end{bmatrix} \]

Gewichtungen:

    \[ w = \begin{bmatrix} 1\\ 2\\ 5\\ 12 \end{bmatrix} \]

Kann nun die Nettoeingabe z berechnet werden, denn der Gewichtungsvektor wird vom Spaltenvektor zum Zeilenvektor. So kann – mathematisch korrekt dargestellt – jedes Element des einen Vektors mit dem zugehörigen Element des anderen Vektors multipliziert werden, die dabei entstehenden Ergebniswerte werden summiert.

    \[ z = w^T \cdot x = \big[1\text{ }2\text{ }5\text{ }12\big] \cdot \begin{bmatrix} 5\\ 12\\ 30\\ 2 \end{bmatrix} = 1 \cdot 5 + 2 \cdot 12 + 5 \cdot 30 + 12 \cdot 2 = 203 \]


Zurück zur eigentlichen Aufgabe des künstlichen neuronalen Netzes: Klassifikation! (Regression, Clustering und Dimensionsreduktion blenden wir ja in diesem Artikel als Aufgabe aus 🙂

Das Perzeptron soll zwei Klassen trennen. Dafür sollen alle Eingaben richtig gewichtet werden, so dass die entstehende Nettoeingabe z die Sprungfunktion dann aktiviert, wenn der Datensatz nicht für die eine, sondern für die andere Klasse ausweist.

Da wir es mit einer linearen Funktion z zutun haben, ist die Konvergenz (= Passgenauigkeit des Models mit der Realität) eines Single-Layer-Perzeptrons nur für lineare Trennbarkeit möglich!

Training des Perzeptron-Netzes

Die Aufgabe ist nun, die richtigen Gewichte zu finden – und nicht nur irgendwelche richtigen, sondern genau die optimalen. Die Frage, die sich für jedes künstliche neuronale Netz stellt, ist die nach den richtigen Gewichtungen. Das Training eines Perzeptron ist vergleichsweise einfach, gerade weil es binär ist. Denn binär bedeutet auch, dass wenn eine falsche Antwort gegeben wurde, muss das jeweils andere mögliche Ergebnis korrekt sein.

Das Training eines Perzeptrons funktioniert wie folgt:

  1. Setze alle Gewichtungen auf den Wert 0,00
  2. Mit jedem Datensatz des Trainings
    1. Berechne den Ausgabewert \^{y}
    2. Vergleiche den Ausgabewert \^{y} mit dem tatsächlichen Ergebnis y
    3. Aktualisiere die Gewichtungen entgegen des Fehlers: w_i = w_i + \Delta w_i

Wobei die Gewichtsanpassung \Delta w_i entgegen des Fehlers (bzw. hin zur jeweils anderen möglichen Antwort) geschieht:

\Delta w_i = (\^{y}_j - y_j ) \cdot x_i

Anmerkung für die Experten: Die Schrittweite \eta blenden wir hier einfach mal aus. Bitte einfach von \eta = 1.0 ausgehen.

\Delta w_i ist die Differenz aus der Prädiktion und dem tatsächlichen Ergebnis (Klasse). Alle Gewichtungen werden mit jedem Fehler gleichzeitig aktualisiert. Sind alle Gewichtungen aktualisiert, kommt der nächste Durchlauf (erneuter Vergleich zwischen \^{y} und y), nicht zu vergessen ist dabei natürlich die Abhängigkeit von den Eingabewerten x:

\Delta w_0 = (\^{y}_j - y_j ) \cdot x_0

\Delta w_2 = (\^{y}_j - y_j ) \cdot x_1

\Delta w_2 = (\^{y}_j - y_j) \cdot x_2

\Delta w_n = (\^{y}_j - y_j) \cdot x_n

Training eines Perzeptrons

Das Training im überwachten Lernen basiert immer auf der Idee, den Ausgabe-Fehler (die Differenz zwischen Prädiktion und tatsächlich korrektem Ergebnis) zu betrachten und die Klassifikationslogik an den richtigen Stellschrauben (bei neuronalen Netzen sind das die Gewichtungen) entgegen des Fehlers anzupassen.

Richtige Klassifikations-Situationen können True-Positives und True-Negatives darstellen, die zu keiner Gewichtsanpassung führen sollen:

True-Positive -> Klassifikation: 1 | korrekte Klasse: 1

\Delta w_i = (\^{y}_j - y_j) \cdot x_i = (1 - 1) \cdot x_i = 0

True-Negative-> Klassifikation: -1 | korrekte Klasse: -1

\Delta w_i = (\^{y}_j - y_j) \cdot x_i = (-1 - -1) \cdot x_i = 0

Falsche Klassifikationen erzeugen einen Fehler, der zu einer Gewichtsanpassung entgegen des Fehlers führen soll:

False-Positive -> Klassifikation: 1 | korrekte Klasse: -1

\Delta w_i = (\^{y}_j - y_j) \cdot x_i = (1 - -1) \cdot x_i = 2 \cdot x_i

False-Negative -> Klassifikation: -1 | korrekte Klasse: 1

\Delta w_i = (\^{y}_j - y_j) \cdot x_i = (-1 - 1) \cdot x_i = -2 \cdot x_i

Imaginäres Trainingsbeispiel eines Single-Layer-Perzeptrons (SLP)

Nehmen wir an, dass x_1 = 0,5 ist und das SLP irrtümlicherweise die Klasse \^{y_1} = -1 ausgewiesen hat, obwohl die korrekte Klasse y_1 = +1 wäre. (Und die Schrittweite lassen wir bei \eta = 1,0)

Dann passiert folgendes:

\Delta w_1 = (\^{y}_1 - y_1) \cdot x_1 = (-1 - 1) \cdot 0,5 = -2,0 \cdot 0,5 = -1,0

Die Gewichtung w_1 verringert sich entsprechend w_1 = w_1 + \Delta w_1 = w_1 - 1,0 und somit wird die Wahrscheinlichkeit größer, dass wenn bei der nächsten Iteration (j=1) wieder die Klasse +1 korrekt sei,  den Schwellwert \phi(z) zu unterschreiten und auf eben diese korrekte Klasse zu stoßen.

