Posts

5 Data Privacy Predictions for 2021

2020 has been a significant year for data management. As businesses face new technological challenges amid the COVID-19 pandemic, issues of privacy have spent some time in the spotlight. In response, data privacy could see some substantial changes in 2021.

Few people will emerge from 2020 with an unchanged perception of data security. As these ideas and feelings shift, some trends will accelerate while others get replaced. Businesses will have to adapt to these changes to survive.

Here are five such changes you can expect in 2021.

International Data Privacy Standards Will Increase

Privacy concerns over Chinese-owned app TikTok caused quite a stir in 2020. With the TikTok situation bringing new attention to privacy in international services, you’ll likely see a rise in international regulations. China has already announced new security standards and asked other countries to follow.

2020 has cast doubt over a lot of international relations. More countries will likely issue new standards to ease tension and move past these doubts. This trend started before 2020, as you can see in Europe’s GDPR, but 2021 will further it.

Customers Will Demand Transparency

Governments aren’t the only ones that will expect more of tech companies’ privacy standards. Since things like TikTok have made people more aware of what apps could access, more people will demand privacy. In 2021, companies that are transparent about how they use data will likely be more successful.

According to a PwC poll, 84% of consumers said they would switch services if they don’t trust how a company uses their data. Data privacy isn’t just important to authorities or businesses anymore. The public is growing more concerned about their data, and their choices will reflect it.

Security Will Become More Automated

In response to these growing expectations, businesses will have to do more to secure people’s data. Cybersecurity companies are facing a considerable talent shortage thanks to pandemic-related complications, though. The data security world will turn to automation to fix both of these problems.

With so many businesses changing the way they operate, cybersecurity will have to become more flexible too. Automating some processes through AI will allow companies to achieve that flexibility. Security AI is still relatively new, but as it develops, it could take off in 2021.

Security Data Analytics Will Become the Norm

Big data analytics have already become standard practice in many business applications. In 2021, more companies will start using them to improve their data privacy measures, too. With major companies like Nintendo and Marriott experiencing significant data breaches this year, more will turn to analytics to find any potential shortcomings.

No one wants to be the next data breach news story, especially with more people paying attention to these issues now. Data analytics can highlight operational improvements, showing companies how to better their data security measures. With data privacy in the spotlight in 2021, taking these steps is crucial.

Third-Party Risk Assessments Will Be More Crucial

As people demand better privacy protection, businesses will have to consider their third-party partners. Consumers will be more critical of companies giving third parties access to their data. As a result, companies will have to perform more risk assessments on any third party.

Third-party data breaches affected companies like General Electric and T-Mobile in 2020, exposing thousands of records. Customers will expect businesses to hold their partners to higher standards to avoid these risks.

2021 Could Be a Landmark Year for Data Privacy

Data privacy is more prominent than ever before, mostly due to a few notable scandals. Now that the general public is more aware of these issues, businesses will have to meet higher standards for data privacy. Implementing data security processes may cause some disruption and confusion at first, but it will ultimately lead to a safer digital landscape.

All of these changes could make 2021 a turning point for data security. With higher expectations from consumers and authorities, data management will become more secure.

Data Science Security Hacks

It would blow your mind if you had exposure to all the information available on the internet. The science behind it is very demanding. It could explain why there is such an explosion of intelligent systems. People come in with different skill sets, including math, data analysis, statistics, and programming, to name a few.

They all use very orthodox methods in their approach to data science. But, we have people with hacker mindsets who think out of the box. You will find them using security hacks to circumvent the scientific approach to data science. Our article will explore some of the methods they use, and why you may need an SSL certificate.

Understanding Data Science

Data science is the use of different tools, machine learning principles and algorithms to shift through raw data to discover any hidden patterns. The scientist will use the information to make predictions and decisions through the use of prescriptive analytics, machine learning, and predictive analytics. They collect data from multiple sources and organize it before translating it into results.

The scientists come to their conclusions by looking at a problem from all viewpoints and asking the right questions. Many companies are using these services to make sound business decisions. You will find the use of data science in areas such as risk and fraud detection, healthcare, advertising, and even gaming.

Data Science Security Hacks

  • Data Protection 

Data is everything to a data scientist. However, they are always at threat of losing it due to a rise in cybersecurity threats. Online hackers are getting more daring and sophisticated and are continually coming up with new ways to access people’s information. It is, therefore, critical to protecting one’s privacy and security while on the internet.

