Language Detecting with sklearn by determining Letter Frequencies

Of course, there are better and more efficient methods to detect the language of a given text than counting its lettes. On the other hand this is a interesting little example to show the impressing ability of todays machine learning algorithms to detect hidden patterns in a given set of data.

For example take the sentence:

“Ceci est une phrase française.”

It’s not to hard to figure out that this sentence is french. But the (lowercase) letters of the same sentence in a random order look like this:

“eeasrsçneticuaicfhenrpaes”

Still sure it’s french? Regarding the fact that this string contains the letter “ç” some people could have remembered long passed french lessons back in school and though might have guessed right. But beside the fact that the french letter “ç” is also present for example in portuguese, turkish, catalan and a few other languages, this is still a easy example just to explain the problem. Just try to guess which language might have generated this:

“ogldviisnntmeyoiiesettpetorotrcitglloeleiengehorntsnraviedeenltseaecithooheinsnstiofwtoienaoaeefiitaeeauobmeeetdmsflteightnttxipecnlgtetgteyhatncdisaceahrfomseehmsindrlttdthoaranthahdgasaebeaturoehtrnnanftxndaeeiposttmnhgttagtsheitistrrcudf”

While this looks simply confusing to the human eye and it seems practically impossible to determine the language it was generated from, this string still contains as set of hidden but well defined patterns from which the language could be predictet with almost complete (ca. 98-99%) certainty.

First of all, we need a set of texts in the languages our model should be able to recognise. Luckily with the package NLTK there comes a big set of example texts which actually are protocolls of the european parliament and therefor are publicly availible in 11 differen languages:

  •  Danish
  •  Dutch
  •  English
  •  Finnish
  •  French
  •  German
  •  Greek
  •  Italian
  •  Portuguese
  •  Spanish
  •  Swedish

Because the greek version is not written with the latin alphabet, the detection of the language greek would just be too simple, so we stay with the other 10 languages availible. To give you a idea of the used texts, here is a little sample:

“Resumption of the session I declare resumed the session of the European Parliament adjourned on Friday 17 December 1999, and I would like once again to wish you a happy new year in the hope that you enjoyed a pleasant festive period.
Although, as you will have seen, the dreaded ‘millennium bug’ failed to materialise, still the people in a number of countries suffered a series of natural disasters that truly were dreadful.”

Train and Test

The following code imports the nessesary modules and reads the sample texts from a set of text files into a pandas.Dataframe object and prints some statistics about the read texts:

Above you see a sample set of random rows of the created Dataframe. After removing very short text snipplets (less than 200 chars) we are left with 56481 snipplets. The function clean_eutextdf() then creates a lower case representation of the texts in the coloum ‘ltext’ to facilitate counting the chars in the next step.
The following code snipplet now extracs the features – in this case the relative frequency of each letter in every text snipplet – that are used for prediction:

Now that we have calculated the features for every text snipplet in our dataset, we can split our data set in a train and test set:

After doing that, we can train a k-nearest-neigbours classifier and test it to get the percentage of correctly predicted languages in the test data set. Because we do not know what value for k may be the best choice, we just run the training and testing with different values for k in a for loop:

As you can see in the output the reliability of the language classifier is generally very high: It starts at about 97.5% for k = 1, increases for with increasing values of k until it reaches a maximum level of about 98.5% at k ≈ 10.

Using the Classifier to predict languages of texts

Now that we have trained and tested the classifier we want to use it to predict the language of example texts. To do that we need two more functions, shown in the following piece of code. The first one extracts the nessesary features from the sample text and predict_lang() predicts the language of a the texts:

With this classifier it is now also possible to predict the language of the randomized example snipplet from the introduction (which is acutally created from the first paragraph of this article):

The KNN classifier of sklearn also offers the possibility to predict the propability with which a given classification is made. While the probability distribution for a specific language is relativly clear for long sample texts it decreases noticeably the shorter the texts are.

Background and Insights

Why does a relative simple model like counting letters acutally work? Every language has a specific pattern of letter frequencies which can be used as a kind of fingerprint: While there are almost no y‘s in the german language this letter is quite common in english. In french the letter k is not very common because it is replaced with q in most cases.

