ACID vs BASE Concepts

Understanding databases for storing, updating and analyzing data requires the understanding of two concepts: ACID and BASE. This is the first article of the article series Data Warehousing Basics.

The properties of ACID are being applied for databases in order to fulfill enterprise requirements of reliability and consistency.

ACID is an acronym, and stands for:

  • Atomicity – Each transaction is either properly executed completely or does not happen at all. If the transaction was not finished the process reverts the database back to the state before the transaction started. This ensures that all data in the database is valid even if we execute big transactions which include multiple statements (e. g. SQL) composed into one transaction updating many data rows in the database. If one statement fails, the entire transaction will be aborted, and hence, no changes will be made.
  • Consistency – Databases are governed by specific rules defined by table formats (data types) and table relations as well as further functions like triggers. The consistency of data will stay reliable if transactions never endanger the structural integrity of the database. Therefor, it is not allowed to save data of different types into the same single column, to use written primary key values again or to delete data from a table which is strictly related to data in another table.
  • Isolation – Databases are multi-user systems where multiple transactions happen at the same time. With Isolation, transactions cannot compromise the integrity of other transactions by interacting with them while they are still in progress. It guarantees data tables will be in the same states with several transactions happening concurrently as they happen sequentially.
  • Durability – The data related to the completed transaction will persist even in cases of network or power outages. Databases that guarante Durability save data inserted or updated permanently, save all executed and planed transactions in a recording and ensure availability of the data committed via transaction even after a power failure or other system failures If a transaction fails to complete successfully because of a technical failure, it will not transform the targeted data.

ACID Databases

The ACID transaction model ensures that all performed transactions will result in reliable and consistent databases. This suits best for businesses which use OLTP (Online Transaction Processing) for IT-Systems such like ERP- or CRM-Systems. Furthermore, it can also be a good choice for OLAP (Online Analytical Processing) which is used in Data Warehouses. These applications need backend database systems which can handle many small- or medium-sized transactions occurring simultaneous by many users. An interrupted transaction with write-access must be removed from the database immediately as it could cause negative side effects impacting the consistency(e.g., vendors could be deleted although they still have open purchase orders or financial payments could be debited from one account and due to technical failure, never credited to another).

The speed of the querying should be as fast as possible, but even more important for those applications is zero tolerance for invalid states which is prevented by using ACID-conform databases.

BASE Concept

ACID databases have their advantages but also one big tradeoff: If all transactions need to be committed and checked for consistency correctly, the databases are slow in reading and writing data. Furthermore, they demand more effort if it comes to storing new data in new formats.

In chemistry, a base is the opposite to acid. The database concepts of BASE and ACID have a similar relationship. The BASE concept provides several benefits over ACID compliant databases asthey focus more intensely on data availability of database systems without guarantee of safety from network failures or inconsistency.

The acronym BASE is even more confusing than ACID as BASE relates to ACID indirectly. The words behind BASE suggest alternatives to ACID.

BASE stands for:

  • Basically Available – Rather than enforcing consistency in any case, BASE databases will guarantee availability of data by spreading and replicating it across the nodes of the database cluster. Basic read and write functionality is provided without liabilityfor consistency. In rare cases it could happen that an insert- or update-statement does not result in persistently stored data. Read queries might not provide the latest data.
  • Soft State – Databases following this concept do not check rules to stay write-consistent or mutually consistent. The user can toss all data into the database, delegating the responsibility of avoiding inconsistency or redundancy to developers or users.
  • Eventually Consistent –No guarantee of enforced immediate consistency does not mean that the database never achieves it. The database can become consistent over time. After a waiting period, updates will ripple through all cluster nodes of the database. However, reading data out of it will stay always be possible, it is just not certain if we always get the last refreshed data.

All the three above mentioned properties of BASE-conforming databases sound like disadvantages. So why would you choose BASE? There is a tradeoff compared to ACID. If databases do not have to follow ACID properties then the database can work much faster in terms of writing and reading from the database. Further, the developers have more freedom to implement data storage solutions or simplify data entry into the database without thinking about formats and structure beforehand.

BASE Databases

While ACID databases are mostly RDBMS, most other database types, known as NoSQL databases, tend more to conform to BASE principles. Redis, CouchDB, MongoDB, Cosmos DB, Cassandra, ElasticSearch, Neo4J, OrientDB or ArangoDB are just some popular examples. But other than ACID, BASE is not a strict approach. Some NoSQL databases apply at least partly to ACID rules or provide optional functions to get almost or even full ACID compatibility. These databases provide different level of freedom which can be useful for the Staging Layer in Data Warehouses or as a Data Lake, but they are not the recommended choice for applications which need data environments guaranteeing strict consistency.

Data Warehousing Basiscs

Data Warehousing is applied Big Data Management and a key success factor in almost every company. Without a data warehouse, no company today can control its processes and make the right decisions on a strategic level as there would be a lack of data transparency for all decision makers. Bigger comanies even have multiple data warehouses for different purposes.

In this series of articles I would like to explain what a data warehouse actually is and how it is set up. However, I would also like to explain basic topics regarding Data Engineering and concepts about databases and data flows.

To do this, we tick off the following points step by step:

 

Moderne Business Intelligence in der Microsoft Azure Cloud

Google, Amazon und Microsoft sind die drei großen Player im Bereich Cloud Computing. Die Cloud kommt für nahezu alle möglichen Anwendungsszenarien infrage, beispielsweise dem Hosting von Unternehmenssoftware, Web-Anwendungen sowie Applikationen für mobile Endgeräte. Neben diesen Klassikern spielt die Cloud jedoch auch für Internet of Things, Blockchain oder Künstliche Intelligenz eine wichtige Rolle als Enabler. In diesem Artikel beleuchten wir den Cloud-Anbieter Microsoft Azure mit Blick auf die Möglichkeiten des Aufbaues eines modernen Business Intelligence oder Data Platform für Unternehmen.

Eine Frage der Architektur

Bei der Konzeptionierung der Architektur stellen sich viele Fragen:

  • Welche Datenbank wird für das Data Warehouse genutzt?
  • Wie sollten ETL-Pipelines erstellt und orchestriert werden?
  • Welches BI-Reporting-Tool soll zum Einsatz kommen?
  • Müssen Daten in nahezu Echtzeit bereitgestellt werden?
  • Soll Self-Service-BI zum Einsatz kommen?
  • … und viele weitere Fragen.

1 Die Referenzmodelle für Business Intelligence Architekturen von Microsoft Azure

Die vielen Dienste von Microsoft Azure erlauben unzählige Einsatzmöglichkeiten und sind selbst für Cloud-Experten nur schwer in aller Vollständigkeit zu überblicken.  Microsoft schlägt daher verschiedene Referenzmodelle für Datenplattformen oder Business Intelligence Systeme mit unterschiedlichen Ausrichtungen vor. Einige davon wollen wir in diesem Artikel kurz besprechen und diskutieren.

1a Automatisierte Enterprise BI-Instanz

Diese Referenzarchitektur für automatisierte und eher klassische BI veranschaulicht die Vorgehensweise für inkrementelles Laden in einer ELT-Pipeline mit dem Tool Data Factory. Data Factory ist der Cloud-Nachfolger des on-premise ETL-Tools SSIS (SQL Server Integration Services) und dient nicht nur zur Erstellung der Pipelines, sondern auch zur Orchestrierung (Trigger-/Zeitplan der automatisierten Ausführung und Fehler-Behandlung). Über Pipelines in Data Factory werden die jeweils neuesten OLTP-Daten inkrementell aus einer lokalen SQL Server-Datenbank (on-premise) in Azure Synapse geladen, die Transaktionsdaten dann in ein tabellarisches Modell für die Analyse transformiert, dazu wird MS Azure Analysis Services (früher SSAS on-premis) verwendet. Als Tool für die Visualisierung der Daten wird von Microsoft hier und in allen anderen Referenzmodellen MS PowerBI vorgeschlagen. MS Azure Active Directory verbindet die Tools on Azure über einheitliche User im Active Directory Verzeichnis in der Azure-Cloud.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/architecture/reference-architectures/data/enterprise-bi-adfQuelle:

Einige Diskussionspunkte zur BI-Referenzarchitektur von MS Azure

Der von Microsoft vorgeschlagenen Referenzarchitektur zu folgen kann eine gute Idee sein, ist jedoch tatsächlich nur als Vorschlag – eher noch als Kaufvorschlag – zu betrachten. Denn Unternehmens-BI ist hochgradig individuell und Bedarf einiger Diskussion vor der Festlegung der Architektur.

Azure Data Factory als ETL-Tool

Azure Data Factory wird in dieser Referenzarchitektur als ETL-Tool vorgeschlagen. In der Tat ist dieses sehr mächtig und rein über Mausklicks bedienbar. Darüber hinaus bietet es die Möglichkeit z. B. über Python oder Powershell orchestriert und pipeline-modelliert zu werden. Der Clue für diese Referenzarchitektur ist der Hinweis auf die On-Premise-Datenquellen. Sollte zuvor SSIS eingesetzt werden sollen, können die SSIS-Packages zu Data Factory migriert werden.