Phishing attacks and malware are genuine threats to the digital space. SSL certificates provide data security because it protects the user from unwanted third party tampering. You can find many types of SSL certificates like single domain, Code Signing certificate, multi-domain SSL, etc.

  • Having the Mindset of a Hacker

A typical scientific mindset is to build models, train, plot graphs, and analyze the different attributes to come up with a solution. The mindset of a hacker is very different from that of a scientist. They focus more on finding Solutions using simple methods.

While the data scientists use so many various components to a problem, the hacker works at eliminating complexity to come up with a solution. The hacker mindset is, therefore, freer, because the confines of the scientific mind do not bound them.

  • Data Cleaning Techniques

There are tons of raw data that data scientists have to work with. Once they collect it, it has to go through the process of cleaning. It is a very complex process because scientists will be working with unstructured data. It is, however, a critical component of data science because scientists will have to extract what they need.

They are then able to process the data and structure it into usable data that will yield the required outcome. One of the ways of achieving the best results might be to use the most straightforward models available. The sophisticated tools do not always give the desired results. Even if they do, they may make the process more tedious and time-consuming than necessary.

  • The Learning Never Ends

In the field of data science, look at it more like a journey, and not a process to get to a destination. They must, therefore, always learn because the domain is vast, and there is new information coming in every day. It is in the process of learning that they can come up with more intelligent models for use within the field. They keep abreast of the latest innovations and technologies, which they can use in their daily problem-solving processes.

The online platform has so much information for anyone interested in developing their skill sets. You do not need to go to a classroom to stay up-to-date with what is happening. You can get information online. The data scientists also share their knowledge in different forums or platforms, thereby providing invaluable resources to fellow practitioners.

  • Knowledge of Domains

One of the critical steps data scientists take is to understand precisely what it is they are working with. If, for example, they are working in the agricultural field, they have to follow the industry to understand any data they collect. It would be unreasonable to expect the scientist to give useful insights and analysis without understanding the industry.

Domain knowledge is, therefore, a critical element of data science. With proper understanding, we can expect a better output from the scientists. Those in the industry can then apply the findings within their relevant areas for better productivity.

  • Cheat Sheets Hacks

Data Science is not a simple field, and you get to learn so much every day. Unless you have one of those super memories, it will be hard to remember everything. That is why data scientists have cheat sheets. There are many such cheat sheets online for anyone who needs one.

Final Thoughts

Data science continues to gain relevance in different fields, and it will continue to grow due to the demand from various industries. It is already very critical in areas such as health care, fraud detection, and agriculture, to name a few. The most vital data security hack for a data scientist is the Installation of an SSL certificate. It will protect from hackers while on the internet. It would be a pity to lose all the data to cybercriminals because of a hack that is simple to install and inexpensive.

DS-GVO: Wie das moderne Data-Warehouse Unternehmen entlastet

Artikel des Blog-Sponsors: Snowflake

Viele Aktivitäten, die zur Einhaltung der DS-GVO-Anforderungen beitragen, liegen in den Händen der Unternehmen selbst. Deren IT-Anbieter sollten dazu beitragen, die Compliance-Anforderungen dieser Unternehmen zu erfüllen. Die SaaS-Anbieter eines Unternehmens sollten zumindest die IT-Sicherheitsanforderungen erfüllen, die sich vollständig in ihrem Bereich befinden und sich auf die Geschäfts- und Datensicherheit ihrer Kunden auswirken.

Snowflake wurde von Grund auf so gestaltet, dass die Einhaltung der DS-GVO erleichtert wird – und von Beginn darauf ausgelegt, enorme Mengen strukturierter und semistrukturierter Daten mit der Leichtigkeit von Standard-SQL zu verarbeiten. Die Zugänglichkeit und Einfachheit von SQL gibt Organisationen die Flexibilität, alle unter der DS-GVO erforderlichen Aktualisierungen, Änderungen oder Löschungen nahtlos vorzunehmen. Snowflakes Unterstützung für semistrukturierte Daten kann die Anpassung an neue Felder und andere Änderungen der Datensätze erleichtern. Darüber hinaus war die Sicherheit von Anfang an von grundlegender Bedeutung für Architektur, Implementierung und Betrieb von Snowflakes Data-Warehouse-as-a-Service.

