CAP Theorem

Understanding databases for storing, updating and analyzing data requires the understanding of the CAP Theorem. This is the second article of the article series Data Warehousing Basics.

Understanding NoSQL Databases by the CAP Theorem

CAP theorem – or Brewer’s theorem – was introduced by the computer scientist Eric Brewer at Symposium on Principles of Distributed computing in 2000. The CAP stands for Consistency, Availability and Partition tolerance.

  • Consistency: Every read receives the most recent writes or an error. Once a client writes a value to any server and gets a response, it is expected to get afresh and valid value back from any server or node of the database cluster it reads from.
    Be aware that the definition of consistency for CAP means something different than to ACID (relational consistency).
  • Availability: The database is not allowed to be unavailable because it is busy with requests. Every request received by a non-failing node in the system must result in a response. Whether you want to read or write you will get some response back. If the server has not crashed, it is not allowed to ignore the client’s requests.
  • Partition tolerance: Databases which store big data will use a cluster of nodes that distribute the connections evenly over the whole cluster. If this system has partition tolerance, it will continue to operate despite a number of messages being delayed or even lost by the network between the cluster nodes.

CAP theorem applies the logic that  for a distributed system it is only possible to simultaneously provide  two out of the above three guarantees. Eric Brewer, the father of the CAP theorem, proved that we are limited to two of three characteristics, “by explicitly handling partitions, designers can optimize consistency and availability, thereby achieving some trade-off of all three.” (Brewer, E., 2012).

CAP Theorem Triangle

To recap, with the CAP theorem in relation to Big Data distributed solutions (such as NoSQL databases), it is important to reiterate the fact, that in such distributed systems it is not possible to guarantee all three characteristics (Availability, Consistency, and Partition Tolerance) at the same time.

Database systems designed to fulfill traditional ACID guarantees like relational database (management) systems (RDBMS) choose consistency over availability, whereas NoSQL databases are mostly systems designed referring to the BASE philosophy which prefer availability over consistency.

The CAP Theorem in the real world

Lets look at some examples to understand the CAP Theorem further and provewe cannot create database systems which are being consistent, partition tolerant as well as always available simultaniously.

AP – Availability + Partition Tolerance

If we have achieved Availability (our databases will always respond to our requests) as well as Partition Tolerance (all nodes of the database will work even if they cannot communicate), it will immediately mean that we cannot provide Consistency as all nodes will go out of sync as soon as we write new information to one of the nodes. The nodes will continue to accept the database transactions each separately, but they cannot transfer the transaction between each other keeping them in synchronization. We therefore cannot fully guarantee the system consistency. When the partition is resolved, the AP databases typically resync the nodes to repair all inconsistencies in the system.

A well-known real world example of an AP system is the Domain Name System (DNS). This central network component is responsible for resolving domain names into IP addresses and focuses on the two properties of availability and failure tolerance. Thanks to the large number of servers, the system is available almost without exception. If a single DNS server fails,another one takes over. According to the CAP theorem, DNS is not consistent: If a DNS entry is changed, e.g. when a new domain has been registered or deleted, it can take a few days before this change is passed on to the entire system hierarchy and can be seen by all clients.

CA – Consistency + Availability

Guarantee of full Consistency and Availability is practically impossible to achieve in a system which distributes data over several nodes. We can have databases over more than one node online and available, and we keep the data consistent between these nodes, but the nature of computer networks (LAN, WAN) is that the connection can get interrupted, meaning we cannot guarantee the Partition Tolerance and therefor not the reliability of having the whole database service online at all times.

Database management systems based on the relational database models (RDBMS) are a good example of CA systems. These database systems are primarily characterized by a high level of consistency and strive for the highest possible availability. In case of doubt, however, availability can decrease in favor of consistency. Reliability by distributing data over partitions in order to make data reachable in any case – even if computer or network failure – meanwhile plays a subordinate role.

CP – Consistency + Partition Tolerance

If the Consistency of data is given – which means that the data between two or more nodes always contain the up-to-date information – and Partition Tolerance is given as well – which means that we are avoiding any desynchronization of our data between all nodes, then we will lose Availability as soon as only one a partition occurs between any two nodes In most distributed systems, high availability is one of the most important properties, which is why CP systems tend to be a rarity in practice. These systems prove their worth particularly in the financial sector: banking applications that must reliably debit and transfer amounts of money on the account side are dependent on consistency and reliability by consistent redundancies to always be able to rule out incorrect postings – even in the event of disruptions in the data traffic. If consistency and reliability is not guaranteed, the system might be unavailable for the users.

CAP Theorem Venn Diagram

Conclusion

The CAP Theorem is still an important topic to understand for data engineers and data scientists, but many modern databases enable us to switch between the possibilities within the CAP Theorem. For example, the Cosmos DB von Microsoft Azure offers many granular options to switch between the consistency, availability and partition tolerance . A common misunderstanding of the CAP theorem that it´s none-absoluteness: “All three properties are more continuous than binary. Availability is continuous from 0 to 100 percent, there are many levels of consistency, and even partitions have nuances. Exploring these nuances requires pushing the traditional way of dealing with partitions, which is the fundamental challenge. Because partitions are rare, CAP should allow perfect C and A most of the time, but when partitions are present or perceived, a strategy is in order.” (Brewer, E., 2012).

ACID vs BASE Concepts

Understanding databases for storing, updating and analyzing data requires the understanding of two concepts: ACID and BASE. This is the first article of the article series Data Warehousing Basics.

The properties of ACID are being applied for databases in order to fulfill enterprise requirements of reliability and consistency.

ACID is an acronym, and stands for:

  • Atomicity – Each transaction is either properly executed completely or does not happen at all. If the transaction was not finished the process reverts the database back to the state before the transaction started. This ensures that all data in the database is valid even if we execute big transactions which include multiple statements (e. g. SQL) composed into one transaction updating many data rows in the database. If one statement fails, the entire transaction will be aborted, and hence, no changes will be made.
  • Consistency – Databases are governed by specific rules defined by table formats (data types) and table relations as well as further functions like triggers. The consistency of data will stay reliable if transactions never endanger the structural integrity of the database. Therefor, it is not allowed to save data of different types into the same single column, to use written primary key values again or to delete data from a table which is strictly related to data in another table.
  • Isolation – Databases are multi-user systems where multiple transactions happen at the same time. With Isolation, transactions cannot compromise the integrity of other transactions by interacting with them while they are still in progress. It guarantees data tables will be in the same states with several transactions happening concurrently as they happen sequentially.
  • Durability – The data related to the completed transaction will persist even in cases of network or power outages. Databases that guarante Durability save data inserted or updated permanently, save all executed and planed transactions in a recording and ensure availability of the data committed via transaction even after a power failure or other system failures If a transaction fails to complete successfully because of a technical failure, it will not transform the targeted data.

ACID Databases

The ACID transaction model ensures that all performed transactions will result in reliable and consistent databases. This suits best for businesses which use OLTP (Online Transaction Processing) for IT-Systems such like ERP- or CRM-Systems. Furthermore, it can also be a good choice for OLAP (Online Analytical Processing) which is used in Data Warehouses. These applications need backend database systems which can handle many small- or medium-sized transactions occurring simultaneous by many users. An interrupted transaction with write-access must be removed from the database immediately as it could cause negative side effects impacting the consistency(e.g., vendors could be deleted although they still have open purchase orders or financial payments could be debited from one account and due to technical failure, never credited to another).

The speed of the querying should be as fast as possible, but even more important for those applications is zero tolerance for invalid states which is prevented by using ACID-conform databases.

BASE Concept

ACID databases have their advantages but also one big tradeoff: If all transactions need to be committed and checked for consistency correctly, the databases are slow in reading and writing data. Furthermore, they demand more effort if it comes to storing new data in new formats.

In chemistry, a base is the opposite to acid. The database concepts of BASE and ACID have a similar relationship. The BASE concept provides several benefits over ACID compliant databases asthey focus more intensely on data availability of database systems without guarantee of safety from network failures or inconsistency.

The acronym BASE is even more confusing than ACID as BASE relates to ACID indirectly. The words behind BASE suggest alternatives to ACID.

BASE stands for:

  • Basically Available – Rather than enforcing consistency in any case, BASE databases will guarantee availability of data by spreading and replicating it across the nodes of the database cluster. Basic read and write functionality is provided without liabilityfor consistency. In rare cases it could happen that an insert- or update-statement does not result in persistently stored data. Read queries might not provide the latest data.
  • Soft State – Databases following this concept do not check rules to stay write-consistent or mutually consistent. The user can toss all data into the database, delegating the responsibility of avoiding inconsistency or redundancy to developers or users.
  • Eventually Consistent –No guarantee of enforced immediate consistency does not mean that the database never achieves it. The database can become consistent over time. After a waiting period, updates will ripple through all cluster nodes of the database. However, reading data out of it will stay always be possible, it is just not certain if we always get the last refreshed data.

All the three above mentioned properties of BASE-conforming databases sound like disadvantages. So why would you choose BASE? There is a tradeoff compared to ACID. If databases do not have to follow ACID properties then the database can work much faster in terms of writing and reading from the database. Further, the developers have more freedom to implement data storage solutions or simplify data entry into the database without thinking about formats and structure beforehand.

BASE Databases

While ACID databases are mostly RDBMS, most other database types, known as NoSQL databases, tend more to conform to BASE principles. Redis, CouchDB, MongoDB, Cosmos DB, Cassandra, ElasticSearch, Neo4J, OrientDB or ArangoDB are just some popular examples. But other than ACID, BASE is not a strict approach. Some NoSQL databases apply at least partly to ACID rules or provide optional functions to get almost or even full ACID compatibility. These databases provide different level of freedom which can be useful for the Staging Layer in Data Warehouses or as a Data Lake, but they are not the recommended choice for applications which need data environments guaranteeing strict consistency.

Data Warehousing Basiscs

Data Warehousing is applied Big Data Management and a key success factor in almost every company. Without a data warehouse, no company today can control its processes and make the right decisions on a strategic level as there would be a lack of data transparency for all decision makers. Bigger comanies even have multiple data warehouses for different purposes.

In this series of articles I would like to explain what a data warehouse actually is and how it is set up. However, I would also like to explain basic topics regarding Data Engineering and concepts about databases and data flows.

To do this, we tick off the following points step by step:

 

Process Mining mit Fluxicon Disco – Artikelserie

Dieser Artikel der Artikelserie Process Mining Tools beschäftigt sich mit dem Anbieter Fluxicon. Das im Jahr 2010 gegründete Unternehmen, bis heute geführt von den zwei Gründern Dr. Anne Rozinat und Dr. Christian W. Günther, die beide bei Prof. Wil van der Aalst in Eindhoven promovierten, sowie einem weiteren Mitarbeiter, ist eines der ersten Tool-Anbieter für Process Mining. Das Tool Disco ist das Kernprodukt des Fluxicon-Teams und bietet pures Process Mining.

Die beiden Gründer haben übrigens eine ganze Reihe an Artikeln zu Process Mining (ohne Sponsoring / ohne Entgelt) veröffentlicht.

Lösungspakete: Standard-Lizenz
Zielgruppe:  Lauf Fluxicon für Unternehmen aller Größen.
Datenquellen: Keine Standard-Konnektoren. Benötigt fertiges Event Log.
Datenvolumen: Unlimitierte Datenmengen, Beschränkung nur durch Hardware.
Architektur: On-Premise / Desktop-Anwendung

Diese Software für Process Mining ist für jeden, der in Process Mining reinschnuppern möchte, direkt als Download verfügbar. Die Demo-Lizenz reicht aus, um eigene Event-Logs auszuprobieren oder das mitgelieferte Event-Log (Sandbox) zu benutzen. Es gibt ferner mehrere Evaluierungslizenz-Modelle sowie akademische Lizenzen via Kooperationen mit Hochschulen.

Fluxicon Disco erfreut sich einer breiten Nutzerbasis, die seit 2012 über das jährliche ‘Process Mining Camp’ (https://fluxicon.com/camp/index und http://processminingcamp.com ) und seit 2020 auch über das monatliche ‘Process Mining Café’ (https://fluxicon.com/cafe/) vorangetrieben wird.

Bedienbarkeit und Anpassungsfähigkeit der Analysen

Fluxicon Disco bietet den Vorteil des schnellen Einstiegs in datengetriebene Prozessanalysen und ist überaus nutzerfreundlich für den Analysten. Die Oberflächen sind leicht zu bedienen und die Bedeutung schnell zu erfassen oder zumindest zu erahnen. Die Filter-Möglichkeiten sind überraschend umfangreich und äußerst intuitiv bedien- und kombinierbar.

Fluxicon Disco Process Mining

Fluxicon Disco Process Mining – Das Haupt-Dashboard zeigt den Process Flow aus der Rekonstruktion auf Basis des Event Logs. Hier wird die Frequenz-Ansicht gezeigt, die Häufigkeiten von Cases und Events darstellt.

Disco lässt den Analysten auf Process Mining im Kern fokussieren, es können keine Analyse-Diagramme strukturell hinzugefügt, geändert oder gelöscht werden, es bleibt ein statischer Report ohne weitere BI-Funktionalitäten.

Die Visualisierung des Prozess-Graphen im Bereich “Map” ist übersichtlich, stets gut lesbar und leicht in der Abdeckung zu steuern. Die Hauptmetrik kann zwischen der Frequenz- zur Zeit-Orientierung hin und her geschaltet werden. Neben der Hauptmetrik kann auch eine zweite Metrik (Secondary Metric) zur Ansicht hinzugefügt werden, was sehr sinnvoll ist, wenn z. B. neben der durchschnittlichen Zeit zwischen Prozessaktivitäten auch die Häufigkeit dieser Prozessfolgen in Relation gesetzt werden soll.

Die Ansicht “Statistics” zeigt die wesentlichen Einblicke nach allen Dimensionen aus statistischer Sicht: Welche Prozessaktivitäten, Ressourcen oder sonstigen Features treten gehäuft auf? Diese Fragen werden hier leicht beantwortet, ohne dass der Analyst selbst statistische Berechnungen anstellen muss – jedoch auch ohne es zu dürfen, würde er wollen.

