Coffee Shop Location Predictor

As part of this article, we will explore the main steps involved in predicting the best location for a coffee shop in Vancouver. We will also take into consideration that the coffee shop is near a transit station, and has no Starbucks near it. Well, while at it, let us also add an extra feature where we make sure the crime in the area is lower.

Introduction

In this article, we will highlight the main steps involved to predict a location for a coffee shop in Vancouver. We also want to make sure that the coffee shop is near a transit station, and has no Starbucks near it. As an added feature, we will make sure that the crime concentration in the area is low, and the entire program should be implemented in Python. So let’s walk through the steps.

Steps Required

  • Get crime history for the last two years
  • Get locations of all transit stations and Starbucks in Vancouver
  • Check all the transit stations that do not have any Starbucks near them
  • Get all the data regarding crimes near the filtered transit stations
  • Create a grid of all possible coordinates around the transit station
  • Check crime around each created coordinate and display the top 5 locations.

Gathering Data

This covers the first two steps required to get data from the internet, both manually and automatically.

Getting all Crime History

We can get crime history for the past 14 years in Vancouver from here. This data is in raw crime.csv format, so we have to process it and filter out useless data. We then write this processed information on the crime_processed.csv file.

Note: There are 530,653 records of crime in this file

In this program, we will just use the type and coordinate of the crime. There are many crime types, but we have classified them into three major categories namely;

Theft (red), Break and Enter (orange) and Mischief (green)

These all crimes can be plotted on Graph as displayed below.

This may seem very congested and full, so let’s see a closeup image for future references.

Getting Locations of all Rapid Transit Stations

We can get the coordinates of all Transit Stations in Vancouver from here. This dataset has all coordinates of rapid transit stations in three transit lines in Vancouver. There are a total of 23 of them in Vancouver, we can then use it for further processing.

Getting Locations of all Starbucks

The Starbucks data is present here, we can scrape it easily and get the locations of all the Starbucks in Vancouver. We just need the Starbucks that is near transit stations, so we’ll filter out the rest. There are a total 24 Starbucks in Vancouver, and 10 of them are near Transit Stations.

Note: Other than the coordinates of Transit Stations and Starbucks, we also need coordinates and type of the crime.

Transit Stations with no Starbucks

As we have all the data required, now moving to the next step. We need to get to the transit Station locations that have no Starbucks near them. For that we can create an area of particular radius around each Transit Station. Then check all Starbucks locations with respect to them, whether they are within that area or not.

If none of the Starbucks are within that particular Transit Station’s area, we can append it to a list. At the end, we have a list of all Transit locations with no Starbucks near them. There are a total of 6 Transit Stations with no Starbucks near them.

Crime near Transit Stations

Now lets filter out all crime records and get just what we are interested in, which means the crime near Transit stations. For that we will plot an area of specific radius around each of them to see the crimes. These are more than 110,000 crime records.

Crime near located Transit Stations

Now that we have all the Transit Stations that don’t have any Starbucks near them and also the crime near all Transit Stations. So, let’s use this information and get crime near the located Transit Stations. These are about 44,000 crime records.

This may seem correct at first glance, but the points are overlapping due to abundance, so we can create different lists of crimes based on their types.

Theft

Break and Enter

Mischief

Generating all possible coordinates

Now finally, we have all the prerequisites and let’s get to the main task at hand, predicting the best coordinate for the coffee shop.

There may be many approaches to solve this problem, but the one I used in this program is that I will create a grid of all possible locations (coordinates) in the area of 1 km radius around each located transit station.

Initially I generated 1 coordinate for every m, this resulted in 1000,000 coordinates in every km. This is a huge number, and for the 6 located Transit stations, it becomes 6 Million. It may not seem much at first glance because computers can handle such data in a few seconds.

But for location prediction we need to compare each coordinate with crime coordinates. As the algorithm has to check for ~7,000 Thefts, ~19,000 Break ins, and ~17,000 Mischiefs around each generated coordinate. Computing this would want the program to process an estimate of 432.4 Billion times. This sort of execution takes many hours on normal computers (sometimes days).

The solution to this is to create a coordinate for each 10 m area, this results about 10,000 coordinate per km. For the above mentioned number of crimes, the estimated processes will be several Billions. That would significantly reduce the time, but is still not less.

To control this, we can remove the duplicate values in crime coordinates and those which are too close to each other ~1m. Doing so, we are left with just 816 Thefts, 2,654 Break ins, and 8,234 Mischiefs around each generated coordinate.
The precision will not be affected much but the time and computational resources required will be reduced a lot.

 

Checking Crime near Generated coordinates

Now that we have all the locations, we will start some processing on it and check each coordinate against some constraints. That are respectively;

  1. Filter out Coordinates having Theft near 1 km
    We get 122,000 coordinates with no Thefts (Below merged 1000 to 1)
  2. Filter out Coordinates having Break Ins near 200m
    We get 8000 coordinates with no Thefts (Below merged 1000 to 1)
  3. Filter out Coordinates having Mischief near 200m
    We get 6000 coordinates with no Thefts (Below merged 1000 to 1)
    Now that we have 6 Coordinates of best locations that have passed through all the constraints, we will order them.To order them, we will check their distance from the nearest transit location. The nearest will be on top of the list as the best possible location, then the second and so on. The generated List is;

    1. -123.0419406741792, 49.24824259252004
    2. -123.05887151659479, 49.24327221040713
    3. -123.05287151659476, 49.24327221040713
    4. -123.04994067417924, 49.239242592520064
    5. -123.0419406741792, 49.239242592520064
    6. -123.0409406741792, 49.239242592520064

How can MindTrades help?

MindTrades Consulting Services, a leading marketing agency provides in-depth analysis and insights for the global IT sector including leading data integration brands such as Diyotta. From Cloud Migration, Big Data, Digital Transformation, Agile Deliver, Cyber Security, to Analytics- Mind trades provides published breakthrough ideas, and prompt content delivery. For more information, refer to mindtrades.com.

Code

https://github.com/Mindtrades-Consulting/Coffee-Shop-Location-Predictor

 

Artikelserie: BI Tools im Vergleich – Qlik Sense

Dies ist ein Artikel der Artikel-Serie “BI Tools im Vergleich – Einführung und Motivation“, zu der auch die vorab sehr lesenswerten einführenden Worte und die Ausführungen zur Datenbasis gehören. Auf Grundlage derselben Daten wurde analog zu diesem Artikel hier auch ein Artikel über Microsoft Power BI und einen zu Tableau.

Übrigens gibt es auch Erweiterungen für Qlik Sense, die Process Mining ermöglichen. Eine dieser Erweiterungen ist die von MEHRWERK Process Mining.

Lizenzmodell

Neben Qlik Sense gibt es auch das lang bewährte Qlik View, dass auf der gleichen In-Memory-Kerntechnologie basiert. Qlik Sense wurde im Jahr 2014 vom schwedischen Softwareunternehmen Qlik Tech herausgebracht und bei Qlik Sense liegt auch der Fokus der Weiterentwicklung. Es handelt sich um Self-Service-BI und eine Plattform für Visual Data Analysis. Dabei gibt es die Möglichkeit einer On Premise Server Version (interne Cloud) oder auf die Server von Qlik zu setzen und somit gänzlich auf die Qlik Sense Cloud zu setzen, also die Qlik Sense Cloud als SaaS-Lösung. Dazu gibt es noch Qlik Sense Desktop, das für kleinere Projekte ausreichen kann und ganz ohne die Cloud auskommt, jedoch Ergebnisse bei Bedarf in die Cloud publishen kann. Ähnlich wie bei Tableau und anders als derzeitig bei Power BI, wird für das Editieren von Apps/Dashboards jedoch kein Qlik Sense Desktop benötigt, denn das Erstellen, Bearbeiten und Verwalten von Qlik Sense Reports darf komplett in der Cloud (vom Browser aus) stattfinden.

Der Kunde hat die Wahl zwischen den Lizenzmodellen von Qlik Sense Business (SaaS) und Qlik Sense Enterprise (SaaS oder On Premise). Die Enterprise Variante ist dann noch mal in Enterprise Professional, Enterprise Analyzer und Enterprise Analyzer Capacity eingeteilt, es stehen also insgesamt drei Lizenzen zur Auswahl. Der Preis für Qlik Sense Business beträgt monatlich derzeitig $30 pro Anwender. Das offizielle Preismodell sieht für Enterprise Professionell $70 für einen Benutzer pro Monat vor und für Enterprise Analyzer $40 pro Benutzer pro Monat. Zum Kennenlernen der Business Version gibt eine kostenlose 30-Tage-Testversion.

Die Version Qlik Sense Desktop ist in der Funktionalität an der SaaS Lösung Qlik Sense Enterprise angepasst und steht ihr in nichts Essenziellem nach. Die Desktop Version kann nur auf Windows-Computern ausgeführt werden und die Verwendung mehrerer Bildschirme oder Tablets wird nicht unterstützt. Außerdem werden Sicherheitsfunktionen nicht unterstützt und es gibt keine Funktion zum automatischen Speichern. Mehr zu den Unterschieden hier.

Community & Features von anderen Entwicklern

Wie relevant die Community für Visualisierungstools ist, wurde bereits in den vorherigen Blogartikeln zu Power BI und Tableau beschrieben. Auch Qlik besitzt eine offizielle Community Seite, in der u. a. Diskussionen, Blogs und Support angeboten werden. Auch hier finden sich zu den meisten Problemstellungen eine Menge Lösungsansätze. Zudem bietet Qlik auf den offiziellen Webseiten auch sehr viele Lernvideos an, mit denen sich Neulinge einarbeiten und fortgeschrittene Anwender auch noch einiges erfahren können.

Neben den zahlreichen Visualisierungen können auch weitere Diagramme hinzugefügt werden. Im Qlik Sense Desktop werden bei Arbeitsblatt im Reiter Benutzerdefinierte Objekte zwei Bundles mitgeliefert. Hier können auch Erweiterungen importiert werden. Ein bekanntes Bundle ist die Vizlib, welches hier unterschiedliche Packages zur Verfügung stellt. Diese Erweiterungen können einfach importiert werden, indem die heruntergeladenen Verzeichnisse in den Qlik Sense Extensions Ordner eingefügt werden. Wem auch die Erweiterungen nicht ausreichen, der kann sogenannte Widgets erstellen. Diese werden in HTML und CSS geschrieben, daher ist ein gewisses Grundverständnis vorausgesetzt. Diese Widgets können auf Qlik Sense Funktionalitäten zugreifen und diese per Klick ausführen. So kann bspw. ein Button zum Entfernen aller gesetzten Filter erstellt werden.

Erstellung von Filtern in Qlik Sense

Daten laden & transformieren

Flexibler als die meisten Vergleichstools ist Qlik in der Verknüpfung von Datenquellen. Es werden Hunderte von Datenquellen angeboten, durch die der Anwender Zugriff auf seine Daten erhalten kann. Die von Qlik entwickelte Associate Engine beschleunig die Verarbeitung von verknüpften Daten. Die Anbindung von Cloudanwendungen steht hier im Vordergrund, aber es werden natürlich auch klassische Datenbanken, Textfiles usw. angeboten.

Nachdem die Daten geladen sind, befindet sich im Dateneditor unter dem Reiter auto generated selection eine automatisch generierte Query für den Ladevorgang. Dieses „Datenladeskript“ kann angelegt, bearbeitet und ausgeführt werden. Im Reiter „Main“ befinden sich hier vordefinierte Variableneinstellungen, wie z. B. SET ThousandSep=’.’; wobei auch diese angepasst und erweitert werden können. Zudem gibt es die Möglichkeit, das Datenmodell mit allen Tabellenverbindungen anzeigen zu lassen. Die große Qlik-Community und die Tutorials ermöglicht es jedem Nutzer, die vielen Möglichkeiten mit Qlik Script zügig aus dem Internet zu erlernen.

Daten laden & transformieren: AdventureWorks2017Dataset

Im Reiter Datenmanager werden die empfohlenen Verknüpfungen angezeigt. Diese sind für Einsteiger sehr nützlich. Im Verlauf der Analysen musste jedoch nachjustiert werden. Wenn die ID-Spalten zum Verknüpfen z. B. unterschiedliche Bezeichnungen haben, tut sich der Algorithmus schon mal schwer.

Abbildung eines Datenmodels in Qlik Sense. Zusehen sind die Verbindungen zwischen den Tabellen der Datenbank “AdventureWorks2016”.

Eine vom Tool vordefinierte Detailansicht in Form einer Visualisierung (siehe Screenshot) ermöglicht einen schnellen und einfachen Qualitätscheck der gerade erst geladenen Daten. Hier können die Verbindungen angepasst und neue erstellt werden. Hier können erste Datentransformation durchgeführt werden, z. B. die Ersetzung von Daten oder NULL-Werten.

Datentransformationen mit einfachen Eingabemasken – Hier: Ersetzen von Werten in Tabellen-Spalten.