Ein Grundprinzip der DS-GVO

Ein wichtiger Faktor für die Einhaltung der DS-GVO ist, zu verstehen, welche Daten eine Organisation besitzt und auf wen sie sich beziehen. Diese Anforderung macht es nötig, dass Daten strukturiert, organisiert und einfach zu suchen sind.

Die relationale SQL-Datenbankarchitektur von Snowflake bietet eine erheblich vereinfachte Struktur und Organisation, was sicherstellt, dass jeder Datensatz einen eindeutigen und leicht identifizierbaren Speicherort innerhalb der Datenbank besitzt. Snowflake-Kunden können auch relationalen Speicher mit dem Variant-Spaltentyp von Snowflake für semistrukturierte Daten kombinieren. Dieser Ansatz erweitert die Einfachheit des relationalen Formats auf die Schema-Flexibilität semistrukturierter Daten.

Snowflake ist noch leistungsfähiger durch seine Fähigkeit, massive Nebenläufigkeit zu unterstützen. Bei größeren Organisationen können Dutzende oder sogar Hunderte nebenläufiger Datenänderungen, -abfragen und -suchvorgänge zu einem bestimmten Zeitpunkt auftreten. Herkömmliche Data-Warehouses können nicht zu einem bestimmten Zeitpunkt über einen einzelnen Rechen-Cluster hinaus skaliert werden, was zu langen Warteschlangen und verzögerter Compliance führt. Snowflakes Multi-Cluster-Architektur für gemeinsam genutzte Daten löst dieses Problem, indem sie so viele einzigartige Rechen-Cluster bereitstellen kann, wie für einen beliebigen Zweck nötig sind, was zu einer effizienteren Workload-Isolierung und höherem Abfragedurchsatz führt. Jeder Mitarbeiter kann sehr große Datenmengen mit so vielen nebenläufigen Benutzern oder Operationen wie nötig speichern, organisieren, ändern, suchen und abfragen.

Rechte von Personen, deren Daten verarbeitet werden („Datensubjekte“)

Organisationen, die von der DS-GVO betroffen sind, müssen sicherstellen, dass sie Anfragen betroffener Personen nachkommen können. Einzelpersonen haben jetzt erheblich erweiterte Rechte, um zu erfahren, welche Art von Daten eine Organisation über sie besitzt, und das Recht, den Zugriff und/oder die Korrektur ihrer Daten anzufordern, die Daten zu löschen und/oder die Daten an einen neuen Provider zu übertragen. Bei der Bereitstellung dieser Dienste müssen Organisationen ziemlich schnell reagieren, in der Regel innerhalb von 30 Tagen. Daher müssen sie ihre Geschäftssysteme und ihr Data-Warehouse schnell durchsuchen können, um alle personenbezogenen Daten zu finden, die mit einer Person in Verbindung stehen, und entsprechende Maßnahmen ergreifen.

Organisationen können in großem Umfang von der Speicherung aller Daten in einem Data-Warehouse-as-a-Service mit vollen DML- und SQL-Fähigkeiten profitieren. Dies erleichtert das (mühevolle) Durchsuchen getrennter Geschäftssysteme und Datenspeicher, um die relevanten Daten zu finden. Und das wiederum hilft sicherzustellen, dass einzelne Datensätze durchsucht, gelöscht, eingeschränkt, aktualisiert, aufgeteilt und auf andere Weise manipuliert werden können, um sie an entsprechende Anfragen betroffener Personen anzupassen. Außerdem können Daten so verschoben werden, dass sie der Anforderung einer Anfrage zum „Recht auf Datenübertragbarkeit“ entsprechen. Von Anfang an wurde Snowflake mit ANSI-Standard-SQL und vollständiger DML-Unterstützung entwickelt, um sicherzustellen, dass diese Arten von Operationen möglich sind.

Sicherheit

Leider erfordern es viele herkömmliche Data-Warehouses, dass sich Unternehmen selbst um die IT-Sicherheit kümmern und diese mit anderen Services außerhalb des Kernangebots kombiniert wird. Außerdem bieten sie manchmal noch nicht einmal standardmäßige Verschlüsselung.