Die Auswahl der Datenbanken

Der Vorteil dieser Referenzarchitektur ist ohne Zweifel die gute Aufstellung der Architektur im Hinblick auf vielseitige Einsatzmöglichkeiten, so werden externe Daten (in der Annahme, dass diese un- oder semi-strukturiert vorliegen) zuerst in den Azure Blob Storage oder in den auf dem Blob Storage beruhenden Azure Data Lake zwischen gespeichert, bevor sie via Data Factory in eine für Azure Synapse taugliche Struktur transformiert werden können. Möglicherweise könnte auf den Blob Storage jedoch auch gut verzichtet werden, solange nur Daten aus bekannten, strukturierten Datenbanken der Vorsysteme verarbeitet werden. Als Staging-Layer und für Datenhistorisierung sind der Azure Blob Storage oder der Azure Data Lake jedoch gute Möglichkeiten, da pro Dateneinheit besonders preisgünstig.

Azure Synapse ist eine mächtige Datenbank mindestens auf Augenhöhe mit zeilen- und spaltenorientierten, verteilten In-Memory-Datenbanken wie Amazon Redshift, Google BigQuery oder SAP Hana. Azure Synapse bietet viele etablierte Funktionen eines modernen Data Warehouses und jährlich neue Funktionen, die zuerst als Preview veröffentlicht werden, beispielsweise der Einsatz von Machine Learning direkt auf der Datenbank.

Zur Diskussion steht jedoch, ob diese Funktionen und die hohe Geschwindigkeit (bei richtiger Nutzung) von Azure Synapse die vergleichsweise hohen Kosten rechtfertigen. Alternativ können MySQL-/MariaDB oder auch PostgreSQL-Datenbanken bei MS Azure eingesetzt werden. Diese sind jedoch mit Vorsicht zu nutzen bzw. erst unter genauer Abwägung einzusetzen, da sie nicht vollständig von Azure Data Factory in der Pipeline-Gestaltung unterstützt werden. Ein guter Kompromiss kann der Einsatz von Azure SQL Database sein, der eigentliche Nachfolger der on-premise Lösung MS SQL Server. MS Azure Snypase bleibt dabei jedoch tatsächlich die Referenz, denn diese Datenbank wurde speziell für den Einsatz als Data Warehouse entwickelt.

Zentrale Cube-Generierung durch Azure Analysis Services

Zur weiteren Diskussion stehen könnte MS Azure Analysis Sevice als Cube-Engine. Diese Cube-Engine, die ursprünglich on-premise als SQL Server Analysis Service (SSAS) bekannt war, nun als Analysis Service in der Azure Cloud verfügbar ist, beruhte früher noch als SSAS auf der Sprache MDX (Multi-Dimensional Expressions), eine stark an SQL angelehnte Sprache zum Anlegen von schnellen Berechnungsformeln für Kennzahlen im Cube-Datenmodellen, die grundlegendes Verständnis für multidimensionale Abfragen mit Tupeln und Sets voraussetzt. Heute wird statt MDX die Sprache DAX (Data Analysis Expression) verwendet, die eher an Excel-Formeln erinnert (diesen aber keinesfalls entspricht), sie ist umfangreicher als MDX, jedoch für den abitionierten Anwender leichter verständlich und daher für Self-Service-BI geeignet.

Punkt der Diskussion ist, dass der Cube über den Analysis-Service selbst keine Möglichkeiten eine Self-Service-BI nicht ermöglicht, da die Bearbeitung des Cubes mit DAX nur über spezielle Entwicklungsumgebungen möglich ist (z. B. Visual Studio). MS Power BI selbst ist ebenfalls eine Instanz des Analysis Service, denn im Kern von Power BI steckt dieselbe Engine auf Basis von DAX. Power BI bietet dazu eine nutzerfreundliche UI und direkt mit mausklickbaren Elementen Daten zu analysieren und Kennzahlen mit DAX anzulegen oder zu bearbeiten. Wird im Unternehmen absehbar mit Power BI als alleiniges Analyse-Werkzeug gearbeitet, ist eine separate vorgeschaltete Instanz des Azure Analysis Services nicht notwendig. Der zur Abwägung stehende Vorteil des Analysis Service ist die Nutzung des Cubes in Microsoft Excel durch die User über Power Pivot. Dies wiederum ist eine eigene Form des sehr flexiblen Self-Service-BIs.

1b Enterprise Data Warehouse-Architektur

Eine weitere Referenz-Architektur von Microsoft auf Azure ist jene für den Einsatz als Data Warehouse, bei der Microsoft Azure Synapse den dominanten Part von der Datenintegration über die Datenspeicherung und Vor-Analyse übernimmt.https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/architecture/solution-ideas/articles/enterprise-data-warehouseQuelle: 

Diskussionspunkte zum Referenzmodell der Enterprise Data Warehouse Architecture

Auch diese Referenzarchitektur ist nur für bestimmte Einsatzzwecke in dieser Form sinnvoll.

Azure Synapse als ETL-Tool

Im Unterschied zum vorherigen Referenzmodell wird hier statt auf Azure Data Factory auf Azure Synapse als ETL-Tool gesetzt. Azure Synapse hat die Datenintegrationsfunktionalitäten teilweise von Azure Data Factory geerbt, wenn gleich Data Factory heute noch als das mächtigere ETL-Tool gilt. Azure Synapse entfernt sich weiter von der alten SSIS-Logik und bietet auch keine Integration von SSIS-Paketen an, zudem sind einige Anbindungen zwischen Data Factory und Synapse unterschiedlich.

Auswahl der Datenbanken

Auch in dieser Referenzarchitektur kommt der Azure Blob Storage als Zwischenspeicher bzw. Staging-Layer zum Einsatz, jedoch im Mantel des Azure Data Lakes, der den reinen Speicher um eine Benutzerebene erweitert und die Verwaltung des Speichers vereinfacht. Als Staging-Layer oder zur Datenhistorisierung ist der Blob Storage eine kosteneffiziente Methode, darf dennoch über individuelle Betrachtung in der Notwendigkeit diskutiert werden.

Azure Synapse erscheint in dieser Referenzarchitektur als die sinnvolle Lösung, da nicht nur die Pipelines von Synapse, sondern auch die SQL-Engine sowie die Spark-Engine (über Python-Notebooks) für die Anwendung von Machine Learning (z. B. für Recommender-Systeme) eingesetzt werden können. Hier spielt Azure Synpase die Möglichkeiten als Kern einer modernen, intelligentisierbaren Data Warehouse Architektur voll aus.

Azure Analysis Service

Auch hier wird der Azure Analysis Service als Cube-generierende Maschinerie von Microsoft vorgeschlagen. Hier gilt das zuvor gesagte: Für den reinen Einsatz mit Power BI ist der Analysis Service unnötig, sollen Nutzer jedoch in MS Excel komplexe, vorgerechnete Analysen durchführen können, dann zahlt sich der Analysis Service aus.

Azure Cosmos DB

Die Azure Cosmos DB ist am nächsten vergleichbar mit der MongoDB Atlas (die Cloud-Version der eigentlich on-premise zu hostenden MongoDB). Es ist eine NoSQL-Datenbank, die über Datendokumente im JSON-File-Format auch besonders große Datenmengen in sehr hoher Geschwindigkeit abfragen kann. Sie gilt als die zurzeit schnellste Datenbank in Sachen Lesezugriff und spielt dabei alle Vorteile aus, wenn es um die massenweise Bereitstellung von Daten in andere Applikationen geht. Unternehmen, die ihren Kunden mobile Anwendungen bereitstellen, die Millionen parallele Datenzugriffe benötigen, setzen auf Cosmos DB.

1c Referenzarchitektur für Realtime-Analytics

Die Referenzarchitektur von Microsoft Azure für Realtime-Analytics wird die Referenzarchitektur für Enterprise Data Warehousing ergänzt um die Aufnahme von Data Streaming.

Diskussionspunkte zum Referenzmodell für Realtime-Analytics

Diese Referenzarchitektur ist nur für Einsatzszenarios sinnvoll, in denen Data Streaming eine zentrale Rolle spielt. Bei Data Streaming handelt es sich, vereinfacht gesagt, um viele kleine, ereignis-getriggerte inkrementelle Datenlade-Vorgänge bzw. -Bedarfe (Events), die dadurch nahezu in Echtzeit ausgeführt werden können. Dies kann über Webshops und mobile Anwendungen von hoher Bedeutung sein, wenn z. B. Angebote für Kunden hochgrade-individualisiert angezeigt werden sollen oder wenn Marktdaten angezeigt und mit ihnen interagiert werden sollen (z. B. Trading von Wertpapieren). Streaming-Tools bündeln eben solche Events (bzw. deren Datenhäppchen) in Data-Streaming-Kanäle (Partitionen), die dann von vielen Diensten (Consumergruppen / Receiver) aufgegriffen werden können. Data Streaming ist insbesondere auch dann ein notwendiges Setup, wenn ein Unternehmen über eine Microservices-Architektur verfügt, in der viele kleine Dienste (meistens als Docker-Container) als dezentrale Gesamtstruktur dienen. Jeder Dienst kann über Apache Kafka als Sender- und/oder Empfänger in Erscheinung treten. Der Azure Event-Hub dient dazu, die Zwischenspeicherung und Verwaltung der Datenströme von den Event-Sendern in den Azure Blob Storage bzw. Data Lake oder in Azure Synapse zu laden und dort weiter zu reichen oder für tiefere Analysen zu speichern.