Zudem können Felder hinzugefügt, also berechnet werden (ähnlich wie in Power BI und Tableau als neues Measure). Z. B. können Textwerte mit dem Operator „&“ verbunden und somit z. B. Vor- und Nachname ganz intuitiv in eine Spalte zusammengefügt werden. Außerdem gibt es mathematische Operatoren für Berechnungen und ein SQL-artiges „like“, um Zeichenfolgen mit Mustern zu vergleichen. Auch an dieser Stelle können Formeln eingegeben werden. Die Formeln umfassen hier: String-, Datums-, numerische, Bedingungs-, mathematische, Verteilungsfunktionen usw. Zu beachten ist hier, dass die Daten neu geladen werden müssen, um die berechneten Spalten zu updaten. Der Umgang mit den Formeln aber erscheint mir einfacher als z. B. mit DAX in Power BI.

Daten visualisieren

Dank einer benutzerfreundlichen Oberfläche sind auch Analysen ohne großes Vorwissen und per Drag and Drop möglich. Individuelle Dashboards sind in wenigen Schritten möglich und erfordern keine besonderen Tricks oder Kniffe um gleich zum Erfolg zu kommen. Die Datenvisualisierung erfolgt in sogenannten Apps, in denen die Dashboards (Seiten in der App) liegen. Diese können von Qlik Sense Desktop nach Qlik Cloud hochgeladen werden und von dort aus mit anderen Usern geteilt werden.

Qlik Sense enthält von Hause aus eine große Anzahl an Visualisierungsmöglichkeiten. „Entdecken Sie neue Einblicke in ihre Daten“ heißt es bei der Funktion namens Einblicke (Insights), denn hier wird der Zugriff auf die Qlik Cognitive Engine gewährt. Dabei kann der Anwender eine Frage an den sogenannten Insight Advisor in natürlicher Sprache formulieren, woraus dann AI-gestützte Dashboard-Vorschläge generiert werden. Auch wenn diese Funktion noch nicht vollkommen ausgereift erscheint, ist dies sicherlich ein Schritt in die Business Intelligence der Zukunft.

Qlik Sense Insights – Einblicke gewinnen mit Stichworten in menschlicher Sprache. Funktioniert mal besser, mal schlechter. Die Titel der Diagramme sind (in Qlik Sense stets per default) die Formeln der Darstellung. Diese lassen sich leicht umbenennen.

Diese Diagrammvorschläge können einen guten ersten Eindruck über verschiedene Dimensionen und Kennzahlen geben und die Diagramme können direkt zu den Arbeitsblättern hinzugefügt werden. Es können auch Fragen gestellt werden, die Berechnungen zur Grundlage haben. So wird im folgenden Beispiel die Korrelation zwischen zwei Kennzahlen ermittelt.

Qlik Sense Insights – Korrelation erstellt mit Anweisung auf Englisch

Den ersten Auftritt hatte die Cognitive Engine im April 2018 und der Insight Advisor im Juni 2018. Über den Insight Adviser werden auch die empfohlenen Verknüpfungen im Datenmanager generiert, diese sollten jedoch vom Anwender (z. B. BI-Developer, Data Analyst oder Data Engineer) jedoch nochmal überblickt werden, da diese nicht unbedingt fehlerfrei abläuft. Gerade in vielen Geschäftsdaten verstecken sich viele “falsche Freunde” unter den ID-Spalten-Benennungen, die einen Zusammenhang herzustellen scheinen – aber es nicht immer tun.

Diagramme können ansonsten auf übliche Weise über eine Paletten ausgewählt werden, um sie dann mit Kennzahlen und Dimensionen zu befüllen. Die Charts können mit vordefinierten Optionen in den Kategorien Daten, Sortieren, Darstellung usw. bearbeitet werden. Unter Darstellung können ggf. verschiedene Designs ausgewählt werden und Beschriftungen, Titel etc. angepasst werden. Die Felder zur Auswahl der Kennzahlen und Dimensionen können nach Tabelle ausgewählt werden, sie sind ansonsten alle in einer Liste und können über eine Suchfunktion schnell gefunden werden, vorausgesetzt die genaue Bezeichnung ist bekannt. Diese Suchfunktion wird auch an anderen Stellen angewandt, immer dann, wenn Felder ausgewählt werden.

Es gibt außerdem die Option „Master-Elemente“, um wieder verwendbare Dimensionen oder Kennzahlen (Measures) zu erstellen.

Hier können Berechnungen für Kennzahlen und Dimensionen hinterlegt und in jedem Arbeitsblatt wiederverwendet werden. Dies gilt auch für Visualisierungen und die damit verbundenen Dateninputs und Einstellungen.

Mit Drag and Drop stößt der Anwender hier schon mal an seine Grenzen, aber dann helfen die Formeln von Qlik Sense Script weiter. Wenn bspw. das Diagramm namens KPI eine Kennzahl mit Filterung nach einer Dimension anzeigen soll, hilft die Formel: Sum({<DimensionName={‘Value’}>} MeasureName. Eine Qlik Sense Formelsammlung ist hier zu finden. Jede Kennzahl und Dimension kann als Formel eingegeben werden. Im Formel bearbeiten – Editor werden auch schon gebräuchliche Berechnungen wie Aggregierungsfunktionen (Sum, Avg, Max usw.) und Distinct, vorgegeben und können auf Knopfdruck und ohne Coding generiert werden, ähnliche wie ein Quick Measure in Power BI.

Fazit

Das Finanzmodell ist auf jede Unternehmensgröße ausgerichtet. Wenn die Datenbereinigung im Vorfeld stattgefunden hat, sind Visualisierungen in wenigen Schritten möglich. Es gibt dabei die Möglichkeit, die Daten in gewissem Rahmen zu transformieren. Für die gewünschte Darstellung der Kennzahlen ist die Verwendung von Qlik Sense Script oftmals erforderlich, jedoch kommen Anfänger auch lange ohne Coding aus. Insgesamt bewerte ich die Nutzerfreundlichkeit auf Grund der intuitiveren Bedienung subjektiv höher als bei Tableau oder Power BI.

Es können Erweiterungen und Widgets zur tiefgründigen Dashboard Erstellung und Analyse genutzt werden. Es gibt viele Drag and Drop Funktionen, um die Dashboards zusammen zu ziehen. Die Erstellung einfacher Berichte erfordert keinen Entwickler oder einen gut ausgebildeten Data Analyst, dennoch werden Unternehmen bei größeren Vorhaben auf Grund der Komplexität von Unternehmensprozessen, die in der Business Intelligence darzustellen versucht werden, nicht um geschultes Personal herum kommen, wofür es viele Angebote an Trainings auch von Qlik-Partnern gibt. Die Schnelligkeit der Datenverarbeitung liegt dank der Associative Engine im Vergleich zu den anderen beiden Tools vorne. AI-gestützte Vorschläge können bei der Dashboard-Erstellung zusätzliche Unterstützung leisten. Die Kombination beider Komponenten, Schnelligkeit und Ai-gestützte Vorschläge des Insight Advisors, grenzt das Qlik Sense Tool zwar nicht so sehr von den anderen Anbietern ab, wie Qlik gerne hätte…. Dennoch ist Qlik Sense auch heute noch ein Tool, dass für Ad-Hoc-Analytics wie Business Intelligence mit Standard Reporting in Erwägung gezogen werden sollte.

Process Mining mit MEHRWERK – Artikelserie

Dieser Artikel der Artikelserie Process Mining Tools beschäftigt sich mit dem Anbieter MEHRWERK. Das im Jahr 2008 gegründete Unternehmen, heute geführt durch drei Geschäftsführer, bietet Business Intelligence als Beratung und Dienstleistung rund um die Produkte des BI-Software-Anbieters QlikTech an. Rund zehn Jahre später, 2018, stieg das Unternehmen auch als Teil-Software-Anbieter in Process Mining ein. MEHRWERK ProcessMining, kurz MPM, ist einen Process Mining Lösung auf der Basis des weit verbreiteten BI-Tools Qlik Sense.

Lösungspakete: Standard-Lizenz
Zielgruppe:  Für mittel- und große Unternehmen
Datenquellen: Beliebig über Standard-Konnektoren von Qlik Sense
Datenvolumen: Unlimitierte Datenmengen
Architektur: On-Premise, Cloud oder Multi-Cloud

Für den Einsatz von MEHRWERK ProcessMining wird Qlik Sense Enterprise benötigt, welches sowohl On-Premise auf unternehmenseigenen Windows-Servern direkt installiert werden kann, über Kubernetes via Container ebenfalls On-Premise oder in  sowie auch noch einfacher direkt in der Qlik Cloud oder aus Datenschutzgründen in Verbindung mit der Hochskalierbarkeit der Cloud als hybrides Deployment.

Bedienbarkeit und Anpassungsfähigkeit der Analysen

Die Beurteilung der Bedienbarkeit ist nahezu vollständig abhängig von der Einschätzung zur Bedienbarkeit von Qlik Sense, da MPM auf diesem gängigen BI-Tool basiert. Im Wording von Qlik Sense arbeiten Developer in einem Hub und erstellen Apps, die ein oder mehrere Worksheets (Arbeitsblätter) umfassen können, welche horizontal durchgeblättert werden können. Die Qlik-Technologie ermöglicht es dabei übrigens auch, neben Story-Telling-Boards ganze Dashboards oder einzelne Visualisierungen über Mashups in Webseiten einzubetten.

Jede App kann in einem bestimmten Stream veröffentlicht werden. Über die Apps und die Streams wird der Zugriff durch die Nutzer erweitert, beschränkt oder anderweitig organisiert. Die Zugriffe auf Apps können über Security Rules gesteuert und beschränkt werden, was für die Data Governance eines Unternehmens wichtig ist und die Lösung auch mandantenfähig macht.

Figure 1 - Übersicht über die wichtigsten Schaltflächen einer Qlik Sense-App

Figure 1 – Übersicht über die wichtigsten Schaltflächen einer Qlik Sense-App

Wer mit Qlik Sense als BI-Tool bereits vertraut ist, wird sich hier sofort zurechtfinden und kann direkt in Process Mining als Analyseform, die immer mehr zum festen Bestandteil leistungsstarker BI-Systeme wird, einsteigen. Standardmäßig startet jede App im Ansichtsmodus. Die Qlik Sense-User-Role „Analyzer User“ ist nur für diese Ansicht berechtigt und kann Apps nur lesend verwenden. Die App ist jedoch interaktiv nutzbar, so dass alle in der App verfügbaren Dimensionen anklickbar und als Filter nutzbar sind. Die Besonderheit ist hier das assoziative Datenmodell, welches durch Qlik’s inMemory Engine bereitgestellt wird. Diese überwindet die Einschränkungen relationaler Datenbanken und SQL-Abfragen. Bei diesem traditionellen Ansatz müssen Datenquellen mit SQL-Join-Befehlen kombiniert werden, und es müssen im Voraus Annahmen über die Art der Fragen getroffen werden, die die Anwender stellen werden. Wenn ein Benutzer eine Analyse durchführen möchte, die nicht geplant war, müssen die Daten neu aufgebaut werden, was die Ausführung komplexer Abfragen zur Folge hat und eine gewisse Wartezeit verursacht. Die assoziative Engine hingegen ermöglicht “on the fly”-Berechnungen und Aggregationen, die sofortige Erkenntnisse über die betrachteten Prozesse liefern.

Für Anwender, die mit den Filtermöglichkeiten nicht so vertraut sind, bietet Qlik auch die assoziative Suche an. Diese ermöglicht es, Suchbegriffe, ähnlich wie bei Google, einzugeben. Die Assoziative Engine ermittelt dann mögliche Treffer und Verbindungen in den Daten, welche daraufhin entsprechend gefiltert werden.

Die User-Role „Professional User“ kann jede veröffentlichte App zudem im Editier-Modus öffnen und eigene Arbeitsblätter und Analysen auf Basis zentral definierter Masteritems (Kennzahlen und Dimensionen) erstellen. Ebenfalls können bestehende Dashboards dupliziert werden, um diese für den eigenen Bedarf anzupassen, z. B. um Tabellen und Diagrammen anzupassen oder zu löschen. Dabei erfolgt jedoch keine Datenduplizierung, da Qlik Sense einen sogenannten Server Side Authoring Ansatz verfolgt. Durch das Konzept der Master Items wird zusätzlich sichergestellt, dass die Data Governance erhalten bleibt. Die erstellen Arbeitsblätter können durch die Professional User wiederrum veröffentlicht werden. Dabei ist sichergestellt, dass alle anderen Anwender diese „Community Sheets“ nur mit den Daten ihres Berechtigungskontexts sehen.

Figure 2 - Eine QlikSense App im Edit-Modus für "Professional User".

Figure 2 – Eine QlikSense App im Edit-Modus für “Professional User”.

Jede Seite der App kann beliebig gestaltet werden, auch so, dass Read-Only-Nutzer über die Standard-Lizenz viele Möglichkeiten des Ablesens und der Filterung von Daten erhalten.

Figure 3 - Hier eine Seite der App, die nur zur Filterung von Dimensionen gestaltet ist: Die Filterung von Prozessnetzen nach Vorgangsnummern, Produkten und/oder Prozess-Varianten

Figure 3 – Hier eine Seite der App, die nur zur Filterung von Dimensionen gestaltet ist: Die Filterung von Prozessnetzen nach Vorgangsnummern, Produkten und/oder Prozess-Varianten

MEHRWERK ProcessMining liefert Vorlagen als Standard-App, die typische Analyse-Szenarien wie das Prozess-Flussdiagramm und Filter für Durchlaufzeiten, Frequenzen und Varianten bereits vorgeben und somit den Einstieg erleichtern. Die Template App liefert außerdem sehr umfangreiche Process Mining Funktionen wie Conformance Checking, automatisierte Ursachenanalysen, Prozessmusterabfragen oder kontinuierliches Process Monitoring gleich mit aus. Außerdem können u.a. Schichten, Prozesshierarchien oder Sollprozesse konfiguriert werden.