For a better understanding look at the output of the following code snipplet where only three letters already lead to a noticable form of clustering:

 

Even though every single letter frequency by itself is not a very reliable indicator, the set of frequencies of all present letters in a text is a quite good evidence because it will more or less represent the letter frequency fingerprint of the given language. Since it is quite hard to imagine or visualize the above plot in more than three dimensions, I used a little trick which shows that every language has its own typical fingerprint of letter frequencies:

What more?

Beside the fact, that letter frequencies alone, allow us to predict the language of every example text (at least in the 10 languages with latin alphabet we trained for) with almost complete certancy there is even more information hidden in the set of sample texts.

As you might know, most languages in europe belong to either the romanian or the indogermanic language family (which is actually because the romans conquered only half of europe). The border between them could be located in belgium, between france and germany and in swiss. West of this border the romanian languages, which originate from latin, are still spoken, like spanish, portouguese and french. In the middle and northern part of europe the indogermanic languages are very common like german, dutch, swedish ect. If we plot the analysed languages with a different colour sheme this border gets quite clear and allows us to take a look back in history that tells us where our languages originate from:

As you can see the more common letters, especially the vocals like a, e, i, o and u have almost the same frequency in all of this languages. Far more interesting are letters like q, k, c and w: While k is quite common in all of the indogermanic languages it is quite rare in romanic languages because the same sound is written with the letters q or c.
As a result it could be said, that even “boring” sets of data (just give it a try and read all the texts of the protocolls of the EU parliament…) could contain quite interesting patterns which – in this case – allows us to predict quite precisely which language a given text sample is written in, without the need of any translation program or to speak the languages. And as an interesting side effect, where certain things in history happend (or not happend): After two thousand years have passed, modern machine learning techniques could easily uncover this history because even though all these different languages developed, they still have a set of hidden but common patterns that since than stayed the same.

Einstieg in Natural Language Processing – Teil 2: Preprocessing von Rohtext mit Python

Dies ist der zweite Artikel der Artikelserie Einstieg in Natural Language Processing.

In diesem Artikel wird das so genannte Preprocessing von Texten behandelt, also Schritte die im Bereich des NLP in der Regel vor eigentlichen Textanalyse durchgeführt werden.

Tokenizing

Um eingelesenen Rohtext in ein Format zu überführen, welches in der späteren Analyse einfacher ausgewertet werden kann, sind eine ganze Reihe von Schritten notwendig. Ganz allgemein besteht der erste Schritt darin, den auszuwertenden Text in einzelne kurze Abschnitte – so genannte Tokens – zu zerlegen (außer man bastelt sich völlig eigene Analyseansätze, wie zum Beispiel eine Spracherkennung anhand von Buchstabenhäufigkeiten ect.).

Was genau ein Token ist, hängt vom verwendeten Tokenizer ab. So bringt NLTK bereits standardmäßig unter anderem BlankLine-, Line-, Sentence-, Word-, Wordpunkt- und SpaceTokenizer mit, welche Text entsprechend in Paragraphen, Zeilen, Sätze, Worte usw. aufsplitten. Weiterhin ist mit dem RegexTokenizer ein Tool vorhanden, mit welchem durch Wahl eines entsprechenden Regulären Ausdrucks beliebig komplexe eigene Tokenizer erstellt werden können.

Üblicherweise wird ein Text (evtl. nach vorherigem Aufsplitten in Paragraphen oder Sätze) schließlich in einzelne Worte und Interpunktionen (Satzzeichen) aufgeteilt. Hierfür kann, wie im folgenden Beispiel z. B. der WordTokenizer oder die diesem entsprechende Funktion word_tokenize() verwendet werden.

Stemming & Lemmatizing

Andere häufig durchgeführte Schritte sind Stemming sowie Lemmatizing. Hierbei werden die Suffixe der einzelnen Tokens des Textes mit Hilfe eines Stemmers in eine Form überführt, welche nur den Wortstamm zurücklässt. Dies hat den Zweck verschiedene grammatikalische Formen des selben Wortes (welche sich oft in ihrer Endung unterscheiden (ich gehe, du gehst, er geht, wir gehen, …) ununterscheidbar zu machen. Diese würden sonst als mehrere unabhängige Worte in die darauf folgende Analyse eingehen.