Die weitere Ansicht “Cases” erlaubt einen Einblick in die Prozess-Varianten und alle Einzelfälle innerhalb einer Variante. Diese Ansicht ist wichtig für Prozessoptimierer, die Optimierungspotenziale vor allem in häufigen, sich oft wiederholenden Prozessverläufen suchen möchten. Für Compliance-Analysten sind hingegen eher die oft vielen verschiedenen Einzelfälle spezieller Prozessverläufe der Fokus.

Für Einsteiger in Process Mining als Methodik und Disco als Tool empfiehlt sich übrigens das Process Mining Online Book: https://processminingbook.com

Integrationsfähigkeit

Fluxicon Disco ist eine Desktop-Anwendung, die nicht als Cloud- oder Server-Version verfügbar ist. Es ist möglich, die Software auf einem Windows Application Server on Premise zu installieren und somit als virtuelle Umgebung via Microsoft Virtual Desktop oder via Citrix als virtuelle Anwendung für mehrere Anwender zugleich verfügbar zu machen. Allerdings ist dies keine hochgradige Integration in eine Enterprise-IT-Infrastruktur.

Auch wird von Disco vorausgesetzt, dass Event Logs als einzelne Tabellen bereits vorliegen müssen. Dieses Tool ist also rein für die Analyse vorgesehen und bietet keine Standardschnittstellen mit vorgefertigten Skripten zur automatischen Herstellung von Event Logs beispielsweise aus Salesforce CRM oder SAP ERP.

Grundsätzlich sollte Process Mining methodisch stets als Doppel-Disziplin betrachtet werden: Der erste Teil des Process Minings fällt in die Kategorie Data Engineering und umfasst die Betrachtung der IT-Systeme (ERP, CRM, SRM, PLM, DMS, ITS,….), die für einen bestimmten Prozess relevant sind, und die in diesen System hinterlegten Datentabellen als Datenquellen. Die in diesen enthaltenen Datenspuren über Prozessaktivitäten müssen dann in ein Prozessprotokoll überführt und in ein Format transformiert werden, das der Inputvoraussetzung als Event Log für das jeweilige Process Mining Tool gerecht wird. Minimalanforderung ist hierbei zumindest eine Vorgangsnummer (Case ID), ein Zeitstempel (Event Time) einer Aktivität und einer Beschreibung dieser Aktivität (Event).

Das Event Log kann dann in ein oder mehrere Process Mining Tools geladen werden und die eigentliche Prozessanalyse kann beginnen. Genau dieser Schritt der Kategorie Data Analytics kann in Fluxicon Disco erfolgen.

Zum Einspeisen eines Event Logs kann der klassische CSV-Import verwendet werden oder neuerdings auch die REST-basierte Airlift-Schnittstelle, so dass Event Logs direkt von Servern On-Premise oder aus der Cloud abgerufen werden können.

Prinzip des direkten Zugriffs auf Event Logs von Servern via Airlift.

Import von Event Logs als CSV (“Open file”) oder von Servern auch aus der Cloud.

Sind diese Limitierungen durch die Software für ein Unternehmen, bzw. für dessen Vorhaben, vertretbar und bestehen interne oder externe Ressourcen zum Data Engineering von Event Logs, begeistert die Einfachheit von Process Mining mit Fluxicon Disco, die den schnellsten Start in diese Analyse verspricht, sofern die Daten als Event Log vorbereitet vorliegen.

Skalierbarkeit

Die Skalierbarkeit im Sinne hochskalierender Datenmengen (Big Data Readiness) sowie auch im Sinne eines Ausrollens dieser Analyse-Software auf einer Konzern-Ebene ist nahezu nicht gegeben, da hierzu Benutzer-Berechtigungsmodelle fehlen. Ferner darf hierbei nicht unberücksichtigt bleiben, dass Disco, wie zuvor erläutert, ein reines Analyse-/Visualisierungstool ist und keine Event Logs generieren kann (der Teil der Arbeit, der viele Hardware Ressourcen benötigt).

Für die reine Analyse läuft Disco jedoch auch mit vielen Daten sehr zügig und ist rein auf Ebene der Hardware-Ressourcen limitiert. Vertikales Upscaling ist auf dieser Ebene möglich, dazu empfiehlt sich diese Leselektüre zum System-Benchmark.

Zukunftsfähigkeit

Fluxicon Disco ist eines der Process Mining Tools der ersten Stunde und wird auch heute noch stetig vom Fluxicon Team mit kleinen Updates versorgt, die Weiterentwicklung ist erkennbar, beschränkt sich jedoch auf Process Mining im Kern.

Preisgestaltung

Die Preisgestaltung wird, wie auch bei den meisten anderen Anbietern für Process Mining Tools, nicht transparent kommuniziert. Aus eigener Einsatzerfahrung als Berater können mit Preisen um 1.000 EUR pro Benutzer pro Monat gerechnet werden, für Endbenutzer in Anwenderunternehmen darf von anderen Tarifen ausgegangen werden.

Studierende von mehr als 700 Universitäten weltweit (siehe https://fluxicon.com/academic/) können Fluxicon Disco kostenlos nutzen und das sehr unkompliziert. Sie bekommen bereits automatisch akademische Lizenzen, sobald sie sich mit ihrer Uni-Email-Adresse in dem Tool registrieren. Forscher und Studierende, deren Uni noch kein Partner ist, können sehr leicht auch individuelle akademische Lizenzen anfragen.

Fazit

Fluxicon Disco ist ein Process Mining Tool der ersten Stunde und das bis heute. Das Tool beschränkt sich auf das Wesentliche, bietet keine Big Data Plattform mit Multi-User-Management oder anderen Möglichkeiten integrierter Data Governance, auch sind keine Standard-Schnittstellen zu anderen IT-Systemen vorhanden. Auch handelt es sich hierbei nicht um ein Tool, das mit anderen BI-Tools interagieren oder gar selbst zu einem werden möchte, es sind keine eigenen Report-Strukturen erstellbar. Fluxicon Disco ist dafür der denkbar schnellste Einstieg mit minimaler Rüstzeit in Process Mining für kleine bis mittelständische Unternehmen, für die Hochschullehre und nicht zuletzt auch für Unternehmensberatungen oder Wirtschaftsprüfungen, die ihren Kunden auf schlanke Art und Weise Ist-Prozessanalysen ergebnisorientiert anbieten möchten.

Dass Disco seitens Fluxicon nur für kleine und mittelgroße Unternehmen bestimmt ist, ist nicht ganz zutreffend. Die meisten Kunden sind grosse Unternehmen (Banken, Versicherungen, Telekommunikationsanabieter, Ministerien, Pharma-Konzerne und andere), denn diese haben komplexe Prozesse und somit den größten Optimierungsbedarf. Um Process Mining kommen die Unternehmen nicht herum und so sind oft auch mehrere Tools verschiedener Anbieter im Einsatz, die sich gegenseitig um ihre Stärken ergänzen, für Fluxicon Disco ist dies die flexible Nutzung, nicht jedoch das unternehmensweite Monitoring. Der flexible und schlanke Einsatz von Disco in vielen Unternehmen zeigt sich auch mit Blick auf die Sprecher und Teilnehmer der jährlichen Nutzerkonferenz, dem Process Mining Camp.

Artikelserie: BI Tools im Vergleich – Qlik Sense

Dies ist ein Artikel der Artikel-Serie “BI Tools im Vergleich – Einführung und Motivation“, zu der auch die vorab sehr lesenswerten einführenden Worte und die Ausführungen zur Datenbasis gehören. Auf Grundlage derselben Daten wurde analog zu diesem Artikel hier auch ein Artikel über Microsoft Power BI und einen zu Tableau.

Übrigens gibt es auch Erweiterungen für Qlik Sense, die Process Mining ermöglichen. Eine dieser Erweiterungen ist die von MEHRWERK Process Mining.

Lizenzmodell

Neben Qlik Sense gibt es auch das lang bewährte Qlik View, dass auf der gleichen In-Memory-Kerntechnologie basiert. Qlik Sense wurde im Jahr 2014 vom schwedischen Softwareunternehmen Qlik Tech herausgebracht und bei Qlik Sense liegt auch der Fokus der Weiterentwicklung. Es handelt sich um Self-Service-BI und eine Plattform für Visual Data Analysis. Dabei gibt es die Möglichkeit einer On Premise Server Version (interne Cloud) oder auf die Server von Qlik zu setzen und somit gänzlich auf die Qlik Sense Cloud zu setzen, also die Qlik Sense Cloud als SaaS-Lösung. Dazu gibt es noch Qlik Sense Desktop, das für kleinere Projekte ausreichen kann und ganz ohne die Cloud auskommt, jedoch Ergebnisse bei Bedarf in die Cloud publishen kann. Ähnlich wie bei Tableau und anders als derzeitig bei Power BI, wird für das Editieren von Apps/Dashboards jedoch kein Qlik Sense Desktop benötigt, denn das Erstellen, Bearbeiten und Verwalten von Qlik Sense Reports darf komplett in der Cloud (vom Browser aus) stattfinden.

Der Kunde hat die Wahl zwischen den Lizenzmodellen von Qlik Sense Business (SaaS) und Qlik Sense Enterprise (SaaS oder On Premise). Die Enterprise Variante ist dann noch mal in Enterprise Professional, Enterprise Analyzer und Enterprise Analyzer Capacity eingeteilt, es stehen also insgesamt drei Lizenzen zur Auswahl. Der Preis für Qlik Sense Business beträgt monatlich derzeitig $30 pro Anwender. Das offizielle Preismodell sieht für Enterprise Professionell $70 für einen Benutzer pro Monat vor und für Enterprise Analyzer $40 pro Benutzer pro Monat. Zum Kennenlernen der Business Version gibt eine kostenlose 30-Tage-Testversion.

Die Version Qlik Sense Desktop ist in der Funktionalität an der SaaS Lösung Qlik Sense Enterprise angepasst und steht ihr in nichts Essenziellem nach. Die Desktop Version kann nur auf Windows-Computern ausgeführt werden und die Verwendung mehrerer Bildschirme oder Tablets wird nicht unterstützt. Außerdem werden Sicherheitsfunktionen nicht unterstützt und es gibt keine Funktion zum automatischen Speichern. Mehr zu den Unterschieden hier.

Community & Features von anderen Entwicklern

Wie relevant die Community für Visualisierungstools ist, wurde bereits in den vorherigen Blogartikeln zu Power BI und Tableau beschrieben. Auch Qlik besitzt eine offizielle Community Seite, in der u. a. Diskussionen, Blogs und Support angeboten werden. Auch hier finden sich zu den meisten Problemstellungen eine Menge Lösungsansätze. Zudem bietet Qlik auf den offiziellen Webseiten auch sehr viele Lernvideos an, mit denen sich Neulinge einarbeiten und fortgeschrittene Anwender auch noch einiges erfahren können.

Neben den zahlreichen Visualisierungen können auch weitere Diagramme hinzugefügt werden. Im Qlik Sense Desktop werden bei Arbeitsblatt im Reiter Benutzerdefinierte Objekte zwei Bundles mitgeliefert. Hier können auch Erweiterungen importiert werden. Ein bekanntes Bundle ist die Vizlib, welches hier unterschiedliche Packages zur Verfügung stellt. Diese Erweiterungen können einfach importiert werden, indem die heruntergeladenen Verzeichnisse in den Qlik Sense Extensions Ordner eingefügt werden. Wem auch die Erweiterungen nicht ausreichen, der kann sogenannte Widgets erstellen. Diese werden in HTML und CSS geschrieben, daher ist ein gewisses Grundverständnis vorausgesetzt. Diese Widgets können auf Qlik Sense Funktionalitäten zugreifen und diese per Klick ausführen. So kann bspw. ein Button zum Entfernen aller gesetzten Filter erstellt werden.

Erstellung von Filtern in Qlik Sense

Daten laden & transformieren

Flexibler als die meisten Vergleichstools ist Qlik in der Verknüpfung von Datenquellen. Es werden Hunderte von Datenquellen angeboten, durch die der Anwender Zugriff auf seine Daten erhalten kann. Die von Qlik entwickelte Associate Engine beschleunig die Verarbeitung von verknüpften Daten. Die Anbindung von Cloudanwendungen steht hier im Vordergrund, aber es werden natürlich auch klassische Datenbanken, Textfiles usw. angeboten.

Nachdem die Daten geladen sind, befindet sich im Dateneditor unter dem Reiter auto generated selection eine automatisch generierte Query für den Ladevorgang. Dieses „Datenladeskript“ kann angelegt, bearbeitet und ausgeführt werden. Im Reiter „Main“ befinden sich hier vordefinierte Variableneinstellungen, wie z. B. SET ThousandSep=’.’; wobei auch diese angepasst und erweitert werden können. Zudem gibt es die Möglichkeit, das Datenmodell mit allen Tabellenverbindungen anzeigen zu lassen. Die große Qlik-Community und die Tutorials ermöglicht es jedem Nutzer, die vielen Möglichkeiten mit Qlik Script zügig aus dem Internet zu erlernen.

Daten laden & transformieren: AdventureWorks2017Dataset

Im Reiter Datenmanager werden die empfohlenen Verknüpfungen angezeigt. Diese sind für Einsteiger sehr nützlich. Im Verlauf der Analysen musste jedoch nachjustiert werden. Wenn die ID-Spalten zum Verknüpfen z. B. unterschiedliche Bezeichnungen haben, tut sich der Algorithmus schon mal schwer.

Abbildung eines Datenmodels in Qlik Sense. Zusehen sind die Verbindungen zwischen den Tabellen der Datenbank “AdventureWorks2016”.

Eine vom Tool vordefinierte Detailansicht in Form einer Visualisierung (siehe Screenshot) ermöglicht einen schnellen und einfachen Qualitätscheck der gerade erst geladenen Daten. Hier können die Verbindungen angepasst und neue erstellt werden. Hier können erste Datentransformation durchgeführt werden, z. B. die Ersetzung von Daten oder NULL-Werten.

Datentransformationen mit einfachen Eingabemasken – Hier: Ersetzen von Werten in Tabellen-Spalten.