Nur User mit der Qlik Sense „Professional User“ Lizenz können dazu im Editier-Modus auch die Datenmodelle einsehen, erstellen und anpassen. So wie auch in der klassischen Business Intelligence sind im Process Mining Datenmodelle in Form sogenannter Event-Logs entscheidend für die Analyse und die Vorbedingung auch für die MPM App.

Figure 4 - Beispielhaftes Event Log aus der Beispielvorlage-App von MEHRWERK.

Figure 4 – Beispielhaftes Event Log aus der Beispielvorlage-App von MEHRWERK.

Das Event Log kann und sollte neben den drei Must-Haves für Process Mining (Case-ID, Activity Description & Timestamp) noch beliebig viele weitere hilfreiche Informationen in weiteren Spalten aufführen. Denn nur so können Abweichungen, Anomalien oder andere Auffälligkeiten im Prozess in einen Kontext gesetzt werden, um gezielte Maßnahmen treffen zu können.

Integrationsfähigkeit

Die Frage, wie gut und leicht sich MEHRWERK ProcessMining in die Unternehmens-IT einfügen lässt, stellt sich mit der Frage, ob Qlik Sense bereits Teil der IT-Infrastruktur ist oder beispielsweise als Cloud-Lösung eingesetzt wird. Unternehmen, die bisher nicht auf Qlik Sense setzten, müssten hier die grundsätzliche Frage der Voraussetzungen des Tools von QlikTech stellen.  Vollständigerweise sei jedoch angemerkt, dass laut Aussage von MEHRWERK ca. 40% ihrer Kunden vorher kein Qlik Sense im Einsatz hatten und die Installation von Qlik Sense keine große Hürde darstellt.

Ein wesentlicher Aspekt der Integrationsfähigkeit ist jedoch nicht nur die Integration der Software in die IT-Infrastruktur, sondern auch, wie leicht sich Daten in das benötigte Datenformat (Event Log) überführen lässt. Es ist zwar möglich, Qlik Sense mit MPM ausschließlich für die Datenanalyse/-visualisierung zu verwenden, und die Datenmodellierung dann mit anderen Tools (Datenbanken, ETL) durchzuführen. Allerdings bringt Qlik Sense selbst eine Menge an Konnektoren zu vielen Datenquellen mit. Wie mit jedem Process Mining Tool ist gibt es dabei zwei Konzepte der Datenaufbereitung. Die eine Möglichkeit ist das Laden, Konsolidieren und Vorbereiten der Datenbank für ein Data Warehouse (DWH), das die Daten bereits in Event Logs transformiert. In diesem Fall kann MPM die Daten über einen Standard-Konnektor von Qlik Sense importieren, in ein MPM-spezifisches Event Log nachbereiten und dann direkt mit der Analyse starten. Dabei benötigt Qlik Sense keine eigene Datenbank für die Datenhaltung sondern verabeitet die Daten hochkomprimiert in der eigenen, patentierten InMemory-Engine.

Figure 5 - Qlik Sense Standard Connectors

Figure 5 – Qlik Sense Standard Connectors

Das andere Konzept der Datenaufbereitung ist die Nutzung von Qlik Sense auch als Tool für das Datenmanagement. Hierfür werden die Standard-Konnektoren genutzt, um Daten möglichst direkt an Qlik Sense anzubinden. In diesem Fall muss die Bildung des anwendungsfallspezifischen Event Logs als prozessprotokollartiges Datenmodell in Qlik Sense erfolgen. Dies lässt sich in einem prozeduralen Skript mit der Qlik-eigenen Skriptsprache, die an die Sprache DAX von Microsoft sowie an SQL erinnert, umsetzen. Dabei kann das Skript in mehrere Segmente unterteilt und die Ausführung automatisiert und ge-timed werden. MEHRWERK ProcessMining bietet hierfür standardisierte ETL-Best-Practices an, die erlauben mit Hilfe von Regelwerken die Eventloggenerierung stark zu vereinfachen. Ein großer Vorteil ist die Verzahnung von Process Mining Funktionalitäten während des ETL-Prozesses. Dies erlaubt frühzeitiges und visuelles Validieren schon bei der Beladung.

Figure 6 - Das Laden und Modellieren von Daten kann eingeschränkt visuell mit klickbaren Oberflächen erfolgen. Mehr Möglichkeiten bietet jedoch der Qlik Script Editor.

Figure 6 – Das Laden und Modellieren von Daten kann eingeschränkt visuell mit klickbaren Oberflächen erfolgen. Mehr Möglichkeiten bietet jedoch der Qlik Script Editor.

Skalierbarkeit

Klassischerweise wurde Qlik Sense Server On-Premise in der eigenen IT-Infrastruktur installiert. Die Software Qlik Sense ist nur als Server-Version verfügbar. Qlik Sense setzt auf eine patentierte In-Memory-Technologie. Technisch ist Qlik Sense in Sachen Performance nur durch die Hardware begrenzt.

Heute kann Qlik Sense Server auch direkt über die Qlik Cloud genutzt oder über Kubernetes auf eigene Server oder in die Multi-Cloud ausgeliefert werden. Ein Betrieb bei typischen Cloud-Anbietern wie von Amazon, Google oder Microsoft ist problemlos möglich und somit technisch auch beliebig skalierbar.

Zukunftsfähigkeit

Die Zukunftsfähigkeit von MPM liegt in erster Linie in der Weiterentwicklung von Qlik Sense durch QlikTech. Im Magic Quadrant von Gartner 2020 für BI- und Analytics-Tools zählt Qlik zu den top drei Anführern nach Tableau und Microsoft.

Auf Grund der großen Qlik-Community und der weiten Verbreitung als BI-Tool zählt die Lösung von MEHRWERK vermutlich zu einer sehr zukunftssicheren mit vielen Weiterentwicklungsmöglichkeiten. Aus der Community und von anderen BI-Unternehmen gibt es viele Erweiterungen für Qlik Sense, die den Funktionsumfang von der Konnektivität zu anderen Tools bis hin zur einfacheren oder visuell attraktiveren Analyse verbessern. Für Qlik Sense gibt es viele weitere Anbieter für diverse Erweiterungen sowie Qlik-eigene und kompatible Co-Lösungen für Master Data Management und Data Governance. Auch die Integration von Data Science Tools via Programmiersprachen wie Python oder R ist möglich und erweitert diese Plattform in Richtung Advanced Analytics.

Die Weiterentwicklung der Process Mining Lösung erfolgt unabhängig davon auch durch MEHRWERK selbst, so wird Machine Learning vermehrt dazu eingesetzt, Process Anomalien zu erkennen sowie Durchlaufzeiten von Prozessen zu prognostizieren.

Preisgestaltung

Die Preisgestaltung wird von MEHRWERK nicht transparent kommuniziert und liegt im Vergleich zu anderen Process Mining Tools erfahrungsgemäß im Mittelfeld. Neben den MPM spezifischen Kosten werden darüber hinaus auch User-Lizenzen für Qlik Sense fällig. Weitere mögliche Kosten hängen auch von der Wahl ab, ob die Qlik Cloud, eine andere Cloud-Plattform oder die On-Premise-Installation geplant wird.

Fazit

MPM ProcessMining ist für Unternehmen, die voll und ganz auf QlikSense als BI-Tool setzen, eine echte Option für den schnellen und leistungsstarken Einstieg in diese spezielle Analysemethodik. Mitarbeiter, die Qlik Sense bereits kennen, finden sich hier beinahe sofort zurecht und können direkt starten, sofern Event-Logs vorliegen. Die Gestaltung von Event-Logs in Qlik Sense bedingt jedoch etwas Erfahrung mit der Datenaufbereitung und -modellierung in Qlik Sense und Kenntnisse in Qlik Script.

Process Mining Tools – Artikelserie

Process Mining ist nicht länger nur ein Buzzword, sondern ein relevanter Teil der Business Intelligence. Process Mining umfasst die Analyse von Prozessen und lässt sich auf alle Branchen und Fachbereiche anwenden, die operative Prozesse haben, die wiederum über operative IT-Systeme erfasst werden. Um die zunehmende Bedeutung dieser Data-Disziplin zu verstehen, reicht ein Blick auf die Entwicklung der weltweiten Datengenerierung aus: Waren es 2010 noch 2 Zettabytes (ZB), sind laut Statista für das Jahr 2020 mehr als 50 ZB an Daten zu erwarten. Für 2025 wird gar mit einem Bestand von 175 ZB gerechnet.

Hier wird das Datenvolumen nach Jahren angezeit

Abbildung 1 zeigt die Entwicklung des weltweiten Datenvolumen (Stand 2018). Quelle: https://www.statista.com/statistics/871513/worldwide-data-created/

Warum jetzt eigentlich Process Mining?

Warum aber profitiert insbesondere Process Mining von dieser Entwicklung? Der Grund liegt in der Unordnung dieser Datenmenge. Die Herausforderung der sich viele Unternehmen gegenübersehen, liegt eben genau in der Analyse dieser unstrukturierten Daten. Hinzu kommt, dass nahezu jeder Prozess Datenspuren in Informationssystemen hinterlässt. Die Betrachtung von Prozessen auf Datenebene birgt somit ein enormes Potential, welches in Anbetracht der Entwicklung zunehmend an Bedeutung gewinnt.

Was war nochmal Process Mining?

Process Mining ist eine Analysemethodik, welche dazu befähigt, aus den abgespeicherten Datenspuren der Informationssysteme eine Rekonstruktion der realen Prozesse zu schaffen. Diese Prozesse können anschließend als Prozessflussdiagramm dargestellt und ausgewertet werden. Die klassischen Anwendungsfälle reichen von dem Aufspüren (Discovery) unbekannter Prozesse, über einen Soll-Ist-Vergleich (Conformance) bis hin zur Anpassung/Verbesserung (Enhancement) bestehender Prozesse. Mittlerweile setzen viele Firmen darüber hinaus auf eine Integration von RPA und Data Science im Process Mining. Und die Analyse-Tiefe wird zunehmen und bis zur Analyse einzelner Klicks reichen, was gegenwärtig als sogenanntes „Task Mining“ bezeichnet wird.

Hier wird ein typischer Process Mining Workflow dargestellt

Abbildung 2 zeigt den typischen Workflow eines Process Mining Projektes. Oftmals dient das ERP-System als zentrale Datenquelle. Die herausgearbeiteten Event-Logs werden anschließend mittels Process Mining Tool visualisiert.

In jedem Fall liegt meistens das Gros der Arbeit auf die Bereitstellung und Vorbereitung der Daten und der Transformation dieser in sogenannte „Event-Logs“, die den Input für die Process Mining Tools darstellen. Deshalb arbeiten viele Anbieter von Process Mining Tools schon länger an Lösungen, um die mit der Datenvorbereitung verbundenen zeit -und arbeitsaufwendigen Schritte zu erleichtern. Während fast alle Tool-Anbieter vorgefertigte Protokolle für Standardprozesse anbieten, gehen manche noch weiter und bieten vollumfängliche Plattform Lösungen an, welche eine effiziente Integration der aufwendigen ETL-Prozesse versprechen. Der Funktionsumfang der Process Mining Tools geht daher mittlerweile deutlich über eine reine Darstellungsfunktion hinaus und deckt ggf. neue Trends sowie optimierte Einsteigerbarrieren mit ab.

Motivation dieser Artikelserie

Die Motivation diesen Artikel zu schreiben liegt nicht in der Erläuterung der Methode des Process Mining. Hierzu gibt es mittlerweile zahlreiche Informationsquellen. Eine besonders empfehlenswerte ist das Buch „Process Mining“ von Will van der Aalst, einem der Urväter des Process Mining. Die Motivation dieses Artikels liegt viel mehr in der Betrachtung der zahlreichen Process Mining Tools am Markt. Sehr oft erlebe ich als Data-Consultant, dass Process Mining Projekte im Vorfeld von der Frage nach dem „besten“ Tool dominiert werden. Diese Fragestellung ist in Ihrer Natur sicherlich immer individuell zu beantworten. Da individuelle Projekte auch einen individuellen Tool-Einsatz bedingen, beschäftige ich mich meist mit einem großen Spektrum von Process Mining Tools. Daher ist es mir in dieser Artikelserie ein Anliegen einen allgemeingültigen Überblick zu den üblichen Process Mining Tools zu erarbeiten. Dabei möchte ich mich nicht auf persönliche Erfahrungen stützen, sondern die Tools anhand von Testdaten einem praktischen Vergleich unterziehen, der für den Leser nachvollziehbar ist.

Um den Umfang der Artikelserie zu begrenzen, werden die verschiedenen Tools nur in Ihren Kernfunktionen angewendet und verglichen. Herausragende Funktionen oder Eigenschaften der jeweiligen Tools werden jedoch angemerkt und ggf. in anderen Artikeln vertieft. Das Ziel dieser Artikelserie soll sein, dem Leser einen ersten Einblick über die am Markt erhältlichen Tools zu geben. Daher spricht dieser Artikel insbesondere Einsteiger aber auch Fortgeschrittene im Process Mining an, welche einen Überblick über die Tools zu schätzen wissen und möglicherweise auch mal über den Tellerand hinweg schauen mögen.