Die Aktualisierung der Gewichtung \Delta w_i ist proportional zu x_i. So würde beispielsweise ein neues x_1=2,0 (bei Iteration j=2) zu einer irrtümlichen Klassifikation \^(y_2) = -1 (y_2 = +1) führen, würde die Entscheidungsgrenze zur korrekten Prädiktion der Klasse beim nächsten Durchlauf (j = 3) an w_1 noch weiter in die gleiche Richtung verschoben werden:

\Delta w_1 = (\^{y}_2 - y_2) \cdot x_1 = (-1 - 1) \cdot 2,0 = -2,0 \cdot 2,0 = -4,0

Mehr zum Training von künstlichen neuronalen Netzen ist im nächsten Artikel dieser Artikelserie zu erfahren.

Single-Layer-Perzeptrons (SLP) – Beispiel mit der boolischen Trennung

Verlassen wir nun das Training des Perzeptrons und gehen einfach mal davon aus, dass die idealen Gewichte schon gefunden wurden und schauen uns nun an, was ein Perzeptron alles (nicht) kann. Denn nicht vergessen, es soll eigentlich Klassen unterscheiden bzw. die dafür nötigen Entscheidungsgrenzen finden.

Boolische Operatoren unterscheiden Fälle nach boolischen Werten. Sie sind ein beliebtes “Hello World” für die Einarbeitung in die lineare Entscheidungslogik eines Perzeptrons. Es gibt drei grundlegende boolische Vergleichsoperatoren: AND, OR und XOR

  x1     x2   AND OR XOR
0 0 0 0 0
0 1 0 1 1
1 0 0 1 1
1 1 1 1 0

Ein Perzeptron zur Lösung dieser Aufgabe bräuchte also zwei Dimensionen (+ Bias): x_1 und x_2
Und es müsste Gewichtungen haben, die dafür sorgen, dass die Vorhersage entsprechend der Logik AND, OR oder XOR mit \^{y} = \phi(z) = \phi (w_0 \cdot 1 + w_1 \cdot x_1 + w_2 \cdot x_2) funktioniert.

Dabei ist es wichtig, dass wir auch phi \phi als Sprungfunktion definieren. Sie könnte beispielsweise so aussehen, dass sie auf den Wert \phi(z) = 1 springt, wenn z > 0 ist, ansonsten aber \phi(z) = 0 bleibt.

Das Netz und die Gewichtungen (w-Setup) könnten für die AND- und die OR-Logik so aussehen:

Die Gewichtungen funktionieren beim SLP problemlos, denn wir haben es mit linear trennbaren Problemen zutun:

Kleiner Test gefällig? So nehmen wir uns erstmal die AND-Logik vor:

  • Wenn x1 = 0 und x2 = 0 ist, gilt: z = -1,5 \cdot 1 + 1 \cdot 0 + 1 \cdot 0 = - 1,5,
    wie erhalten als Prädiktion \phi(z) = \phi(-1,5) = 0
  • Wenn x1 = 1 und x2 = 0 ist, gilt: z = -1,5 \cdot 1 + 1 \cdot 1 + 1 \cdot 0 = - 0,5,
    wie erhalten als Prädiktion \phi(z) = \phi(-0,5) = 0
  • Wenn x1 = 1 und x2 = 1 ist, gilt: z = -1,5 \cdot 1 + 1 \cdot 1 + 1 \cdot 1 = + 0,5,
    wie erhalten als Prädiktion \phi(z) = \phi(0,5) = 1

Scheint zu funktionieren!

Und dann die OR-Logik mit

  • Wenn x1 = 0 und x2 = 0 ist, gilt: z = -0,5 \cdot 1 + 1 \cdot 0 + 1 \cdot 0 = - 0,5,
    wie erhalten als Prädiktion \phi(z) = \phi(-0,5) = 0
  • Wenn x1 = 1 und x2 = 0 ist, gilt: z = -0,5 \cdot 1 + 1 \cdot 1 + 1 \cdot 0 = + 0,5,
    wie erhalten als Prädiktion \phi(z) = \phi(0,5) = 1
  • Wenn x1 = 1 und x2 = 1 ist, gilt: z = -0,5 \cdot 1 + 1 \cdot 1 + 1 \cdot 1 = + 1,5,
    wie erhalten als Prädiktion \phi(z) = \phi(1,5) = 1

Super! Jedoch stellt sich nun die Frage, wie das XOR-Problem zu lösen ist, denn das bedingt sowohl die Grenzen von AND als auch jene des OR-Operators.

Multi-Layer-Perzeptron (MLP) bzw. (Deep) Feed Forward (FF) Net

Denn ein XOR kann mathematisch auch so korrekt beschrieben werden: x_1 \text{ xor } x_2 = (x_1 \text{ and } \neg x_2) \text{ or } (\neg x_1 \text{ and } x_2)

Testen wir es aus!