Als Data-Warehouse, das speziell für die Cloud entwickelt wurde und das Sicherheit als zentrales Element bietet, umfasst Snowflake unter anderem folgende integrierte Schutzfunktionen:

  • Minimaler Betriebsaufwand: Weniger Komplexität durch automatische Performance, Sicherheit und Hochverfügbarkeit, sodass die Infrastruktur nicht optimiert werden muss und kein Tuning nötig ist.
  • Durchgängige Verschlüsselung: Automatische Verschlüsselung aller Daten jederzeit (in ruhendem und bewegtem Zustand).
  • Umfassender Schutz: Zu den Sicherheitsfunktionen zählen Multi-Faktor-Authentifizierung, rollenbasierte Zugriffskontrolle, IP-Adressen-Whitelisting, zentralisierte Authentifizierung und jährliche Neuverschlüsselung verschlüsselter Daten.
  • Tri-Secret Secure: Kundenkontrolle und Datenschutz durch die Kombination aus einem vom Kunden, einem von Snowflake bereitgestellten Verschlüsselungsschlüssel und Benutzerzugangsdaten.
  • Unterstützung für AWS Private Link: Kunden können Daten zwischen ihrem virtuellen privaten Netzwerk und Snowflake übertragen, ohne über das Internet gehen zu müssen. Dadurch ist die Konnektivität zwischen den Netzwerken sicher und einfacher zu verwalten.
  • Stärkere unternehmensinterne Datenabgrenzung dank Snowflake Data Sharing: Organisationen können die Datenfreigabefunktionen von Snowflake nutzen, um nicht personenbezogene Daten mit anderen Abteilungen zu teilen, die keinen Zugriff benötigen – indem sie strengere Sicherheits- und DS-GVO-Kontrollen durchsetzen.
  • Private Umgebung: Unternehmen können eine dedizierte, verwaltete Snowflake- Instanz in einer separaten AWS Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) abrufen.

Rechenschaftspflicht

Was die Komplexität weiter erhöht: Organisationen müssen auch sicherstellen, dass sie und die Organisationen und Tools, mit denen sie arbeiten, Compliance nachweisen können. Snowflake prüft und verfeinert seine IT-Sicherheitspraxis regelmäßig mit peniblen Penetrationstests. Snowflakes Data-Warehouse-as-a-Service ist zertifiziert nach SOC 2 Type II, ist PCI-DSS-konform und unterstützt HIPAA-Compliance. Um Anfragen von Personen, deren Daten verarbeitet werden („Datensubjekte“), zu entsprechen, können Kunden genutzte Daten überprüfen.

Zusätzlich zu diesen Standardfunktionen und -validierungen schützt Snowflake seine Kunden auch durch den Datenschutznachtrag („Data Protection Addendum“), der genau auf die Anforderungen der DS-GVO abgestimmt ist. Snowflake hält sich außerdem an penibel vertraglich festgelegte Sicherheitsverpflichtungen („contractual security commitments“), um effizientere Transaktionen und eine vereinfachte Sorgfaltspflicht zu ermöglichen.

Fazit

Im Rahmen der Europäischen Datenschutz-Grundverordnung müssen Unternehmen technische Maßnahmen ergreifen, mit deren Hilfe sie den Anforderungen ihrer Kunden in Bezug auf Datenschutz und Schutz der Privatsphäre gerecht werden können. Snowflake bietet hier nicht nur den Vorteil, alle wichtigen Kundendaten an einem einzigen Ort zu speichern, sondern ermöglicht auch das schnelle Auffinden und Abrufen dieser Daten, sodass Unternehmen im Bedarfsfall schnell aktiv werden können.

Show your Data Science Workplace!

The job of a data scientist is often a mystery to outsiders. Of course, you do not really need much more than a medium-sized notebook to use data science methods for finding value in data. Nevertheless, data science workplaces can look so different and, let’s say, interesting. And that’s why I want to launch a blog parade – which I want to start with this article – where you as a Data Scientist or Data Engineer can show your workplace and explain what tools a data scientist in your opinion really needs.

I am very curious how many monitors you prefer, whether you use Apple, Dell, HP or Lenovo, MacOS, Linux or Windows, etc., etc. And of course, do you like a clean or messy desk?

What is a Blog Parade?