Azure Eventhub ArchitectureQuelle: https://docs.microsoft.com/de-de/azure/event-hubs/event-hubs-about

Für die Datenverarbeitung in nahezu Realtime sind der Azure Data Lake und Azure Synapse derzeitig relativ alternativlos. Günstigere Datenbank-Instanzen von MariaDB/MySQL, PostgreSQL oder auch die Azure SQL Database wären hier ein Bottleneck.

2 Fazit zu den Referenzarchitekturen

Die Referenzarchitekturen sind exakt als das zu verstehen: Als Referenz. Keinesfalls sollte diese Architektur unreflektiert für ein Unternehmen übernommen werden, sondern vorher in Einklang mit der Datenstrategie gebracht werden, dabei sollten mindestens diese Fragen geklärt werden:

  • Welche Datenquellen sind vorhanden und werden zukünftig absehbar vorhanden sein?
  • Welche Anwendungsfälle (Use Cases) habe ich für die Business Intelligence bzw. Datenplattform?
  • Über welche finanziellen und fachlichen Ressourcen darf verfügt werden?

Darüber hinaus sollten sich die Architekten bewusst sein, dass, anders als noch in der trägeren On-Premise-Welt, die Could-Dienste schnelllebig sind. So sah die Referenzarchitektur 2019/2020 noch etwas anders aus, in der Databricks on Azure als System für Advanced Analytics inkludiert wurde, heute scheint diese Position im Referenzmodell komplett durch Azure Synapse ersetzt worden zu sein.

Azure Reference Architecture BI Databrikcs 2019

Azure Reference Architecture – with Databricks, old image source: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/architecture/solution-ideas/articles/modern-data-warehouse

Hinweis zu den Kosten und der Administration

Die Kosten für Cloud Computing statt für IT-Infrastruktur On-Premise sind ein zweischneidiges Schwert. Der günstige Einstieg in de Azure Cloud ist möglich, jedoch bedingt ein kosteneffizienter Betrieb viel Know-How im Umgang mit den Diensten und Konfigurationsmöglichkeiten der Azure Cloud oder des jeweiligen alternativen Anbieters. Beispielsweise können über Azure Data Factory Datenbanken über Pipelines automatisiert hochskaliert und nach nur Minuten wieder runterskaliert werden. Nur wer diese dynamischen Skaliermöglichkeiten nutzt, arbeitet effizient in der Cloud.

Ferner sind Kosten nur schwer einschätzbar, da diese mehr noch von der Nutzung (Datenmenge, CPU, RAM) als von der zeitlichen Nutzung (Lifetime) abhängig sind. Preisrechner ermöglichen zumindest eine Kosteneinschätzung: https://azure.com/e/96162a623bda4911bb8f631e317affc6

Sechs Eigenschaften einer modernen Business Intelligence

Völlig unabhängig von der Branche, in der Sie tätig sind, benötigen Sie Informationssysteme, die Ihre geschäftlichen Daten auswerten, um Ihnen Entscheidungsgrundlagen zu liefern. Diese Systeme werden gemeinläufig als sogenannte Business Intelligence (BI) bezeichnet. Tatsächlich leiden die meisten BI-Systeme an Mängeln, die abstellbar sind. Darüber hinaus kann moderne BI Entscheidungen teilweise automatisieren und umfassende Analysen bei hoher Flexibilität in der Nutzung ermöglichen.


english-flagRead this article in English:
“Six properties of modern Business Intelligence”


Lassen Sie uns die sechs Eigenschaften besprechen, die moderne Business Intelligence auszeichnet, die Berücksichtigungen von technischen Kniffen im Detail bedeuten, jedoch immer im Kontext einer großen Vision für die eigene Unternehmen-BI stehen:

1.      Einheitliche Datenbasis von hoher Qualität (Single Source of Truth)

Sicherlich kennt jeder Geschäftsführer die Situation, dass sich seine Manager nicht einig sind, wie viele Kosten und Umsätze tatsächlich im Detail entstehen und wie die Margen pro Kategorie genau aussehen. Und wenn doch, stehen diese Information oft erst Monate zu spät zur Verfügung.

In jedem Unternehmen sind täglich hunderte oder gar tausende Entscheidungen auf operative Ebene zu treffen, die bei guter Informationslage in der Masse sehr viel fundierter getroffen werden können und somit Umsätze steigern und Kosten sparen. Demgegenüber stehen jedoch viele Quellsysteme aus der unternehmensinternen IT-Systemlandschaft sowie weitere externe Datenquellen. Die Informationsbeschaffung und -konsolidierung nimmt oft ganze Mitarbeitergruppen in Anspruch und bietet viel Raum für menschliche Fehler.

Ein System, das zumindest die relevantesten Daten zur Geschäftssteuerung zur richtigen Zeit in guter Qualität in einer Trusted Data Zone als Single Source of Truth (SPOT) zur Verfügung stellt. SPOT ist das Kernstück moderner Business Intelligence.

Darüber hinaus dürfen auch weitere Daten über die BI verfügbar gemacht werden, die z. B. für qualifizierte Analysen und Data Scientists nützlich sein können. Die besonders vertrauenswürdige Zone ist jedoch für alle Entscheider diejenige, über die sich alle Entscheider unternehmensweit synchronisieren können.

2.      Flexible Nutzung durch unterschiedliche Stakeholder

Auch wenn alle Mitarbeiter unternehmensweit auf zentrale, vertrauenswürdige Daten zugreifen können sollen, schließt das bei einer cleveren Architektur nicht aus, dass sowohl jede Abteilung ihre eigenen Sichten auf diese Daten erhält, als auch, dass sogar jeder einzelne, hierfür qualifizierte Mitarbeiter seine eigene Sicht auf Daten erhalten und sich diese sogar selbst erstellen kann.

Viele BI-Systeme scheitern an der unternehmensweiten Akzeptanz, da bestimmte Abteilungen oder fachlich-definierte Mitarbeitergruppen aus der BI weitgehend ausgeschlossen werden.

Moderne BI-Systeme ermöglichen Sichten und die dafür notwendige Datenintegration für alle Stakeholder im Unternehmen, die auf Informationen angewiesen sind und profitieren gleichermaßen von dem SPOT-Ansatz.

3.      Effiziente Möglichkeiten zur Erweiterung (Time to Market)

Bei den Kernbenutzern eines BI-Systems stellt sich die Unzufriedenheit vor allem dann ein, wenn der Ausbau oder auch die teilweise Neugestaltung des Informationssystems einen langen Atem voraussetzt. Historisch gewachsene, falsch ausgelegte und nicht besonders wandlungsfähige BI-Systeme beschäftigen nicht selten eine ganze Mannschaft an IT-Mitarbeitern und Tickets mit Anfragen zu Änderungswünschen.

Gute BI versteht sich als Service für die Stakeholder mit kurzer Time to Market. Die richtige Ausgestaltung, Auswahl von Software und der Implementierung von Datenflüssen/-modellen sorgt für wesentlich kürzere Entwicklungs- und Implementierungszeiten für Verbesserungen und neue Features.

Des Weiteren ist nicht nur die Technik, sondern auch die Wahl der Organisationsform entscheidend, inklusive der Ausgestaltung der Rollen und Verantwortlichkeiten – von der technischen Systemanbindung über die Datenbereitstellung und -aufbereitung bis zur Analyse und dem Support für die Endbenutzer.

4.      Integrierte Fähigkeiten für Data Science und AI

Business Intelligence und Data Science werden oftmals als getrennt voneinander betrachtet und geführt. Zum einen, weil Data Scientists vielfach nur ungern mit – aus ihrer Sicht – langweiligen Datenmodellen und vorbereiteten Daten arbeiten möchten. Und zum anderen, weil die BI in der Regel bereits als traditionelles System im Unternehmen etabliert ist, trotz der vielen Kinderkrankheiten, die BI noch heute hat.

Data Science, häufig auch als Advanced Analytics bezeichnet, befasst sich mit dem tiefen Eintauchen in Daten über explorative Statistik und Methoden des Data Mining (unüberwachtes maschinelles Lernen) sowie mit Predictive Analytics (überwachtes maschinelles Lernen). Deep Learning ist ein Teilbereich des maschinellen Lernens (Machine Learning) und wird ebenfalls für Data Mining oder Predictvie Analytics angewendet. Bei Machine Learning handelt es sich um einen Teilbereich der Artificial Intelligence (AI).

In der Zukunft werden BI und Data Science bzw. AI weiter zusammenwachsen, denn spätestens nach der Inbetriebnahme fließen die Prädiktionsergebnisse und auch deren Modelle wieder in die Business Intelligence zurück. Vermutlich wird sich die BI zur ABI (Artificial Business Intelligence) weiterentwickeln. Jedoch schon heute setzen viele Unternehmen Data Mining und Predictive Analytics im Unternehmen ein und setzen dabei auf einheitliche oder unterschiedliche Plattformen mit oder ohne Integration zur BI.

Moderne BI-Systeme bieten dabei auch Data Scientists eine Plattform, um auf qualitativ hochwertige sowie auf granularere Rohdaten zugreifen zu können.