Zudem können Felder hinzugefügt, also berechnet werden (ähnlich wie in Power BI und Tableau als neues Measure). Z. B. können Textwerte mit dem Operator „&“ verbunden und somit z. B. Vor- und Nachname ganz intuitiv in eine Spalte zusammengefügt werden. Außerdem gibt es mathematische Operatoren für Berechnungen und ein SQL-artiges „like“, um Zeichenfolgen mit Mustern zu vergleichen. Auch an dieser Stelle können Formeln eingegeben werden. Die Formeln umfassen hier: String-, Datums-, numerische, Bedingungs-, mathematische, Verteilungsfunktionen usw. Zu beachten ist hier, dass die Daten neu geladen werden müssen, um die berechneten Spalten zu updaten. Der Umgang mit den Formeln aber erscheint mir einfacher als z. B. mit DAX in Power BI.

Daten visualisieren

Dank einer benutzerfreundlichen Oberfläche sind auch Analysen ohne großes Vorwissen und per Drag and Drop möglich. Individuelle Dashboards sind in wenigen Schritten möglich und erfordern keine besonderen Tricks oder Kniffe um gleich zum Erfolg zu kommen. Die Datenvisualisierung erfolgt in sogenannten Apps, in denen die Dashboards (Seiten in der App) liegen. Diese können von Qlik Sense Desktop nach Qlik Cloud hochgeladen werden und von dort aus mit anderen Usern geteilt werden.

Qlik Sense enthält von Hause aus eine große Anzahl an Visualisierungsmöglichkeiten. „Entdecken Sie neue Einblicke in ihre Daten“ heißt es bei der Funktion namens Einblicke (Insights), denn hier wird der Zugriff auf die Qlik Cognitive Engine gewährt. Dabei kann der Anwender eine Frage an den sogenannten Insight Advisor in natürlicher Sprache formulieren, woraus dann AI-gestützte Dashboard-Vorschläge generiert werden. Auch wenn diese Funktion noch nicht vollkommen ausgereift erscheint, ist dies sicherlich ein Schritt in die Business Intelligence der Zukunft.

Qlik Sense Insights – Einblicke gewinnen mit Stichworten in menschlicher Sprache. Funktioniert mal besser, mal schlechter. Die Titel der Diagramme sind (in Qlik Sense stets per default) die Formeln der Darstellung. Diese lassen sich leicht umbenennen.

Diese Diagrammvorschläge können einen guten ersten Eindruck über verschiedene Dimensionen und Kennzahlen geben und die Diagramme können direkt zu den Arbeitsblättern hinzugefügt werden. Es können auch Fragen gestellt werden, die Berechnungen zur Grundlage haben. So wird im folgenden Beispiel die Korrelation zwischen zwei Kennzahlen ermittelt.

Qlik Sense Insights – Korrelation erstellt mit Anweisung auf Englisch

Den ersten Auftritt hatte die Cognitive Engine im April 2018 und der Insight Advisor im Juni 2018. Über den Insight Adviser werden auch die empfohlenen Verknüpfungen im Datenmanager generiert, diese sollten jedoch vom Anwender (z. B. BI-Developer, Data Analyst oder Data Engineer) jedoch nochmal überblickt werden, da diese nicht unbedingt fehlerfrei abläuft. Gerade in vielen Geschäftsdaten verstecken sich viele “falsche Freunde” unter den ID-Spalten-Benennungen, die einen Zusammenhang herzustellen scheinen – aber es nicht immer tun.

Diagramme können ansonsten auf übliche Weise über eine Paletten ausgewählt werden, um sie dann mit Kennzahlen und Dimensionen zu befüllen. Die Charts können mit vordefinierten Optionen in den Kategorien Daten, Sortieren, Darstellung usw. bearbeitet werden. Unter Darstellung können ggf. verschiedene Designs ausgewählt werden und Beschriftungen, Titel etc. angepasst werden. Die Felder zur Auswahl der Kennzahlen und Dimensionen können nach Tabelle ausgewählt werden, sie sind ansonsten alle in einer Liste und können über eine Suchfunktion schnell gefunden werden, vorausgesetzt die genaue Bezeichnung ist bekannt. Diese Suchfunktion wird auch an anderen Stellen angewandt, immer dann, wenn Felder ausgewählt werden.

Es gibt außerdem die Option „Master-Elemente“, um wieder verwendbare Dimensionen oder Kennzahlen (Measures) zu erstellen.

Hier können Berechnungen für Kennzahlen und Dimensionen hinterlegt und in jedem Arbeitsblatt wiederverwendet werden. Dies gilt auch für Visualisierungen und die damit verbundenen Dateninputs und Einstellungen.

Mit Drag and Drop stößt der Anwender hier schon mal an seine Grenzen, aber dann helfen die Formeln von Qlik Sense Script weiter. Wenn bspw. das Diagramm namens KPI eine Kennzahl mit Filterung nach einer Dimension anzeigen soll, hilft die Formel: Sum({<DimensionName={‘Value’}>} MeasureName. Eine Qlik Sense Formelsammlung ist hier zu finden. Jede Kennzahl und Dimension kann als Formel eingegeben werden. Im Formel bearbeiten – Editor werden auch schon gebräuchliche Berechnungen wie Aggregierungsfunktionen (Sum, Avg, Max usw.) und Distinct, vorgegeben und können auf Knopfdruck und ohne Coding generiert werden, ähnliche wie ein Quick Measure in Power BI.

Fazit

Das Finanzmodell ist auf jede Unternehmensgröße ausgerichtet. Wenn die Datenbereinigung im Vorfeld stattgefunden hat, sind Visualisierungen in wenigen Schritten möglich. Es gibt dabei die Möglichkeit, die Daten in gewissem Rahmen zu transformieren. Für die gewünschte Darstellung der Kennzahlen ist die Verwendung von Qlik Sense Script oftmals erforderlich, jedoch kommen Anfänger auch lange ohne Coding aus. Insgesamt bewerte ich die Nutzerfreundlichkeit auf Grund der intuitiveren Bedienung subjektiv höher als bei Tableau oder Power BI.

Es können Erweiterungen und Widgets zur tiefgründigen Dashboard Erstellung und Analyse genutzt werden. Es gibt viele Drag and Drop Funktionen, um die Dashboards zusammen zu ziehen. Die Erstellung einfacher Berichte erfordert keinen Entwickler oder einen gut ausgebildeten Data Analyst, dennoch werden Unternehmen bei größeren Vorhaben auf Grund der Komplexität von Unternehmensprozessen, die in der Business Intelligence darzustellen versucht werden, nicht um geschultes Personal herum kommen, wofür es viele Angebote an Trainings auch von Qlik-Partnern gibt. Die Schnelligkeit der Datenverarbeitung liegt dank der Associative Engine im Vergleich zu den anderen beiden Tools vorne. AI-gestützte Vorschläge können bei der Dashboard-Erstellung zusätzliche Unterstützung leisten. Die Kombination beider Komponenten, Schnelligkeit und Ai-gestützte Vorschläge des Insight Advisors, grenzt das Qlik Sense Tool zwar nicht so sehr von den anderen Anbietern ab, wie Qlik gerne hätte…. Dennoch ist Qlik Sense auch heute noch ein Tool, dass für Ad-Hoc-Analytics wie Business Intelligence mit Standard Reporting in Erwägung gezogen werden sollte.

Moderne Business Intelligence in der Microsoft Azure Cloud

Google, Amazon und Microsoft sind die drei großen Player im Bereich Cloud Computing. Die Cloud kommt für nahezu alle möglichen Anwendungsszenarien infrage, beispielsweise dem Hosting von Unternehmenssoftware, Web-Anwendungen sowie Applikationen für mobile Endgeräte. Neben diesen Klassikern spielt die Cloud jedoch auch für Internet of Things, Blockchain oder Künstliche Intelligenz eine wichtige Rolle als Enabler. In diesem Artikel beleuchten wir den Cloud-Anbieter Microsoft Azure mit Blick auf die Möglichkeiten des Aufbaues eines modernen Business Intelligence oder Data Platform für Unternehmen.

Eine Frage der Architektur

Bei der Konzeptionierung der Architektur stellen sich viele Fragen:

  • Welche Datenbank wird für das Data Warehouse genutzt?
  • Wie sollten ETL-Pipelines erstellt und orchestriert werden?
  • Welches BI-Reporting-Tool soll zum Einsatz kommen?
  • Müssen Daten in nahezu Echtzeit bereitgestellt werden?
  • Soll Self-Service-BI zum Einsatz kommen?
  • … und viele weitere Fragen.

1 Die Referenzmodelle für Business Intelligence Architekturen von Microsoft Azure

Die vielen Dienste von Microsoft Azure erlauben unzählige Einsatzmöglichkeiten und sind selbst für Cloud-Experten nur schwer in aller Vollständigkeit zu überblicken.  Microsoft schlägt daher verschiedene Referenzmodelle für Datenplattformen oder Business Intelligence Systeme mit unterschiedlichen Ausrichtungen vor. Einige davon wollen wir in diesem Artikel kurz besprechen und diskutieren.

1a Automatisierte Enterprise BI-Instanz

Diese Referenzarchitektur für automatisierte und eher klassische BI veranschaulicht die Vorgehensweise für inkrementelles Laden in einer ELT-Pipeline mit dem Tool Data Factory. Data Factory ist der Cloud-Nachfolger des on-premise ETL-Tools SSIS (SQL Server Integration Services) und dient nicht nur zur Erstellung der Pipelines, sondern auch zur Orchestrierung (Trigger-/Zeitplan der automatisierten Ausführung und Fehler-Behandlung). Über Pipelines in Data Factory werden die jeweils neuesten OLTP-Daten inkrementell aus einer lokalen SQL Server-Datenbank (on-premise) in Azure Synapse geladen, die Transaktionsdaten dann in ein tabellarisches Modell für die Analyse transformiert, dazu wird MS Azure Analysis Services (früher SSAS on-premis) verwendet. Als Tool für die Visualisierung der Daten wird von Microsoft hier und in allen anderen Referenzmodellen MS PowerBI vorgeschlagen. MS Azure Active Directory verbindet die Tools on Azure über einheitliche User im Active Directory Verzeichnis in der Azure-Cloud.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/architecture/reference-architectures/data/enterprise-bi-adfQuelle:

Einige Diskussionspunkte zur BI-Referenzarchitektur von MS Azure

Der von Microsoft vorgeschlagenen Referenzarchitektur zu folgen kann eine gute Idee sein, ist jedoch tatsächlich nur als Vorschlag – eher noch als Kaufvorschlag – zu betrachten. Denn Unternehmens-BI ist hochgradig individuell und Bedarf einiger Diskussion vor der Festlegung der Architektur.

Azure Data Factory als ETL-Tool

Azure Data Factory wird in dieser Referenzarchitektur als ETL-Tool vorgeschlagen. In der Tat ist dieses sehr mächtig und rein über Mausklicks bedienbar. Darüber hinaus bietet es die Möglichkeit z. B. über Python oder Powershell orchestriert und pipeline-modelliert zu werden. Der Clue für diese Referenzarchitektur ist der Hinweis auf die On-Premise-Datenquellen. Sollte zuvor SSIS eingesetzt werden sollen, können die SSIS-Packages zu Data Factory migriert werden.

Die Auswahl der Datenbanken

Der Vorteil dieser Referenzarchitektur ist ohne Zweifel die gute Aufstellung der Architektur im Hinblick auf vielseitige Einsatzmöglichkeiten, so werden externe Daten (in der Annahme, dass diese un- oder semi-strukturiert vorliegen) zuerst in den Azure Blob Storage oder in den auf dem Blob Storage beruhenden Azure Data Lake zwischen gespeichert, bevor sie via Data Factory in eine für Azure Synapse taugliche Struktur transformiert werden können. Möglicherweise könnte auf den Blob Storage jedoch auch gut verzichtet werden, solange nur Daten aus bekannten, strukturierten Datenbanken der Vorsysteme verarbeitet werden. Als Staging-Layer und für Datenhistorisierung sind der Azure Blob Storage oder der Azure Data Lake jedoch gute Möglichkeiten, da pro Dateneinheit besonders preisgünstig.

Azure Synapse ist eine mächtige Datenbank mindestens auf Augenhöhe mit zeilen- und spaltenorientierten, verteilten In-Memory-Datenbanken wie Amazon Redshift, Google BigQuery oder SAP Hana. Azure Synapse bietet viele etablierte Funktionen eines modernen Data Warehouses und jährlich neue Funktionen, die zuerst als Preview veröffentlicht werden, beispielsweise der Einsatz von Machine Learning direkt auf der Datenbank.

Zur Diskussion steht jedoch, ob diese Funktionen und die hohe Geschwindigkeit (bei richtiger Nutzung) von Azure Synapse die vergleichsweise hohen Kosten rechtfertigen. Alternativ können MySQL-/MariaDB oder auch PostgreSQL-Datenbanken bei MS Azure eingesetzt werden. Diese sind jedoch mit Vorsicht zu nutzen bzw. erst unter genauer Abwägung einzusetzen, da sie nicht vollständig von Azure Data Factory in der Pipeline-Gestaltung unterstützt werden. Ein guter Kompromiss kann der Einsatz von Azure SQL Database sein, der eigentliche Nachfolger der on-premise Lösung MS SQL Server. MS Azure Snypase bleibt dabei jedoch tatsächlich die Referenz, denn diese Datenbank wurde speziell für den Einsatz als Data Warehouse entwickelt.

Zentrale Cube-Generierung durch Azure Analysis Services

Zur weiteren Diskussion stehen könnte MS Azure Analysis Sevice als Cube-Engine. Diese Cube-Engine, die ursprünglich on-premise als SQL Server Analysis Service (SSAS) bekannt war, nun als Analysis Service in der Azure Cloud verfügbar ist, beruhte früher noch als SSAS auf der Sprache MDX (Multi-Dimensional Expressions), eine stark an SQL angelehnte Sprache zum Anlegen von schnellen Berechnungsformeln für Kennzahlen im Cube-Datenmodellen, die grundlegendes Verständnis für multidimensionale Abfragen mit Tupeln und Sets voraussetzt. Heute wird statt MDX die Sprache DAX (Data Analysis Expression) verwendet, die eher an Excel-Formeln erinnert (diesen aber keinesfalls entspricht), sie ist umfangreicher als MDX, jedoch für den abitionierten Anwender leichter verständlich und daher für Self-Service-BI geeignet.