Die Tools

Die Gruppe der zu betrachteten Tools besteht aus den folgenden namenhaften Anwendungen:

Die Auswahl der Tools orientiert sich an den „Market Guide for Process Mining 2019“ von Gartner. Aussortiert habe ich jene Tools, mit welchen ich bisher wenig bis gar keine Berührung hatte. Diese Auswahl an Tools verspricht meiner Meinung nach einen spannenden Einblick von verschiedene Process Mining Tools am Markt zu bekommen.

Die Anwendung in der Praxis

Um die Tools realistisch miteinander vergleichen zu können, werden alle Tools die gleichen Datengrundlage benutzen. Die Datenbasis wird folglich über die gesamte Artikelserie hinweg für die Darstellungen mit den Tools genutzt. Ich werde im nächsten Artikel explizit diese Datenbasis kurz erläutern.

Das Ziel der praktischen Untersuchung soll sein, die Beispieldaten in die verschiedenen Tools zu laden, um den enthaltenen Prozess zu visualisieren. Dabei möchte ich insbesondere darauf achten wie bedienbar und anpassungsfähig/flexibel die Tools mir erscheinen. An dieser Stelle möchte ich eindeutig darauf hinweisen, dass dieser Vergleich und seine Bewertung meine Meinung ist und keineswegs Anspruch auf Vollständigkeit beansprucht. Da der Markt in Bewegung ist, behalte ich mir ferner vor, diese Artikelserie regelmäßig anzupassen.

Die Kriterien

Neben der Bedienbarkeit und der Anpassungsfähigkeit der Tools möchte ich folgende zusätzliche Gesichtspunkte betrachten:

  • Bedienbarkeit: Wie leicht gehen die Analysen von der Hand? Wie einfach ist der Einstieg?
  • Anpassungsfähigkeit: Wie flexibel reagiert das Tool auf meine Daten und Analyse-Wünsche?
  • Integrationsfähigkeit: Welche Schnittstellen bringt das Tool mit? Läuft es auch oder nur in der Cloud?
  • Skalierbarkeit: Ist das Tool dazu in der Lage, auch große und heterogene Daten zu verarbeiten?
  • Zukunftsfähigkeit: Wie steht es um Machine Learning, ETL-Modeller oder Task Mining?
  • Preisgestaltung: Nach welchem Modell bestimmt sich der Preis?

Die Datengrundlage

Die Datenbasis bildet ein Demo-Datensatz der von Celonis für die gesamte Artikelserie netter Weise zur Verfügung gestellt wurde. Dieser Datensatz bildet einen Versand Prozess vom Zeitpunkt des Kaufes bis zur Auslieferung an den Kunden ab. In der folgenden Abbildung ist der Soll Prozess abgebildet.

Hier wird die Variante 1 der Demo Daten von Celonis als Grafik dargestellt

Abbildung 4 zeigt den gewünschten Versand Prozess der Datengrundlage von dem Kauf des Produktes bis zur Auslieferung.

Die Datengrundlage besteht aus einem 60 GB großen Event-Log, welcher lokal in einer Microsoft SQL Datenbank vorgehalten wird. Da diese Tabelle über 600 Mio. Events beinhaltet, wird die Datengrundlage für die Analyse der einzelnen Tools auf einen Ausschnitt von 60 Mio. Events begrenzt. Um die Performance der einzelnen Tools zu testen, wird jedoch auf die gesamte Datengrundlage zurückgegriffen. Der Ausschnitt der Event-Log Tabelle enthält 919 verschiedene Varianten und weisst somit eine ausreichende Komplexität auf, welche es mit den verschiednene Tools zu analysieren gilt.

Folgender Veröffentlichungsplan gilt für diese Artikelserie und wird mit jeder Veröffentlichung verlinkt:

  1. Celonis
  2. PAFnow
  3. MEHRWERK
  4. Fluxicon Disco
  5. Lana Labs (erscheint demnächst)
  6. Signavio (erscheint demnächst)
  7. Process Gold (erscheint demnächst)
  8. Aris Process Mining der Software AG (erscheint demnächst)

Ein Einblick in die Aktienmärkte unter Berücksichtigung von COVID-19

Einleitung

Die COVID-19-Pandemie hat uns alle fest im Griff. Besonders die Wirtschaft leidet stark unter den erforderlichen Maßnahmen, die weltweit angewendet werden. Wir wollen daher die Gelegenheit nutzen einen Blick auf die Aktienkurse zu wagen und analysieren, inwieweit der Virus einen Einfluss auf das Wachstum des Marktes hat.

Rahmenbedingungen

Zuallererst werden wir uns auf die Industrie-, Schwellenländer und Grenzmärkte konzentrieren. Dafür nutzen wir die MSCI Global Investable Market Indizes (kurz GIMI), welche die zuvor genannten Gruppen abbilden. Die MSCI Inc. ist ein US-amerikanischer Finanzdienstleister und vor allem für ihre Aktienindizes bekannt.

Aktienindizes sind Kennzahlen der Entwicklung bzw. Änderung einer Auswahl von Aktienkursen und können repräsentativ für ganze Märkte, spezifische Branchen oder Länder stehen. Der DAX ist zum Beispiel ein Index, welcher die Entwicklung der größten 30 deutschen Unternehmen zusammenfasst.

Leider sind die Daten von MSCI nicht ohne weiteres zugänglich, weshalb wir unsere Analysen mit ETFs (engl.: “Exchange Traded Fund”) durchführen werden. ETFs sind wiederum an Börsen gehandelte Fonds, die von Fondgesellschaften/-verwaltern oder Banken verwaltet werden.

Für unsere erste Analyse sollen folgende ETFs genutzt werden, welche die folgenden Indizes führen:

Index Beschreibung ETF
MSCI World über 1600 Aktienwerte aus 24 Industrieländern iShares MSCI World ETF
MSCI Emerging Markets ca. 1400 Aktienwerte aus 27 Schwellenländern iShares MSCI Emerging Markets ETF
MSCI Frontier Markets Aktienwerte aus ca. 29 Frontier-Ländern iShares MSCI Frontier 100 ETF

Tab.1: MSCI Global Investable Market Indizes mit deren repräsentativen ETFs

Datenquellen

Zur Extraktion der ETF-Börsenkurse nehmen wir die yahoo finance API zur Hilfe. Mit den richtigen Symbolen können wir die historischen Daten unserer ETF-Auswahl ausgeben lassen. Wie unter diesem Link für den iShares MSCI World ETF zu sehen ist, gibt es mehrere Werte in den historischen Daten. Für unsere Analyse nutzen wir den Wert, nachdem die Börse geschlossen hat.

Da die ETFs in ihren Kurswerten Unterschiede haben und uns nur die relative Entwicklung interessiert, werden wir relative Werte für die Analyse nutzen. Der Startzeitpunkt soll mit dem 06.01.2020 festgelegt werden.

Die Daten über bestätigte Infektionen mit COVID-19 entnehmen wir aus der Hochrechnung der Johns Hopkins Universität.

Correlation between confirmed cases and growth of MSCI GIMI
Abb.1: Interaktives Diagramm: Wachstum der Aktienmärkte getrennt in Industrie-, Schwellen-, Frontier-Länder und deren bestätigten COVID-19 Fälle über die Zeit. Die bestätigten Fälle der jeweiligen Märkte basieren auf der Aufsummierung der Länder, welche auch in den Märkten aufzufinden sind und daher kann es zu Unterschieden bei den offiziellen Zahlen kommen.

Interpretation des Diagramms

Auf den ersten Blick sieht man deutlich, dass mit steigenden COVID-19 Fällen die Aktienkurse bis zu -31% einbrechen. (Anfangszeitpunkt: 06.01.2020 Endzeitpunkt: 09.04.2020)

Betrachten wir den Anfang des Diagramms so sehen wir einen Einbruch der Emerging Markets, welche eine Gewichtung von 39.69 % (Stand 09.04.20) chinesische Aktien haben. Am 17.01.20 verzeichnen die Emerging Marktes noch ein Plus von 3.15 % gegenüber unserem Startzeitpunkt, wohingegen wir am 01.02.2020 ein Defizit von -6.05 % gegenüber dem Startzeitpunkt haben, was ein Einbruch von -9.20 % zum 17.01.2020 entspricht. Da der Ursprung des COVID-19 Virus auch in China war, könnte man diesen Punkt als Grund des Einbruches interpretieren. Die Industrie- und  Frontier-Länder bleiben hingegen recht stabil und auch deren bestätigten Fälle sind noch sehr niedrig.

Die Industrieländer erreichen ihren Höchststand am 19.02.20 mit einem Plus von 2.80%. Danach brachen alle drei Märkte deutlich ein. Auch in diesem Zeitraum gab es die ersten Todesopfer in Europa und in den USA. Der derzeitige Tiefpunkt, welcher am 23.03.20 zu registrieren ist, beläuft sich für die Industrieländer -32.10 %, Schwellenländer 31.7 % und Frontier-Länder auf -34.88 %.

Interessanterweise steigen die Marktwerte ab diesem Zeitpunkt wieder an. Gründe könnten die Nachrichten aus China sein, welche keine weiteren Neu-Infektionen verzeichnen, die FED dem Markt bis zu 1.5 Billionen Dollar zur Verfügung stellt und/oder die Ankündigung der Europäische Zentralbank Anleihen in Höhe von 750 MRD. Euro zu kaufen. Auch in Deutschland wurden große Hilfspakete angekündigt.

Um detaillierte Aussagen treffen zu können, müssen wir uns die Kurse auf granularer Ebene anschauen. Durch eine gezieltere Betrachtung auf Länderebene könnten Zusammenhänge näher beschrieben werden.

Wenn du dich für interaktive Analysen interessierst und tiefer in die Materie eintauchen möchtest: DATANOMIQ COVID-19 Dashboard

Hier haben wir ein Dashboard speziell für Analysen für die Aktienmärkte, welches stetig verbessert wird. Auch sollen Krypto-Währungen bald implementiert werden. Habt ihr Vorschläge und Verbesserungswünsche, dann lasst gerne ein Kommentar da!

Artikelserie: BI Tools im Vergleich – Tableau

Dies ist ein Artikel der Artikel-Serie “BI Tools im Vergleich – Einführung und Motivation“. Solltet ihr gerade erst eingestiegen sein, dann schaut euch ruhig vorher einmal die einführenden Worte und die Ausführungen zur Datenbasis an. Power BI machte den Auftakt und ihr findet den Artikel hier.

Lizenzmodell

Tableau stellt seinen Kunden zu allererst vor die Wahl, wo und von wem die Infrastruktur betrieben werden soll. Einen preislichen Vorteil hat der Kunde bei der Wahl einer selbstverwaltenden Lösung unter Nutzung von Tableau Server. Die Alternative ist eine Cloud-Lösung, bereitgestellt und verwaltet von Tableau. Bei dieser Variante wird Tableau Server durch Tableau Online ersetzt, wobei jede dieser Optionen die gleichen Funktionalitäten mit sich bringen. Bereits das Lizenzmodell definiert unterschiedliche Rollen an Usern, welche in drei verschiedene Lizenztypen unterteilt und unterschiedlich bepreist sind (siehe Grafik). So kann der User die Rolle eines Creators, Explorers oder Viewers einnehmen.Der Creator ist befähigt, alle Funktionen von Tableau zu nutzen, sofern ein Unternehmen die angebotenen Add-ons hinzukauft. Die Lizenz Explorer ermöglicht es dem User, durch den Creator vordefinierte Datasets in Eigenregie zu analysieren und zu visualisieren. Demnach obliegt dem Creator, und somit einer kleinen Personengruppe, die Datenbereitstellung, womit eine Single Source of Truth garantiert werden soll. Der Viewer hat nur die Möglichkeit Berichte zu konsumieren, zu teilen und herunterzuladen. Wobei in Bezug auf Letzteres der Viewer limitiert ist, da dieser nicht die kompletten zugrundeliegenden Daten herunterladen kann. Lediglich eine Aggregation, auf welcher die Visualisierung beruht, kann heruntergeladen werden. Ein Vergleich zeigt die wesentlichen Berechtigungen je Lizenz.

Der Einstieg bei Tableau ist für Organisationen nicht unter 106 Lizenzen (100 Viewer, 5 Explorer, 1 Creator) möglich, und Kosten von mindestens $1445 im Monat müssen einkalkuliert werden.