5.      Ausreichend hohe Performance

Vermutlich werden die meisten Leser dieser sechs Punkte schon einmal Erfahrung mit langsamer BI gemacht haben. So dauert das Laden eines täglich zu nutzenden Reports in vielen klassischen BI-Systemen mehrere Minuten. Wenn sich das Laden eines Dashboards mit einer kleinen Kaffee-Pause kombinieren lässt, mag das hin und wieder für bestimmte Berichte noch hinnehmbar sein. Spätestens jedoch bei der häufigen Nutzung sind lange Ladezeiten und unzuverlässige Reports nicht mehr hinnehmbar.

Ein Grund für mangelhafte Performance ist die Hardware, die sich unter Einsatz von Cloud-Systemen bereits beinahe linear skalierbar an höhere Datenmengen und mehr Analysekomplexität anpassen lässt. Der Einsatz von Cloud ermöglicht auch die modulartige Trennung von Speicher und Rechenleistung von den Daten und Applikationen und ist damit grundsätzlich zu empfehlen, jedoch nicht für alle Unternehmen unbedingt die richtige Wahl und muss zur Unternehmensphilosophie passen.

Tatsächlich ist die Performance nicht nur von der Hardware abhängig, auch die richtige Auswahl an Software und die richtige Wahl der Gestaltung von Datenmodellen und Datenflüssen spielt eine noch viel entscheidender Rolle. Denn während sich Hardware relativ einfach wechseln oder aufrüsten lässt, ist ein Wechsel der Architektur mit sehr viel mehr Aufwand und BI-Kompetenz verbunden. Dabei zwingen unpassende Datenmodelle oder Datenflüsse ganz sicher auch die neueste Hardware in maximaler Konfiguration in die Knie.

6.      Kosteneffizienter Einsatz und Fazit

Professionelle Cloud-Systeme, die für BI-Systeme eingesetzt werden können, bieten Gesamtkostenrechner an, beispielsweise Microsoft Azure, Amazon Web Services und Google Cloud. Mit diesen Rechnern – unter Einweisung eines erfahrenen BI-Experten – können nicht nur Kosten für die Nutzung von Hardware abgeschätzt, sondern auch Ideen zur Kostenoptimierung kalkuliert werden. Dennoch ist die Cloud immer noch nicht für jedes Unternehmen die richtige Lösung und klassische Kalkulationen für On-Premise-Lösungen sind notwendig und zudem besser planbar als Kosten für die Cloud.

Kosteneffizienz lässt sich übrigens auch mit einer guten Auswahl der passenden Software steigern. Denn proprietäre Lösungen sind an unterschiedliche Lizenzmodelle gebunden und können nur über Anwendungsszenarien miteinander verglichen werden. Davon abgesehen gibt es jedoch auch gute Open Source Lösungen, die weitgehend kostenfrei genutzt werden dürfen und für viele Anwendungsfälle ohne Abstriche einsetzbar sind.

Die Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) gehören zum BI-Management mit dazu und sollten stets im Fokus sein. Falsch wäre es jedoch, die Kosten einer BI nur nach der Kosten für Hardware und Software zu bewerten. Ein wesentlicher Teil der Kosteneffizienz ist komplementär mit den Aspekten für die Performance des BI-Systems, denn suboptimale Architekturen arbeiten verschwenderisch und benötigen mehr und teurere Hardware als sauber abgestimmte Architekturen. Die Herstellung der zentralen Datenbereitstellung in adäquater Qualität kann viele unnötige Prozesse der Datenaufbereitung ersparen und viele flexible Analysemöglichkeiten auch redundante Systeme direkt unnötig machen und somit zu Einsparungen führen.

In jedem Fall ist ein BI für Unternehmen mit vielen operativen Prozessen grundsätzlich immer günstiger als kein BI zu haben. Heutzutage könnte für ein Unternehmen nichts teurer sein, als nur nach Bauchgefühl gesteuert zu werden, denn der Markt tut es nicht und bietet sehr viel Transparenz.

Dennoch sind bestehende BI-Architekturen hin und wieder zu hinterfragen. Bei genauerem Hinsehen mit BI-Expertise ist die Kosteneffizienz und Datentransparenz häufig möglich.

Introduction to Recommendation Engines

This is the second article of article series Getting started with the top eCommerce use cases. If you are interested in reading the first article you can find it here.

What are Recommendation Engines?

Recommendation engines are the automated systems which helps select out similar things whenever a user selects something online. Be it Netflix, Amazon, Spotify, Facebook or YouTube etc. All of these companies are now using some sort of recommendation engine to improve their user experience. A recommendation engine not only helps to predict if a user prefers an item or not but also helps to increase sales, ,helps to understand customer behavior, increase number of registered users and helps a user to do better time management. For instance Netflix will suggest what movie you would want to watch or Amazon will suggest what kind of other products you might want to buy. All the mentioned platforms operates using the same basic algorithm in the background and in this article we are going to discuss the idea behind it.

What are the techniques?

There are two fundamental algorithms that comes into play when there’s a need to generate recommendations. In next section these techniques are discussed in detail.

Content-Based Filtering

The idea behind content based filtering is to analyse a set of features which will provide a similarity between items themselves i.e. between two movies, two products or two songs etc. These set of features once compared gives a similarity score at the end which can be used as a reference for the recommendations.

There are several steps involved to get to this similarity score and the first step is to construct a profile for each item by representing some of the important features of that item. In other terms, this steps requires to define a set of characteristics that are discovered easily. For instance, consider that there’s an article which a user has already read and once you know that this user likes this article you may want to show him recommendations of similar articles. Now, using content based filtering technique you could find the similar articles. The easiest way to do that is to set some features for this article like publisher, genre, author etc. Based on these features similar articles can be recommended to the user (as illustrated in Figure 1). There are three main similarity measures one could use to find the similar articles mentioned below.

 

Figure 1: Content-Based Filtering

 

 

Minkowski distance

Minkowski distance between two variables can be calculated as:

(x,y)= (\sum_{i=1}^{n}{|X_{i} - Y_{i}|^{p}})^{1/p}

 

Cosine Similarity

Cosine similarity between two variables can be calculated as :

  \mbox{Cosine Similarity} = \frac{\sum_{i=1}^{n}{x_{i} y_{i}}} {\sqrt{\sum_{i=1}^{n}{x_{i}^{2}}} \sqrt{\sum_{i=1}^{n}{y_{i}^{2}}}} \

 

Jaccard Similarity

 

  J(X,Y) = |X ∩ Y| / |X ∪ Y|

 

These measures can be used to create a matrix which will give you the similarity between each movie and then a function can be defined to return the top 10 similar articles.

 

Collaborative filtering

This filtering method focuses on finding how similar two users or two products are by analyzing user behavior or preferences rather than focusing on the content of the items. For instance consider that there are three users A,B and C.  We want to recommend some movies to user A, our first approach would be to find similar users and compare which movies user A has not yet watched and recommend those movies to user A.  This approach where we try to find similar users is called as User-User Collaborative Filtering.  

The other approach that could be used here is when you try to find similar movies based on the ratings given by others, this type is called as Item-Item Collaborative Filtering. The research shows that item-item collaborative filtering works better than user-user collaborative filtering as user behavior is really dynamic and changes over time. Also, there are a lot more users and increasing everyday but on the other side item characteristics remains the same. To calculate the similarities we can use Cosine distance.

 

Figure 2: Collaborative Filtering

 

Recently some companies have started to take advantage of both content based and collaborative filtering techniques to make a hybrid recommendation engine. The results from both models are combined into one hybrid model which provides more accurate recommendations. Five steps are involved to make a recommendation engine work which are collection of data, storing of data, analyzing the data, filtering the data and providing recommendations. There are a lot of attributes that are involved in order to collect user data including browsing history, page views, search logs, order history, marketing channel touch points etc. which requires a strong data architecture.  The collection of data is pretty straightforward but it can be overwhelming to analyze this amount of data. Storing this data could get tricky on the other hand as you need a scalable database for this kind of data. With the rise of graph databases this area is also improving for many use cases including recommendation engines. Graph databases like Neo4j can also help to analyze and find similar users and relationship among them. Analyzing the data can be carried in different ways, depending on how strong and scalable your architecture you can run real time, batch or near real time analysis. The fourth step involves the filtering of the data and here you can use any of the above mentioned approach to find similarities to finally provide the recommendations.

Having a good recommendation engine can be time consuming initially but it is definitely beneficial in the longer run. It not only helps to generate revenue but also helps to to improve your product catalog and customer service.

Erstellen und benutzen einer Geodatenbank

In diesem Artikel soll es im Gegensatz zum vorherigen Artikel Alles über Geodaten weniger darum gehen, was man denn alles mit Geodaten machen kann, dafür aber mehr darum wie man dies anstellt. Es wird gezeigt, wie man aus dem öffentlich verfügbaren Datensatz des OpenStreetMap-Projekts eine Geodatenbank erstellt und einige Beispiele dafür gegeben, wie man diese abfragen und benutzen kann.

Wahl der Datenbank

Prinzipiell gibt es zwei große “geo-kompatible” OpenSource-Datenbanken bzw. “Datenbank-AddOn’s”: Spatialite, welches auf SQLite aufbaut, und PostGIS, das PostgreSQL verwendet.