  • Wenn x1 = 0 und x2 = 0 ist, gilt:
    z_1 = w_{10} \cdot 1 + w_{11} \cdot x1 + w_{12} \cdot  x2 = -0.5 \cdot 1 + 1,0 \cdot 0 - 1,0 \cdot 0 = -0,5 und somit \phi(z_1) = \phi(-0,5) = 0
    z_2 = w_{20} \cdot 1 + w_{21} \cdot x1 + w_{22} \cdot  x2 = -0.5 \cdot 1 - 1,0 \cdot 0 + 1,0 \cdot 0 = -0,5 und somit \phi(z_2) = \phi(-0,5) = 0
    z_3 = w_{30} \cdot 1 + w_{31} \cdot \phi(z_1) + w_{32} \cdot \phi(z_2) = -0,5 \cdot 1 + 1,0 \cdot 0 + 1,0 \cdot 0 = -0,5 und somit \phi(z_3) = \phi(-0,5) = 0
  • Wenn x1 = 1 und x2 = 0 ist, gilt:
    z_1 = w_{10} \cdot 1 + w_{11} \cdot x1 + w_{12} \cdot  x2 = -0.5 \cdot 1 + 1,0 \cdot 1 - 1,0 \cdot 0 = 0,5 und somit \phi(z_1) = \phi(0,5) = 1
    z_2 = w_{20} \cdot 1 + w_{21} \cdot x1 + w_{22} \cdot  x2 = -0.5 \cdot 1 - 1,0 \cdot 1 + 1,0 \cdot 0 = -1,5 und somit \phi(z_2) = \phi(-1,5) = 0
    z_3 = w_{30} \cdot 1 + w_{31} \cdot \phi(z_1) + w_{32} \cdot \phi(z_2) = -0,5 \cdot 1 + 1,0 \cdot 1 + 1,0 \cdot 0 = 0,5 und somit \phi(z_3) = \phi(0,5) = 1
  • Wenn x1 = 0 und x2 = 1 ist, gilt:
    z_1 = w_{10} \cdot 1 + w_{11} \cdot x1 + w_{12} \cdot  x2 = -0.5 \cdot 1 + 1,0 \cdot 0 - 1,0 \cdot 1 = -1,5 und somit \phi(z_1) = \phi(-1,5) = 0
    z_2 = w_{20} \cdot 1 + w_{21} \cdot x1 + w_{22} \cdot  x2 = -0.5 \cdot 1 - 1,0 \cdot 0 + 1,0 \cdot 1 = 0,5 und somit \phi(z_2) = \phi(0,5) = 1
    z_3 = w_{30} \cdot 1 + w_{31} \cdot \phi(z_1) + w_{32} \cdot \phi(z_2) = -0,5 \cdot 1 + 1,0 \cdot 0 + 1,0 \cdot 1 = 0,5 und somit \phi(z_3) = \phi(0,5) = 1
  • Wenn x1 = 1 und x2 = 1 ist, gilt:
    z_1 = w_{10} \cdot 1 + w_{11} \cdot x1 + w_{12} \cdot  x2 = -0.5 \cdot 1 + 1,0 \cdot 1 - 1,0 \cdot 1 = -1,5 und somit \phi(z_1) = \phi(-0,5) = 0
    z_2 = w_{20} \cdot 1 + w_{21} \cdot x1 + w_{22} \cdot  x2 = -0.5 \cdot 1 - 1,0 \cdot 1 + 1,0 \cdot 1 = 0,5 und somit \phi(z_2) = \phi(-0,5) = 0
    z_3 = w_{30} \cdot 1 + w_{31} \cdot \phi(z_1) + w_{32} \cdot \phi(z_2) = -0,5 \cdot 1 + 1,0 \cdot 0 + 1,0 \cdot 0 = -0,5 und somit \phi(z_3) = \phi(-0,5) = 0

Es funktioniert!

Mehrfachklassifikation mit dem Perzeptron

Ein Perzeptron-Netz klassifiziert binär, die Ausgabe beschränkt sich auf 1 oder -1 bzw. 0 oder 1.

Jedoch wird in der Praxis oftmals eine One-vs-All (OvA) bzw. One-vs-Rest (OvR) Klassifikation implementiert. In diesem Fall steht die 1 für die Erkennung einer konkreten Klasse, während alle anderen übrigen Klassen als negativ betrachtet werden.

Um jede Klasse erkennen zu können, werden n Klassifizierer (= n Perzeptron-Netze) benötigt. Jedes Perzeptron-Netz ist auf die Erkennung einer bestimmten Klasse trainiert.

Adaline – Oder: die Limitation des Perzeptrons

Das Perzeptron wird nur über eine Sprungfunktion aktiviert. Das schränkt die Feinabstimmung des Trainings enorm ein. Besser sind Aktivierungen über stetige Funktionen, die dann nämlich differenzierbar (ableitbar) sind. Das ergibt eine konvexe Fehlerfunktion mit einem eindeutigen Minimum. Der Adaline-Algorithmus (ADAptive Linear NEuron) erweitert die Idee des Perzeptrons um genau diese Idee. Der wesentliche Fortschritt der Adaline-Regel gegenüber der des Perzeptrons ist demnach, dass die Aktualisierung der Gewichtungen nicht wie beim Perzeptron auf einer einfachen Sprungfunktion, sondern auf einer linearen, stetigen Aktivierungsfunktion beruht.

Single-Layer-Adaline

Wie ein künstliches neuronales Netz mit der Kategorie Adaline trainiert werden kann, wird im nächsten Artikel dieser Artikelserie erläutert.