A blog parade is a call to blog owners to report on a specific topic. Everyone who participates in the blog parade, write on their blog a contribution to the topic. The organizer of the blog parade collects all the articles and will recap those articles in a short form together, of course with links to the articles.

How can I participate?

Write an article on your blog! Mention this blog parade here, show and explain your workplace (your desk with your technical equipment) in an article. If you’re missing your own blog, articles can also be posted directly to LinkedIn (LinkedIn has its own blogging feature that every LinkedIn member can use). Alternative – as a last resort – it would also be possible to send me your article with a photo about your workplace directly to: redaktion@data-science-blog.com.
Please make me aware of an article, via e-mail or with a comment (below) on this article.

Who can participate?

Any data scientist or anyone close to Data Science: Everyone concerned with topics such as data analytics, data engineering or data security. Please do not over-define data science here, but keep it in a nutshell, so that all professionals who manage and analyze data can join in with a clear conscience.

And yes, I will participate too. I will propably be the first who write an article about my workplace (I just need a new photo of my desk).

When does the article have to be finished?

By 31/12/2017, the article must have been published on your blog (or LinkedIn or wherever) and the release has to be reported to me.
But beware: Anyone who has previously written an article will also be linked earlier. After all, reporting on your article will take place immediately after I hear about it.
If you publish an artcile tomorrow, it will be shown the day after tomorrow here on the Data Science Blog.

What is in it for me to join?

Nothing! Except perhaps the fun factor of sharing your idea of ​​a nice desk for a data expert with others, so as to share creativity or a certain belief in what a data scientist needs.
Well and for bloggers: There is a great backlink from this data science blog for you 🙂

What should I write? What are the minimum requirements of content?

The article does not have to (but may be) particularly long. Anyway, here on this data science blog only a shortened version of your article will appear (with a link, of course).

Minimum requirments:

  • Show a photo (at least one!) of your workplace desk!
  • And tell us something about:
    • How many monitors do you use (or wish to have)?
    • What hardware do you use? Apple? Dell? Lenovo? Others?
    • Which OS do you use (or prefer)? MacOS, Linux, Windows? Virtual Machines?
    • What are your favorite databases, programming languages and tools? (e.g. Python, R, SAS, Postgre, Neo4J,…)
    • Which data dou you analyze on your local hardware? Which in server clusters or clouds?
    • If you use clouds, do you prefer Azure, AWS, Google oder others?
    • Where do you make your notes/memos/sketches. On paper or digital?

Not allowed:
Of course, please do not provide any information, which could endanger your company`s IT security.

Absolutly allowed:
Bringing some joke into the matter 🙂 We are happy to vote in the comments on the best or funniest desk for election, there may be also a winner later!


The resulting Blog Posts: https://data-science-blog.com/data-science-insights/show-your-desk/


 

Establish a Collaborative Culture – Process Mining Rule 4 of 4

This is article no. 4 of the four-part article series Privacy, Security and Ethics in Process Mining.

Read this article in German:
Datenschutz, Sicherheit und Ethik beim Process Mining – Regel 4 von 4

Perhaps the most important ingredient in creating a responsible process mining environment is to establish a collaborative culture within your organization. Process mining can make the flaws in your processes very transparent, much more transparent than some people may be comfortable with. Therefore, you should include change management professionals, for example, Lean practitioners who know how to encourage people to tell each other “the truth”, in your team.

Furthermore, be careful how you communicate the goals of your process mining project and involve relevant stakeholders in a way that ensures their perspective is heard. The goal is to create an atmosphere, where people are not blamed for their mistakes (which only leads to them hiding what they do and working against you) but where everyone is on board with the goals of the project and where the analysis and process improvement is a joint effort.

Do:

  • Make sure that you verify the data quality before going into the data analysis, ideally by involving a domain expert already in the data validation step. This way, you can build trust among the process managers that the data reflects what is actually happening and ensure that you have the right understanding of what the data represents.
  • Work in an iterative way and present your findings as a starting point for discussion in each iteration. Give people the chance to explain why certain things are happening and let them ask additional questions (to be picked up in the next iteration). This will help to improve the quality and relevance of your analysis as well as increase the buy-in of the process stakeholders in the final results of the project.