PostGIS bietet zum Teil eine einfachere Syntax, welche manchmal weniger Tipparbeit verursacht. So kann man zum Beispiel um die Entfernung zwischen zwei Orten zu ermitteln einfach schreiben:

während dies in Spatialite “nur” mit einer normalen Funktion möglich ist:

Trotztdem wird in diesem Artikel Spatialite (also SQLite) verwendet, da dessen Einrichtung deutlich einfacher ist (schließlich sollen interessierte sich alle Ergebnisse des Artikels problemlos nachbauen können, ohne hierfür einen eigenen Datenbankserver aufsetzen zu müssen).

Der Hauptunterschied zwischen PostgreSQL und SQLite (eigentlich der Unterschied zwischen SQLite und den meissten anderen Datenbanken) ist, dass für PostgreSQL im Hintergrund ein Server laufen muss, an welchen die entsprechenden Queries gesendet werden, während SQLite ein “normales” Programm (also kein Client-Server-System) ist welches die Queries selber auswertet.

Hierdurch fällt beim Aufsetzen der Datenbank eine ganze Menge an Konfigurationsarbeit weg: Welche Benutzer gibt es bzw. akzeptiert der Server? Welcher Benutzer bekommt welche Rechte? Über welche Verbindung wird auf den Server zugegriffen? Wie wird die Sicherheit dieser Verbindung sichergestellt? …

Während all dies bei SQLite (und damit auch Spatialite) wegfällt und die Einrichtung der Datenbank eigentlich nur “installieren und fertig” ist, muss auf der anderen Seite aber auch gesagt werden dass SQLite nicht gut für Szenarien geeignet ist, in welchen viele Benutzer gleichzeitig (insbesondere schreibenden) Zugriff auf die Datenbank benötigen.

Benötigte Software und ein Beispieldatensatz

Was wird für diesen Artikel an Software benötigt?

SQLite3 als Datenbank

libspatialite als “Geoplugin” für SQLite

spatialite-tools zum erstellen der Datenbank aus dem OpenStreetMaps (*.osm.pbf) Format

python3, die beiden GeoModule spatialite, folium und cartopy, sowie die Module pandas und matplotlib (letztere gehören im Bereich der Datenauswertung mit Python sowieso zum Standart). Für pandas gibt es noch die Erweiterung geopandas sowie eine praktisch unüberschaubare Anzahl weiterer geographischer Module aber bereits mit den genannten lassen sich eine Menge interessanter Dinge herausfinden.

– und natürlich einen Geodatensatz: Zum Beispiel sind aus dem OpenStreetMap-Projekt extrahierte Datensätze hier zu finden.

Es ist ratsam, sich hier erst einmal einen kleinen Datensatz herunterzuladen (wie zum Beispiel einen der Stadtstaaten Bremen, Hamburg oder Berlin). Zum einen dauert die Konvertierung des .osm.pbf-Formats in eine Spatialite-Datenbank bei größeren Datensätzen unter Umständen sehr lange, zum anderen ist die fertige Datenbank um ein vielfaches größer als die stark gepackte Originaldatei (für “nur” Deutschland ist die fertige Datenbank bereits ca. 30 GB groß und man lässt die Konvertierung (zumindest am eigenen Laptop) am besten über Nacht laufen – willkommen im Bereich “BigData”).

Erstellen eine Geodatenbank aus OpenStreetMap-Daten

Nach dem Herunterladen eines Datensatzes der Wahl im *.osm.pbf-Format kann hieraus recht einfach mit folgendem Befehl aus dem Paket spatialite-tools die Datenbank erstellt werden:

Erkunden der erstellten Geodatenbank

Nach Ausführen des obigen Befehls sollte nun eine Datei mit dem gewählten Namen (im Beispiel bremen-latest.sqlite) im aktuellen Ordner vorhanden sein – dies ist bereits die fertige Datenbank. Zunächst sollte man mit dieser Datenbank erst einmal dasselbe machen, wie mit jeder anderen Datenbank auch: Sich erst einmal eine Weile hinsetzen und schauen was alles an Daten in der Datenbank vorhanden und vor allem wo diese Daten in der erstellten Tabellenstruktur zu finden sind. Auch wenn dieses Umschauen prinzipiell auch vollständig über die Shell oder in Python möglich ist, sind hier Programme mit graphischer Benutzeroberfläche (z. B. spatialite-gui oder QGIS) sehr hilfreich und sparen nicht nur eine Menge Zeit sondern vor allem auch Tipparbeit. Wer dies tut, wird feststellen, dass sich in der generierten Datenbank einige dutzend Tabellen mit Namen wie pt_addresses, ln_highway und pg_boundary befinden.

Die Benennung der Tabellen folgt dem Prinzip, dass pt_*-Tabellen Punkte im Geokoordinatensystem wie z. B. Adressen, Shops, Bäckereien und ähnliches enthalten. ln_*-Tabellen enthalten hingegen geographische Entitäten, welche sich als Linien darstellen lassen, wie beispielsweise Straßen, Hochspannungsleitungen, Schienen, ect. Zuletzt gibt es die pg_*-Tabellen welche Polygone – also Flächen einer bestimmten Form enthalten. Dazu zählen Landesgrenzen, Bundesländer, Inseln, Postleitzahlengebiete, Landnutzung, aber auch Gebäude, da auch diese jeweils eine Grundfläche besitzen. In dem genannten Datensatz sind die Grundflächen von Gebäuden – zumindest in Europa – nahezu vollständig. Aber auch der Rest der Welt ist für ein “Wikipedia der Kartographie” insbesondere in halbwegs besiedelten Gebieten bemerkenswert gut erfasst, auch wenn nicht unbedingt davon ausgegangen werden kann, dass abgelegenere Gegenden (z. B. irgendwo auf dem Land in Südamerika) jedes Gebäude eingezeichnet ist.

Verwenden der Erstellten Datenbank

Auf diese Datenbank kann nun entweder direkt aus der Shell über den Befehl

zugegriffen werden oder man nutzt das gleichnamige Python-Paket:

Nach Eingabe der obigen Befehle in eine Python-Konsole, ein Jupyter-Notebook oder ein anderes Programm, welches die Anbindung an den Python-Interpreter ermöglicht, können die von der Datenbank ausgegebenen Ergebnisse nun direkt in ein Pandas Data Frame hineingeladen und verwendet/ausgewertet/analysiert werden.

Im Grunde wird hierfür “normales SQL” verwendet, wie in anderen Datenbanken auch. Der folgende Beispiel gibt einfach die fünf ersten von der Datenbank gefundenen Adressen aus der Tabelle pt_addresses aus:

Link zur Ausgabe

Es wird dem Leser sicherlich aufgefallen sein, dass die Spalte “Geometry” (zumindest für das menschliche Auge) nicht besonders ansprechend sowie auch nicht informativ aussieht: Der Grund hierfür ist, dass diese Spalte die entsprechende Position im geographischen Koordinatensystem aus Gründen wie dem deutlich kleineren Speicherplatzbedarf sowie der damit einhergehenden Optimierung der Geschwindigkeit der Datenbank selber, in binärer Form gespeichert und ohne weitere Verarbeitung auch als solche ausgegeben wird.

Glücklicherweise stellt spatialite eine ganze Reihe von Funktionen zur Verarbeitung dieser geographischen Informationen bereit, von denen im folgenden einige beispielsweise vorgestellt werden:

Für einzelne Punkte im Koordinatensystem gibt es beispielsweise die Funktionen X(geometry) und Y(geometry), welche aus diesem “binären Wirrwarr” den Längen- bzw. Breitengrad des jeweiligen Punktes als lesbare Zahlen ausgibt.

Ändert man also das obige Query nun entsprechend ab, erhält man als Ausgabe folgendes Ergebnis in welchem die Geometry-Spalte der ausgegebenen Adressen in den zwei neuen Spalten Longitude und Latitude in lesbarer Form zu finden ist:

Link zur Tabelle

Eine weitere häufig verwendete Funktion von Spatialite ist die Distance-Funktion, welche die Distanz zwischen zwei Orten berechnet.

Das folgende Beispiel sucht in der Datenbank die 10 nächstgelegenen Bäckereien zu einer frei wählbaren Position aus der Datenbank und listet diese nach zunehmender Entfernung auf (Achtung – die frei wählbare Position im Beispiel liegt in München, wer die selbe Position z. B. mit dem Bremen-Datensatz verwendet, wird vermutlich etwas weiter laufen müssen…):

Link zur Ausgabe

Ein Anwendungsfall für eine solche Liste können zum Beispiel Programme/Apps wie maps.me oder Google-Maps sein, in denen User nach Bäckereien, Geldautomaten, Supermärkten oder Apotheken “in der Nähe” suchen können sollen.

Diese Liste enthält nun alle Informationen die grundsätzlich gebraucht werden, ist soweit auch informativ und wird in den meißten Fällen der Datenauswertung auch genau so gebraucht, jedoch ist diese für das Auge nicht besonders ansprechend.

Viel besser wäre es doch, die gefundenen Positionen auf einer interaktiven Karte einzuzeichnen:

Was kann man sonst interessantes mit der erstellten Datenbank und etwas Python machen? Wer in Deutschland ein wenig herumgekommen ist, dem ist eventuell aufgefallen, dass sich die Endungen von Ortsnamen stark unterscheiden: Um München gibt es Stadteile und Dörfer namens Garching, Freising, Aubing, ect., rund um Stuttgart enden alle möglichen Namen auf “ingen” (Plieningen, Vaihningen, Echterdingen …) und in Berlin gibt es Orte wie Pankow, Virchow sowie eine bunte Auswahl weiterer *ow’s.