Weiterführende Netz-Konzepte (CNN und RNN)

Wer bereits mit Frameworks wie TensorFlow in das Deep Learning eingestiegen ist, hat möglicherweise schon erweiterte Konzepte der künstlichen neuronalen Netze kennen gelernt. Die CNNs (Convolutional Neuronal Network) sind im Moment die Wahl für die Verarbeitung von hochdimensionalen Aufgaben, beispielsweise die Bilderkennung (Computer Vision) und Texterkennung (NLP). Das CNN erweitert die Möglichkeiten mit neuronalen Netzen deutlich, indem ein Netz zur Dimensionsreduktion vorgeschaltet wird, im Kern steckt jedoch weiterhin die Idee der MLPs. Beim Einsatz in der Bilderkennung funktionieren CNNs vereinfacht gesprochen so, dass der vorgeschaltete Netzbereich die Millionen Bildpixel sektorweise ausliest (Convolution, Faltung durch Auslesen über Sektoren, die sich gegenseitig überlappen), verdichtet (Pooling, beispielsweise über nicht-lineare Funktionen wie max()) und dann – nach diesem Prozedere – ähnlich eim MLP klassifiziert.

 

Eine andere erweiterte Form sind RNNs (Recurrent Neuronal Network), die ebenfalls auf der Idee des MLPs basieren, dieses Konzept jedoch dank Rückverbindungen (Neuronen senden an vorherige Schichten) und Selbstverbindungen (Neuronen senden an sich selbst) wiederum auf den Kopf stellen.

 

Dennoch ist es für das tiefere Verständnis von CNNs und RNNs essenziell, dass vorher das Konzept des MLPs verstanden ist. Es ist die einfachste Form der auch heute noch am meisten eingesetzten und sehr mächtigen Netz-Topologien.

Im Jahr 2016 hatte Fjodor van Veen von asimovinstitute.org hatte – dankenswerterweise – mal eine Zusammenstellung von Netz-Topologien erstellt, auf die ich heute noch immer mal wieder einen Blick werfe:

Künstliche neuronale Netze – Topologie-Übersicht von Fjodor van Veen

Buchempfehlungen

Die folgenden Bücher nutze ich für mein Selbststudium von Machine Learning und Deep Learning und sind teilweise Gedankenvorlagen auch für diesen Artikel gewesen:

 

Machine Learning mit Python und Scikit-Learn und TensorFlow: Das umfassende Praxis-Handbuch für Data Science, Predictive Analytics und Deep Learning (mitp Professional) Deep Learning mit Python und Keras: Das Praxis-Handbuch vom Entwickler der Keras-Bibliothek(mitp Professional)

 

Wieviele Trainungsbeispiele benötigen Lernverfahren? (1/2)

Kurz nach der Jahrtausendwende begann das Zeitalter der digitalen Daten. Seitdem übertrifft die Menge der digitalen Daten die der Analogen [HL11] und dem Maschinellen Lernen stehen enorme Datenmengen zur Verfügung. Unter dem Buzzword „big data“ wird dabei meist nur das reine Volumen gesehen, andere Faktoren, wie die Frequenz mit der die Daten zu verarbeiten sind und die Variabilität der Formate werden oft vernachlässigt, obwohl auch solche Daten unter „big data“ zusammengefasst werden. Betrachtet man das Volumen dann spielen zwei Faktoren eine zentrale Rolle, die das „big“ von „big data“ ausmachen: die Anzahl der Beispieldatensätze und – und dies wird häufig übersehen – die Anzahl der Eigenschaften mit denen die Beispieldaten beschrieben werden.
Wenn von „big data“ gesprochen wird, wird dabei oft angenommen, dass genügend Datensätze vorhanden sind. Für bestimmte Anwendungen jedoch, müssen die Daten in unterschiedliche Gruppen unterschieden werden, um beim Lernen nicht Äpfel und Birnen in einen Topf zu werfen. In solchen Fällen kann es leicht passieren, dass pro Gruppe zu wenig Beispieldaten vorhanden sind und die Frage an Bedeutung gewinnt: „Reichen die Datensätze eigentlich aus, um ein Vorhersagemodel mit einer gewissen Mindestgüte zu lernen?“.
Leider gibt es bisher keine einfache Antwort auf diese Frage, da diese neben der Anzahl der Eigenschaften – der Dimensionalität – der Daten, von der Struktur des Datenraums, der Verteilung der Daten in diesem Raum, dem verwendeten Lernverfahren, der Ausdrucksfähigkeit seiner Hypothesenrepräsentation und seiner endgültigen Parametrisierung abhängt. In der “Computational Learning Theory” wurden jedoch Ansätze zur Abschätzungen von Untergrenzen erarbeitet, die, unter der Annahme idealer Lernverfahren, zu mindestens eine Aussage über die benötigte Mindestmenge an Trainingsdaten gestatten.
Ziel dieses Beitrags ist es auf möglichst anschauliche Art und Weise anhand eines praktischen Beispiels zu zeigen, welchen Einfluss die Dimensionalität der Daten auf die Abschätzung der Anzahl der benötigten Beispiele für das Erlernen von Vorhersagemodellen – genauer einfachen Klassifikationsmodellen[1] – hat und welche Methoden hierfür existieren. In diesem ersten Teil liegt das Hauptaugenmerk auf endlichen Daten- und Hypothesenräumen und wir werden sehen, dass selbst für eine kleine Anzahl von Eigenschaften – sprich Dimensionen – nützliche Aussagen nur für sehr einfache Hypothesenrepräsentationen möglich sind. Im zweiten Teil werden wir einen Abschätzungsansatz betrachten, der die „Unterscheidungsstärke“ unterschiedlicher Lernverfahren berücksichtigt und mit dem auch Abschätzungen für unendliche Daten- und Hypothesenräume möglich werden.