Punkt der Diskussion ist, dass der Cube über den Analysis-Service selbst keine Möglichkeiten eine Self-Service-BI nicht ermöglicht, da die Bearbeitung des Cubes mit DAX nur über spezielle Entwicklungsumgebungen möglich ist (z. B. Visual Studio). MS Power BI selbst ist ebenfalls eine Instanz des Analysis Service, denn im Kern von Power BI steckt dieselbe Engine auf Basis von DAX. Power BI bietet dazu eine nutzerfreundliche UI und direkt mit mausklickbaren Elementen Daten zu analysieren und Kennzahlen mit DAX anzulegen oder zu bearbeiten. Wird im Unternehmen absehbar mit Power BI als alleiniges Analyse-Werkzeug gearbeitet, ist eine separate vorgeschaltete Instanz des Azure Analysis Services nicht notwendig. Der zur Abwägung stehende Vorteil des Analysis Service ist die Nutzung des Cubes in Microsoft Excel durch die User über Power Pivot. Dies wiederum ist eine eigene Form des sehr flexiblen Self-Service-BIs.

1b Enterprise Data Warehouse-Architektur

Eine weitere Referenz-Architektur von Microsoft auf Azure ist jene für den Einsatz als Data Warehouse, bei der Microsoft Azure Synapse den dominanten Part von der Datenintegration über die Datenspeicherung und Vor-Analyse übernimmt.https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/architecture/solution-ideas/articles/enterprise-data-warehouseQuelle: 

Diskussionspunkte zum Referenzmodell der Enterprise Data Warehouse Architecture

Auch diese Referenzarchitektur ist nur für bestimmte Einsatzzwecke in dieser Form sinnvoll.

Azure Synapse als ETL-Tool

Im Unterschied zum vorherigen Referenzmodell wird hier statt auf Azure Data Factory auf Azure Synapse als ETL-Tool gesetzt. Azure Synapse hat die Datenintegrationsfunktionalitäten teilweise von Azure Data Factory geerbt, wenn gleich Data Factory heute noch als das mächtigere ETL-Tool gilt. Azure Synapse entfernt sich weiter von der alten SSIS-Logik und bietet auch keine Integration von SSIS-Paketen an, zudem sind einige Anbindungen zwischen Data Factory und Synapse unterschiedlich.

Auswahl der Datenbanken

Auch in dieser Referenzarchitektur kommt der Azure Blob Storage als Zwischenspeicher bzw. Staging-Layer zum Einsatz, jedoch im Mantel des Azure Data Lakes, der den reinen Speicher um eine Benutzerebene erweitert und die Verwaltung des Speichers vereinfacht. Als Staging-Layer oder zur Datenhistorisierung ist der Blob Storage eine kosteneffiziente Methode, darf dennoch über individuelle Betrachtung in der Notwendigkeit diskutiert werden.

Azure Synapse erscheint in dieser Referenzarchitektur als die sinnvolle Lösung, da nicht nur die Pipelines von Synapse, sondern auch die SQL-Engine sowie die Spark-Engine (über Python-Notebooks) für die Anwendung von Machine Learning (z. B. für Recommender-Systeme) eingesetzt werden können. Hier spielt Azure Synpase die Möglichkeiten als Kern einer modernen, intelligentisierbaren Data Warehouse Architektur voll aus.

Azure Analysis Service

Auch hier wird der Azure Analysis Service als Cube-generierende Maschinerie von Microsoft vorgeschlagen. Hier gilt das zuvor gesagte: Für den reinen Einsatz mit Power BI ist der Analysis Service unnötig, sollen Nutzer jedoch in MS Excel komplexe, vorgerechnete Analysen durchführen können, dann zahlt sich der Analysis Service aus.

Azure Cosmos DB

Die Azure Cosmos DB ist am nächsten vergleichbar mit der MongoDB Atlas (die Cloud-Version der eigentlich on-premise zu hostenden MongoDB). Es ist eine NoSQL-Datenbank, die über Datendokumente im JSON-File-Format auch besonders große Datenmengen in sehr hoher Geschwindigkeit abfragen kann. Sie gilt als die zurzeit schnellste Datenbank in Sachen Lesezugriff und spielt dabei alle Vorteile aus, wenn es um die massenweise Bereitstellung von Daten in andere Applikationen geht. Unternehmen, die ihren Kunden mobile Anwendungen bereitstellen, die Millionen parallele Datenzugriffe benötigen, setzen auf Cosmos DB.

1c Referenzarchitektur für Realtime-Analytics

Die Referenzarchitektur von Microsoft Azure für Realtime-Analytics wird die Referenzarchitektur für Enterprise Data Warehousing ergänzt um die Aufnahme von Data Streaming.

Diskussionspunkte zum Referenzmodell für Realtime-Analytics

Diese Referenzarchitektur ist nur für Einsatzszenarios sinnvoll, in denen Data Streaming eine zentrale Rolle spielt. Bei Data Streaming handelt es sich, vereinfacht gesagt, um viele kleine, ereignis-getriggerte inkrementelle Datenlade-Vorgänge bzw. -Bedarfe (Events), die dadurch nahezu in Echtzeit ausgeführt werden können. Dies kann über Webshops und mobile Anwendungen von hoher Bedeutung sein, wenn z. B. Angebote für Kunden hochgrade-individualisiert angezeigt werden sollen oder wenn Marktdaten angezeigt und mit ihnen interagiert werden sollen (z. B. Trading von Wertpapieren). Streaming-Tools bündeln eben solche Events (bzw. deren Datenhäppchen) in Data-Streaming-Kanäle (Partitionen), die dann von vielen Diensten (Consumergruppen / Receiver) aufgegriffen werden können. Data Streaming ist insbesondere auch dann ein notwendiges Setup, wenn ein Unternehmen über eine Microservices-Architektur verfügt, in der viele kleine Dienste (meistens als Docker-Container) als dezentrale Gesamtstruktur dienen. Jeder Dienst kann über Apache Kafka als Sender- und/oder Empfänger in Erscheinung treten. Der Azure Event-Hub dient dazu, die Zwischenspeicherung und Verwaltung der Datenströme von den Event-Sendern in den Azure Blob Storage bzw. Data Lake oder in Azure Synapse zu laden und dort weiter zu reichen oder für tiefere Analysen zu speichern.

Azure Eventhub ArchitectureQuelle: https://docs.microsoft.com/de-de/azure/event-hubs/event-hubs-about

Für die Datenverarbeitung in nahezu Realtime sind der Azure Data Lake und Azure Synapse derzeitig relativ alternativlos. Günstigere Datenbank-Instanzen von MariaDB/MySQL, PostgreSQL oder auch die Azure SQL Database wären hier ein Bottleneck.

2 Fazit zu den Referenzarchitekturen

Die Referenzarchitekturen sind exakt als das zu verstehen: Als Referenz. Keinesfalls sollte diese Architektur unreflektiert für ein Unternehmen übernommen werden, sondern vorher in Einklang mit der Datenstrategie gebracht werden, dabei sollten mindestens diese Fragen geklärt werden:

  • Welche Datenquellen sind vorhanden und werden zukünftig absehbar vorhanden sein?
  • Welche Anwendungsfälle (Use Cases) habe ich für die Business Intelligence bzw. Datenplattform?
  • Über welche finanziellen und fachlichen Ressourcen darf verfügt werden?

Darüber hinaus sollten sich die Architekten bewusst sein, dass, anders als noch in der trägeren On-Premise-Welt, die Could-Dienste schnelllebig sind. So sah die Referenzarchitektur 2019/2020 noch etwas anders aus, in der Databricks on Azure als System für Advanced Analytics inkludiert wurde, heute scheint diese Position im Referenzmodell komplett durch Azure Synapse ersetzt worden zu sein.

Azure Reference Architecture BI Databrikcs 2019

Azure Reference Architecture – with Databricks, old image source: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/architecture/solution-ideas/articles/modern-data-warehouse

Hinweis zu den Kosten und der Administration

Die Kosten für Cloud Computing statt für IT-Infrastruktur On-Premise sind ein zweischneidiges Schwert. Der günstige Einstieg in de Azure Cloud ist möglich, jedoch bedingt ein kosteneffizienter Betrieb viel Know-How im Umgang mit den Diensten und Konfigurationsmöglichkeiten der Azure Cloud oder des jeweiligen alternativen Anbieters. Beispielsweise können über Azure Data Factory Datenbanken über Pipelines automatisiert hochskaliert und nach nur Minuten wieder runterskaliert werden. Nur wer diese dynamischen Skaliermöglichkeiten nutzt, arbeitet effizient in der Cloud.

Ferner sind Kosten nur schwer einschätzbar, da diese mehr noch von der Nutzung (Datenmenge, CPU, RAM) als von der zeitlichen Nutzung (Lifetime) abhängig sind. Preisrechner ermöglichen zumindest eine Kosteneinschätzung: https://azure.com/e/96162a623bda4911bb8f631e317affc6

Process Mining mit MEHRWERK – Artikelserie

Dieser Artikel der Artikelserie Process Mining Tools beschäftigt sich mit dem Anbieter MEHRWERK. Das im Jahr 2008 gegründete Unternehmen, heute geführt durch drei Geschäftsführer, bietet Business Intelligence als Beratung und Dienstleistung rund um die Produkte des BI-Software-Anbieters QlikTech an. Rund zehn Jahre später, 2018, stieg das Unternehmen auch als Teil-Software-Anbieter in Process Mining ein. MEHRWERK ProcessMining, kurz MPM, ist einen Process Mining Lösung auf der Basis des weit verbreiteten BI-Tools Qlik Sense.

Lösungspakete: Standard-Lizenz
Zielgruppe:  Für mittel- und große Unternehmen
Datenquellen: Beliebig über Standard-Konnektoren von Qlik Sense
Datenvolumen: Unlimitierte Datenmengen
Architektur: On-Premise, Cloud oder Multi-Cloud

Für den Einsatz von MEHRWERK ProcessMining wird Qlik Sense Enterprise benötigt, welches sowohl On-Premise auf unternehmenseigenen Windows-Servern direkt installiert werden kann, über Kubernetes via Container ebenfalls On-Premise oder in  sowie auch noch einfacher direkt in der Qlik Cloud oder aus Datenschutzgründen in Verbindung mit der Hochskalierbarkeit der Cloud als hybrides Deployment.

Bedienbarkeit und Anpassungsfähigkeit der Analysen

Die Beurteilung der Bedienbarkeit ist nahezu vollständig abhängig von der Einschätzung zur Bedienbarkeit von Qlik Sense, da MPM auf diesem gängigen BI-Tool basiert. Im Wording von Qlik Sense arbeiten Developer in einem Hub und erstellen Apps, die ein oder mehrere Worksheets (Arbeitsblätter) umfassen können, welche horizontal durchgeblättert werden können. Die Qlik-Technologie ermöglicht es dabei übrigens auch, neben Story-Telling-Boards ganze Dashboards oder einzelne Visualisierungen über Mashups in Webseiten einzubetten.

Jede App kann in einem bestimmten Stream veröffentlicht werden. Über die Apps und die Streams wird der Zugriff durch die Nutzer erweitert, beschränkt oder anderweitig organisiert. Die Zugriffe auf Apps können über Security Rules gesteuert und beschränkt werden, was für die Data Governance eines Unternehmens wichtig ist und die Lösung auch mandantenfähig macht.

Figure 1 - Übersicht über die wichtigsten Schaltflächen einer Qlik Sense-App

Figure 1 – Übersicht über die wichtigsten Schaltflächen einer Qlik Sense-App

Wer mit Qlik Sense als BI-Tool bereits vertraut ist, wird sich hier sofort zurechtfinden und kann direkt in Process Mining als Analyseform, die immer mehr zum festen Bestandteil leistungsstarker BI-Systeme wird, einsteigen. Standardmäßig startet jede App im Ansichtsmodus. Die Qlik Sense-User-Role „Analyzer User“ ist nur für diese Ansicht berechtigt und kann Apps nur lesend verwenden. Die App ist jedoch interaktiv nutzbar, so dass alle in der App verfügbaren Dimensionen anklickbar und als Filter nutzbar sind. Die Besonderheit ist hier das assoziative Datenmodell, welches durch Qlik’s inMemory Engine bereitgestellt wird. Diese überwindet die Einschränkungen relationaler Datenbanken und SQL-Abfragen. Bei diesem traditionellen Ansatz müssen Datenquellen mit SQL-Join-Befehlen kombiniert werden, und es müssen im Voraus Annahmen über die Art der Fragen getroffen werden, die die Anwender stellen werden. Wenn ein Benutzer eine Analyse durchführen möchte, die nicht geplant war, müssen die Daten neu aufgebaut werden, was die Ausführung komplexer Abfragen zur Folge hat und eine gewisse Wartezeit verursacht. Die assoziative Engine hingegen ermöglicht “on the fly”-Berechnungen und Aggregationen, die sofortige Erkenntnisse über die betrachteten Prozesse liefern.

Für Anwender, die mit den Filtermöglichkeiten nicht so vertraut sind, bietet Qlik auch die assoziative Suche an. Diese ermöglicht es, Suchbegriffe, ähnlich wie bei Google, einzugeben. Die Assoziative Engine ermittelt dann mögliche Treffer und Verbindungen in den Daten, welche daraufhin entsprechend gefiltert werden.

Die User-Role „Professional User“ kann jede veröffentlichte App zudem im Editier-Modus öffnen und eigene Arbeitsblätter und Analysen auf Basis zentral definierter Masteritems (Kennzahlen und Dimensionen) erstellen. Ebenfalls können bestehende Dashboards dupliziert werden, um diese für den eigenen Bedarf anzupassen, z. B. um Tabellen und Diagrammen anzupassen oder zu löschen. Dabei erfolgt jedoch keine Datenduplizierung, da Qlik Sense einen sogenannten Server Side Authoring Ansatz verfolgt. Durch das Konzept der Master Items wird zusätzlich sichergestellt, dass die Data Governance erhalten bleibt. Die erstellen Arbeitsblätter können durch die Professional User wiederrum veröffentlicht werden. Dabei ist sichergestellt, dass alle anderen Anwender diese „Community Sheets“ nur mit den Daten ihres Berechtigungskontexts sehen.

Figure 2 - Eine QlikSense App im Edit-Modus für "Professional User".