Das folgende Query spuckt gibt alle “village’s”, “town’s” und “city’s” aus der Tabelle pt_place, also Dörfer und Städte, aus:

Link zur Ausgabe

Graphisch mit matplotlib und cartopy in ein Koordinatensystem eingetragen sieht diese Verteilung folgendermassen aus:

Die Grafik zeigt, dass stark unterschiedliche Vorkommen der verschiedenen Ortsendungen in Deutschland (Clustering). Über das genaue Zustandekommen dieser Verteilung kann ich hier nur spekulieren, jedoch wird diese vermutlich ähnlichen Prozessen unterliegen wie beispielsweise die Entwicklung von Dialekten.

Wer sich die Karte etwas genauer anschaut wird merken, dass die eingezeichneten Landesgrenzen und Küstenlinien nicht besonders genau sind. Hieran wird ein interessanter Effekt von häufig verwendeten geographischen Entitäten, nämlich Linien und Polygonen deutlich. Im Beispiel werden durch die beiden Zeilen

die bereits im Modul cartopy hinterlegten Daten verwendet. Genaue Verläufe von Küstenlinien und Landesgrenzen benötigen mit wachsender Genauigkeit hingegen sehr viel Speicherplatz, da mehr und mehr zu speichernde Punkte benötigt werden (genaueres siehe hier).

Schlussfolgerung

Man kann also bereits mit einigen Grundmodulen und öffentlich verfügbaren Datensätzen eine ganze Menge im Bereich der Geodaten erkunden und entdecken. Gleichzeitig steht, insbesondere für spezielle Probleme, eine große Bandbreite weiterer Software zur Verfügung, für welche dieser Artikel zwar einen Grundsätzlichen Einstieg geben kann, die jedoch den Rahmen dieses Artikels sprengen würden.

Interview: Does Business Intelligence benefit from Cloud Data Warehousing?

Interview with Ross Perez, Senior Director, Marketing EMEA at Snowflake

Read this article in German:
“Profitiert Business Intelligence vom Data Warehouse in der Cloud?”

Does Business Intelligence benefit from Cloud Data Warehousing?

Ross Perez is the Senior Director, Marketing EMEA at Snowflake. He leads the Snowflake marketing team in EMEA and is charged with starting the discussion about analytics, data, and cloud data warehousing across EMEA. Before Snowflake, Ross was a product marketer at Tableau Software where he founded the Iron Viz Championship, the world’s largest and longest running data visualization competition.

Data Science Blog: Ross, Business Intelligence (BI) is not really a new trend. In 2019/2020, making data available for the whole company should not be a big thing anymore. Would you agree?

BI is definitely an old trend, reporting has been around for 50 years. People are accustomed to seeing statistics and data for the company at large, and even their business units. However, using BI to deliver analytics to everyone in the organization and encouraging them to make decisions based on data for their specific area is relatively new. In a lot of the companies Snowflake works with, there is a huge new group of people who have recently received access to self-service BI and visualization tools like Tableau, Looker and Sigma, and they are just starting to find answers to their questions.

Data Science Blog: Up until today, BI was just about delivering dashboards for reporting to the business. The data warehouse (DWH) was something like the backend. Today we have increased demand for data transparency. How should companies deal with this demand?

Because more people in more departments are wanting access to data more frequently, the demand on backend systems like the data warehouse is skyrocketing. In many cases, companies have data warehouses that weren’t built to cope with this concurrent demand and that means that the experience is slow. End users have to wait a long time for their reports. That is where Snowflake comes in: since we can use the power of the cloud to spin up resources on demand, we can serve any number of concurrent users. Snowflake can also house unlimited amounts of data, of both structured and semi-structured formats.

Data Science Blog: Would you say the DWH is the key driver for becoming a data-driven organization? What else should be considered here?

Absolutely. Without having all of your data in a single, highly elastic, and flexible data warehouse, it can be a huge challenge to actually deliver insight to people in the organization.

Data Science Blog: So much for the theory, now let’s talk about specific use cases. In general, it matters a lot whether you are storing and analyzing e.g. financial data or machine data. What do we have to consider for both purposes?

Financial data and machine data do look very different, and often come in different formats. For instance, financial data is often in a standard relational format. Data like this needs to be able to be easily queried with standard SQL, something that many Hadoop and noSQL tools were unable to provide. Luckily, Snowflake is an ansi-standard SQL data warehouse so it can be used with this type of data quite seamlessly.

On the other hand, machine data is often semi-structured or even completely unstructured. This type of data is becoming significantly more common with the rise of IoT, but traditional data warehouses were very bad at dealing with it since they were optimized for relational data. Semi-structured data like JSON, Avro, XML, Orc and Parquet can be loaded into Snowflake for analysis quite seamlessly in its native format. This is important, because you don’t want to have to flatten the data to get any use from it.

Both types of data are important, and Snowflake is really the first data warehouse that can work with them both seamlessly.

Data Science Blog: Back to the common business use case: Creating sales or purchase reports for the business managers, based on data from ERP-systems such as Microsoft or SAP. Which architecture for the DWH could be the right one? How many and which database layers do you see as necessary?

The type of report largely does not matter, because in all cases you want a data warehouse that can support all of your data and serve all of your users. Ideally, you also want to be able to turn it off and on depending on demand. That means that you need a cloud-based architecture… and specifically Snowflake’s innovative architecture that separates storage and compute, making it possible to pay for exactly what you use.

Data Science Blog: Where would you implement the main part of the business logic for the report? In the DWH or in the reporting tool? Does it matter which reporting tool we choose?

The great thing is that you can choose either. Snowflake, as an ansi-Standard SQL data warehouse, can support a high degree of data modeling and business logic. But you can also utilize partners like Looker and Sigma who specialize in data modeling for BI. We think it’s best that the customer chooses what is right for them.

Data Science Blog: Snowflake enables organizations to store and manage their data in the cloud. Does it mean companies lose control over their storage and data management?

Customers have complete control over their data, and in fact Snowflake cannot see, alter or change any aspect of their data. The benefit of a cloud solution is that customers don’t have to manage the infrastructure or the tuning – they decide how they want to store and analyze their data and Snowflake takes care of the rest.

Data Science Blog: How big is the effort for smaller and medium sized companies to set up a DWH in the cloud? Does this have to be an expensive long-term project in every case?

The nice thing about Snowflake is that you can get started with a free trial in a few minutes. Now, moving from a traditional data warehouse to Snowflake can take some time, depending on the legacy technology that you are using. But Snowflake itself is quite easy to set up and very much compatible with historical tools making it relatively easy to move over.

Allgemeines über Geodaten

Dieser Artikel ist der Auftakt in einer Artikelserie zum Thema “Geodatenanalyse”.

Von den vielen Arten an Datensätzen, die öffentlich im Internet verfügbar sind, bin ich in letzter Zeit vermehrt über eine besonders interessante Gruppe gestolpert, die sich gleich für mehrere Zwecke nutzen lassen: Geodaten.

Gerade in wirtschaftlicher Hinsicht bieten sich eine ganze Reihe von Anwendungsfällen, bei denen Geodaten helfen können, Einblicke in Tatsachen zu erlangen, die ohne nicht möglich wären. Der wohl bekannteste Fall hierfür ist vermutlich die einfache Navigation zwischen zwei Punkten, die jeder kennt, der bereits ein Navigationssystem genutzt oder sich eine Route von Google Maps berechnen lassen hat.
Hiermit können nicht nur Fragen nach dem schnellsten oder Energie einsparensten (und damit gleichermaßen auch witschaftlichsten) Weg z. B. von Berlin nach Hamburg beantwortet werden, sondern auch die bestmögliche Lösung für Ausnahmesituationen wie Stau oder Vollsperrungen berechnet werden (ja, Stau ist, zumindest in der Theorie immer noch eine “Ausnahmesituation” ;-)).
Neben dieser beliebten Art Geodaten zu nutzen, gibt es eine ganze Reihe weiterer Situationen in denen deren Nutzung hilfreich bis essentiell sein kann. Als Beispiel sei hier der Einzugsbereich von in Konkurrenz stehenden Einheiten, wie z. B. Supermärkten genannt. Ohne an dieser Stelle statistische Nachweise vorlegen zu können, kaufen (zumindest meiner persönlichen Beobachtung nach) die meisten Menschen fast immer bei dem Supermarkt ein, der am bequemsten zu erreichen ist und dies ist in der Regel der am nächsten gelegene. Besitzt man nun eine Datenbank mit der Information, wo welcher Supermarkt bzw. welche Supermarktkette liegt, kann man mit so genannten Voronidiagrammen recht einfach den jeweiligen Einzugsbereich der jeweiligen Supermärkte berechnen.
Entsprechende Karten können auch von beliebigen anderen Entitäten mit fester geographischer Position gezeichnet werden: Geldautomaten, Funkmasten, öffentlicher Nahverkehr, …

Ein anderes Beispiel, das für die Datenauswertung interessant ist, ist die kartographische Auswertung von Postleitzahlen. Diese sind in fast jedem Datensatz zu Kunden, Lieferanten, ect. vorhanden, bilden jedoch weder eine ordinale, noch eine sinnvolle kategorische Größe, da es viele tausend verschiedene gibt. Zudem ist auch eine einfache Gruppierung in gröbere Kategorien wie beispielsweise Postleitzahlen des Schemas 1xxxx oft kaum sinnvoll, da diese in aller Regel kein sinnvolles Mapping auf z. B. politische Gebiete – wie beispielsweise Bundesländer – zulassen. Ein Ausweg aus diesem Dilemma ist eine einfache kartographische Übersicht, welche die einzelnen Postleitzahlengebiete in einer Farbskala zeigt.