Neben bereits fertigen Stemmern bietet NLTK auch für diesen Schritt die Möglichkeit sich eigene Stemmer zu programmieren. Da verschiedene Stemmer Suffixe nach unterschiedlichen Regeln entfernen, sind nur die Wortstämme miteinander vergleichbar, welche mit dem selben Stemmer generiert wurden!

Im forlgenden Beispiel werden verschiedene vordefinierte Stemmer aus dem Paket NLTK auf den bereits oben verwendeten Beispielsatz angewendet und die Ergebnisse der gestemmten Tokens in einer Art einfachen Tabelle ausgegeben:

Sehr ähnlich den Stemmern arbeiten Lemmatizer: Auch ihre Aufgabe ist es aus verschiedenen Formen eines Wortes die jeweilige Grundform zu bilden. Im Unterschied zu den Stemmern ist das Lemma eines Wortes jedoch klar als dessen Grundform definiert.

Vokabular

Auch das Vokabular, also die Menge aller verschiedenen Worte eines Textes, ist eine informative Kennzahl. Bezieht man die Größe des Vokabulars eines Textes auf seine gesamte Anzahl verwendeter Worte, so lassen sich hiermit Aussagen zu der Diversität des Textes machen.

Außerdem kann das auftreten bestimmter Worte später bei der automatischen Einordnung in Kategorien wichtig werden: Will man beispielsweise Nachrichtenmeldungen nach Themen kategorisieren und in einem Text tritt das Wort „DAX“ auf, so ist es deutlich wahrscheinlicher, dass es sich bei diesem Text um eine Meldung aus dem Finanzbereich handelt, als z. B. um das „Kochrezept des Tages“.

Dies mag auf den ersten Blick trivial erscheinen, allerdings können auch mit einfachen Modellen, wie dem so genannten „Bag-of-Words-Modell“, welches nur die Anzahl des Auftretens von Worten prüft, bereits eine Vielzahl von Informationen aus Texten gewonnen werden.

Das reine Vokabular eines Textes, welcher in der Variable “rawtext” gespeichert ist, kann wie folgt in der Variable “vocab” gespeichert werden. Auf die Ausgabe wurde in diesem Fall verzichtet, da diese im Falle des oben als Beispiel gewählten Satzes den einzelnen Tokens entspricht, da kein Wort öfter als ein Mal vorkommt.

Stopwords

Unter Stopwords werden Worte verstanden, welche zwar sehr häufig vorkommen, jedoch nur wenig Information zu einem Text beitragen. Beispiele in der beutschen Sprache sind: der, und, aber, mit, …

Sowohl NLTK als auch cpaCy bringen vorgefertigte Stopwordsets mit. 

Vorsicht: NLTK besitzt eine Stopwordliste, welche erst in ein Set umgewandelt werden sollte um die lookup-Zeiten kurz zu halten – schließlich muss jedes einzelne Token des Textes auf das vorhanden sein in der Stopworditerable getestet werden!

POS-Tagging

POS-Tagging steht für „Part of Speech Tagging“ und entspricht ungefähr den Aufgaben, die man noch aus dem Deutschunterricht kennt: „Unterstreiche alle Subjekte rot, alle Objekte blau…“. Wichtig ist diese Art von Tagging insbesondere, wenn man später tatsächlich strukturiert Informationen aus dem Text extrahieren möchte, da man hierfür wissen muss wer oder was als Subjekt mit wem oder was als Objekt interagiert.

Obwohl genau die selben Worte vorkommen, bedeutet der Satz „Die Katze frisst die Maus.“ etwas anderes als „Die Maus frisst die Katze.“, da hier Subjekt und Objekt aufgrund ihrer Reihenfolge vertauscht sind (Stichwort: Subjekt – Prädikat – Objekt ).

Weniger wichtig ist dieser Schritt bei der Kategorisierung von Dokumenten. Insbesondere bei dem bereits oben erwähnten Bag-of-Words-Modell, fließen POS-Tags überhaupt nicht mit ein.