Figure 2 – Eine QlikSense App im Edit-Modus für “Professional User”.

Jede Seite der App kann beliebig gestaltet werden, auch so, dass Read-Only-Nutzer über die Standard-Lizenz viele Möglichkeiten des Ablesens und der Filterung von Daten erhalten.

Figure 3 - Hier eine Seite der App, die nur zur Filterung von Dimensionen gestaltet ist: Die Filterung von Prozessnetzen nach Vorgangsnummern, Produkten und/oder Prozess-Varianten

Figure 3 – Hier eine Seite der App, die nur zur Filterung von Dimensionen gestaltet ist: Die Filterung von Prozessnetzen nach Vorgangsnummern, Produkten und/oder Prozess-Varianten

MEHRWERK ProcessMining liefert Vorlagen als Standard-App, die typische Analyse-Szenarien wie das Prozess-Flussdiagramm und Filter für Durchlaufzeiten, Frequenzen und Varianten bereits vorgeben und somit den Einstieg erleichtern. Die Template App liefert außerdem sehr umfangreiche Process Mining Funktionen wie Conformance Checking, automatisierte Ursachenanalysen, Prozessmusterabfragen oder kontinuierliches Process Monitoring gleich mit aus. Außerdem können u.a. Schichten, Prozesshierarchien oder Sollprozesse konfiguriert werden.

Nur User mit der Qlik Sense „Professional User“ Lizenz können dazu im Editier-Modus auch die Datenmodelle einsehen, erstellen und anpassen. So wie auch in der klassischen Business Intelligence sind im Process Mining Datenmodelle in Form sogenannter Event-Logs entscheidend für die Analyse und die Vorbedingung auch für die MPM App.

Figure 4 - Beispielhaftes Event Log aus der Beispielvorlage-App von MEHRWERK.

Figure 4 – Beispielhaftes Event Log aus der Beispielvorlage-App von MEHRWERK.

Das Event Log kann und sollte neben den drei Must-Haves für Process Mining (Case-ID, Activity Description & Timestamp) noch beliebig viele weitere hilfreiche Informationen in weiteren Spalten aufführen. Denn nur so können Abweichungen, Anomalien oder andere Auffälligkeiten im Prozess in einen Kontext gesetzt werden, um gezielte Maßnahmen treffen zu können.

Integrationsfähigkeit

Die Frage, wie gut und leicht sich MEHRWERK ProcessMining in die Unternehmens-IT einfügen lässt, stellt sich mit der Frage, ob Qlik Sense bereits Teil der IT-Infrastruktur ist oder beispielsweise als Cloud-Lösung eingesetzt wird. Unternehmen, die bisher nicht auf Qlik Sense setzten, müssten hier die grundsätzliche Frage der Voraussetzungen des Tools von QlikTech stellen.  Vollständigerweise sei jedoch angemerkt, dass laut Aussage von MEHRWERK ca. 40% ihrer Kunden vorher kein Qlik Sense im Einsatz hatten und die Installation von Qlik Sense keine große Hürde darstellt.

Ein wesentlicher Aspekt der Integrationsfähigkeit ist jedoch nicht nur die Integration der Software in die IT-Infrastruktur, sondern auch, wie leicht sich Daten in das benötigte Datenformat (Event Log) überführen lässt. Es ist zwar möglich, Qlik Sense mit MPM ausschließlich für die Datenanalyse/-visualisierung zu verwenden, und die Datenmodellierung dann mit anderen Tools (Datenbanken, ETL) durchzuführen. Allerdings bringt Qlik Sense selbst eine Menge an Konnektoren zu vielen Datenquellen mit. Wie mit jedem Process Mining Tool ist gibt es dabei zwei Konzepte der Datenaufbereitung. Die eine Möglichkeit ist das Laden, Konsolidieren und Vorbereiten der Datenbank für ein Data Warehouse (DWH), das die Daten bereits in Event Logs transformiert. In diesem Fall kann MPM die Daten über einen Standard-Konnektor von Qlik Sense importieren, in ein MPM-spezifisches Event Log nachbereiten und dann direkt mit der Analyse starten. Dabei benötigt Qlik Sense keine eigene Datenbank für die Datenhaltung sondern verabeitet die Daten hochkomprimiert in der eigenen, patentierten InMemory-Engine.

Figure 5 - Qlik Sense Standard Connectors

Figure 5 – Qlik Sense Standard Connectors

Das andere Konzept der Datenaufbereitung ist die Nutzung von Qlik Sense auch als Tool für das Datenmanagement. Hierfür werden die Standard-Konnektoren genutzt, um Daten möglichst direkt an Qlik Sense anzubinden. In diesem Fall muss die Bildung des anwendungsfallspezifischen Event Logs als prozessprotokollartiges Datenmodell in Qlik Sense erfolgen. Dies lässt sich in einem prozeduralen Skript mit der Qlik-eigenen Skriptsprache, die an die Sprache DAX von Microsoft sowie an SQL erinnert, umsetzen. Dabei kann das Skript in mehrere Segmente unterteilt und die Ausführung automatisiert und ge-timed werden. MEHRWERK ProcessMining bietet hierfür standardisierte ETL-Best-Practices an, die erlauben mit Hilfe von Regelwerken die Eventloggenerierung stark zu vereinfachen. Ein großer Vorteil ist die Verzahnung von Process Mining Funktionalitäten während des ETL-Prozesses. Dies erlaubt frühzeitiges und visuelles Validieren schon bei der Beladung.

Figure 6 - Das Laden und Modellieren von Daten kann eingeschränkt visuell mit klickbaren Oberflächen erfolgen. Mehr Möglichkeiten bietet jedoch der Qlik Script Editor.

Figure 6 – Das Laden und Modellieren von Daten kann eingeschränkt visuell mit klickbaren Oberflächen erfolgen. Mehr Möglichkeiten bietet jedoch der Qlik Script Editor.

Skalierbarkeit

Klassischerweise wurde Qlik Sense Server On-Premise in der eigenen IT-Infrastruktur installiert. Die Software Qlik Sense ist nur als Server-Version verfügbar. Qlik Sense setzt auf eine patentierte In-Memory-Technologie. Technisch ist Qlik Sense in Sachen Performance nur durch die Hardware begrenzt.

Heute kann Qlik Sense Server auch direkt über die Qlik Cloud genutzt oder über Kubernetes auf eigene Server oder in die Multi-Cloud ausgeliefert werden. Ein Betrieb bei typischen Cloud-Anbietern wie von Amazon, Google oder Microsoft ist problemlos möglich und somit technisch auch beliebig skalierbar.

Zukunftsfähigkeit

Die Zukunftsfähigkeit von MPM liegt in erster Linie in der Weiterentwicklung von Qlik Sense durch QlikTech. Im Magic Quadrant von Gartner 2020 für BI- und Analytics-Tools zählt Qlik zu den top drei Anführern nach Tableau und Microsoft.

Auf Grund der großen Qlik-Community und der weiten Verbreitung als BI-Tool zählt die Lösung von MEHRWERK vermutlich zu einer sehr zukunftssicheren mit vielen Weiterentwicklungsmöglichkeiten. Aus der Community und von anderen BI-Unternehmen gibt es viele Erweiterungen für Qlik Sense, die den Funktionsumfang von der Konnektivität zu anderen Tools bis hin zur einfacheren oder visuell attraktiveren Analyse verbessern. Für Qlik Sense gibt es viele weitere Anbieter für diverse Erweiterungen sowie Qlik-eigene und kompatible Co-Lösungen für Master Data Management und Data Governance. Auch die Integration von Data Science Tools via Programmiersprachen wie Python oder R ist möglich und erweitert diese Plattform in Richtung Advanced Analytics.

Die Weiterentwicklung der Process Mining Lösung erfolgt unabhängig davon auch durch MEHRWERK selbst, so wird Machine Learning vermehrt dazu eingesetzt, Process Anomalien zu erkennen sowie Durchlaufzeiten von Prozessen zu prognostizieren.

Preisgestaltung

Die Preisgestaltung wird von MEHRWERK nicht transparent kommuniziert und liegt im Vergleich zu anderen Process Mining Tools erfahrungsgemäß im Mittelfeld. Neben den MPM spezifischen Kosten werden darüber hinaus auch User-Lizenzen für Qlik Sense fällig. Weitere mögliche Kosten hängen auch von der Wahl ab, ob die Qlik Cloud, eine andere Cloud-Plattform oder die On-Premise-Installation geplant wird.

Fazit

MPM ProcessMining ist für Unternehmen, die voll und ganz auf QlikSense als BI-Tool setzen, eine echte Option für den schnellen und leistungsstarken Einstieg in diese spezielle Analysemethodik. Mitarbeiter, die Qlik Sense bereits kennen, finden sich hier beinahe sofort zurecht und können direkt starten, sofern Event-Logs vorliegen. Die Gestaltung von Event-Logs in Qlik Sense bedingt jedoch etwas Erfahrung mit der Datenaufbereitung und -modellierung in Qlik Sense und Kenntnisse in Qlik Script.

Process Mining mit PAFnow – Artikelserie

Artikelserie zu Process Mining Tools – PAFnow

Der zweite Artikel der Artikelserie Process Mining Tools beschäftigt sich mit dem Anbieter PAFnow. 2014 in Deutschland gegründet kann das Unternehmen PAF, dessen Kürzel für Process Analytics Factory steht, bereits auf eine beachtliche Anzahl an Projekten zurückblicken. Das klare selbst gesteckte Ziel von PAF: Mit dem eigenen Tool namens PAFnow Process Mining für jeden zugänglich machen.

PAFnow basiert auf dem bekannten BI-Tool „Power BI“. Wer sein Wissen zu Power BI noch einmal auffrischen möchte, kann das gerne in diesem Artikel aus der Artikelserie zu BI-Tools machen. Da Power BI selbst als Cloud- und On-Premise-Lösung erhältlich ist, gilt dies indirekt auch für PAFnow. Diese vier Versionen des Process Mining Tools werden von PAFnow angeboten:

Free Pro Premium Enterprise
Lizenz:  Kostenfrei
(Marketplace Power BI)
99€ pro User pro Monat 499€ pro User pro Monat Nur auf Anfrage
Zielgruppe:  Für kleine Unternehmen und Einzelanwender Für kleine bis mittlere Unternehmen Für mittlere und große Unternehmen Für mittlere und große Unternehmen
Datenquellen: Beliebig (Power BI Konnektoren), Transformationen in Power BI Beliebig (Power BI Konnektoren), Transformationen in Power BI Beliebig (Power BI Konnektoren), Transformationen in Power BI Beliebig (Power BI Konnektoren), Transformationen auch via MS SSIS
Datenvolumen: Limitiert auf 30.000 Events,
1 Visual
Unlimitierte Events,
1 Visual, 1 Report
Unlimitierte Events,
9 Visual, 10 Reports
Unlimitierte Events,
10 Visual, 10 Reports, Content Packs
Architektur: Nur On-Premise Nur On-Premise Nur On-Premise Nur On-Premise

Abbildung 1: Übersicht zu den vier verschiedenen Produktversionen des Process Mining Tools PAFnow

PAF führt auf seiner Website weitere Informationen zu den jeweiligen Versionsunterschieden an. Für diesen Artikel wird sich im weiteren Verlauf auf die Enterprise Version bezogen, wenn nicht anderes gekennzeichnet.

Bedienbarkeit und Anpassungsfähigkeit der Analysen

Das übersichtliche Userinterface von Power BI unterstützt die Analyse von Prozessen mit PAFnow. Und auch Anfänger können sich glücklich schätzen, denn es gibt eine beeindruckende Vielzahl an hochwertigen Lernvideos und Dokumentation zu Power BI. Die von PAFnow entwickelten Visuals, wie zum Beispiel der „Process Explorer“ fügt sich reibungslos zu den Power BI Visuals ein. Denn die Bedienung dieser Visuals entspricht größtenteils demselben Prinzip wie dem der Power BI Visuals. Neue Anwendungen wie beim Process Explorer der Conformance Check, werden jedoch auch von PAFnow in Lernvideos erläutert.

PAFnow Process Mining by using Power BIAbbildung 1: Userinterface von PAFnow in dem vorgefertigten Report „Discovery“

Die PAFnow Visuals werden – wie in Power BI – üblich per drag & drop platziert und mit den gewünschten Dimensionen und Measures bestückt. Die Visuals besitzen verschiedenste Einstellungsmöglichkeiten, um dem Benutzer das Visual nach seinen Vorstellungen gestallten zu lassen. Kommt man an die Grenzen der Einstellungen, lohnt sich immer ein Blick in den Marketplace von Power BI. Dort werden viele und teilweise auch technisch sehr gute Visuals kostenlos angeboten, welche viele weitere Analyseideen im Kontext der Prozessanalyse abdecken.

Die vorgefertigten Reports von PAFnow sind intuitiv zu handhaben, denn sie vermitteln dem Analysten direkt den passenden Eindruck, wie die jeweiligen Visuals am besten einzusetzen sind. Einzelne Elemente aus dem Report können gelöscht und nach Belieben ergänzt werden. Dadurch kann Zeit gespart und mit der eigentlichen Analyse schnell begonnen werden.

PAFnow Process Mining Power BI - Varienten-AnalyseAbbildung 2: Vorgefertigter Report „Variants“ an dem direkt eine Root-Cause Analyse durchgeführt werden kann

In Power BI werden die KPI’s bzw. Measures in einer von Microsoft eigens entwickelten Analysesprache namens DAX (Data Analysis Expressions) definiert. Diese Formelsprache ist ein sehr stark an Excel angelehnter Syntax und bietet für viele Nutzer in dieser Hinsicht einen guten Einstieg. Allerdings bietet der Umfang von DAX noch deutlich mehr, als es die meisten Excel Nutzer gewohnt sein werden, so können auch motivierte und technisch affine Business Experten recht tief in die Analyse abtauchen. Da es auch hier eine sehr gut aufgestellte Community als auch Dokumentation gibt, sind die Informationen zu den verborgenen Fähigkeiten von DAX meist nur ein paar Klicks entfernt.