Don’t:

  • Jump to conclusions. You can never assume that you know everything about the process. For example, slower teams may be handling the difficult cases, people may deviate from the process for good reasons, and you may not see everything in the data (for example, there might be steps that are performed outside of the system). By consistently using your observations as a starting point for discussion, and by allowing people to join in the interpretation, you can start building trust and the collaborative culture that process mining needs to thrive.
  • Force any conclusions that you expect, or would like to have, by misrepresenting the data (or by stating things that are not actually supported by the data). Instead, keep track of the steps that you have taken in the data preparation and in your process mining analysis. If there are any doubts about the validity or questions about the basis of your analysis, you can always go back and show, for example, which filters have been applied to the data to come to the particular process view that you are presenting.

Consider Anonymization – Process Mining Rule 3 of 4

This is article no. 3 of the four-part article series Privacy, Security and Ethics in Process Mining.

Read this article in German:
Datenschutz, Sicherheit und Ethik beim Process Mining – Regel 3 von 4

If you have sensitive information in your data set, instead of removing it you can also consider the use of anonymization. When you anonymize a set of values, then the actual values (for example, the employee names “Mary Jones”, “Fred Smith”, etc.) will be replaced by another value (for example, “Resource 1”, “Resource 2”, etc.).

If the same original value appears multiple times in the data set, then it will be replaced with the same replacement value (“Mary Jones” will always be replaced by “Resource 1”). This way, anonymization allows you to obfuscate the original data but it preserves the patterns in the data set for your analysis. For example, you will still be able to analyze the workload distribution across all employees without seeing the actual names.

Some process mining tools (Disco and ProM) include anonymization functionality. This means that you can import your data into the process mining tool and select which data fields should be anonymized. For example, you can choose to anonymize just the Case IDs, the resource name, attribute values, or the timestamps. Then you export the anonymized data set and you can distribute it among your team for further analysis.

Do:

  • Determine which data fields are sensitive and need to be anonymized (see also the list of common process mining attributes and how they are impacted if anonymized).
  • Keep in mind that despite the anonymization certain information may still be identifiable. For example, there may be just one patient having a very rare disease, or the birthday information of your customer combined with their place of birth may narrow down the set of possible people so much that the data is not anonymous anymore.

Don’t:

  • Anonymize the data before you have cleaned your data, because after the anonymization the data cleaning may not be possible anymore. For example, imagine that slightly different customer category names are used in different regions but they actually mean the same. You would like to merge these different names in a data cleaning step. However, after you have anonymized the names as “Category 1”, “Category 2”, etc. the data cleaning cannot be done anymore.
  • Anonymize fields that do not need to be anonymized. While anonymization can help to preserve patterns in your data, you can easily lose relevant information. For example, if you anonymize the Case ID in your incident management process, then you cannot look up the ticket number of the incident in the service desk system anymore. By establishing a collaborative culture around your process mining initiative (see guideline No. 4) and by working in a responsible, goal-oriented way, you can often work openly with the original data that you have within your team.

Responsible Handling of Data – Process Mining Rule 2 of 4

This is article no. 2 of the four-part article series Privacy, Security and Ethics in Process Mining.

Read this article in German:
Datenschutz, Sicherheit und Ethik beim Process Mining – Regel 2 von 4

Like in any other data analysis technique, you must be careful with the data once you have obtained it. In many projects, nobody thinks about the data handling until it is brought up by the security department. Be that person who thinks about the appropriate level of protection and has a clear plan already prior to the collection of the data.

Do:

  • Have external parties sign a Non Disclosure Agreement (NDA) to ensure the confidentiality of the data. This holds, for example, for consultants you have hired to perform the process mining analysis for you, or for researchers who are participating in your project. Contact your legal department for this. They will have standard NDAs that you can use.
  • Make sure that the hard drive of your laptop, external hard drives, and USB sticks that you use to transfer the data and your analysis results are encrypted.

Don’t:

  • Give the data set to your co-workers before you have checked what is actually in the data. For example, it could be that the data set contains more information than you requested, or that it contains sensitive data that you did not think about. For example, the names of doctors and nurses might be mentioned in a free-text medical notes attribute. Make sure you remove or anonymize (see guideline No. 3) all sensitive data before you pass it on.
  • Upload your data to a cloud-based process mining tool without checking that your organization allows you to upload this kind of data. Instead, use a desktop-based process mining tool (like Disco [3] or ProM [4]) to analyze your data locally or get the cloud-based process mining vendor to set-up an on-premise version of their software within your organization. This is also true for cloud-based storage services like Dropbox: Don’t just store data or analysis results in the cloud even if it is convenient.