Wie bereits erwähnt, existieren Leistungserweiterungen, sogennante Add-ons. Die selbstverwaltende Alternative unter Nutzung von Tableau Server (hosted by customer) kann um das Tableau Data Management Add‑on und das Server Management Add‑on erweitert werden. Hauptsächlich zur Serveradministration, Datenverwaltung und -bereitstellung konzipiert sind die Features in vielen Fällen entbehrlich. Für die zweite Alternative (hosted by Tableau) kann der Kunde ebenfalls das Tableau Data Management Add‑on sowie sogenannte Resource Blocks dazu kaufen. Letzteres lässt bereits im Namen einen kapazitätsabhängigen Kostenfaktor vermuten, welcher zur Skalierung dient. Die beiden Add‑ons wiederum erhöhen die Kosten einer jeden Lizenz, was erhebliche Kostensteigerungen mit sich bringen kann. Das Data Management Add‑on soll als Beispiel die Kostenrelevanz verdeutlichen. Es gelten $5,50 je Lizenz für beide Hosting Varianten. Ein Unternehmen bezieht 600 Lizenzen (50 Creator, 150 Explorer und 400 Viewer) und hosted Tableau Server auf einer selbstgewählten Infrastruktur. Beim Zukauf des Add‑ons erhöht sich die einzelne Viewer-Lizenz bei einem Basispreis von $12 um 46%. Eine nicht unrelevante Größe bei der Vergabe neuer Viewer-Lizenzen, womit sich ein jedes Unternehmen mit Wachstumsambitionen auseinandersetzen sollte. Die Gesamtkosten würden nach geschilderter Verteilung der Lizenzen um 24% steigen (Anmerkung: eventuelle Rabatte sind nicht mit einbezogen). Die Tatsache, dass die Zuschläge für alle Lizenzen gelten, kann zumindest kritisch hinterfragt werden.

Ein weiterer, anfangs oft unterschätzter Kostenfaktor ist die Anzahl der Explorer-Lizenzen. Das Verhältnis der Explorer-Lizenzen an der Gesamtanzahl wächst in vielen Fällen mittelfristig nach der Einführungsphase stark an. Häufig wird Tableau als eine neue State of the Art Reporting Lösung mit schönen bunten Bildern betrachtet und dessen eigentliche Stärke, die Generierung von neuen Erkenntnissen mittels Data Discovery, wird unterschätzt. Hier kommt die Explorer Lizenz ins Spiel, welche ca. das Dreifache einer Viewer Lizenz kostet und den User befähigt, tiefer in die Daten einzusteigen.

Nichtdestotrotz kann man behaupten, dass das Lizenzmodell sehr transparent ist. Tableau selbst wirbt damit, dass keine versteckten Kosten auf den Kunden zukommen. Das Lizenzmodell ist aber nicht nur auf die Endkunden ausgerichtet, sondern bietet mit Tableau Server auch ein besonders auf Partner ausgerichtetes Konzept an. Serviceanbieter können so Lizenzen erwerben und in das eigene Angebot zu selbst gewählten Konditionen aufnehmen. Eine Server Instanz reicht aus, da das Produkt auch aus technischer Sicht mit sogenannten Sites auf verschiedene Stakeholder ausgerichtet werden kann.

Community & Features von anderen Entwicklern

Die Bedeutung einer breiten Community soll hier noch einmal hervorgehoben werden. Für Nutzer ist der Austausch über Probleme und Herausforderungen sowie technischer und organisatorischer Art äußerst wichtig, und auch der Softwarehersteller profitiert davon erheblich. Nicht nur, dass der Support teilweise an die eigenen Nutzer abgegeben wird, auch kann der Anbieter bestehende Features zielgerichteter optimieren und neue Features der Nachfrage anpassen. Somit steht die Tableau Community der Power BI Community in nichts nach. Zu den meisten Themen wird man schnell fündig in diversen Foren wie auch auf der Tableau Webseite. Es existiert die klassische Community Plattform, aber auch eine Tableau Besonderheit: Tableau Public. Es handelt sich hierbei um eine kostenlose Möglichkeit eine abgespeckte Version von Tableau zu nutzen und Inhalte auf der gleichnamigen Cloud zu veröffentlichen. Ergänzend sind etliche Lernvideos auf den einschlägigen Seiten fast zu jedem Thema zu finden und komplettieren das Support-Angebot.

Zusätzlich bietet Tableau sogenannte Admin-Tools aus eigenem Hause an, welche als Plug ins eingebunden werden können. Tableau unterscheidet dabei zwischen Community Supported Tools (z.B. TabMon) und Tableau Supported Tools (z.B. Tabcmd).

Ebenfalls bietet Tableau seit der Version 2018.2 dritten Entwicklern eine sogenannte Extensions API an und ermöglicht diesen damit, auf Basis der Tableau-Produkte eigene Produkte zu entwickeln. Erst kürzlich wurde mit Sandboxed Extensions in der Version 2019.4 ein wesentlicher Schritt hin zu einer höheren Datensicherheit gemacht, so dass es zukünftig zwei Gruppen von Erweiterungen geben wird. Die erste und neue Gruppe Sandboxed Extensions beinhaltet alle Erweiterungen, bei denen die Daten das eigene Netzwerk bzw. die Cloud nicht verlassen. Alle übrigen Erweiterungen werden in der zweiten Gruppe Network-Enabled Extensions zusammengefasst. Diese kommunizieren wie gehabt mit der Außenwelt, um den jeweiligen Service bereitzustellen.

Grundsätzlich ist Tableau noch zurückhaltend, wenn es um Erweiterungen des eigenen Produktportfolios geht. Deshalb ist die Liste mit insgesamt 37 Erweiterungen von 19 Anbietern noch recht überschaubar.

Daten laden & transformieren

Bevor der Aufbau der Visualisierungen beginnen kann, müssen die Daten fehlerfrei in Logik und in Homogenität in das Tool geladen werden. Zur Umsetzung dieser Anforderungen bietet sich ein ETL Tool an, und mit der Einführung von Tableau Prep Builder im April 2018 gibt der Softwareentwickler dem Anwender ein entsprechendes Tool an die Hand. Die Umsetzung ist sehr gut gelungen und die Bedienung ist sogar Analysten ohne Kenntnisse von Programmiersprachen möglich. Natürlich verfügen die zur Visualisierung gedachten Tools im Produktsortiment (Tableau Desktop, Server und Online) ebenfalls über (gleiche) Werkzeuge zur Datenmanipulierung. Jedoch verfügt Tableau Prep Builder dank seiner erweiterten Visualisierungen zur Transformation und Zusammenführung von Daten über hervorragende Werkzeuge zur Überprüfung und Analyse der Datengrundlage sowie der eigenen Arbeit.

Als Positivbeispiel ist die Visualisierung zu den JOIN-Operationen hervorzuheben, welche dem Anwender auf einen Blick zeigt, wie viele Datensätze vom JOIN betroffen sind und letztendlich auch, wie viele Datensätze in die Output-Tabelle eingeschlossen werden (siehe Grafik).

Zur Datenzusammenführung dienen klassische JOIN- und UNION-Befehle und die Logik entspricht den SQL-Befehlen. Das Ziel dabei ist die Generierung einer Extract-Datei und somit einer zweidimensionalen Tabelle für den Bau von Visualisierungen.

Exkurs – Joins in Power BI:

Erst bei der Visualisierung führt Power BI (im Hintergrund) die Daten durch Joins verschiedener Tabellen zusammen, sofern man vorher ein Datenmodell fehlerfrei definiert hat und die Daten nicht bereits mittels Power Query zusammengeführt hat.

Alternativ können auch diverse Datenquellen in das Visualisierungstool geladen und entsprechend des Power BI-Ansatzes Daten zusammengeführt werden. Dieses sogenannte Data Blending rückt seit der Einführung von Tableau Prep Builder immer mehr in den Hintergrund und Tableau führt die User auch hin zu einer weiteren Komponente: Tableau Prep Conductor. Es ist Bestandteil des bereits erwähnten, kostenpflichtigen Tableau Data Management Add-ons und ergänzt die eingeschränkte Möglichkeit, in Tableau Prep Builder automatisierte Aktualisierungen zu planen.

Kalkulationen können, wie auch bei Power BI, teilweise über ein Userinterface (UI) getätigt werden. Jedoch bietet das UI weniger Möglichkeiten, die wirklich komplizierten Berechnungen vorzunehmen, und der User wird schneller mit der von Tableau entwickelten Sprache konfrontiert. Drei Kategorien von Berechnungen werden unterschieden:

  • Einfache Berechnungen
  • Detailgenauigkeits-Ausdrücke (Level of Detail, LOD)
  • Tabellenberechnungen

Es gibt zwei wesentliche Fragestellungen bei der Auswahl der Berechnungsmethode.

1. Was soll berechnet werden? => Detailgenauigkeit?

Diese Frage klingt auf den ersten Blick simpel, kann aber komplexe Ausmaße annehmen. Tableau gibt hierzu aber einen guten Leitfaden für den Start an die Hand.

2. Wann soll berechnet werden?

Die Wahl der Berechnungsmethode hängt auch davon ab, wann welche Berechnung von der Software durchgeführt wird. Die Reihenfolge der Operationen zeigt die folgende Grafik.

Man braucht einiges an Übung, bis man eine gewisse Selbstsicherheit erlangt hat. Deshalb ist ein strukturiertes Vorgehen für komplexe Vorhaben ratsam.

Daten laden & transformieren: AdventureWorks2017Dataset

Wie bereits im ersten Artikel beschrieben, ist es nicht sehr sinnvoll, ein komplettes Datenmodell in ein BI-Tool zu laden, insbesondere wenn man nur wenige Informationen aus diesem benötigt. Ein für diese Zwecke angepasster View in der Datenbasis wäre aus vielerlei Hinsicht näher an einem Best Practice-Vorgehen. Nicht immer hat man die Möglichkeit, Best Practice im Unternehmen zu leben => siehe Artikel 1 der Serie.

Erst durch die Nutzung von Tableau Prep wurde die komplexe Struktur der Daten deutlich. In Power BI fiel bei der Bereitstellung der Tabellen nicht auf, dass die Adressdaten zu den [Store Contact] nicht in der Tabelle [Adress] zu finden sind. Erst durch die Nutzung von Tableau Prep und einer Analyse zu den Joins, zeigte das Fehlen zuvor genannter Adressen für Stores auf. Weiterhin zeigte die Analyse des Joins von Handelswaren und dazugehöriger Lieferanten auch eine m:n Beziehung auf und somit eine Vervielfachung der Datensätze der output Tabelle.

Kurzum: Tableau Prep ist ein empfehlenswertes Tool, um die Datenbasis schnell zu durchdringen und aufwendige Datenbereitstellungen vorzunehmen.

Daten visualisieren

Erwartungsgemäß sind im Vergleich zwischen Tableau und Power BI einige Visualisierungen leichter und andere dagegen schwerer aufzubauen. Grundsätzlich bieten beide Tools einige vorprogrammierte Visualisierungsobjekte an, welche ohne großen Aufwand erstellt werden können. Interessant wird es beim Vergleich der Detailgenauigkeit der Visualisierungen, wobei es nebensächlich ist, ob es sich dabei um ein Balken- oder Liniendiagramm handelt.

Hands on! Dazu lädt Tableau ein, und das ist auch der beste Weg, um sich mit der Software vertraut zu machen. Für einen einfacheren Start sollte man sich mit zwei wesentlichen Konzepten vertraut machen:

Reihenfolge der Operationen

Yep! Wir hatten das Thema bereits. Ein Blick auf die Grafik beim Basteln einzelner Visualisierungen kann helfen! Jeder Creator und Explorer sollte sich vorher mit der Reihenfolge von Operationen vertraut machen. Das Konzept ist nicht selbsterklärend und Fehler fallen nicht sofort auf. Schaut einmal HIER rein! Tableau hat sich eine Stunde Zeit genommen, um das Konzept anhand von Beispielen zu erklären.

Starre Anordnung von Elementen

Visualisierungen werden erst in einem extra Arbeitsblatt entworfen und können mit anderen Arbeitsblättern in einem Dashboard verbaut werden. Die Anordnung der Elemente auf dem Dashboard kann frei erfolgen und/oder Elemente werden in einer Objekthierarchie abgelegt. Letzteres eignet sich gut für den Bau von Vorlagen und ist somit eine Stärke von Tableau. Das Vorgehen dabei ist nicht trivial, das heißt ein saloppes Reinschmeißen von Visualisierungen führt definitiv nicht zum Ziel.
Tim erklärt ziemlich gut, wie man vorgehen kann => HIER.

Tableau ist aus der Designperspektive limitiert, weshalb das Endergebnis, das Dashboard,  nicht selten sehr eckig und kantig aussieht. Einfache visuelle Anpassungen wie abgerundete Kanten von Arbeitsblättern/Containern sind nicht möglich. Designtechnisch hat Tableau daher noch Luft nach oben!

Fazit

Der Einstieg für kleine Unternehmen mit Tableau ist nur unter sehr hohem Kostenaufwand möglich, aufgrund von preisintensiven Lizenzen und einer Mindestabnahme an Lizenzen. Aber auch bei einem hohen Bedarf an Lizenzen befindet sich Tableau im höheren Preissegment. Jedoch beinhalten Tableaus Lizenzgebühren bereits Kosten, welche bei der Konkurrenz erst durch die Nutzung ersichtlich werden, da bei ihnen die Höhe der Kosten stärker von der beanspruchten Kapazität abhängig ist. Tableau bietet seinen Kunden damit eine hohe Transparenz über ein zwar preisintensives, aber sehr ausgereiftes Produktportfolio.

Tableau legt mit einer lokalen Option, welche die gleichen Funktionalitäten beinhaltet wie die cloudbasierte Alternative, ein Augenmerk auf Kunden mit strengen Data Governance-Richtlinien. Sandboxed Extensions sind ein weiteres Beispiel für das Bewusstsein für eine hohe Datensicherheit. Jedoch ist das Angebot an Extensions, also das Angebot dritter Entwickler, ausbaufähig. Eine breit aufgestellte Community bietet nicht nur dritten Entwicklern eine gute Geschäftsgrundlage, sondern auch Nutzern zu fast jedem Thema eine Hilfestellung.