Anwendungsbeispiel

Betrachten wir das Beispiel eines Online-Shops, der Produkte über das Internet verkauft und dessen Produkte klassifiziert werden sollen. Wie die Produkte klassifiziert werden sollen ist für unsere Betrachtungen unerheblich, was wir aber im Kopf haben sollten: der Absatz unterschiedlicher Produkte folgt einer Potenzverteilung. Eine kleine Zahl von Produkten wird sehr häufig verkauft, so dass für sie viele Datensätze existieren (solche Produkte werden gewöhnlicher Weise in konventionellen Geschäften vertrieben, die nur begrenzte Lagerkapazitäten haben). Der Großteil der Produkte wird jedoch eher seltener umgesetzt (auch als „long tail“ bezeichnet), so dass die Anzahl ihrer Datensätze gering ist; u.U. so gering, dass für sie keine verlässlichen Vorhersagemodelle erlernbar sind.

Zur Illustration gehen wir davon aus, dass in dem Online-Shop Produkte von 500 Marken verkauft werden und diese Produkte neben ihrer Marke durch ihre Größe (10 mögliche Werte), ihre Farbe (20 mögliche Werte), die ersten drei Ebenen der Google Produktkategorien (auf der dritten Ebene 500 mögliche Werte) und ihren Preis (im Bereich 0,49 – 100 €) beschrieben werden.

In diesem Kontext besitzt die Antwort auf die Frage: „Wie viele Daten werden überhaupt für ein Lernverfahren benötigt?“ offensichtlich konkreten Nutzen,

  • da wir abschätzen können, ob für ein konkretes Produkt überhaupt ein sinnvolles Vorhersagemodell erlernbar ist,
  • da wir aus der Abschätzung auf die Dauer der Datensammlung schließen können und
  • um ggf. die Daten von selten verkauften Produkten inhaltlich oder zeitlich zu aggregieren.

Was uns vorweg klar sein sollte

Die Daten, die wir zum Erlernen von Vorhersagemodellen verwenden, werden durch Eigenschaften (normalerweise als Feature, in der Statistik auch als Variablen bezeichnet) beschrieben. Die Eigenschaften werden in beobachtete und abhängige Eigenschaften (im Maschinellen Lernen auch als Label bezeichnet) unterschieden. Die Wertebereiche der Eigenschaften können in endliche und unendliche Wertebereich unterschieden werden.

Wir können nicht erwarten, dass ein Lernverfahren ein 100%ig korrektes Modell erlernt. Lernverfahren versuchen durch einen induktiven Schluss aus Daten ein Vorhersagemodell zu ermitteln. Da die zur Verfügung stehende Datenmenge immer begrenzt sein wird und die Daten damit realistischer Weise unvollständig sein werden, Messfehler und Inkonsistenzen enthalten können, kann auch ein erlerntes Modell niemals 100%ig korrekt sein.

Viele unterschiedliche Modelle können konsistent mit den verfügbaren Daten sein. Ziel des Lernverfahrens ist es daher mit den verfügbaren Daten das bestmögliche Vorhersagemodell zu ermitteln.

Wir müssen in Kauf nehmen, dass unbekannte, zukünftige oder ungewöhnliche Daten zu fehlerhaften Vorhersagen führen. Zum Lernzeitpunkt ist nur ein Ausschnitt aller Daten verfügbar. Zukünftig erhobene Daten können Veränderungen unterliegen oder es können bisher noch nicht gesehene Fälle auftreten, auf die das erlernte Modell nicht mehr richtig passt.

Aus diesen Fakten ergibt sich die einzig realistische Annahme: ein gutes Lernverfahren soll mit großer Wahrscheinlichkeit eine gute Näherung des richtigen Vorhersagemodells erlernen.

Anzahl benötigter Trainingsfälle

Zur Abschätzung der Anzahl benötigter Trainingsfälle – als Beispielkomplexität (sample complexity) bezeichnet – wurden in der Computational Learning Theory unterschiedliche Ansätze entwickelt. Diese Ansätze beschreiben für idealisierte Lernverfahren unter welchen Bedingungen probabilistisch, approximativ, korrektes Lernen (PAC learning) effizient möglich ist. Grundlegend für die Einsetzbarkeit dieser Ansätze ist die Unterscheidung, ob das Lernen in einem endlichen oder unendlichen Hypothesenraum erfolgt, und ob das Lernverfahren konsistente Hypothesen oder nur näherungsweise Hypothesen, z.B. beim Vorliegen von Messfehlern, zu den Daten erlernen kann.

Endliche Datenräume

Sofern die Daten nur durch nominelle Eigenschaften mit endlichen Wertebereichen beschrieben werden[2], lässt sich die Größe des Datenraums relativ einfach bestimmen. Die folgende Tabelle beschreibt für die wichtigsten nominellen Eigenschaftstypen Größenfaktoren, die im Folgenden zur vereinheitlichten Darstellung verwendet werden:

Type
t
Fehlende Werte (NA) ? Größe des Wertebereichs
n
Größenfaktor g(t)
Boolean Nein 2 2
Boolean Ja 2 3
Nominal (Menge) Nein n_t n_t
Nominal (Menge) Ja n_t n_t+1

Die Größe eines endlichen d-dimensionalen Datenraums D kann allgemein mit folgender Formel bestimmt werden |D| = \prod_{i=1}^d{g(t_i)}.

Das Lernproblem besteht darin: aus einer Teilmenge von Trainingsbeispielen S  aus dem Datenraum D, i.e. S \subset D, die ein Trainer dem Lernverfahren vorgibt, um Zielkonzept c zu erlernen, eine Hypothese aus dem Hypothesenraum h \in H des Lernverfahrens zu ermitteln, welche (möglichst) alle positiven Beispiel S_p  umfasst und (möglichst) alle negativen Beispiele S_n  ausschließt.