Clarify Goal of the Analysis – Process Mining Rule 1 of 4

This is article no. 1 of the four-part article series Privacy, Security and Ethics in Process Mining.

Read this article in German:
Datenschutz, Sicherheit und Ethik beim Process Mining – Regel 1 von 4

Clarify Goal of the Analysis

The good news is that in most situations Process Mining does not need to evaluate personal information, because it usually focuses on the internal organizational processes rather than, for example, on customer profiles. Furthermore, you are investigating the overall process patterns. For example, a process miner is typically looking for ways to organize the process in a smarter way to avoid unnecessary idle times rather than trying to make people work faster.

However, as soon as you would like to better understand the performance of a particular process, you often need to know more about other case attributes that could explain variations in process behaviours or performance. And people might become worried about where this will lead them.

Therefore, already at the very beginning of the process mining project, you should think about the goal of the analysis. Be clear about how the results will be used. Think about what problem are you trying to solve and what data you need to solve this problem.

Do:

  • Check whether there are legal restrictions regarding the data. For example, in Germany employee-related data cannot be used and typically simply would not be extracted in the first place. If your project relates to analyzing customer data, make sure you understand the restrictions and consider anonymization options (see guideline No. 3).
  • Consider establishing an ethical charter that states the goal of the project, including what will and what will not be done based on the analysis. For example, you can clearly state that the goal is not to evaluate the performance of the employees. Communicate to the people who are responsible for extracting the data what these goals are and ask for their assistance to prepare the data accordingly.

Don’t:

  • Start out with a fuzzy idea and simply extract all the data you can get. Instead, think about what problem are you trying to solve? And what data do you actually need to solve this problem? Your project should focus on business goals that can get the support of the process managers you work with (see guideline No. 4).
  • Make your first project too big. Instead, focus on one process with a clear goal. If you make the scope of your project too big, people might block it or work against you while they do not yet even understand what process mining can do.

Privacy, Security and Ethics in Process Mining – Article Series

When I moved to the Netherlands 12 years ago and started grocery shopping at one of the local supermarket chains, Albert Heijn, I initially resisted getting their Bonus card (a loyalty card for discounts), because I did not want the company to track my purchases. I felt that using this information would help them to manipulate me by arranging or advertising products in a way that would make me buy more than I wanted to. It simply felt wrong.

Read this article in German:
Datenschutz, Sicherheit und Ethik beim Process Mining – Artikelserie

The truth is that no data analysis technique is intrinsically good or bad. It is always in the hands of the people using the technology to make it productive and constructive. For example, while supermarkets could use the information tracked through the loyalty cards of their customers to make sure that we have to take the longest route through the store to get our typical items (passing by as many other products as possible), they can also use this information to make the shopping experience more pleasant, and to offer more products that we like.

Most companies have started to use data analysis techniques to analyze their data in one way or the other. These data analyses can bring enormous opportunities for the companies and for their customers, but with the increased use of data science the question of ethics and responsible use also grows more dominant. Initiatives like the Responsible Data Science seminar series [1] take on this topic by raising awareness and encouraging researchers to develop algorithms that have concepts like fairness, accuracy, confidentiality, and transparency built in (see Wil van der Aalst’s presentation on Responsible Data Science at Process Mining Camp 2016).

Process Mining can provide you with amazing insights about your processes, and fuel your improvement initiatives with inspiration and enthusiasm, if you approach it in the right way. But how can you ensure that you use process mining responsibly? What should you pay attention to when you introduce process mining in your own organization?

In this article series, we provide you four guidelines that you can follow to prepare your process mining analysis in a responsible way:

Part 1 of 4: Clarify the Goal of the Analysis

Part 2 of 4: Responsible Handling of Data

Part 3 of 4: Consider Anonymization

Part 4 of 4: Establish a collaborative Culture

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank Frank van Geffen and Léonard Studer, who initiated the first discussions in the workgroup around responsible process mining in 2015. Furthermore, we would like to thank Moe Wynn, Felix Mannhardt and Wil van der Aalst for their feedback on earlier versions of this article.