Tableau Prep Builder => TOP!

Mit diesem Tool kann die Datengrundlage super einfach analysiert werden und Datenmanipulationen sind einfach durchzuführen. Die Syntax und die Verwendung von Berechnungen bedarf einiger Übung, aber wenn man die wesentlichen Konzepte verstanden hat, dann sind Berechnungen schnell erstellt.

Ein Dashboard kann zu 90 % in fast jedem Tool gleich aussehen. Der Weg dorthin ist oft ein anderer und je nach Anforderung bei einem Tool leichter als bei einem anderen. Tableau bietet ein komplexes Konzept, sodass auch die außergewöhnlichsten Anforderungen erfüllt werden können. Jedoch ist das zugrundliegende Design oft sehr kantig und nicht immer zeitgemäß.

Fortsetzung folgt… MicroStrategy

Multi-touch attribution: A data-driven approach

This is the first article of article series Getting started with the top eCommerce use cases.

What is Multi-touch attribution?

Customers shopping behavior has changed drastically when it comes to online shopping, as nowadays, customer likes to do a thorough market research about a product before making a purchase. This makes it really hard for marketers to correctly determine the contribution for each marketing channel to which a customer was exposed to. The path a customer takes from his first search to the purchase is known as a Customer Journey and this path consists of multiple marketing channels or touchpoints. Therefore, it is highly important to distribute the budget between these channels to maximize return. This problem is known as multi-touch attribution problem and the right attribution model helps to steer the marketing budget efficiently. Multi-touch attribution problem is well known among marketers. You might be thinking that if this is a well known problem then there must be an algorithm out there to deal with this. Well, there are some traditional models  but every model has its own limitation which will be discussed in the next section.

Traditional attribution models

Most of the eCommerce companies have a performance marketing department to make sure that the marketing budget is spent in an agile way. There are multiple heuristics attribution models pre-existing in google analytics however there are several issues with each one of them. These models are:

First touch attribution model

100% credit is given to the first channel as it is considered that the first marketing channel was responsible for the purchase.

Figure 1: First touch attribution model

Last touch attribution model

100% credit is given to the last channel as it is considered that the first marketing channel was responsible for the purchase.

Figure 2: Last touch attribution model

Linear-touch attribution model

In this attribution model, equal credit is given to all the marketing channels present in customer journey as it is considered that each channel is equally responsible for the purchase.

Figure 3: Linear attribution model

U-shaped or Bath tub attribution model

This is most common in eCommerce companies, this model assigns 40% to first and last touch and 20% is equally distributed among the rest.

Figure 4: Bathtub or U-shape attribution model

Data driven attribution models

Traditional attribution models follows somewhat a naive approach to assign credit to one or all the marketing channels involved. As it is not so easy for all the companies to take one of these models and implement it. There are a lot of challenges that comes with multi-touch attribution problem like customer journey duration, overestimation of branded channels, vouchers and cross-platform issue, etc.

Switching from traditional models to data-driven models gives us more flexibility and more insights as the major part here is defining some rules to prepare the data that fits your business. These rules can be defined by performing an ad hoc analysis of customer journeys. In the next section, I will discuss about Markov chain concept as an attribution model.

Markov chains

Markov chains concepts revolves around probability. For attribution problem, every customer journey can be seen as a chain(set of marketing channels) which will compute a markov graph as illustrated in figure 5. Every channel here is represented as a vertex and the edges represent the probability of hopping from one channel to another. There will be an another detailed article, explaining the concept behind different data-driven attribution models and how to apply them.

Figure 5: Markov chain example

Challenges during the Implementation

Transitioning from a traditional attribution models to a data-driven one, may sound exciting but the implementation is rather challenging as there are several issues which can not be resolved just by changing the type of model. Before its implementation, the marketers should perform a customer journey analysis to gain some insights about their customers and try to find out/perform:

  1. Length of customer journey.
  2. On an average how many branded and non branded channels (distinct and non-distinct) in a typical customer journey?
  3. Identify most upper funnel and lower funnel channels.
  4. Voucher analysis: within branded and non-branded channels.

When you are done with the analysis and able to answer all of the above questions, the next step would be to define some rules in order to handle the user data according to your business needs. Some of the issues during the implementation are discussed below along with their solution.

Customer journey duration

Assuming that you are a retailer, let’s try to understand this issue with an example. In May 2016, your company started a Fb advertising campaign for a particular product category which “attracted” a lot of customers including Chris. He saw your Fb ad while working in the office and clicked on it, which took him to your website. As soon as he registered on your website, his boss called him (probably because he was on Fb while working), he closed everything and went for the meeting. After coming back, he started working and completely forgot about your ad or products. After a few days, he received an email with some offers of your products which also he ignored until he saw an ad again on TV in Jan 2019 (after 3 years). At this moment, he started doing his research about your products and finally bought one of your products from some Instagram campaign. It took Chris almost 3 years to make his first purchase.

Figure 6: Chris journey

Now, take a minute and think, if you analyse the entire journey of customers like Chris, you would realize that you are still assigning some of the credit to the touchpoints that happened 3 years ago. This can be solved by using an attribution window. Figure 6 illustrates that 83% of the customers are making a purchase within 30 days which means the attribution window here could be 30 days. In simple words, it is safe to remove the touchpoints that happens after 30 days of purchase. This parameter can also be changed to 45 days or 60 days, depending on the use case.

Figure 7: Length of customer journey

Removal of direct marketing channel

A well known issue that every marketing analyst is aware of is, customers who are already aware of the brand usually comes to the website directly. This leads to overestimation of direct channel and branded channels start getting more credit. In this case, you can set a threshold (say 7 days) and remove these branded channels from customer journey.

Figure 8: Removal of branded channels

Cross platform problem

If some of your customers are using different devices to explore your products and you are not able to track them then it will make retargeting really difficult. In a perfect world these customers belong to same journey and if these can’t be combined then, except one, other paths would be considered as “non-converting path”. For attribution problem device could be thought of as a touchpoint to include in the path but to be able to track these customers across all devices would still be challenging. A brief introduction to deterministic and probabilistic ways of cross device tracking can be found here.

Figure 9: Cross platform clash

How to account for Vouchers?

To better account for vouchers, it can be added as a ‘dummy’ touchpoint of the type of voucher (CRM,Social media, Affiliate or Pricing etc.) used. In our case, we tried to add these vouchers as first touchpoint and also as a last touchpoint but no significant difference was found. Also, if the marketing channel of which the voucher was used was already in the path, the dummy touchpoint was not added.

Figure 10: Addition of Voucher as a touchpoint

Let me know in comments if you would like to add something or if you have a different perspective about this use case.

Artikelserie: BI Tools im Vergleich – Power BI von Microsoft

 

Den Auftakt dieser Artikelserie zum Vergleich von BI-Tools macht die Softwarelösung Power BI von Microsoft. Solltet ihr gerade erst eingestiegen sein, dann schaut euch ruhig vorher einmal die einführenden Worte und die Ausführungen zur Datenbasis an.

Lizenzmodell

Power BI ist in seinem Kern ein Cloud-Dienst und so ist auch die Ausrichtung des Lizenzmodells. Der Bezug als Stand-Alone SaaS ist genauso gut möglich, wie auch die Nutzung von Power BI im Rahmen des Serviceportfolios Office 365 von Microsoft. Zusätzlich besteht aber auch die Möglichkeit die Software lokal, also on premise laufen zu lassen. Beachten sollten man aber die eingeschränkte Funktionalität gegenüber der cloudbasierten Alternative.

Power BI Desktop, das Kernelement des Produktportfolios, ist eine frei verfügbare Anwendung. Damit schafft Microsoft eine geringe Einstiegsbarriere zur Nutzung der Software. Natürlich gibt es, wie auf dem Markt üblich, Nutzungsbeschränkungen, welche den User zum Kauf animieren. Interessanterweise liegen diese Limitierungen nicht in den wesentlichen Funktionen der Software selbst, also nicht im Aufbau von Visualisierungen, sondern vor allem in der beschränkten Möglichkeit Dashboards in einem Netzwerk zu teilen. Beschränkt auch deshalb, weil in der freien Version ebenfalls die Möglichkeit besteht, die Dashboards teilen zu können, indem eine Datei gespeichert und weiter versendet werden kann. Microsoft rät natürlich davon ab und verweist auf die Vorteile der Power BI Pro Lizenz. Dem ist i.d.R. zuzustimmen, da (wie im ersten Artikel näher erläutert) ein funktionierendes Konzept zur Data Governance die lokale Erstellung von Dashboards und manuelle Verteilung nicht erlauben würde. Sicherlich gibt es Firmen die Lizenzkosten einsparen wollen und funktionierende Prozesse eingeführt haben, um eine Aktualität und Korrektheit der Dashboards zu gewährleisten. Ein Restrisiko bleibt! Demgegenüber stehen relativ geringe Lizenzkosten mit $9,99 pro Monat/User für eine Power BI Pro Lizenz, nutzt man die cloud-basierte Variante mit dem Namen Power BI Service. Das Lizenzmodell ist für den Einstieg mit wenigen Lizenzen transparent gestaltet und zudem besteht keine Verpflichtung zur Abnahme einer Mindestmenge an Lizenzen, also ist der Einstieg auch für kleine Unternehmen gut möglich. Das Lizenzmodell wird komplexer bei intensivierter Nutzung der Cloud (Power BI Service) und dem zeitgleichen Wunsch, leistungsfähige Abfragen durchzuführen und große Datenmengen zu sichern. Mit einer Erweiterung der Pro Lizenz auf die Power BI Premium Lizenz, kann der Bedarf nach höheren Leistungsanforderungen gedeckt werden. Natürlich sind mit diesem Upgrade Kapazitätsgrenzen nicht aufgehoben und die Premium Lizenz kann je nach Leistungsanforderungen unterschiedliche Ausprägungen annehmen und Kosten verursachen. Microsoft hat sogenannte SKU´s definiert, welche hier aufgeführt sind. Ein Kostenrechner steht für eine Kostenschätzung online bereit, wobei je nach Anforderung unterschiedliche Parameter zu SKU`s (Premium P1, P2, P3) und die Anzahl der Pro Lizenzen wesentliche Abweichungen zum kalkulierten Preis verursachen kann. Die Kosten für die Premium P1 Lizenz belaufen sich auf derzeit $4.995 pro Monat und pro Speicherressource (Cloud), also i.d.R. je Kunde. Sollte eine cloud-basierte Lösung aus Kosten, technischen oder sogar Data Governance Gründen nicht möglich sein, kann der Power BI Report Server auf einer selbst gewählten Infrastruktur betrieben werden. Eine Premium Lizenz ermöglicht die lokale Bereitstellung der Software.

Anmerkung: Sowohl die Pro als auch die Premium Lizenz umfassen weitere Leistungen, welche in Einzelfällen ähnlich bedeutend sein können.

Um nur einige wenige zu nennen:

  • Eingebettete Dashboards auf Webseiten oder anderer SaaS Anwendungen
  • Nutzung der Power BI mobile app
  • Inkrementelle Aktualisierung von Datenquellen
  • Erhöhung der Anzahl automatischer Aktualisierungen pro Tag (Pro = 8)
  • u.v.m.

Community & Features von anderen Entwicklern

Power BI Benutzer können sich einer sehr großen Community erfreuen, da diese Software sich laut Gartner unter den führenden BI Tools befindet und Microsoft einen großen Kundenstamm vorzuweisen hat. Dementsprechend gibt es nicht nur auf der Microsoft eigenen Webseite https://community.powerbi.com/ eine Vielzahl von Themen, welche erörtert werden, sondern behandeln auch die einschlägigen Foren Problemstellungen und bieten Infomaterial an. Dieser große Kundenstamm bietet eine attraktive Geschäftsgrundlage für Entwickler von Produkten, welche komplementär oder gar substitutiv zu einzelnen Funktionen von Power BI angeboten werden. Ein gutes Beispiel für einen ersetzenden Service ist das Tool PowerBI Robots, welches mit Power BI verbunden, automatisch generierte E-Mails mit Screenshots von Dashboards an beliebig viele Personen sendet. Da dafür keine Power BI Pro Lizenz benötigt wird, hebelt dieser Service die wichtige Veröffentlichungsfunktion und damit einen der Hauptgründe für die Beschaffung der Pro Lizenz teilweise aus. Weiterhin werden Features ergänzt, welche noch nicht durch Microsoft selbst angeboten werden, wie z.B. die Erweiterung um ein Process Mining Tool namens PAFnow. Dieses und viele weitere Angebote können auf der Marketplace-Plattform heruntergeladen werden, sofern man eine Pro Lizenz besitzt.