Einfache Hypothesenrepräsentation

Die einfachste Hypothesenrepräsentation, in der Lernen, welches über einfaches Erinnern hinausgeht, sinnvoll ist, sind Disjunktionen von Bool’schen Eigenschaften. Eine Beispielanwendung für die diese Repräsentation Sinn macht, ist das Erkennen von Spam-Emails anhand des Vorliegens unterschiedlicher alternativer Eigenschaften, die Spam-Emails charakterisieren. Der Hypothesenraum dieser Sprache besitzt eine Größe von |H| = 2^d [FoDS18]. Ein Beispiel für ein verbreitetes Lernverfahren, das eine Hypothesenrepräsentation dieses Typs nutzt, ist Naive Bayes.

Beliebige nominelle Eigenschaften können durch One-Hot- oder Dummy-Encoding als Bool’sche Variablen kodiert werden. Damit ergibt sich zum Erlernen von Disjunktionen kodierter, Bool’scher Eigenschaften die Größe des Hypothesenraums als |H| = 2^{\sum_{i=1}^d{g(t_i)}}.

Um unser Produktbeispiel in dieser Sprache zu repräsentieren, müssen die Eigenschaften geeignet kodiert werden, z.B. durch One-Hot- oder Dummy-Encoding, bei dem jeder Wert einer Eigenschaft durch eine neue bool’sche Variable kodiert wird. Hieraus ergeben sich im Fall von One-Hot-Encoding 500+10+20+500+9941=10.971 und im Fall von Dummy-Encoding 499+9+19+499+9940=10.966 neue Bool’sche Eigenschaften.

Eigenschaftsvektoren (Feature-Vektoren, bzw. Konjunktionen von Eigenschaften) stellen die nächstkomplexere Repräsentationssprache dar, die, solange sie nicht um ein Konstrukt zur Verallgemeinerung erweitert wird, sehr unspektakulär ist, da Beispiele mit ihr lediglich erinnert werden. Erst wenn ein „don’t care“-Symbol, wie z.B. „?“, für beliebige Eigenschaftswerte hinzugefügt wird, wird die extremste Form von Generalisierung möglich, die von einzelnen Werten gleich auf alle Werte generalisiert [ML97]. Durch das „don’t care“-Symbol wird der Größenfaktor g um einen weiteren Wert erhöht. Für diese Repräsentation beträgt die Größe des Hypothesenraums  über rein bool‘schen Eigenschaften (inkl. „don’t care“)  |H| = 3^d und für allgemeine endliche Eigenschaften|H| = \prod_{i=1}^d{(g(t_i)+1)}. Diese Repräsentation ist sehr eingeschränkt und erlaubt es nur einzelne und keine kombinierten Konzepte zu erlernen. Sie ist daher eigentlich nur von theoretischem Interesse und wird – soweit bekannt – in keinem praktisch eingesetzten Lernverfahren genutzt.

Interessanter ist eine Verallgemeinerung dieser Repräsentationssprache, die k-CNF (konjunktive Normalform), die aus einer Konjunktion von Disjunktionen der Länge k besteht, die sowohl polynomielle Beispiel- als auch Zeitkomplexität besitzt [ML97] und für die ein effizienter Algorithmus existiert. Diese Repräsentation lässt sich auch auf einen d-dimensionalen Eigenschaftsvektor übertragen, in dem für jede Eigenschaft Generalisierungen über beliebige Teilmengen erlaubt werden. Die Größe des Hypothesenraums dieser Sprache beträgt |H| = \prod_{i=1}^d{2^{g(t_i)}} = 2^{\sum_{i=1}^d{g(t_i)}}. Mit dieser Sprache können alle Eigenschaften zwar separat auf beliebige Teilmengen generalisiert werden, Korrelationen zwischen Eigenschaften werden jedoch nicht berücksichtigt.

Für Repräsentationssprachen, die keinerlei Einschränkungen machen, besitzt der Hypothesenraum für Daten mit d bool‘schen Eigenschaften eine Größe von |H| = 2^{2^d}. Auf beliebige endliche Eigenschaften übertragen, kann diese Aussage zu |H| = 2^{|D|} = 2^{\prod_{i=1}^d{g(t_i)}} verallgemeinert werden.

Wie aus diesen Abschätzungen ersichtlich wird, hat die Dimensionalität d der Daten einen direkten Einfluss auf die Größe des Hypothesenraums und damit auf die Anzahl der von einem Lernverfahren zu berücksichtigenden Konzepte.

Realistische Hypothesenrepräsentation

Bis auf einfache Disjunktionen bool’scher Eigenschaften, sind einfache Hypothesenrepräsentationen entweder zu ausdrucksschwach, so dass nützliche Konzepte kaum ausdrückbar sind, oder zu ausdrucksstark, so dass Lernen in vertretbarer nicht-exponentieller Zeit nicht möglich ist. Die gängigen Lernverfahren, wie k-Nearest Neighbors, Naive Bayes, Decision Trees, Random Forrests, AdaBoost, XGBoost, Logistic Regression, Support Vector Machines und Neuronale Netze, etc. beschränken durch spezifische Annahmen (inductive bias) den Hypothesenraum, um so nützliche Konzepte in vernünftiger Zeit zu erlernen.

Leider lassen sich nur für wenige der real eingesetzten Verfahren Abschätzungen für die Größe des Hypothesenraums finden.