Integrationsfähigkeit

PAF bietet für sein Process Mining Tool aktuell noch keine eigene Cloud-Lösung an und ist somit nur über Power BI selbst als Cloud-Lösung erhältlich. Anwender, die sich eine unabhängige Process Mining – Plattform wünschen, müssen sich daher mit Power BI zufriedengeben. Ob PAFnow in absehbarer Zeit diese Lücke schließen wird und die Enterprise-Readiness des Tools somit erhöhen wird, bleibt abzuwarten, wünschenswert wäre es. Mit Power BI als Cloud-Lösung ist man als Anwender jedoch in den meisten Fällen nicht schlecht vertröstet. Da Power BI sowohl als Cloud- und als On-Premise-Lösung verfügbar ist, kann hier situationsabhängig entschieden werden. An dieser Stelle gilt es abzuwägen, welche Limitationen die beiden Lösungen mit sich bringen und daher sei auch an dieser Stelle der Artikel zu Power BI aus der BI-Tool-Artikelserie empfohlen. Darüber hinaus sollte die Größe der zu analysierenden Prozessdaten berücksichtigt werden. So kann bei plötzlich zu großen Datenmengen auch später noch ein Wechsel von der recht günstigen Power BI Pro-Lizenz auf die deutlich kostenintensivere Premium-Lizenz erfordern. In der Enterprise Version von PAFnow sind zwei frei wählbare Content Packs enthalten, welche aus SAP-Konnektoren, sowie vorentwickelten SSIS Packages bestehen. Mittels Datenextraktor werden die benötigten Prozessdaten, z. B. für die Prozesse P2P (Purchase-to-Pay) und O2C (Order-to-Cash), in eine Datenbank eines MS SQL Servers geladen und dort durch die SSIS-Packages automatisch in das für die Analyse benötigte Format transformiert. SSIS ist ein ETL-Tool von Microsoft und steht für SQL Server Integration Services. SSIS ist ein Teil der Enterprise-Vollversion des Microsoft SQL Servers.

Die vorgefertigten Reports die PAFnow zur Verfügung stellt, können Projekte zusätzlich beschleunigen. Neben den zwei frei wählbaren Content Packs, die in der Enterprise Version von PAFnow enthalten sind, stellen Partner die von Ihnen selbstentwickelte Packs zur Verfügung. Diese sind sofern die zwei kostenlosen Content Packs bereits beansprucht wurden jedoch zahlungspflichtig. PAFnow profitiert von der beeindruckenden Menge an verschiedenen Konnektoren, die Microsoft in Power BI zur Verfügung stellt. So können zusätzlich Daten direkt aus den Quellsystemen in Power BI geladen werden und dem Datenmodel ggf. hinzugefügt werden. Der Vorteil liegt in der Flexibilität, Daten nicht immer zwingend über ein Data Warehouse verfügbar machen zu müssen, sondern durch den direkten Zugriff auf die Datenquellen schnelle Workarounds zu ermöglichen. Allerdings ist dieser Vorteil nur auf ergänzende Daten beschränkt, denn das Event-Log wird stets via SSIS-ETL in der Datenbank oder der sogenannten „Companion-Software“ transformiert und bereitgestellt. Da der Companion jedoch ohne Schedule-Funktion auskommt, Transformationen also manuell angestoßen werden müssen, eignet sich dieser kaum für das Monitoring von Prozessen. Falls eine hohe Aktualität der Daten gefordert ist, sollte daher auf die SSIS-Package-Funktion der Enterprise Version zurückgegriffen werden.

Ergänzende Daten können anschließend mittels einer der vielen Power BI Konnektoren auch direkt aus der Datenquelle geladen werden, um Sie anschließend mit dem Datenmodell zu verknüpfen. Dabei sollte bei der Modellierung jedoch darauf geachtet werden, dass ein entsprechender Verbindungsschlüssel besteht. Die Flexibilität, Daten aus verschiedensten Datenquellen in nahezu x-beliebigem Format der Process Mining Analyse hinzufügen zu können, ist ein klarer Pluspunkt und der große Vorteil von PAFnow, auf die erfolgreiche BI-Lösung von Microsoft aufzusetzen. Mit der Wahl von SSIS als Event-Log/ETL-Lösung, positioniert sich PAFnow noch ein deutliches Stück näher zum Microsoft Stack und erleichtert die Integration in diejenige IT-Infrastruktur, die auf eben diesen Microsoft Stack setzt.

Auch in Sachen Benutzer-Berechtigungsmanagement können die Process Mining Analysen mittels Power BI Features, wie z.B. Row-based Level Security detailliert verwaltet werden. So können ganze Reports nur für bestimmte Personen oder Gruppen zugänglich gemacht werden, aber auch Teile des Reports sowie einzelne Datenausschnitte kontrolliert definierten Rollen zugewiesen werden.

Skalierbarkeit

Um große Datenmengen mit Analysemethodik aus dem Process Mining analysieren zu können, muss die Software bei Bedarf skalieren. Wer mit großen Datasets in Power BI Pro lokal auf seinem Rechner schon Erfahrungen sammeln durfte, wird sicherlich schon mal an seine Grenzen gestoßen sein und Power BI nicht unbedingt als Big Data ready bezeichnen. Diese Performance spiegelt allerdings nur die untere Seite des Spektrums wider. So ist Power BI mit der Premium-Lizenz und einer ausreichend skalierten Azure SQL Data Warehouse Instanz durchaus dazu in der Lage, Daten im Petabytebereich zu analysieren. Microsoft entwickelt Power BI kontinuierlich weiter und wird mit an Sicherheit grenzender Wahrscheinlichkeit auch für weitere Performance-Verbesserung sorgen. Dabei wird MS Azure, die Cloud-Plattform von Microsoft, weiterhin eine entscheidende Rolle spielen. Hiervon wird PAFnow profitieren und attraktiv auch für Process Mining Projekte mit Big Data werden. Referenzprojekte mit besonders großen Datenmengen, die mit PAFnow analysiert wurden, sind öffentlich nicht bekannt. Im Grunde sind jegliche Skalierungsfähigkeiten jedoch nicht jene dieser Analysefunktionalität, sondern liegen im Microsoft Technology Stack mit all seinen Vor- und Nachteilen der Nutzung on-Premise oder in der Microsoft Cloud. Dabei steckt der Teufel übrigens immer im Detail und so muss z. B. stets auf die richtige Version von Power BI geachtet werden, denn es gibt für die Nutzung On-Premise mit dem Power BI Report Server als auch für jene Nutzung über Microsoft Azure unterschiedliche Versionen, die zueinander passen müssen.

Die Datenmodellierung erfolgt in der Datenbank (On-Premise oder in der Cloud) und wird dann in Power BI geladen. Das Datenmodell wird in Power BI grafisch und übersichtlich dargestellt, wodurch auch der End-Nutzer jederzeit nachvollziehen kann in welcher Beziehung die einzelnen Tabellen zueinanderstehen. Die folgende Abbildung zeigt ein beispielhaftes Datenmodel visuell in Power BI.

Data Model in Microsoft Power BIAbbildung 3: Grafische Darstellung des Datenmodels in Power BI

Zusätzliche Daten lassen sich – wie bereits erwähnt – sehr einfach hinzufügen und auch einfach anbinden, sofern ein Verbindungsschlüssel besteht. Sollten also zusätzliche Slicer benötigt werden, können diese problemlos ergänzt werden. An dieser Stelle sorgen die vielen von Power BI bereitgestellten Konnektoren für einen hohen Grad an Flexibilität. Für erfahrene Power BI Benutzer ist die Datenmodellierung also wie immer reibungslos und übersichtlich. Aber auch Neulinge sollten, sofern sie Erfahrung in der Datenmodellierung haben, hier keine Schwierigkeiten haben. Kleinere Transformationen beim Datenimport können im Query Editor von Power BI, mit Hilfe der Formelsprache Power Query (M) gemacht werden. Diese Formelsprache ist einsteigerfreundlich und ähnelt in Teilen der Programmiersprache F#. Aber auch ohne diese Formelsprache können einfache Transformationen mit Hilfe des übersichtlichen und mit vielen Funktionen ausgestatteten Userinterfaces im Query Editor intuitiv erledigt werden. Bei größeren und komplexeren Transformationen sollten die Daten jedoch auf Datenbankebene erfolgen. Dort werden die Rohdaten auch für die PAFnow Visuals vorbereitet, sofern die Enterprise-Version genutzt wird. PAFnow stellt für diese Transformationen vorgefertigte SSIS-Packages zur Verfügung, welche auch angepasst und erweitert werden können. Die Modellierung erfolgt somit in T-SQL, das in den SSIS-Queries eingebettet ist und stellt für jeden erfahrenden SQL-Anwender keine Schwierigkeiten dar. Bei der Erweiterbarkeit und Flexibilität der Datenmodelle konnte ich ebenfalls keine besonderen Einschränkungen feststellen. Einzig das Schema, welches von den PAFnow Visuals vorgegeben wird, muss eingehalten werden. Durch das Zurückgreifen auf die Abfragesprache SQL, kann bei der Modellierung auf eine sehr breite Community zurückgegriffen werden. Darüber hinaus können bestehende SQL-Skripte eingefügt und leicht angepasst werden. Und auch die Suche nach einem geeigneten Data Engineer gestaltet sich dadurch praktisch, da SQL im Generellen und der MS SQL Server im Speziellen im Einsatz sehr verbreitet sind.

Zukunftsfähigkeit

Grundsätzlich verfolgt PAF nach eigener Aussage einen anderen Ansatz als der Großteil ihrer Mitbewerber: “So setzt PAF weniger auf monolithische Strukturen, sondern verfolgt einen Plattform-agnostischen Ansatz“.  Damit grenzt sich PAF von sogenannte All-in-one Lösungen ab, bei welchen alle Funktionen bereits integriert sind. Der Vorteil solcher Lösungen ist, dass sie vollumfänglich „ready-to-use“ sind, sobald sie erfolgreich implementiert wurden. Der Nachteil solcher Systeme liegt in der unzureichenden Steuerungsmöglichkeit der einzelnen Bestandteile. Microservices hingegen versprechen eben genau diese Kontrolle und erlauben es dem Anwender, nur die Funktionen, die benötigt werden nach eigenen Vorstellungen in das System zu integrieren. Auf der anderen Seite ist der Aufbau solcher agnostischen Systeme deutlich komplexer und beansprucht daher oft mehr Zeit bei der Implementierung und setzt auch ein gewissen Know-How voraus. Die Entscheidung für den einen oder anderen Ansatz gleicht ein wenig einer make-or-buy Entscheidung und muss daher in den individuellen Situationen abgewogen werden.

In den beiden Trendthemen Machine Learning und Task Mining kann PAFnow aktuell noch keine Lösungen vorzeigen. Nach eigenen Aussagen gibt es jedoch bereits einige Neuerungen in der Pipeline, welche PAFnow in Zukunft deutlich AI-getriebener gestalten werden. Näheres zu diesem Thema wollte man an dieser Stelle zum Zeitpunkt der Veröffentlichung dieses Artikels nicht verkünden. Jedoch kann der Website von PAFnow diverse Forschungsprojekte eingesehen werden, welche sich unteranderem mit KI und RPA befassen. Sicherlich profitieren PAFnow Anwender auch von der Zukunftsfähigkeit von Power BI bzw. Microsoft selbst. Inwieweit diese Entwicklungen in dieselbe Richtung gehen wie die Trends im Bereich Process Mining bleibt abzuwarten.

Preisgestaltung

Der Kostenrahmen für das Process Mining Tool von PAFnow ist sehr weit gehalten. Da die Pro Version bereits für 120$ im Monat zu haben ist, spiegelt sich hier die Philosophie von PAFnow wider, Process Mining für jedermann zugänglich zu machen. Mit dieser niedrigen Einstiegshürde können Unternehmen erste Erfahrungen im Process Mining sammeln und diese ohne großes Investitionsrisiko validieren. Nicht im Preis enthalten, sind jedoch etwaige Kosten für das notwendige BI-Tool Power BI. Da jedoch auch hier der Kostenrahmen sehr weit ausfällt und mittlerweile auch im Serviceportfolio von Microsoft 365 enthalten ist, bleibt es bei einer niedrigen Einstieghürde aus finanzieller Sicht. Allerdings kann bei umfangreicher Nutzung der Preis der Power BI Lizenzgebühren auch deutlich höher ausfallen. Kommt Power BI z. B. aus Gründen der Data Governance nur als On-Premise-Lösung in Betracht, steigen die Kosten für Power BI grundsätzlich bereits auf mindestens 4.995 EUR pro Monat. Die Preisbewertung von PAFnow ist also eng verbunden mit dem Power BI Lizenzmodel und sollte im Einzelfall immer mit einbezogen werden. Wer gerne mehr zum Lizenzmodel von Power BI wissen möchte, bekommt hier eine zusammengefasste Übersicht.

Fazit

Mit PAFnow ist ein durchaus erschwingliche Process Mining Tool auf dem Markt erhältlich, welches sich geschickt in den Microsoft-BI-Stack eingliedert und die Hürden für den Einstieg relativ geringhält. Unternehmen, die ohnehin Power BI als Reporting Lösung nutzen, können ohne großen Aufwand erste Projekte mit Process Mining starten und den Umfang der Funktionen über die verschiedenen Lizenzen hochskalieren. Allerdings sind dem Autor auch Unternehmen bekannt, die Power BI und den MS SQL Server explizit für die Nutzung von PAFnow erstmalig in ihre Unternehmens-IT eingeführt haben. Da Power BI bereits mit vielen Features ausgestattet ist und auch kontinuierlich weiterentwickelt wird, profitiert PAFnow von dieser Entwicklungsarbeit ungemein. Die vorgefertigten Reports von PAFnow können die Time-to-Value lukrativ verkürzen und sind flexibel erweiterbar. Für erfahrene Anwender von Power BI ist der Umgang mit den Visuals von PAF sehr intuitiv und bedarf keines großen Schulungsaufwandes. Die Datenmodellierung erfolgt auf SSIS-Basis in SQL und weist somit auch keine nennenswerten Hürden auf. Wie leistungsstark PAFnow mit großen Datenmengen umgeht kann an dieser Stelle nicht bewertet werden. PAFnow steht nicht nur in diesem Punkt in direkter Abhängigkeit von der zukünftigen Entwicklung des Microsoft Technology Stacks und insbesondere von Microsoft Power BI. Für strategische Überlegungen bzgl. der Integrationsfähigkeit in das jeweilige Unternehmen sollte dies immer berücksichtigt werden.