Daten laden: Allgemeines

Ein sehr großes Spektrum an Datenquellen wird von Power BI unterstützt und fast jeder Nutzer sollte auf seinen Datenbestand zugreifen können. Unterstützte Datenquellen sind natürlich diverse Textdateien, SaaS verschiedenster Anbieter und Datenbanken jeglicher Art, aber auch Python, R Skripte sowie Blank Queries können eingebunden werden. Ebenfalls besteht die Möglichkeit mit einer ODBC-Schnittstelle eine Verbindung zu diversen, nicht aufgelisteten Datenquellen herstellen zu können. Ein wesentlicher Unterschied zwischen den einzelnen Datenquellen besteht in der Limitierung, eine direkte Verbindung aufsetzen zu können, eine sogenannte DirectQuery. In der Dokumentation zu Datenquellen findet man eine Auflistung mit entsprechender Info zur DirectQuery. Die Alternative dazu ist ein Import der Daten in Kombination mit regelmäßig durchgeführten Aktualisierungen. Mit Dual steht dem Anwender ein Hybrid aus beiden Methoden zur Verfügung, welcher in besonderen Anwendungsfällen sinnvoll sein kann. Demnach können einzelne Tabellen als Dual definiert und die im Folgenden beschriebenen Vorteile beider Methoden genutzt werden.

Import vs DirectQuery

Welche Verbindung man wählen sollte, hängt von vielen Faktoren ab. Wie bereits erwähnt, besteht eine Limitierung von 8 Aktualisierungen pro Tag und je Dataset bei importierten Datenquellen, sofern man nur eine Pro Lizenz besitzt. Mit der Nutzung einer DirectQuery besteht diese Limitierung nicht. Ebenfalls existiert keine Beschränkung in Bezug auf die Upload-Größe von 1GB je Dataset. Eine stetige Aktualität der Reports ist unter der Einstellung DirectQuery selbst redend.

Wann bringt also der Import Vorteile?

Dieser besteht im Grunde in den folgenden technischen Limitierungen von DirectQuery:

  • Es können nicht mehr als 1 Mio. Zeilen zurückgegeben werden (Aggregationen wiederum können über mehr Zeilen laufen).
  • Es können nur eingeschränkt Measures (Sprache DAX) geschrieben werden.
  • Es treten Fehler im Abfrageeditor bei übermäßiger Komplexität von Abfragen auf.
  • Zeitintelligenzfunktionen sind nicht verfügbar.

Daten laden: AdventureWorks2017Dataset

Wie zu erwarten, verlief der Import der Daten reibungslos, da sowohl die Datenquelle als auch das Dataset Produkte von Microsoft sind. Ein Import war notwendig, um Measures unter Nutzung von DAX anzuwenden. Power BI ermöglichte es, die Daten schnell in das Tool zu laden.

Beziehungen zwischen Datentabellen werden durch die Software entweder aufgrund von automatischer Erkennung gleicher Attribute über mehrere Tabellen hinweg oder durch das Laden von Metadaten erkannt. Aufgrund des recht komplexen und weit verzweigten Datasets schien dieses Feature im ersten Moment von Vorteil zu sein, erst in späteren Visualisierungsschritten stellte sich heraus, dass einige Verbindungen nicht aus den Metadaten geladen wurden, da eine falsch gesetzte Beziehung durch eine automatische Erkennung gesetzt wurde und so die durch die Metadaten determinierte Beziehung nicht übernommen werden konnte. Lange Rede kurzer Sinn: Diese Automatisierung ist arbeitserleichternd und nützlich, insbesondere für Einsteiger, aber das manuelle Setzen von Beziehungen kann wenig auffällige Fehler vermeiden und fördert zugleich das eigene Verständnis für die Datengrundlage. Microsoft bietet seinen Nutzer an, diese Features zu deaktivieren. Das manuelle Setzen der Beziehungen ist über das Userinterface (UI) im Register „Beziehungen“ einfach umzusetzen. Besonders positiv ist die Verwirklichung dieses Registers, da der Nutzer ein einfach zu bedienendes Tool zur Strukturierung der Daten erhält. Ein Entity-Relationship-Modell (ERM) zeigt das Resultat der Verknüpfung und zugleich das Datenmodel gemäß dem Konzept eines Sternenschemas.

Daten transformieren

Eines der wesentlichen Instrumente zur Transformierung von Daten ist Power Query. Diese Software ist ebenfalls ein etablierter Bestandteil von Excel und verfügt über ein gelungenes UI, welches die Sprache M generiert. Ca. 95% der gewünschten Daten Transformationen können über das UI durchgeführt werden und so ist es in den meisten Fällen nicht notwendig, M schreiben zu müssen. Durch das UI ermöglicht Power Query, wesentliche Aufgaben wie das Bereinigen, Pivotieren und Zusammenführen von Daten umzusetzen. Aber es ist von Vorteil, wenn man sich zumindest mit der Syntax auskennt und die Sprache in groben Zügen versteht. Die Sprache M wie auch das UI, welches unter anderem die einzelnen Bearbeitungs-/Berechnungsschritte aufzeigt, ist Workflow-orientiert. Das UI ist gut strukturiert, und Nutzer finden schnellen Zugang zur Funktionsweise. Ein sehr gut umgesetztes Beispiel ist die Funktion „Spalten aus Beispielen“. In nur wenigen Schritten konnten der Längen- und Breitengrad aus einer zusammengefassten Spalte getrennt werden. Den erzeugten M-Code und den beschriebenen Workflow seht ihr in der folgenden Grafik.

Das Feature zur Zusammenführung von Tabellen ist jedoch problematisch, da das UI von Power Query dem Nutzer keine vorprogrammierten Visualisierungen o.ä. an die Hand gibt, um die Resultate überprüfen zu können. Wie bei dem Beispiel Dataset von Microsoft, welches mit über 70 Tabellen eine relativ komplexe Struktur aufweist, können bei unzureichender Kenntnis über die Struktur der Datenbasis Fehler entstehen. Eine mögliche Folge können die ungewollte Vervielfachung von Zeilen (Kardinalität ist „viele zu viele“) oder gar das Fehlen von Informationen sein (nur eine Teilmenge ist in die Verknüpfung eingeschlossen). Zur Überprüfung der JOIN Ergebnisse können die drei genannten Register (siehe obige Grafik) dienen, aber ein Nutzer muss sich selbst ein eigenes Vorgehen zur Überwachung der korrekten Zusammenführung überlegen.

Nachdem die Bearbeitung der Daten in Power Query abgeschlossen ist und diese in Power BI geladen werden, besteht weiterhin die Möglichkeit, die Daten unter Nutzung von DAX zu transformieren. Insbesondere Measures bedienen sich ausschließlich dieser Sprache und ein gutes Auto-Fill-Feature mit zusätzlicher Funktionsbeschreibung erleichtert das Schreiben in DAX. Dynamische Aggregationen und etliche weitere Kalkulationen sind denkbar. Nachfolgend findet ihr einige wenige Beispiele, welche auch im AdventureWorks Dashboard Anwendung finden:

Measures können komplexe Formen annehmen und Power BI bietet eine sehr gute Möglichkeit gebräuchliche Berechnungen über sogenannte Quickmeasures (QM) vorzunehmen. Ähnlich wie für die Sprache M gibt es ein UI zur Erstellung dieser, ohne eine Zeile Code schreiben zu müssen. Die Auswahl an QM ist groß und die Anwendungsfälle für die einzelnen QM sind vielfältig. Als Beispiel könnt ihr euch das Measure „Kunden nach Year/KPI/Category“ im bereitgestellten AdventureWorks Dashboard anschauen, welches leicht abgewandelt auf Grundlage des QM „Verkettete Werteliste“ erstellt wurde. Dieses Measure wurde als dynamischer Titel in das Balkendiagramm eingebunden und wie das funktioniert seht ihr hier.

Daten visualisieren

Der letzte Schritt, die Visualisierung der Daten, ist nicht nur der wichtigste, sondern auch der sich am meisten unterscheidende Schritt im Vergleich der einzelnen BI-Tools. Ein wesentlicher Faktor dabei ist die Arbeitsabfolge in Bezug auf den Bau von Visualisierungen. Power BI ermöglicht dem Nutzer, einzelne Grafiken in einem UI zu gestalten und in dem selbigen nach Belieben anzuordnen. Bei Tableau und Looker zum Beispiel werden die einzelnen Grafiken in separaten UIs gestaltet und in einem weiteren UI als Dashboard zusammengesetzt. Eine Anordnung der Visualisierungen ist in Power BI somit sehr flexibel und ein Dashboard kann in wenigen Minuten erstellt werden. Verlieren kann man sich in den Details, fast jede visuelle Vorstellung kann erfüllt werden und in der Regel sind diese nur durch die eigene Zeit und das Know-How limitiert. Ebenfalls kann das Repertoire an Visualisierungen um sogenannte Custom Visualizations erweitert werden. Sofern man eine Pro Lizenz besitzt, ist das Herunterladen dieser Erweiterungen unter AppSource möglich.

Eine weitere Möglichkeit zur Anreicherung von Grafiken um Detailinformationen, besteht über das Feature Quickinfo. Sowohl eine schnell umsetzbare und somit wenig detaillierte Einbindung von Details ist möglich, aber auch eine aufwendigere Alternative ermöglicht die Umsetzung optisch ansprechender und sehr detaillierter Quickinfos.

Das Setzen von Filtern kann etliche Resultate und Erkenntnisse mit sich bringen. Dem Nutzer können beliebige Ansichten bzw. Filtereinstellungen in sogenannten Bookmarks gespeichert werden, sodass ein einziger Klick genügt. In dem AdventureWorks Dashboard wurde ein nützliches Bookmark verwendet, welches dem Zurücksetzen aller Filter dient.

Erstellt man Visualisierungen im immer gleichen Format, dann lohnt es sich ein eigenes Design in JSON-Format zu erstellen. Wenn man mit diesem Format nicht vertraut ist, kann man eine Designvorlage über das Tool Report Theme Generator V3 sehr einfach selbst erstellen.

Existiert ein Datenmodell und werden Daten aus verschiedenen Tabellen im selben Dashboard zusammengestellt (siehe auch Beispiel Dashboard AdventureWorks), dann werden entsprechende JOIN-Operationen im Hintergrund beim Zusammenstellen der Visualisierung erstellt. Ob das Datenmodell richtig aufgebaut wurde, ist oft erst in diesem Schritt erkennbar und wie bereits erwähnt, muss sich ein jeder Anwender ein eigenes Vorgehen überlegen, um mit Hilfe dieses Features die vorausgegangenen Schritte zu kontrollieren.

Warum braucht Power BI eine Python Integration?

Interessant ist dieses Feature in Bezug auf Machine Learning Algorithmen, welche direkt in Power BI integriert werden können. Python ist aber auch für einige Nutzer eine gern genutzte Alternative zu DAX und M, sofern man sich mit diesen Sprachen nicht auseinandersetzen möchte. Zwei weitere wesentliche Gründe für die Nutzung von Python sind Daten zu transformieren und zu visualisieren, unter Nutzung der allseits bekannten Plots. Zudem können weitere Quellen eingebunden werden. Ein Vorteil von Python ist dessen Repertoire an vielen nützlichen Bibliotheken wie pandas, matplotlib u.v.m.. Jedoch ist zu bedenken, dass die Python-Skripte zur Datenbereinigung und zur Abfrage der Datenquelle erst durch den Data Refresh in Power BI ausgeführt werden. In DAX geschriebene Measures bieten den Vorteil, dass diese mehrmals verwendet werden können. Ein Python-Skript hingegen muss kopiert und demnach auch mehrfach instandgehalten werden.

Es ist ratsam, Python in Power BI nur zu nutzen, wenn man an die Grenzen von DAX und M kommt.

Fazit

Das Lizenzmodel ist stark auf die Nutzung in der Cloud ausgerichtet und zudem ist die Funktionalität der Software, bei einer lokalen Verwendung (Power Bi Report Server) verglichen mit der cloud-basierten Variante, eingeschränkt. Das Lizenzmodell ist für den Power BI Neuling, welcher geringe Kapazitäten beansprucht einfach strukturiert und sehr transparent. Bereits kleine Firmen können so einen leichten Einstieg in Power BI finden, da auch kein Mindestumsatz gefordert ist.

Gut aufbereitete Daten können ohne großen Aufwand geladen werden und bis zum Aufbau erster Visualisierungen bedarf es nicht vieler Schritte, jedoch sind erste Resultate sehr kritisch zu hinterfragen. Die Kontrolle automatisch generierter Beziehungen und das Schreiben von zusätzlichen DAX Measures zur Verwendung in den Visualisierungen sind in den meisten Fällen notwendig, um eine korrekte Darstellung der Zahlen zu gewährleisten.

Die Transformation der Daten kann zum großen Teil über unterschiedliche UIs umgesetzt werden, jedoch ist das Schreiben von Code ab einem gewissen Punkt unumgänglich und wird auch nie komplett vermeidbar sein. Power BI bietet aber bereits ein gut durchdachtes Konzept.

Im Großen und Ganzen ist Power BI ein ausgereiftes und sehr gut handhabbares Produkt mit etlichen Features, ob von Microsoft selbst oder durch Drittanbieter angeboten. Eine große Community bietet ebenfalls Hilfestellung bei fast jedem Problem, wenn dieses nicht bereits erörtert wurde. Hervorzuheben ist der Kern des Produkts: die Visualisierungen. Einfach zu erstellende Visualisierungen jeglicher Art in einem ansprechenden Design grenzen dieses Produkt von anderen ab.

Fortsetzung: Tableau wurde als zweites Tool dieser Artikelserie näher beleuchtet.