Verfahren |H| Parameter
Boolean-coded Naive Bayes 2^{\sum_{i=1}^d{g(t_i)}}
Boolean-coded Decision Trees[3] 2^{\sum_{i=1}^d{g(t_i)}}
Boolean-coded Decision Trees with limited depth [4] 2(2^k-1)(1+log_2{⁡\sum_{i=1}^d{g(t_i)}} ) +1 k = Tiefenbegrenzung

Lernen eines zu allen Trainingsdaten konsistenten Konzepts (aka Overfitting)

Unter der Annahme eines idealen Lernalgorithmus, kann die Größe des Hypothesenraums dazu verwendet werden die Anzahl der Trainingsdaten m die ein „konsistenter Lernalgorithmus“[5] benötigt, um ein beliebiges Konzept mit einem maximalen Fehler \epsilon und einer Unsicherheit \delta (bzw. einer Wahrscheinlichkeit von 1 - \delta ) zu erlernen, abgeschätzt werden mit[6]

    \[m \geq \frac{1}{\epsilon}(ln{(|H|)} + ln{(\frac{1}{\delta})})\]

Nehmen wir für unser Beispielszenario an Produkt A wird stündlich im Durchschnitt 100 mal verkauft und Produkt B wird jeden Tag im Schnitt nur 10 mal verkauft.  Zur Vereinfachung nehmen wir weiter an, die Produkte werden jeden Tag – egal ob Wochentag oder Wochenende – nur zwischen 6:00 und 20:00 Uhr verkauft. Pro Monat erhalten wir für Produkt A 42.000 Datensätze und für Produkt B 300 Datensätze.

Der Datenraum D hat eine Größe von |D| = 500*10*20*500*9941 \approx 497 Mrd. Punkten. Mit einer einfachen bool’schen Kodierung ergibt sich d = 500+10+20+500+9951 = 10.971 und |H| = 2^{10.961}.

Wollten wir Datensätze dieser Produkte mit einem Fehler \epsilon von maximal 10% und einer maximalen Unsicherheit \delta = 5% – wie auch immer – klassifizieren, so würden wir für den Einsatz von Naive Bayes oder unbegrenzten DecisionTrees mindestens 76.145 Datensätze benötigen. Weder die monatlichen Daten von Produkt A noch Produkt B würden ausreichen.

Mit einem tiefenbeschränkten Entscheidungsbaum-Verfahren mit 5 Stufen, sind, ungeachtet der Qualität des Lernergebnisses, die Daten von Produkt A und B ausreichend, um die Anforderungen an \epsilon und \delta einzuhalten, da nur mindestens 91 Datensätze benötigt werden.

Ein, dieser Abschätzung zugrundeliegender, idealer Lernalgorithmus, ist jedoch für praktische Anwendungen unrealistisch, da er zwar für die Trainingsdaten ein konsistentes Konzept ermitteln würde, welches aber bei unbekannten, neuen Daten versagen kann. Der angenommene Lernalgorithmus unterliegt der „Überanpassung“ (overfitting).

Nichts desto trotz ist diese Abschätzungsformel hilfreich, da sie eine Aussage erlaubt, wie viele Trainingsbeispiele im besten Fall ausreichen, um mit einem idealen Lernverfahren ein Konzept mit einem maximalen Fehler von \epsilon und einer Unsicherheit von höchstens \delta zu erlernen, das in der genutzten Hypothesenrepräsentation ausdrückbar ist.

Agnostisches Lernen eines Konzeptes, das möglichst gut zu den Trainingsdaten passt

Überanpassung wollen wir in der Regel vermeiden, damit die erlernten Vorhersagemodelle auch auf unbekannte, fehlerbehaftete oder teilweise inkonsistente Daten anwendbar sind. Anders ausgedrückt: das zu erlernende Konzept c kann etwas außerhalb des Hypothesenraums liegen, der durch das eingesetzte Lernverfahren erfasst wird. Dies bedeutet, dass wir im Hypothesenraum des Lernverfahrens nur eine Näherung c' erlernen können, die möglichst gut sein sollte. Solch ein – als agnostisch bezeichnetes – Lernverfahren muss daher bestrebt sein den Fehler zwischen den Trainingsdaten und dem Fehler der sich durch das Erlernen der Näherung c' ergibt möglichst klein zu halten.

Auch hierfür kann, unter der Annahme eines idealen Lernalgorithmus, die Größe des Hypothesenraums dazu verwendet werden die Anzahl der Trainingsdaten m die ein „agnostisches Lernverfahren“ benötigt, um eine gute Näherung an das zu erlernende Konzept in einem endlichen Hypothesenraum mit einem maximalen Fehler \epsilon und einer Unsicherheit \delta (bzw. einer Wahrscheinlichkeit von 1 - \delta) zu erlernen, abgeschätzt werden mit[6]

    \[m \geq \frac{1}{2\epsilon^2}(ln{(|H|)} + ln{(\frac{2}{\delta})})\]

Auf das Beispiel angewendet müsste sich – unter der Annahme gleicher Rahmenbedingungen – die Mindestzahl von Trainingsbeispielen auf m = 490 belaufen. D.h. die Daten von Produkt A könnten zum Lernen der Klassifikation verwendet werden, die Datenmenge für Produkt B wäre jedoch nicht ausreichend.

Folgerung

Mit diesem ersten Beitrag haben wir anhand eines kleinen realen Beispiels gezeigt, wie sich für einen idealen Lernalgorithmus über die Betrachtung der Größe endlicher Hypothesenräume, die Mindestanzahl der benötigten Trainingsbeispiel abschätzen lässt.

Auch wenn es sich hierbei um eine idealisierte Betrachtung handelt, erlauben solche Abschätzungen Aussagen darüber, wann Lernverfahren nur mit einem größeren Fehler behaftet einsetzbar sind.