Im gezeigten Beispiel ist die Bevölkerungsdichte Deutschlands als Karte zu sehen. Hiermit wird schnell und übersichtlich deutlich, wo in Deutschland die Bevölkerung lokalisiert ist. Ähnliche Karten können beispielsweise erstellt werden, um Fragen wie “Wie ist meine Kundschaft verteilt?” oder “Wo hat die Werbekampange XYZ besonders gut funktioniert?” zu beantworten. Bezieht man weitere Daten wie die absolute Bevölkerung oder die Bevölkerungsdichte mit ein, können auch Antworten auf Fragen wie “Welchen Anteil der Bevölkerung habe ich bereits erreicht und wo ist noch nicht genutztes Potential?” oder “Ist mein Produkt eher in städtischen oder ländlichen Gebieten gefragt?” einfach und schnell gefunden werden.
Ohne die entsprechende geographische Zusatzinformation bleiben insbesondere Postleitzahlen leider oft als “nicht sinnvoll auswertbar” bei der Datenauswertung links liegen.
Eine ganz andere Art von Vorteil der Geodaten ist der educational point of view:
  • Wer erst anfängt, sich mit Datenbanken zu beschäftigen, findet mit Straßen, Postleitzahlen und Ländern einen deutlich einfacheren und vor allem besser verständlichen Zugang zu SQL als mit abstrakten Größen und Nummern wie ProductID, CustomerID und AdressID. Zudem lassen sich Geodaten nebenbei bemerkt mittels so genannter GeoInformationSystems (*gis-Programme), erstaunlich einfach und ansprechend plotten.
  • Wer sich mit SQL bereits ein wenig auskennt, kann mit den (beispielsweise von Spatialite oder PostGIS) bereitgestellten SQL-Funktionen eine ganze Menge über Datenbanken sowie deren Möglichkeiten – aber auch über deren Grenzen – erfahren.
  • Für wen relationale Datenbanken sowie deren Funktionen schon lange nichts Neues mehr darstellen, kann sich hier (selbst mit dem eigenen Notebook) erstaunlich einfach in das Thema “Bug Data” einarbeiten, da die Menge an öffentlich vorhandenen Geodaten z.B. des OpenStreetMaps-Projektes selbst in optimal gepackten Format vielen Dutzend GB entsprechen. Gerade die Möglichkeit, die viele *gis-Programme wie beispielsweise QGIS bieten, nämlich Straßen-, Schienen- und Stromnetze “on-the-fly” zu plotten, macht die Bedeutung von richtig oder falsch gesetzten Indices in verschiedenen Datenbanken allein anhand der Geschwindigkeit mit der sich die Plots aufbauen sehr eindrucksvoll deutlich.
Um an Datensätze zu kommen, reicht es in der Regel Google mit den entsprechenden Schlagworten zu versorgen.
Neben – um einen Vergleich zu nutzen – dem Brockhaus der Karten GoogleMaps gibt es beispielsweise mit dem OpenStreetMaps-Projekt einen freien Geodatensatz, welcher in diesem Kontext etwa als das Wikipedia der Karten zu verstehen ist.
Hier findet man zum Beispiel Daten wie Straßen-, Schienen- oder dem Stromnetz, aber auch die im obigen Voronidiagramm eingezeichneten Gebäude und Supermärkte stammen aus diesem Datensatz. Hiermit lassen sich recht einfach just for fun interessante Dinge herausfinden, wie z. B., dass es in Deutschland ca. 28 Mio Gebäude gibt (ein SQL-Einzeiler), dass der Berliner Osten auch ca. 30 Jahre nach der Wende noch immer vorwiegend von der Tram versorgt wird, während im Westen hauptsächlich die U-Bahn fährt. Oder über welche Trassen der in der Nordsee von Windkraftanlagen erzeugte Strom auf das Festland kommt und von da aus weiter verteilt wird.
Eher grundlegende aber deswegen nicht weniger nützliche Datensätze lassen sich unter dem Stichwort “natural earth” finden. Hier sind Daten wie globale Küstenlinien, mittels Echolot ausgemessene Meerestiefen, aber auch von Menschen geschaffene Dinge wie Landesgrenzen und Städte sehr übersichtlich zu finden.
Im Grunde sind der Vorstellung aber keinerlei Grenzen gesetzt und fast alle denkbaren geographischen Fakten können, manchmal sogar live via Sattelit, mitverfolgt werden. So kann man sich beispielsweise neben aktueller Wolkenbedekung, Regenradar und globaler Oberflächentemperatur des Planeten auch das Abschmelzen der Polkappen seit 1970 ansehen (NSIDC) oder sich live die Blitzeinschläge auf dem gesamten Planeten anschauen – mit Vorhersage darüber, wann und wo der Donner zu hören ist (das funktioniert wirklich! Beispielsweise auf lightningmaps).
Kurzum Geodaten sind neben ihrer wirtschaftlichen Relevanz – vor allem für die Logistik – auch für angehende Data Scientists sehr aufschlussreich und ein wunderbares Spielzeug, mit dem man sich lange beschäftigen und eine Menge interessanter Dinge herausfinden kann.

How To Remotely Send R and Python Execution to SQL Server from Jupyter Notebooks

Introduction

Did you know that you can execute R and Python code remotely in SQL Server from Jupyter Notebooks or any IDE? Machine Learning Services in SQL Server eliminates the need to move data around. Instead of transferring large and sensitive data over the network or losing accuracy on ML training with sample csv files, you can have your R/Python code execute within your database. You can work in Jupyter Notebooks, RStudio, PyCharm, VSCode, Visual Studio, wherever you want, and then send function execution to SQL Server bringing intelligence to where your data lives.

This tutorial will show you an example of how you can send your python code from Juptyter notebooks to execute within SQL Server. The same principles apply to R and any other IDE as well. If you prefer to learn through videos, this tutorial is also published on YouTube here:


 

Environment Setup Prerequisites

  1. Install ML Services on SQL Server

In order for R or Python to execute within SQL, you first need the Machine Learning Services feature installed and configured. See this how-to guide.

  1. Install RevoscalePy via Microsoft’s Python Client

In order to send Python execution to SQL from Jupyter Notebooks, you need to use Microsoft’s RevoscalePy package. To get RevoscalePy, download and install Microsoft’s ML Services Python Client. Documentation Page or Direct Download Link (for Windows).

After downloading, open powershell as an administrator and navigate to the download folder. Start the installation with this command (feel free to customize the install folder): .\Install-PyForMLS.ps1 -InstallFolder “C:\Program Files\MicrosoftPythonClient”

Be patient while the installation can take a little while. Once installed navigate to the new path you installed in. Let’s make an empty folder and open Jupyter Notebooks: mkdir JupyterNotebooks; cd JupyterNotebooks; ..\Scripts\jupyter-notebook

Create a new notebook with the Python 3 interpreter:

 

To test if everything is setup, import revoscalepy in the first cell and execute. If there are no error messages you are ready to move forward.

Database Setup (Required for this tutorial only)

For the rest of the tutorial you can clone this Jupyter Notebook from Github if you don’t want to copy paste all of the code. This database setup is a one time step to ensure you have the same data as this tutorial. You don’t need to perform any of these setup steps to use your own data.

  1. Create a database

Modify the connection string for your server and use pyodbc to create a new database.

  1. Import Iris sample from SkLearn

Iris is a popular dataset for beginner data science tutorials. It is included by default in sklearn package.

  1. Use RecoscalePy APIs to create a table and load the Iris data

(You can also do this with pyodbc, sqlalchemy or other packages)

Define a Function to Send to SQL Server

Write any python code you want to execute in SQL. In this example we are creating a scatter matrix on the iris dataset and only returning the bytestream of the .png back to Jupyter Notebooks to render on our client.

Send execution to SQL

Now that we are finally set up, check out how easy sending remote execution really is! First, import revoscalepy. Create a sql_compute_context, and then send the execution of any function seamlessly to SQL Server with RxExec. No raw data had to be transferred from SQL to the Jupyter Notebook. All computation happened within the database and only the image file was returned to be displayed.

While this example is trivial with the Iris dataset, imagine the additional scale, performance, and security capabilities that you now unlocked. You can use any of the latest open source R/Python packages to build Deep Learning and AI applications on large amounts of data in SQL Server. We also offer leading edge, high-performance algorithms in Microsoft’s RevoScaleR and RevoScalePy APIs. Using these with the latest innovations in the open source world allows you to bring unparalleled selection, performance, and scale to your applications.