Artikelserie: BI Tools im Vergleich – Datengrundlage

Dieser Artikel wird als Fortsetzung des ersten Artikels, einer Artikelserie zu BI Tools, die Datengrundlage erläutern.

Als Datengrundlage sollen die Trainingsdaten – AdventureWorks 2017 – von Microsoft dienen und Ziel soll es sein, ein möglichst gleiches Dashboard in jedem dieser Tools zu erstellen.

Bei der Datenbasis handelt es sich bereits um ein relationales Datenbankmodel mit strukturierten Daten, welches als Datei-Typ .bak zur Verfügung steht. Die Daten sind bereits bereinigt und normalisiert, sowie bestehen auch bereits Beziehungen zwischen den Tabellen. Demnach fallen sowohl aufwendige Datenbereinigungen weg, als auch der Aufbau eines relationalen Datenmodells im Dashboard. In den meisten Tools ist beides möglich, wenn auch nicht das optimale Programm. Vor allem sollte vermieden werden Datenbereinigungen in BI Tools vorzunehmen. Alle Tools bieten einem die Möglichkeit strukturierte und unstrukturierte Daten aus verschiedensten Datenquellen zu importieren. Die Datenquelle wird SQL Server von Microsoft sein, da die .bak Datei nicht direkt in die meisten Dashboards geladen werden kann und zudem auf Grund der Datenmenge ein kompletter Import auch nicht ratsam ist. Aus Gründen der Performance sollten nur die für das Dashboard relevanten Daten importiert werden. Für den Vergleich werden 15 von insgesamt 71 Tabellen importiert, um Visualisierungen für wesentliche Geschäftskennzahlen aufzubauen. Die obere Grafik zeigt das Entity-Relationship-Modell (ERM) zu den relevanten Tabellen. Die Datengrundlage eignet sich sehr gut für tiefer gehende Analysen und bietet zugleich ein großes Potential für sehr ausgefallene Visualisierungen. Im Fokus dieser Artikelserie soll aber nicht die Komplexität der Grafiken, sondern die allgemeine Handhabbarkeit stehen. Allgemein besteht die Gefahr, dass die Kernaussagen eines Reports in den Hintergrund rücken bei der Verwendung von zu komplexen Visualisierungen, welche lediglich der Ästhetik dienlich sind.

Eine Beschränkung soll gelten: So soll eine Manipulation von Daten lediglich in den Dashboards selbst vorgenommen werden. Bedeutet das keine Tabellen in SQL Server geändert oder Views erstellt werden. Gehen wir einfach Mal davon aus, dass der Data Engineer Haare auf den Zähnen hat und die Zuarbeit in jeglicher Art und Weise verwehrt wird.

Also ganz nach dem Motto: Help yourself! 😉

Daten zum Üben gibt es etliche. Einfach Mal Github, Kaggle oder andere Open Data Quellen anzapfen. Falls ihr Lust habt, dann probiert euch doch selber einmal an den Dashboards. Ihr solltet ein wenig Zeit mitbringen, aber wenn man erstmal drin ist macht es viel Spaß und es gibt immer etwas neues zu entdecken! Das erste Dashboard und somit die Fortsetzung dieser Artikelserie wird  Power BI als Grundlage haben.

Hier ein paar Links um euch startklar zu machen, falls das Interesse in euch geweckt wurde.

Dataset: AdventureWorks 2017

MS SQL Server

MS SSMS

MS Power BI (Desktop)

Artikelserie: BI Tools im Vergleich – Einführung und Motivation

„Mit welchem BI-Tool arbeitest du am liebsten?“ Mit dieser Frage werde ich dieser Tage oft konfrontiert. Meine klassische Antwort und eine typische Beraterantwort: „Es kommt darauf an.“ Nach einem Jahr als Berater sitzt diese Antwort sicher, aber gerade in diesem Fall auch begründet. Auf den Analytics und Business Intelligence Markt drängen jedes Jahr etliche neue Dashboard-Anbieter und die etablierten erweitern Services und Technik in rasantem Tempo. Zudem sind die Anforderungen an ein BI-Tool höchst unterschiedlich und von vielen Faktoren abhängig. Meine Perspektive, also die Anwenderperspektive eines Entwicklers, ist ein Faktor und auch der Kern dieser Artikelserie. Um die Masse an Tools auf eine machbare Anzahl runter zu brechen werde ich die bekanntesten Tools im Vergleich ausprobieren und hier vorstellen. Die Aufgabe ist also schnell erklärt: Ein Dashboard mit den gleichen Funktionen und Aussagen in unterschiedlichen Tools erstellen. Im Folgenden werde ich auch ein paar Worte zur Bewertungsgrundlage und zur Datengrundlage verlieren.

Erstmal kurz zu mir: Wie bereits erwähnt arbeite ich seit einem Jahr als Berater, genauer als Data Analyst in einem BI-Consulting Unternehmen namens DATANOMIQ. Bereits davor habe ich mich auf der anderen Seite der Macht, quasi als Kunde eines Beraters, viel mit Dashboards beschäftigt. Aber erst in dem vergangenen Jahr wurde mir die Fülle an BI Tools bewusst und der Lerneffekt war riesig. Die folgende Grafik zeigt alle Tools welche ich in der Artikelserie vorstellen möchte.

Gartner’s Magic Quadrant for Analytics and Business Intelligence Platform führt jedes Jahr eine Portfolioanalyse über die visionärsten und bedeutendsten BI-Tools durch, unter der genannten befindet sich nur eines, welches nicht in dieser Übersicht geführt wird, ich jedoch als potenziellen Newcomer für die kommenden Jahre erwarte. Trotz mittlerweile einigen Jahren Erfahrung gibt es noch reichlich Potential nach oben und viel Neues zu entdecken, gerade in einem so direkten Vergleich. Also seht mich ruhig als fortgeschrittenen BI-Analyst, der für sich herausfinden will, welche Tools aus Anwendersicht am besten geeignet sind und vielleicht kann ich dem ein oder anderen auch ein paar nützliche Tipps mit auf den Weg geben.

Was ist eigentlich eine „Analytical and Business Intelligence Platform“?

Für alle, die komplett neu im Thema sind, möchte ich erklären, was eine Analytical and Business Intelligence Platform in diesem Kontext ist und warum wir es nachfolgend auch einfach als BI-Tool bezeichnen können. Es sind Softwarelösungen zur Generierung von Erkenntnissen mittels Visualisierung und Informationsintegration von Daten. Sie sollten einfach handhabbar sein, weil der Nutzer für die Erstellung von Dashboards keine speziellen IT-Kenntnisse mitbringen muss und das Userinterface der jeweiligen Software einen mehr oder minder gut befähigt die meisten Features zu nutzen. Die meisten und zumindest die oben genannten lassen sich aber auch um komplexere Anwendungen und Programmiersprachen erweitern. Zudem bestimmt natürlich auch der Use Case den Schwierigkeitsgrad der Umsetzung.

Cloudbasierte BI Tools sind mittlerweile der Standard und folgen dem allgemeinen Trend. Die klassische Desktop-Version wird aber ebenfalls von den meisten angeboten. Von den oben genannten haben lediglich Data Studio und Looker keine Desktop- Version. Für den einfachen User macht das keinen großen Unterschied, welche Version man nutzt. Aber für das Unternehmen in Gesamtheit ist es ein wesentlicher Entscheidungsfaktor für die Wahl der Software und auch auf den Workflow des Developers bzw. BI-Analyst kann sich das auswirken.

Unternehmensperspektive: Strategie & Struktur

Die Unternehmensstrategie setzt einen wesentlichen Rahmen zur Entwicklung einer Datenstrategie worunter auch ein anständiges Konzept zur Data Governance gehört.

Ein wesentlicher Punkt der Datenstrategie ist die Verteilung der BI- und Datenkompetenz im Unternehmen. An der Entwicklung der Dashboards arbeiten in der Regel zwei Parteien, der Developer, der im Unternehmen meistens die Bezeichnung BI- oder Data Analyst hat, und der Stakeholder, also einzelner User oder die User ganzer Fachabteilungen.

Prognose: Laut Gartner wird die Anzahl der Daten- und Analyse-Experten in den Fachabteilungen, also die Entwickler und Benutzer von BI Tools, drei Mal so schnell wachsen verglichen mit dem bereits starken Wachstum an IT-Fachkräften.

Nicht selten gibt es für ein Dashboard mehrere Stakeholder verschiedener Abteilungen. Je nach Organisation und Softwarelösung mit unterschiedlich weitreichenden Verantwortlichkeiten, was die Entwicklung eines Dashboards an geht.

Die obige Grafik zeigt die wesentlichen Prozessschritte von der Konzeption bis zum fertigen Dashboard und drei oft gelebte Konzepte zur Verteilung der Aufgaben zwischen dem User und dem Developer. Natürlich handelt es sich fast immer um einen iterativen Prozess und am Ende stellen sich auch positive Nebenerkenntnisse heraus. Verschiedene Tools unterstützen durch Ihre Konfiguration und Features verschiedene Ansätze zur Aufgabenverteilung, auch wenn mit jedem Tool fast jedes System gelebt werden kann, provozieren einige Tools mit ihrem logischen Aufbau und dem Lizenzmodell zu einer bestimmten Organisationsform. Looker zum Beispiel verkauft mit der Software das Konzept, dem User eine größere Möglichkeit zu geben, das Dashboard in Eigenregie zu bauen und gleichzeitig die Datenhoheit an den richtigen Stellen zu gewährleisten (mittlerer Balken in der Grafik). Somit wird dem User eine höhere Verantwortung übertragen und weit mehr Kompetenzen müssen vermittelt werden, da der Aufbau von Visualisierung ebenfalls Fehlerpotential in sich birgt. Ein Full‑Service hingegen unterstützt das Konzept fast aller Tools durch Zuweisen von Berechtigungen. Teilweise werden aber gewisse kostenintensive Features nicht genutzt oder auf Cloud-Lizenzen verzichtet, so dass jeder Mitarbeiter unabhängig auf einer eigenen Desktop-Version arbeitet, am Ende dann leider die Single Source of Truth nicht mehr gegeben ist. Denn das führt eigentlich gezwungenermaßen dazu, dass die User sich aus x beliebigen Datentöpfen bedienen, ungeschultes Personal falsche Berechnungen anstellt und am Ende die unterschiedlichen Abteilungen sich mit schlichtweg falschen KPIs überbieten. Das spricht meistens für ein Unternehmen ohne vollumfängliches Konzept für Data Governance bzw. einer fehlenden Datenstrategie.

Zu dem Thema könnte man einen Roman schreiben und um euch diesen zu ersparen, möchte ich kurz die wichtigsten Fragestellungen aus Unternehmensperspektive aufzählen, ohne Anspruch auf Vollständigkeit:

  • Wann wird ein Return on Invest (ROI) realisiert werden?
  • Wie hoch ist mein Budget für BI-Lösungen?
  • Sollen die Mitarbeiter mit BI-Kompetenz zentral oder dezentral organisiert sein?
  • Wie ist meine Infrastruktur aufgebaut? Cloudbasiert oder on Premise?
  • Soll der Stakeholder/User Zeit-Ressourcen für den Aufbau von Dashboards erhalten?
  • Über welche Skills verfügen die Mitarbeiter bereits?
  • Welche Autorisierung in Bezug auf die Datensichtbarkeit und -manipulation haben die jeweiligen Mitarbeiter der Fachabteilungen?
  • Bedarf an Dashboards: Wie häufig werden diese benötigt und wie oft werden bestehende Dashboards angepasst?
  • Kann die Data Exploration durch den Stakeholder/User einen signifikanten Mehrwert liefern?
  • Werden Dashboards in der Regel für mehrere Stakeholder gebaut?

Die Entscheidung für die Wahl eines Dashboards ist nicht nur davon abhängig, wie sich die Grafiken von links nach rechts schieben lassen, sondern es handelt sich auch um eine wichtige strategische Frage aus Unternehmersicht.

Ein Leitsatz hierbei sollte lauten:
Die Strategie des Unternehmens bestimmt die Anforderungen an das Tool und nicht andersrum!

Perspektive eines Entwicklers:      Bewertungsgrundlage der Tools

So jetzt Mal Butter bei die Fische und ab zum Kern des Artikels. Jeder der Artikel wird aus den folgenden Elementen bestehen:

  • Das Tool:
    • Daten laden
    • Daten transformieren
    • Daten visualisieren
    • Zukunftsfähigkeit am Beispiel von Pythonintegration
    • Handhabbarkeit
  • Umweltfaktoren:
    • Community
    • Dokumentation
    • Features anderer Entwickler(-firmen) zur Erweiterung
    • Lizenzmodell
      • Cloud (SaaS) ODER on premise Lizenzen?
      • Preis (pro Lizenz, Unternehmenslizenz etc.)
      • Freie Version

 

Im Rahmen dieser Artikelserie erscheinen im Laufe der kommenden Monate folgende Artikel zu den Reviews der BI-Tools:

  1. Power BI von Microsoft
  2. Tableau
  3. Qlik Sense
  4. MicroStrategy (erscheint demnächst)
  5. Looker (erscheint demnächst)

Über einen vorausgehend veröffentlichten Artikel wird die Datengrundlage erläutert, die für alle Reviews gemeinsam verwendet wird: Vorstellung der Datengrundlage