Und weil es so schön einfach ist: Die obigen Schritte mit spaCy

Die obigen Methoden und Arbeitsschritte, welche Texte die in natürlicher Sprache geschrieben sind, allgemein computerzugänglicher und einfacher auswertbar machen, können beliebig genau den eigenen Wünschen angepasst, einzeln mit dem Paket NLTK durchgeführt werden. Dies zumindest einmal gemacht zu haben, erweitert das Verständnis für die funktionsweise einzelnen Schritte und insbesondere deren manchmal etwas versteckten Komplexität. (Wie muss beispielsweise ein Tokenizer funktionieren der den Satz “Schwierig ist z. B. dieser Satz.” korrekt in nur einen Satz aufspaltet, anstatt ihn an jedem Punkt welcher an einem Wortende auftritt in insgesamt vier Sätze aufzuspalten, von denen einer nur aus einem Leerzeichen besteht?) Hier soll nun aber, weil es so schön einfach ist, auch das analoge Vorgehen mit dem Paket spaCy beschrieben werden:

Dieser kurze Codeabschnitt liest den an spaCy übergebenen Rohtext in ein spaCy Doc-Object ein und führt dabei automatisch bereits alle oben beschriebenen sowie noch eine Reihe weitere Operationen aus. So stehen neben dem immer noch vollständig gespeicherten Originaltext, die einzelnen Sätze, Worte, Lemmas, Noun-Chunks, Named Entities, Part-of-Speech-Tags, ect. direkt zur Verfügung und können.über die Methoden des Doc-Objektes erreicht werden. Des weiteren liegen auch verschiedene weitere Objekte wie beispielsweise Vektoren zur Bestimmung von Dokumentenähnlichkeiten bereits fertig vor.

Die Folgende Übersicht soll eine kurze (aber noch lange nicht vollständige) Übersicht über die automatisch von spaCy generierten Objekte und Methoden zur Textanalyse geben:

Diese „Vollautomatisierung“ der Vorabschritte zur Textanalyse hat jedoch auch seinen Preis: spaCy geht nicht gerade sparsam mit Ressourcen wie Rechenleistung und Arbeitsspeicher um. Will man einen oder einige Texte untersuchen so ist spaCy oft die einfachste und schnellste Lösung für das Preprocessing. Anders sieht es aber beispielsweise aus, wenn eine bestimmte Analyse wie zum Beispiel die Einteilung in verschiedene Textkategorien auf eine sehr große Anzahl von Texten angewendet werden soll. In diesem Fall, sollte man in Erwägung ziehen auf ressourcenschonendere Alternativen wie zum Beispiel gensim auszuweichen.

Wer beim lesen genau aufgepasst hat, wird festgestellt haben, dass ich im Abschnitt POS-Tagging im Gegensatz zu den anderen Abschnitten auf ein kurzes Codebeispiel verzichtet habe. Dies möchte ich an dieser Stelle nachholen und dabei gleich eine Erweiterung des Pakets spaCy vorstellen: displaCy.

Displacy bietet die Möglichkeit, sich Zusammenhänge und Eigenschaften von Texten wie Named Entities oder eben POS-Tagging graphisch im Browser anzeigen zu lassen.

Nach ausführen des obigen Codes erhält man eine Ausgabe die wie folgt aussieht:

Nun öffnet man einen Browser und ruft die URL ‘http://127.0.0.1:5000’ auf (Achtung: localhost anstatt der IP funktioniert – warum auch immer – mit displacy nicht). Im Browser sollte nun eine Seite mit einem SVG-Bild geladen werden, welches wie folgt aussieht

Die Abbildung macht deutlich was POS-Tagging genau ist und warum es von Nutzen sein kann wenn man Informationen aus einem Text extrahieren will. Jedem Word (Token) ist eine Wortart zugeordnet und die Beziehung der einzelnen Worte durch Pfeile dargestellt. Dies ermöglicht es dem Computer zum Beispiel in dem Satzteil “der grüne Apfel”, das Adjektiv “grün” auf das Nomen “Apfel” zu beziehen und diesem somit als Eigenschaft zuzuordnen.