Process Mining mit Celonis – Artikelserie

Der erste Artikel dieser Artikelserie Process Mining Tools beschäftigt sich mit dem Anbieter Celonis. Das 2011 in Deutschland gegründete Unternehmen ist trotz wachsender Anzahl an Wettbewerbern zum Zeitpunkt der Veröffentlichung dieses Artikels der eindeutige Marktführer im Bereich Process Mining.

Celonis Process Mining – Teil 1 der Artikelserie

Celonis Process Mining ist 2011 als reine On-Premise-Lösung gestartet und seit 2018 auch als Cloud-Lösuung zu haben. Übersicht zu den vier verschiedenen Produktversionen der Celonis Process Mining Lösungen:

Celonis Snap Celonis Enterprise Celonis Academic Celonis Consulting
Lizenz:  Kostenfrei Kostenpflichtige Lösungspakete Kostenfrei Consulting Lizenz on Demand
Zielgruppe:  Für kleine Unternehmen und Einzelanwender Für mittel- und große Unternehmen Für akademische Einrichtungen und Studenten Für Berater
Datenquellen: ServiceNow, CSV/XLS -Datei Beliebig (On-Premise- und Cloud – Anbindungen) ServiceNow, CSV/XLS/XES –Datei oder Demosysteme Beliebig (On-Premise- und Cloud – Anbindungen)
Datenvolumen: Limitiert auf 500 MB Event-Log-Daten Unlimitierte Datenmengen (Größte Installation 50 TB) Unlimitierte Datenmengen Unlimitierte Datenmengen (Größte Installation 30 TB
Architektur: Cloud & On-Premise Cloud & On-Premise Cloud & On-Premise Cloud & On-Premise

Dieser Artikel bezieht sich im weiteren Verlauf auf die Celonis Enterprise Version, wenn nicht anders gekennzeichnet. Spezifische Unterschiede unter den einzelnen Produkten und weitere Informationen können auf der Website von Celonis entnommen werden.

Bedienbarkeit und Anpassungsfähigkeit der Analysen

In Sachen Bedienbarkeit punktet Celonis mit einem sehr übersichtlichen und einsteigerfreundlichem Userinterface. Jeder der mit BI-Tools wir z.B. „Power-BI“ oder „Tableau“ gearbeitet hat, wird sich wahrscheinlich schnell zurechtfinden.

Userinterface Celonis

Abbildung 1: Userinterface von Celonis. Über die Reiter kann direkt von der Analyse (Process Analytics) zu den ETL-Prozessen (Event Collection) gewechselt werden.

Das Erstellen von Analysen funktioniert intuitiv und schnell, auch weil die einzelnen Komponentenbausteine lediglich per drag & drop platziert und mit den gewünschten Dimensionen und KPI’s bestückt werden müssen.

Process Analytics im Process Explorer

Abbildung 2: Typische Analyse im Edit Modus. Neue Komponenten können aus dem Reiter (rechts im Bild) mittels drag & drop auf der Dashboard Bearbeitungsfläche platziert werden.

Darüber hinaus bietet Celonis mit seinem kostenlosen Programm „Celonis Acadamy“ einen umfangreichen und leicht verständlichen Pool an Trainingseinheiten für die verschiedenen User-Rollen: „Snap“, „Executive“, „Business User“, „Analyst“ und „Data Engineer“. Einsteiger finden sich nach der Absolvierung der Grundkurse etwa nach vier Stunden in dem Tool zurecht.

Conformance Analyse In Celonis

Abbildung 3: Conformance Analyse In Celonis. Es kann direkt analysiert werden, welche Art von Verstößen welche Auswirkungen haben und mit welcher Häufigkeit diese auftreten.

Die Definition von eigenen KPIs erfolgt mittels übersichtlichem Code Editor. Die verwendete proprietäre und patentierte Programmiersprache lautet PQL (Process Query Language) , dessen Syntax stark an SQL angelehnt ist und alle prozessrelevanten Berechnungen ermöglicht. Noch einsteigerfreundlicher ist der Visual Editor, in welchem KPIs alternativ mit zahlreicher visueller Unterstützung und über 130 mathematischen Operatoren erstellt werden können – ganz ohne Coding Erfahrung.
Mit Hilfe von über 30 Komponenten lassen sich alle üblichen Charts und Grafiken erstellen. Ich hatte das Gefühl, dass die Auswahl grundsätzlich ausreicht und dem Erkenntnisgewinn nicht im Weg steht. Dieses Gefühl rührt nicht zuletzt daher, dass die vorgefertigten Features, wie zum Beispiel „Conformance“ direkt und ohne Aufwand implementiert werden können und bemerkenswerte Erkenntnisse liefern. Kurzum: Ja es ist vieles vorgefertigt, aber hier wurde mit hohen Qualitätsansprüchen vorgefertigt!

Celonis Code Editor vs Visual Editor

Abbildung 4: Coder Editor (links) und Visual Editor (rechts). Während im Code Editor mit PQL geschrieben werden muss, können Einsteiger im Visual Editor visuelle Hilfestellungen nehmen, um KPIs zu definieren.

Diese Flexibilität erscheint groß und bedient mehrere Zielgruppen, beginnend bei den Einsteigern. Insbesondere da das Verständnis für den Code Editor und somit für PQL durch die Arbeit mit dem Visual Code Editor gefördert wird. Wer SQL-Kenntnisse mitbringt, wird sehr schnell ohne Probleme KPIs im Code Editor definieren können. Erfahrenen Data Engineers stünde es dennoch frei, die Entwicklungsarbeit auf die Datenbankebene zu verschieben.

Celonis Visual Editor

Abbildung 5: Mit Hilfe zahlreicher Möglichkeiten können Einsteiger im Visual Editor visuelle Hilfestellungen nehmen, um individuelle KPIs zu definieren.

Nachdem die ersten Analysen erstellt wurden, steht der Prozessanalyse nichts mehr im Wege. Während sich per Knopfdruck auf alle visualisierten Datenpunkte filtern lässt, unterstützt auch hier Celonis zusätzlich mit zahlreichen sogenannten ‘Auswahlansichten’, um die Entdeckung unerwünschter oder betrügerischer Prozesse so einfach wie das Googeln zu machen.

Predefined dashboard apps

Abbildung 6: Die anwenderfreundlichen Auswahlarten ermöglichen es dem Benutzer, einfach mit wenigen Klicks nach Unregelmäßigkeiten oder Mustern in Transaktionen zu suchen und diese eingehend zu analysieren.

Integrationsfähigkeit

Die Celonis Enterprise Version ist sowohl als Cloud- und On-Premise-Lösung verfügbar. Die Cloud-Lösung bietet die folgenden Vorteile: Zum einen zusätzliche Leistungen wieCloud Connectoren, einer sogenannten Action Engine die jeden einzelnen Mitarbeiter in einem Unternehmen mit datengetriebenen nächstbesten Handlungen unterstützt, intelligenter Process Automation, Machine Learning und AI, einen App Store sowie verschiedene Boards. Diese Erweiterungen zeigen deutlich den Anspruch des Münchner Process Mining Vendors auf, neben der reinen Prozessanalyse Unternehmen beim heben der identifizierten Potentiale tatkräftig zu unterstützen. Darüber hinaus kann die Cloud-Lösung punkten mit, einer schnellen Amortisierung, bedarfsgerechter Skalierbarkeit der Kapazitäten sowie einen noch stärkeren Fokus auf Security & Compliance. Darüber hinaus  erfolgen regelmäßig Updates.

Celonis Process Automation

Abbildung 7: Celonis Process Automation ermöglicht Unternehmen ihre Prozesse auf intelligente Art und Weise so zu automatisieren, dass die Zielerreichung der jeweiligen Fachabteilung im Fokus stehen. Auch hier trumpft Celonis mit über 30+ vorgefertigten Möglichkeiten von der Automatisierung von Kommunikation, über Backend Automatisierung in Quellsystemen bis hin zu Einbindung von RPA Bots und vielem mehr.

Der Schwenk von Celonis scheint in Richtung Cloud zu sein und es bleibt abzuwarten, wie die On-Premise-Lösung zukünftig aussehen wird und ob sie noch angeboten wird. Je nach Ausgangssituation gilt es hier abzuwägen, welche der beiden Lösungen die meisten Vorteile bietet. In jedem Fall wird Celonis als browserbasierte Webanwendung für den Endanwender zur Verfügung gestellt. Die folgende Abbildung zeigt eine beispielhafte Celonis on-Premise-Architektur, bei welcher der User über den Webbrowser Zugang erhält.

Celonis bringt eine ausreichende Anzahl an vordefinierten Datenschnittstellen mit, wodurch sowohl gängige on-Premise Datenbanken / ERP-Systeme als auch Cloud-Dienste, wie z. B. „ServiceNow“ oder „Salesforce“ verbunden werden können. Im „App Store“ können zusätzlich sogenannte „prebuild Process-Connectors“ kostenlos erworben werden. Diese erstellen die Verbindung und erzeugen das Datenmodell (Extract and Transform) für einen Standard Prozess automatisch, so dass mit der Analyse direkt begonnen werden kann. Über 500 vordefinierte Analysen für Standard Prozesse gibt es zusätzlich im App Store. Dadurch kann die Bearbeitungszeit für ein Process-Mining Projekt erheblich verkürzt werden, vorausgesetzt das benötigte Datenmodel weicht im Kern nicht zu sehr von dem vordefinierten Model ab. Sollten Schnittstellen mal nicht vorhanden sein, können Daten auch als CSV oder XLS Format importiert werden.

Celonis App Store

Abbildung 8: Der Celonis App Store beinhaltet über 100 Prozesskonnektoren, über 500 vorgefertigte Analysen und über 80 Action Engine Fähigkeiten die kostenlos mit der Cloud Lizenz zur Verfügung stehen

Auch wenn von einer 100%-Cloud gesprochen wird, muss für die Anbindung von unternehmensinternen on-premise Datenquellen (z. B. lokale Instanzen von SAP ERP, Oracle ERP, MS Dynamics ERP) ein sogenannter Extractor on-premise installiert werden.

Celonis Extractors

Abbildung 9: Celonis Extractor muss für die Anbindung von On-Premise Datenquellen ebenfalls On-Premise installiert werden. Dieser arbeitet wie ein Gateway zur Celonis Intelligent Business Cloud (IBC). Die IBC enthält zudem einen eigenen Extratctor für die Anbindung von Daten aus anderen Cloud-Systemen.

Celonis bietet in der Enterprise-Ausführung zudem ein umfassendes Benutzer-Berechtigungsmanagement, so dass beispielsweise für Analysen im Einkauf die Berechtigungen zwischen dem Einkaufsleiter, Einkäufern und Praktikanten im Einkauf unterschieden werden können. Auch dieser Punkt ist für viele Unternehmen eine Grundvoraussetzung für einen eventuellen unternehmensweiten Roll-Out.

Skalierbarkeit

In Punkto großen Datenmengen kann Celonis sich sehen lassen. Allein für „Uber“ verarbeitet die Cloud rund 50 Millionen Datensätze, wobei ein einzelner mehrere Terabyte (TB) groß sein kann. Der größte einzelne Datenblock, den Celonis analysiert, beträgt wohl etwas über 50 TB. Celonis bietet somit Process Mining, zeitgerecht im Bereich Big Data an und kann daher auch viele große renommierten Unternehmen zu seinen Kunden zählen, wie zum Beispiel Siemens, ABB oder BMW. Doch wie erweiterbar und flexibel sind die erstellten Datenmodelle? An diesem Punkt konnte ich keine Schwierigkeiten feststellen. Celonis bietet ein übersichtlich gestaltetes Userinterface, welches das Datenmodell mit seinen Tabellen und Beziehungen sauber darstellt. Modelliert wird mit SQL-Befehlen, wodurch eine zusätzliche Abfragesprache entfällt. Der von Celonis gewählte SQL-Dialekt ist Vertica. Dieser ist keineswegs begrenzt und bietet die ausreichende Tiefe, welche an dieser Stelle benötigt wird. Die Erweiterbarkeit sowie die Flexibilität der Datenmodelle wird somit ausschließlich von der Arbeit des Data Engineer bestimmt und in keiner Weise durch Celonis selbst eingeschränkt. Durch das Zurückgreifen auf die Abfragesprache SQL, kann bei der Modellierung auf eine sehr breite Community zurückgegriffen werden. Darüber hinaus können bestehende SQL-Skripte eingefügt und leicht angepasst werden. Und auch die Suche nach einem geeigneten Data Engineer gestaltet sich dadurch praktisch, da SQL eine der meistbeherrschten Abfragesprachen ist.

Zukunftsfähigkeit

Machine Learning umfasst Data Mining und Predictive Analytics und findet vermehrt den Einzug ins Process Mining. Auch ist es längst ein wesentlicher Bestandteil von Celonis. So basiert z. B. das Feature „Conformance“ auf Machine Learning Algorithmen, welche zu den identifizierten Prozessabweichungen den Einfluss auf das Geschäft berechnen. Aber auch Lösungen zu den Identifizierten Problemen werden von Verfahren des maschinellen Lernens dem Benutzer vorgeschlagen. Was zusätzlich in Sachen Machine Learning von Celonis noch bereitgestellt wird, ist die sogenannte Machine-Learning-Workbench, welche in die Intelligent Business Cloud integriert ist. Hier können eigene Anwendungen mit Machine Learning auf Basis der Event-Log Daten entwickelt und eingesetzt werden, um z. B. Vorhersagen zu Lieferzeiten treffen zu können.