Diese Betrachtung erstreckte sich bisher nur über endliche Eigenschaften und berücksichtigt die Komplexität der Hypothesenrepräsentation – eine der wesentlichen Eigenschaften eines Lernverfahrens – noch nicht. Dies wird Thema des zweiten Teils sein, in dem wir sehen werden, wie sich Abschätzung auf der Basis der – sogenannten – Vapnik-Chervonenkis-Dimension (VC-Dimension) für viele gängige Klassen von Lernverfahren einsetzen lassen.

Fußnoten

[1] Wir betrachten hierbei nur rein binäre, binomiale resp. Bool’sche Klassifikationsprobleme, deren Aussagen sich jedoch auch auf multinomiale Klassifikation und reell-wertige Vorhersagemodelle übertragen lassen (siehe [ESL09], Seite 238).

[2] Unendlich, überabzählbare Eigenschaften lassen sich in Abhängigkeit vom Anwendungsproblem und der erforderlichen Genauigkeit oft diskretisieren und als ordinale Daten oder Intervalle ganzer Zahlen repräsentieren, wie z.B. Alter, Körpergröße, Längen, Temperatur, und Zeitintervalle usw., wenn es ausreichend ist diese mit einer Genauigkeit von Jahren, cm, mm, Zehntelgrad oder Sekunden zu erfassen.

[3] Vollausgebaute Decision Trees unterliegen der Gefahr der „Überanpassung“ (overfitting) und werden in der Regel gestutzt, um dies zu vermeiden. Die Abschätzung stellt daher die Obergrenze dar.

[4] http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~guestrin/Class/10701/slides/learningtheory-bigpicture.pdf  und https://www.autonlab.org/_media/tutorials/pac05.pdf (Letzter Zugriff: 10.3.2018)

[5] Ein „konsistenter Lernalgorithmus“ erlernt Hypothesen, die – wann immer möglich – perfekt zu den Trainingsdaten passen [ML97].

[6] Details zur Ableitung der beschriebenen Untergrenzen finden sich u.a. in [ML97], [FoML12] oder [FoDS18].

Referenzen

[HL11] „The World’s Technological Capacity to Store, Communicate, and Compute Information“, M. Hilbert, P. López, Science 332, 60, 2011, http://www.uvm.edu/pdodds/files/papers/others/2011/hilbert2011a.pdf (letzter Zugriff: 14. März 2018)

[ESL09] “The Elements of Statistical Learning”, T. Hastie, R. Tibshirani, J. Friedman, 2nd Edition, Springer, 2009.

[ML97] „Machine Learning“, T. Mitchell, McGraw-Hill, 1997.

[FoML12] „Foundations of Machine Learning“, M. Mohri, A. Rostamizadeh, A. Talwalkar, The MIT Press, 2012.

[FoDS18] „Foundations of Data Science“, A. Blum, J. Hopcroft, R. Kannan, Cornell University, https://www.cs.cornell.edu/jeh/book.pdf, Jan. 4th, 2018 (letzter Zugriff: 14. März 2018)

Einstieg in Deep Learning – Artikelserie

Deep Learning gilt als ein Teilgebiet des maschinellen Lernens (Machine Learning), welches wiederum ein Teilgebiet der künstlichen Intelligenz (Artificial Intelligence) ist. Machine Learning umfasst alle (teilweise äußerst unterschiedliche) Methoden der Klassifikation oder Regression, die die Maschine über ein vom Menschen begleitetes Training selbst erlernt. Darüber hinaus umfasst Machine Learning auch unüberwachte Methoden zum Data Mining in besonders großen und vielfältigen Datenmengen.

Deep Learning ist eine Unterform des maschinellen Lernens und macht im Grunde nichts anderes: Es geht um antrainierte Klassifikation oder Regression. Seltener werden Deep Learning Algorithmen auch als unüberwachter Lernenmechanismus verwendet, zum Lernen von Rauschen zur Erkennung von Mustern (Data Mining). Deep Learning bezeichnet den Einsatz von künstlichen neuronalen Netzen, die gegenüber anderen Verfahren des maschinellen Lernens häufig überlegen sind und diesen gegenüber auch andere Vor- und Nachteile besitzen.

Im Rahmen dieser Artikelserie erscheinen im Laufe der kommenden Monate folgende Artikel:

  1. Machine Learning vs Deep Learning – Wo liegt der Unterschied?
  2. Funktionsweise künstlicher neuronaler Netze
  3. Training eines Neurons mit dem Gradientenverfahren
  4. Fehler-Rückführung mit der Backpropagation
  5. Künstliches neuronales Netz in Python (erscheint demnächst)
  6. Künstliches neuronales Netz mit dem TensorFlow-Framework (erscheint demnächst)

Buchempfehlungen

Seit 2016 arbeite ich mich in Deep Learning ein und biete auch Seminare und Workshops zu Machine Learning und Deep Learning an, dafür habe ich eine ausführliche Einarbeitung und ein immer wieder neu auflebendes Literaturstudium hinter mir. Unter Anderen habe ich folgende Bücher für mein Selbststudium verwendet und nutze ich auch Auszugsweise für meine Lehre:


Praxiseinstieg Machine Learning mit Scikit-Learn und TensorFlow: Konzepte, Tools und Techniken für intelligente Systeme (Animals)

Neuronale Netze selbst programmieren: Ein verständlicher Einstieg mit Python

Praxiseinstieg Deep Learning: Mit Python, Caffe, TensorFlow und Spark eigene Deep-Learning-Anwendungen erstellen

Machine Learning mit Python und Scikit-Learn und TensorFlow: Das umfassende Praxis-Handbuch für Data Science, Predictive Analytics und Deep Learning (mitp Professional)