Nachdem dieser Artikel wichtige Schritte des Preprocessing von Texten beschrieben hat, geht es im nächsten Artikel darum was man an Texten eigentlich analysieren kann und welche Analysemöglichkeiten die verschiedenen für Python vorhandenen Module bieten.

How To Remotely Send R and Python Execution to SQL Server from Jupyter Notebooks

Introduction

Did you know that you can execute R and Python code remotely in SQL Server from Jupyter Notebooks or any IDE? Machine Learning Services in SQL Server eliminates the need to move data around. Instead of transferring large and sensitive data over the network or losing accuracy on ML training with sample csv files, you can have your R/Python code execute within your database. You can work in Jupyter Notebooks, RStudio, PyCharm, VSCode, Visual Studio, wherever you want, and then send function execution to SQL Server bringing intelligence to where your data lives.

This tutorial will show you an example of how you can send your python code from Juptyter notebooks to execute within SQL Server. The same principles apply to R and any other IDE as well. If you prefer to learn through videos, this tutorial is also published on YouTube here:


 

Environment Setup Prerequisites

  1. Install ML Services on SQL Server

In order for R or Python to execute within SQL, you first need the Machine Learning Services feature installed and configured. See this how-to guide.

  1. Install RevoscalePy via Microsoft’s Python Client

In order to send Python execution to SQL from Jupyter Notebooks, you need to use Microsoft’s RevoscalePy package. To get RevoscalePy, download and install Microsoft’s ML Services Python Client. Documentation Page or Direct Download Link (for Windows).

After downloading, open powershell as an administrator and navigate to the download folder. Start the installation with this command (feel free to customize the install folder): .\Install-PyForMLS.ps1 -InstallFolder “C:\Program Files\MicrosoftPythonClient”

Be patient while the installation can take a little while. Once installed navigate to the new path you installed in. Let’s make an empty folder and open Jupyter Notebooks: mkdir JupyterNotebooks; cd JupyterNotebooks; ..\Scripts\jupyter-notebook

Create a new notebook with the Python 3 interpreter:

 

To test if everything is setup, import revoscalepy in the first cell and execute. If there are no error messages you are ready to move forward.

Database Setup (Required for this tutorial only)

For the rest of the tutorial you can clone this Jupyter Notebook from Github if you don’t want to copy paste all of the code. This database setup is a one time step to ensure you have the same data as this tutorial. You don’t need to perform any of these setup steps to use your own data.

  1. Create a database

Modify the connection string for your server and use pyodbc to create a new database.

  1. Import Iris sample from SkLearn

Iris is a popular dataset for beginner data science tutorials. It is included by default in sklearn package.

  1. Use RecoscalePy APIs to create a table and load the Iris data

(You can also do this with pyodbc, sqlalchemy or other packages)

Define a Function to Send to SQL Server

Write any python code you want to execute in SQL. In this example we are creating a scatter matrix on the iris dataset and only returning the bytestream of the .png back to Jupyter Notebooks to render on our client.

Send execution to SQL

Now that we are finally set up, check out how easy sending remote execution really is! First, import revoscalepy. Create a sql_compute_context, and then send the execution of any function seamlessly to SQL Server with RxExec. No raw data had to be transferred from SQL to the Jupyter Notebook. All computation happened within the database and only the image file was returned to be displayed.

While this example is trivial with the Iris dataset, imagine the additional scale, performance, and security capabilities that you now unlocked. You can use any of the latest open source R/Python packages to build Deep Learning and AI applications on large amounts of data in SQL Server. We also offer leading edge, high-performance algorithms in Microsoft’s RevoScaleR and RevoScalePy APIs. Using these with the latest innovations in the open source world allows you to bring unparalleled selection, performance, and scale to your applications.

Learn More

Check out SQL Machine Learning Services Documentation to learn how you can easily deploy your R/Python code with SQL stored procedures making them accessible in your ETL processes or to any application. Train and store machine learning models in your database bringing intelligence to where your data lives.