Task Mining ist einer der nächsten Schritte im Bereich Process Mining, der den Detailgrad für Analysen von Prozessen bis hin zu einzelnen Aufgaben auf Mausklick-Ebene erhöht. Im Oktober 2019 hatte Celonis bereits angekündigt, dass die Intelligent Business Cloud um eben diese neue Technik der Datenerhebung und -analyse erweitert wird. Die beiden Methoden Prozess Analyse und Task Mining ergänzen sich ausgezeichnet. Stelle ich in der Prozess Analyse fest, dass sich eine bestimmte Aktivität besonders negativ auf meine gewünschte Performance auswirkt (z. B. Zeit), können mit Task Mining diese Aktivität genauer untersuchen und die möglichen Gründe sehr granular betrachten. So kann ich evtl. feststellen das Mitarbeiter bei einer bestimmten Art von Anfrage sehr viel Zeit in Salesforce verbringen, um Informationen zu sammeln. Hier liegt also viel Potential versteckt, um den gesamten Prozess zu verbessern. In dem z.B. die Informationsbeschaffung erleichtert wird oder evtl. der Anfragetyp optimiert wird, kann dieses Potential genutzt werden. Auch ist Task Mining die ideale Grundlage zur Formulierung von RPA-Lösungen.

Ebenfalls entscheidend für die Zukunftsfähigkeit von Process Mining ist die Möglichkeit, Verknüpfungen zwischen unterschiedlichen Geschäftsprozesse zu erkennen. Häufig sind diese untrennbar miteinander verbunden und der Output eines Prozesses bildet den Input für einen anderen. Mit prozessübergreifenden Multi-Event Logs bietet Celonis die Möglichkeit, genau diese Verbindungen aufzuzeigen. So entsteht ein einheitliches Prozessmodell für das gesamte Unternehmen. Und das unter bestimmten Voraussetzungen auch in nahezu Echtzeit.

Werden die ersten Entwicklungen im Bereich Machine Learning und Task Mining von Celonis weiter ausgebaut, ist Celonis weiterhin auf einem zukunftssicheren Weg. Unternehmen, die vor allem viel Wert auf Enterprise-Readiness und eine intensive Weiterentwicklung legen, dürften mit Celonis auf der sicheren Seite sein.

Preisgestaltung

Die Preisgestaltung der Enterprise Version wird von Celonis nicht transparent kommuniziert. Angeboten werden verschiedene kostenpflichtige Lösungspakete, welche sich aus den Anforderungen eines Projektes ergeben.  Generell stufe ich die Celonis Enterprise Version als Premium Produkt ein. Dies liegt auch daran, weil die Basisausführung der Celonis Enterprise Version bereits sehr umfänglich ist und neben der Software Subscription standardmäßig auch mit Wartung und Support kommt. Zusätzlich steckt mittlerweile sehr viel Entwicklungsarbeit in der Celonis Process Mining Plattform, welche weit über klassische Process Discovery Solutions hinausgeht.  Für kleinere Unternehmen mit begrenztem Budget gibt es daher zwischen der kostenfreien Snap Version und den Basis Paketen der Enterprise Version oft keine Interimslösung.

Fazit

Insgesamt stellt Celonis ein unabhängiges und leistungsstarkes Process Mining Tool in der Cloud bereit. Gehört die Cloud zur Unternehmensstrategie, ist man bei Celonis an der richtigen Adresse. Die „prebuild Process-Connectors“ und die vordefinierten Analysen können ein Process Mining Projekt signifikant beschleunigen und somit die Time-to-Value lukrativ verkürzen. Die Analyse Tools sind leicht bedienbar und schaffen dank integrierter Machine Learning Algorithmen Optimierungspotentiale. Positiv ist auch zu bewerten, dass Celonis ohne speziellen Syntax auskommt und mittelmäßige SQL-Fähigkeiten somit völlig ausreichend sind, um Prozessanalysen vollumfänglich durchzuführen. Diesen vielen positiven Aspekten steht eigentlich nur die hohe Preisgestaltung für die Enterprise Version gegenüber. Ob diese im Einzelfall gerechtfertigt ist, sollte situationsabhängig evaluiert werden. Sicherlich richtet sich Celonis Enterprise in erster Linie an größere Unternehmen, welche komplexe Prozesse mit hohen Datenvolumina analysieren möchte.  Mit Celonis-Snap können jedoch auch kleine Unternehmen und Start-ups einen begrenzten Einblick in dieses gut gelungene Process Mining Tool erhalten.

Sechs Eigenschaften einer modernen Business Intelligence

Völlig unabhängig von der Branche, in der Sie tätig sind, benötigen Sie Informationssysteme, die Ihre geschäftlichen Daten auswerten, um Ihnen Entscheidungsgrundlagen zu liefern. Diese Systeme werden gemeinläufig als sogenannte Business Intelligence (BI) bezeichnet. Tatsächlich leiden die meisten BI-Systeme an Mängeln, die abstellbar sind. Darüber hinaus kann moderne BI Entscheidungen teilweise automatisieren und umfassende Analysen bei hoher Flexibilität in der Nutzung ermöglichen.


english-flagRead this article in English:
“Six properties of modern Business Intelligence”


Lassen Sie uns die sechs Eigenschaften besprechen, die moderne Business Intelligence auszeichnet, die Berücksichtigungen von technischen Kniffen im Detail bedeuten, jedoch immer im Kontext einer großen Vision für die eigene Unternehmen-BI stehen:

1.      Einheitliche Datenbasis von hoher Qualität (Single Source of Truth)

Sicherlich kennt jeder Geschäftsführer die Situation, dass sich seine Manager nicht einig sind, wie viele Kosten und Umsätze tatsächlich im Detail entstehen und wie die Margen pro Kategorie genau aussehen. Und wenn doch, stehen diese Information oft erst Monate zu spät zur Verfügung.

In jedem Unternehmen sind täglich hunderte oder gar tausende Entscheidungen auf operative Ebene zu treffen, die bei guter Informationslage in der Masse sehr viel fundierter getroffen werden können und somit Umsätze steigern und Kosten sparen. Demgegenüber stehen jedoch viele Quellsysteme aus der unternehmensinternen IT-Systemlandschaft sowie weitere externe Datenquellen. Die Informationsbeschaffung und -konsolidierung nimmt oft ganze Mitarbeitergruppen in Anspruch und bietet viel Raum für menschliche Fehler.

Ein System, das zumindest die relevantesten Daten zur Geschäftssteuerung zur richtigen Zeit in guter Qualität in einer Trusted Data Zone als Single Source of Truth (SPOT) zur Verfügung stellt. SPOT ist das Kernstück moderner Business Intelligence.

Darüber hinaus dürfen auch weitere Daten über die BI verfügbar gemacht werden, die z. B. für qualifizierte Analysen und Data Scientists nützlich sein können. Die besonders vertrauenswürdige Zone ist jedoch für alle Entscheider diejenige, über die sich alle Entscheider unternehmensweit synchronisieren können.

2.      Flexible Nutzung durch unterschiedliche Stakeholder

Auch wenn alle Mitarbeiter unternehmensweit auf zentrale, vertrauenswürdige Daten zugreifen können sollen, schließt das bei einer cleveren Architektur nicht aus, dass sowohl jede Abteilung ihre eigenen Sichten auf diese Daten erhält, als auch, dass sogar jeder einzelne, hierfür qualifizierte Mitarbeiter seine eigene Sicht auf Daten erhalten und sich diese sogar selbst erstellen kann.

Viele BI-Systeme scheitern an der unternehmensweiten Akzeptanz, da bestimmte Abteilungen oder fachlich-definierte Mitarbeitergruppen aus der BI weitgehend ausgeschlossen werden.

Moderne BI-Systeme ermöglichen Sichten und die dafür notwendige Datenintegration für alle Stakeholder im Unternehmen, die auf Informationen angewiesen sind und profitieren gleichermaßen von dem SPOT-Ansatz.

3.      Effiziente Möglichkeiten zur Erweiterung (Time to Market)

Bei den Kernbenutzern eines BI-Systems stellt sich die Unzufriedenheit vor allem dann ein, wenn der Ausbau oder auch die teilweise Neugestaltung des Informationssystems einen langen Atem voraussetzt. Historisch gewachsene, falsch ausgelegte und nicht besonders wandlungsfähige BI-Systeme beschäftigen nicht selten eine ganze Mannschaft an IT-Mitarbeitern und Tickets mit Anfragen zu Änderungswünschen.

Gute BI versteht sich als Service für die Stakeholder mit kurzer Time to Market. Die richtige Ausgestaltung, Auswahl von Software und der Implementierung von Datenflüssen/-modellen sorgt für wesentlich kürzere Entwicklungs- und Implementierungszeiten für Verbesserungen und neue Features.

Des Weiteren ist nicht nur die Technik, sondern auch die Wahl der Organisationsform entscheidend, inklusive der Ausgestaltung der Rollen und Verantwortlichkeiten – von der technischen Systemanbindung über die Datenbereitstellung und -aufbereitung bis zur Analyse und dem Support für die Endbenutzer.

4.      Integrierte Fähigkeiten für Data Science und AI

Business Intelligence und Data Science werden oftmals als getrennt voneinander betrachtet und geführt. Zum einen, weil Data Scientists vielfach nur ungern mit – aus ihrer Sicht – langweiligen Datenmodellen und vorbereiteten Daten arbeiten möchten. Und zum anderen, weil die BI in der Regel bereits als traditionelles System im Unternehmen etabliert ist, trotz der vielen Kinderkrankheiten, die BI noch heute hat.

Data Science, häufig auch als Advanced Analytics bezeichnet, befasst sich mit dem tiefen Eintauchen in Daten über explorative Statistik und Methoden des Data Mining (unüberwachtes maschinelles Lernen) sowie mit Predictive Analytics (überwachtes maschinelles Lernen). Deep Learning ist ein Teilbereich des maschinellen Lernens (Machine Learning) und wird ebenfalls für Data Mining oder Predictvie Analytics angewendet. Bei Machine Learning handelt es sich um einen Teilbereich der Artificial Intelligence (AI).

In der Zukunft werden BI und Data Science bzw. AI weiter zusammenwachsen, denn spätestens nach der Inbetriebnahme fließen die Prädiktionsergebnisse und auch deren Modelle wieder in die Business Intelligence zurück. Vermutlich wird sich die BI zur ABI (Artificial Business Intelligence) weiterentwickeln. Jedoch schon heute setzen viele Unternehmen Data Mining und Predictive Analytics im Unternehmen ein und setzen dabei auf einheitliche oder unterschiedliche Plattformen mit oder ohne Integration zur BI.

Moderne BI-Systeme bieten dabei auch Data Scientists eine Plattform, um auf qualitativ hochwertige sowie auf granularere Rohdaten zugreifen zu können.

5.      Ausreichend hohe Performance

Vermutlich werden die meisten Leser dieser sechs Punkte schon einmal Erfahrung mit langsamer BI gemacht haben. So dauert das Laden eines täglich zu nutzenden Reports in vielen klassischen BI-Systemen mehrere Minuten. Wenn sich das Laden eines Dashboards mit einer kleinen Kaffee-Pause kombinieren lässt, mag das hin und wieder für bestimmte Berichte noch hinnehmbar sein. Spätestens jedoch bei der häufigen Nutzung sind lange Ladezeiten und unzuverlässige Reports nicht mehr hinnehmbar.

Ein Grund für mangelhafte Performance ist die Hardware, die sich unter Einsatz von Cloud-Systemen bereits beinahe linear skalierbar an höhere Datenmengen und mehr Analysekomplexität anpassen lässt. Der Einsatz von Cloud ermöglicht auch die modulartige Trennung von Speicher und Rechenleistung von den Daten und Applikationen und ist damit grundsätzlich zu empfehlen, jedoch nicht für alle Unternehmen unbedingt die richtige Wahl und muss zur Unternehmensphilosophie passen.

Tatsächlich ist die Performance nicht nur von der Hardware abhängig, auch die richtige Auswahl an Software und die richtige Wahl der Gestaltung von Datenmodellen und Datenflüssen spielt eine noch viel entscheidender Rolle. Denn während sich Hardware relativ einfach wechseln oder aufrüsten lässt, ist ein Wechsel der Architektur mit sehr viel mehr Aufwand und BI-Kompetenz verbunden. Dabei zwingen unpassende Datenmodelle oder Datenflüsse ganz sicher auch die neueste Hardware in maximaler Konfiguration in die Knie.

6.      Kosteneffizienter Einsatz und Fazit

Professionelle Cloud-Systeme, die für BI-Systeme eingesetzt werden können, bieten Gesamtkostenrechner an, beispielsweise Microsoft Azure, Amazon Web Services und Google Cloud. Mit diesen Rechnern – unter Einweisung eines erfahrenen BI-Experten – können nicht nur Kosten für die Nutzung von Hardware abgeschätzt, sondern auch Ideen zur Kostenoptimierung kalkuliert werden. Dennoch ist die Cloud immer noch nicht für jedes Unternehmen die richtige Lösung und klassische Kalkulationen für On-Premise-Lösungen sind notwendig und zudem besser planbar als Kosten für die Cloud.

Kosteneffizienz lässt sich übrigens auch mit einer guten Auswahl der passenden Software steigern. Denn proprietäre Lösungen sind an unterschiedliche Lizenzmodelle gebunden und können nur über Anwendungsszenarien miteinander verglichen werden. Davon abgesehen gibt es jedoch auch gute Open Source Lösungen, die weitgehend kostenfrei genutzt werden dürfen und für viele Anwendungsfälle ohne Abstriche einsetzbar sind.

Die Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) gehören zum BI-Management mit dazu und sollten stets im Fokus sein. Falsch wäre es jedoch, die Kosten einer BI nur nach der Kosten für Hardware und Software zu bewerten. Ein wesentlicher Teil der Kosteneffizienz ist komplementär mit den Aspekten für die Performance des BI-Systems, denn suboptimale Architekturen arbeiten verschwenderisch und benötigen mehr und teurere Hardware als sauber abgestimmte Architekturen. Die Herstellung der zentralen Datenbereitstellung in adäquater Qualität kann viele unnötige Prozesse der Datenaufbereitung ersparen und viele flexible Analysemöglichkeiten auch redundante Systeme direkt unnötig machen und somit zu Einsparungen führen.

In jedem Fall ist ein BI für Unternehmen mit vielen operativen Prozessen grundsätzlich immer günstiger als kein BI zu haben. Heutzutage könnte für ein Unternehmen nichts teurer sein, als nur nach Bauchgefühl gesteuert zu werden, denn der Markt tut es nicht und bietet sehr viel Transparenz.

Dennoch sind bestehende BI-Architekturen hin und wieder zu hinterfragen. Bei genauerem Hinsehen mit BI-Expertise ist die Kosteneffizienz und Datentransparenz häufig möglich.