Datenschutz, Sicherheit und Ethik beim Process Mining – Regel 4 von 4:

Dieser Artikel ist Teil 4 von 4 aus der Reihe Datenschutz, Sicherheit und Ethik beim Process Mining.

english-flagRead this article in English:
Privacy, Security and Ethics in Process Mining – Rule 4 of 4


Schaffung einer Kooperationskultur

Möglicherweise ist der wichtigste Bestandteil bei der Schaffung eines verantwortungsbewussten Process Mining-Umfeldes der Aufbau einer Kooperationskultur innerhalb Ihrer Organisation. Process Mining kann die Fehler Ihrer Prozesse viel eindeutiger aufzeigen, als das manchen Menschen lieb ist. Daher sollten Sie Change Management-Experten miteinbeziehen wie beispielsweise Lean-Coaches, die es verstehen, Menschen dazu zu bewegen, sich gegenseitig “die Wahrheit“ zu sagen (siehe auch: Erfolgskriterien beim Process Mining).

Darüber hinaus sollten Sie vorsichtig sein, wie Sie die Ziele Ihres Process Mining-Projektes vermitteln und relevante Stakeholder so einbeziehen, dass ihre Meinung gehört wird. Ziel ist es, eine Atmosphäre zu schaffen, in der die Menschen nicht für ihre Fehler verantwortlich gemacht werden (was nur dazu führt, dass sie verbergen, was sie tun und gegen Sie arbeiten), sondern ein Umfeld zu schaffen, in dem jeder mitgenommen wird und wo die Analyse und Prozessverbesserung ein gemeinsames Ziel darstellt, für das man sich engagiert.

Was man tun sollte:

  • Vergewissern Sie sich, dass Sie die Datenqualität überprüfen, bevor Sie mit der Datenanalyse beginnen, bestenfalls durch die Einbeziehung eines Fachexperten bereits in der Datenvalidierungsphase. Auf diese Weise können Sie das Vertrauen der Prozessmanager stärken, dass die Daten widerspiegeln, was tatsächlich passiert und sicherstellen, dass Sie verstanden haben, was die Daten darstellen.
  • Arbeiten Sie auf iterative Weise und präsentieren Sie Ihre Ergebnisse als Ausgangspunkt einer Diskussion bei jeder Iteration. Geben Sie allen Beteiligten die Möglichkeit zu erklären, warum bestimmte Dinge geschehen und seien Sie offen für zusätzliche Fragen (die in der nächsten Iteration aufgegriffen werden). Dies wird dazu beitragen, die Qualität und Relevanz Ihrer Analyse zu verbessern, als auch das Vertrauen der Prozessverantwortlichen in die endgültigen Projektergebnisse zu erhöhen.

Was man nicht tun sollte:

  • Voreilige Schlüsse ziehen. Sie können nie davon ausgehen, dass Sie alles über den Prozess wissen. Zum Beispiel können langsamere Teams die schwierigen Fälle behandeln, es kann gute Gründe geben, von dem Standardprozess abzuweichen und Sie sehen möglicherweise nicht alles in den Daten (beispielsweise Vorgänge, die außerhalb des Systems durchgeführt werden). Indem Sie konstant Ihre Beobachtungen als Ausgangspunkt für Diskussionen anbringen und den Menschen die Möglichkeit einräumen, Ihre Erfahrung und Interpretationen mitzugeben, beginnen Sie, Vertrauen und die Kooperationskultur aufzubauen, die Process Mining braucht.
  • Schlussfolgerungen erzwingen, die ihren Erwartungen entsprechen oder die sie haben möchten, indem Sie die Daten falsch darstellen (oder Dinge darstellen, die nicht wirklich durch die Daten unterstützt werden). Führen Sie stattdessen ganz genau Buch über die Schritte, die Sie bei der Datenaufbereitung und in Ihrer Process-Mining-Analyse ausgeführt haben. Wenn Zweifel an der Gültigkeit bestehen oder es Fragen zu Ihrer Analysebasis gibt, dann können Sie stets zurückkehren und beispielsweise zeigen, welche Filter bei den Daten angewendet wurden, um zu der bestimmten Prozesssicht zu gelangen, die Sie vorstellen.

Events

Nothing Found

Sorry, no posts matched your criteria