Learn More

Check out SQL Machine Learning Services Documentation to learn how you can easily deploy your R/Python code with SQL stored procedures making them accessible in your ETL processes or to any application. Train and store machine learning models in your database bringing intelligence to where your data lives.

Other YouTube Tutorials:

DS-GVO: Wie das moderne Data-Warehouse Unternehmen entlastet

Artikel des Blog-Sponsors: Snowflake

Viele Aktivitäten, die zur Einhaltung der DS-GVO-Anforderungen beitragen, liegen in den Händen der Unternehmen selbst. Deren IT-Anbieter sollten dazu beitragen, die Compliance-Anforderungen dieser Unternehmen zu erfüllen. Die SaaS-Anbieter eines Unternehmens sollten zumindest die IT-Sicherheitsanforderungen erfüllen, die sich vollständig in ihrem Bereich befinden und sich auf die Geschäfts- und Datensicherheit ihrer Kunden auswirken.

Snowflake wurde von Grund auf so gestaltet, dass die Einhaltung der DS-GVO erleichtert wird – und von Beginn darauf ausgelegt, enorme Mengen strukturierter und semistrukturierter Daten mit der Leichtigkeit von Standard-SQL zu verarbeiten. Die Zugänglichkeit und Einfachheit von SQL gibt Organisationen die Flexibilität, alle unter der DS-GVO erforderlichen Aktualisierungen, Änderungen oder Löschungen nahtlos vorzunehmen. Snowflakes Unterstützung für semistrukturierte Daten kann die Anpassung an neue Felder und andere Änderungen der Datensätze erleichtern. Darüber hinaus war die Sicherheit von Anfang an von grundlegender Bedeutung für Architektur, Implementierung und Betrieb von Snowflakes Data-Warehouse-as-a-Service.

Ein Grundprinzip der DS-GVO

Ein wichtiger Faktor für die Einhaltung der DS-GVO ist, zu verstehen, welche Daten eine Organisation besitzt und auf wen sie sich beziehen. Diese Anforderung macht es nötig, dass Daten strukturiert, organisiert und einfach zu suchen sind.

Die relationale SQL-Datenbankarchitektur von Snowflake bietet eine erheblich vereinfachte Struktur und Organisation, was sicherstellt, dass jeder Datensatz einen eindeutigen und leicht identifizierbaren Speicherort innerhalb der Datenbank besitzt. Snowflake-Kunden können auch relationalen Speicher mit dem Variant-Spaltentyp von Snowflake für semistrukturierte Daten kombinieren. Dieser Ansatz erweitert die Einfachheit des relationalen Formats auf die Schema-Flexibilität semistrukturierter Daten.

Snowflake ist noch leistungsfähiger durch seine Fähigkeit, massive Nebenläufigkeit zu unterstützen. Bei größeren Organisationen können Dutzende oder sogar Hunderte nebenläufiger Datenänderungen, -abfragen und -suchvorgänge zu einem bestimmten Zeitpunkt auftreten. Herkömmliche Data-Warehouses können nicht zu einem bestimmten Zeitpunkt über einen einzelnen Rechen-Cluster hinaus skaliert werden, was zu langen Warteschlangen und verzögerter Compliance führt. Snowflakes Multi-Cluster-Architektur für gemeinsam genutzte Daten löst dieses Problem, indem sie so viele einzigartige Rechen-Cluster bereitstellen kann, wie für einen beliebigen Zweck nötig sind, was zu einer effizienteren Workload-Isolierung und höherem Abfragedurchsatz führt. Jeder Mitarbeiter kann sehr große Datenmengen mit so vielen nebenläufigen Benutzern oder Operationen wie nötig speichern, organisieren, ändern, suchen und abfragen.

Rechte von Personen, deren Daten verarbeitet werden („Datensubjekte“)

Organisationen, die von der DS-GVO betroffen sind, müssen sicherstellen, dass sie Anfragen betroffener Personen nachkommen können. Einzelpersonen haben jetzt erheblich erweiterte Rechte, um zu erfahren, welche Art von Daten eine Organisation über sie besitzt, und das Recht, den Zugriff und/oder die Korrektur ihrer Daten anzufordern, die Daten zu löschen und/oder die Daten an einen neuen Provider zu übertragen. Bei der Bereitstellung dieser Dienste müssen Organisationen ziemlich schnell reagieren, in der Regel innerhalb von 30 Tagen. Daher müssen sie ihre Geschäftssysteme und ihr Data-Warehouse schnell durchsuchen können, um alle personenbezogenen Daten zu finden, die mit einer Person in Verbindung stehen, und entsprechende Maßnahmen ergreifen.

Organisationen können in großem Umfang von der Speicherung aller Daten in einem Data-Warehouse-as-a-Service mit vollen DML- und SQL-Fähigkeiten profitieren. Dies erleichtert das (mühevolle) Durchsuchen getrennter Geschäftssysteme und Datenspeicher, um die relevanten Daten zu finden. Und das wiederum hilft sicherzustellen, dass einzelne Datensätze durchsucht, gelöscht, eingeschränkt, aktualisiert, aufgeteilt und auf andere Weise manipuliert werden können, um sie an entsprechende Anfragen betroffener Personen anzupassen. Außerdem können Daten so verschoben werden, dass sie der Anforderung einer Anfrage zum „Recht auf Datenübertragbarkeit“ entsprechen. Von Anfang an wurde Snowflake mit ANSI-Standard-SQL und vollständiger DML-Unterstützung entwickelt, um sicherzustellen, dass diese Arten von Operationen möglich sind.

Sicherheit

Leider erfordern es viele herkömmliche Data-Warehouses, dass sich Unternehmen selbst um die IT-Sicherheit kümmern und diese mit anderen Services außerhalb des Kernangebots kombiniert wird. Außerdem bieten sie manchmal noch nicht einmal standardmäßige Verschlüsselung.

Als Data-Warehouse, das speziell für die Cloud entwickelt wurde und das Sicherheit als zentrales Element bietet, umfasst Snowflake unter anderem folgende integrierte Schutzfunktionen:

  • Minimaler Betriebsaufwand: Weniger Komplexität durch automatische Performance, Sicherheit und Hochverfügbarkeit, sodass die Infrastruktur nicht optimiert werden muss und kein Tuning nötig ist.
  • Durchgängige Verschlüsselung: Automatische Verschlüsselung aller Daten jederzeit (in ruhendem und bewegtem Zustand).
  • Umfassender Schutz: Zu den Sicherheitsfunktionen zählen Multi-Faktor-Authentifizierung, rollenbasierte Zugriffskontrolle, IP-Adressen-Whitelisting, zentralisierte Authentifizierung und jährliche Neuverschlüsselung verschlüsselter Daten.
  • Tri-Secret Secure: Kundenkontrolle und Datenschutz durch die Kombination aus einem vom Kunden, einem von Snowflake bereitgestellten Verschlüsselungsschlüssel und Benutzerzugangsdaten.
  • Unterstützung für AWS Private Link: Kunden können Daten zwischen ihrem virtuellen privaten Netzwerk und Snowflake übertragen, ohne über das Internet gehen zu müssen. Dadurch ist die Konnektivität zwischen den Netzwerken sicher und einfacher zu verwalten.
  • Stärkere unternehmensinterne Datenabgrenzung dank Snowflake Data Sharing: Organisationen können die Datenfreigabefunktionen von Snowflake nutzen, um nicht personenbezogene Daten mit anderen Abteilungen zu teilen, die keinen Zugriff benötigen – indem sie strengere Sicherheits- und DS-GVO-Kontrollen durchsetzen.
  • Private Umgebung: Unternehmen können eine dedizierte, verwaltete Snowflake- Instanz in einer separaten AWS Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) abrufen.

Rechenschaftspflicht

Was die Komplexität weiter erhöht: Organisationen müssen auch sicherstellen, dass sie und die Organisationen und Tools, mit denen sie arbeiten, Compliance nachweisen können. Snowflake prüft und verfeinert seine IT-Sicherheitspraxis regelmäßig mit peniblen Penetrationstests. Snowflakes Data-Warehouse-as-a-Service ist zertifiziert nach SOC 2 Type II, ist PCI-DSS-konform und unterstützt HIPAA-Compliance. Um Anfragen von Personen, deren Daten verarbeitet werden („Datensubjekte“), zu entsprechen, können Kunden genutzte Daten überprüfen.

Zusätzlich zu diesen Standardfunktionen und -validierungen schützt Snowflake seine Kunden auch durch den Datenschutznachtrag („Data Protection Addendum“), der genau auf die Anforderungen der DS-GVO abgestimmt ist. Snowflake hält sich außerdem an penibel vertraglich festgelegte Sicherheitsverpflichtungen („contractual security commitments“), um effizientere Transaktionen und eine vereinfachte Sorgfaltspflicht zu ermöglichen.

Fazit

Im Rahmen der Europäischen Datenschutz-Grundverordnung müssen Unternehmen technische Maßnahmen ergreifen, mit deren Hilfe sie den Anforderungen ihrer Kunden in Bezug auf Datenschutz und Schutz der Privatsphäre gerecht werden können. Snowflake bietet hier nicht nur den Vorteil, alle wichtigen Kundendaten an einem einzigen Ort zu speichern, sondern ermöglicht auch das schnelle Auffinden und Abrufen dieser Daten, sodass Unternehmen im Bedarfsfall schnell aktiv werden können.