Other YouTube Tutorials:

Analyse der Netzwerktopologie des Internets auf Basis des IPv4-Protokolls

Wie kommen Daten die man via Internet quer durch die Welt sendet eigentlich an ihr Ziel? Welchen Weg nehmen beispielsweise die Datenpakete, wenn ich von mir zu Hause eine Datei an meinen Nachbarn ein Haus weiter sende? Wie groß ist der “Umweg”, den die Daten nehmen? Und macht es eigentlich einen Unterschied, ob ich www.google.de, www.google.com oder www.google.nl aufrufe, oder gehen alle Suchanfragen sowieso an dasselbe Ziel?

Fragen wie diese lassen sich durch eine Kombination von Tools wie traceroute oder tracepath und geoiplookup beantworten und unter Verwendung des Python-Paketes geoplotlib sogar graphisch auf einer Weltkarte darstellen. Die so gewonnenen Ergebnisse zeigen Teile der Netzwerktopologie des Internets auf und führen zu interessanten, teils unerwarteten Erkenntnissen.

Ziel dieses Artikels soll sein, ein möglichst einfaches Tutorial zum selber mitbasteln bereit zu stellen. Die einzelnen Schritte die hierfür notwendig sind, werden möglichst einfach verständlich dargestellt und erklärt, trotzdem sind zum vollständigen Verständnis grundlegende Kenntnisse in Python sowie der Kommandozeile hilfreich. Er richtet sich aber auch an alle, die sich einfach einmal etwas in ihrer virtuellen Umgebung „umschauen“ möchten oder einfach nur an den Ergebnissen interessiert sind, ohne sich mit den Details und wie diese umgesetzt werden, auseinander setzen zu wollen.  Am Ende des Artikels werden die einzelnen Skripte des Projekts als zip-Datei bereitgestellt.

Hinweis: Diese Anleitung bezieht sich auf ein Linux-System und wurde unter Ubuntu getestet. Windows-User können beispielsweise mit dem Befehl tracert (als Ersatz für traceroute) ähnliche Ergebnisse erziehlen, jedoch muss dann das Parsing der IP-Adressen abgeändert werden.

1. Grundsätzliches Erkunden der Route, die ein Datenpaket nimmt

Hierfür wird ein Programm wie traceroute, tracepath oder nmap benötigt, welches durch Versenden von „abgelaufenen Datenpaketen“ die Hosts „auf dem Weg“ zum Ziel dazu bringt, ihre IPv4-Adresse zurück zu geben. In diesem Artikel wird beispielhaft traceroute verwendet, da dieses unter den meisten Linux-Versionen bereits zur „Grundausstattung“ gehört und somit für diesen Schritt keine weitere Software installiert werden muss. Die Verwendung von traceroute folgt der Syntax:

Als Ziel muss hier die IP-Adresse bzw. der Domainname des Zielrechners angegeben werden. Ein Beispiel soll dies vereinfachen:

Im Beispiel wird die Route zum Hostrechner mit der Domain www.google.de ermittelt. In der ersten Spalte der Ausgabe ist die Nummer des jeweiligen „Hops“ zu sehen. Wichtig ist insbesondere die zweite Spalte, welche die IPv4-Adresse des jeweiligen Rechners auf dem Weg zum Ziel darstellt. Die folgenden Spalten enthalten weitere Informationen wie Antwortzeiten der jeweiligen Server und die IP-Adressen der Folge-Server.

Um die Ausgabe in eine Form umzuwandeln, welche später einfacher von Python gelesen werden kann, muss diese noch ausgelesen werden (Parsing). zuerst soll die erste Zeile der Ausgabe herausgeschnitten werden, da diese zwar informativ, jedoch kein Teil der eigentlichen Route ist. Dies kann sehr einfach durchgeführt werden, indem die Ausgabe des traceroute-Befehls an einen Befehl wie beispielsweise sed „gepiped“ (also weitergeleitet) wird. Die dabei entstehende Pipe sieht dann wie folgt aus:

Um bei unserem Beispiel mit der Route zu www.google.de zu bleiben, sieht der Befehl und die Entsprechende Ausgabe wie folgt aus:

Anschließend soll die zweite Spalte der Ausgabe herausgeschnitten werden. Dies ist am einfachsten mit dem Befehl awk zu bewerkstelligen. Das Prinzip dahinter ist das gleiche wie im obigen Schritt: die Ausgabe des vorherigen Befehls wird dem Befehl awk als Eingabe weitergeleitet, womit der gesamte Befehl nun wie folgt aussieht:

Bezogen auf das google-Beispiel sehen Ein- und Ausgabe nun so aus:

Im letzten Schritt sollen die einzelnen IP-Adressen durch Leerzeichen getrennt in eine einzelne Zeile geschrieben werden. Sinn dieses Schrittes ist, dass später viele Zielrechner nacheinander aus einer Datei eingelesen werden können und jede Route zu einem Zielrechner als eine einzelne Zeile in eine Zieldatei geschrieben wird.
Auch dieser Schritt funktioniert ähnlich wie die obigen Schritte, indem die Ausgabe des letzten Schrittes an einen weiteren Befehl weitergeleitet wird, der diese Funktion erfüllt. Dieser Schritt könnte wieder mit dem Befehl sed durchgeführt werden, da aber nur ein einzelnes Zeichen (nämlich das Zeilenumbruch-Zeichen bzw. Newline) durch ein Leerzeichen ersetzt werden soll, wird hier aufgrund der einfacheren Syntax der Befehl tr verwendet.
Der fertige Befehl sieht nun wie folgt aus:

Oder im fertigen Beispiel mit www.google.de:

Hiermit ist das Parsen abgeschlossen und die fertige Ausgabe kann nun in eine Ergebnisdatei geschrieben werden. Um automatisch viele Zielrechner aus einer Datei einzulesen und alle gefundenen Routen in eine Zieldatei zu schreiben, wird der obige Befehl in eine Schleife „verpackt“ welche die Zielrechner Zeile für Zeile aus der Datei zieladressen.txt ausliest und die gefundenen Routen ebenso Zeile für Zeile in die Datei routen.csv schreibt. Die Datei routen.csv kann später zur Ermittlung verschiedener Informationen zu den gefunden IP-Adressen einfach mit einem Python-Skript eingelesen und geparst werden.

In diesem Artikel wird das fertige Skript ohne weitere Erklärung in der beiliegenden zip-Datei bereitgestellt. Wen die genaue Funktionsweise der Schleife interessiert, sei angehalten sich generell über die Funktionsweise von Shellskripten einzulesen, da dies den Rahmen des Artikels sprengen würde.

Dieses Skript benötigt die Datei zieladressen.txt welche wie folgt aussehen muss (anstatt Domainnamen können auch direkt IPv4-Adressen verwendet werden):

2. Sammeln von (Geo-)Informationen zu bestimmten IPv4-Adressen

Die gefundenen IPv4-Adressen können anschließend mit dem Befehl geoiplookup oder über die Internetseite http://geoiplookup.net/ relativ genau (meißtens auf Städteniveau) lokalisiert werden. Dies funktioniert, da einzelne Subnets in der Regel bestimmten Regionen und Internetprovidern zugeordnet sind.

Der Befehl geoiplookup greift hierbei auf eine vorher installierte und lokal gespeicherte Datenbank zu, welche je nach installierter Version als Country- oder City-Edition vorliegt. Da geoiplookup nicht zu den Standartbordmitteln unter Linux gehört und um die weiteren Schritte auch Benutzern anderer Betriebssysteme zu ermöglichen, wird hier nur ein kurzes Beispiel der Benutzung dieses Befehls und dessen Ausgabe gegeben und im weiteren die Online-Abfrage mittels eines Python-Skriptes beschrieben.

Die Internetseite http://geoiplookup.net bietet einen Onlineservice welcher Geo- und weitere Informationen zu gegebenen IPv4-Adressen bereitstellt. Öffnet man die Seite ohne Angabe einer IP-Adresse in einem Browser, so erhält man die entsprechenden Informationen über die eigene IP-Adresse. (Achtung: die Verwendung eines Proxies oder gar Tor führt zwangsläufig zu falschen Ergebnissen.)

Da die Seite auch über eine API (also eine automatisierte Abfrageschnittstelle) unter der Adresse “http://api.geoiplookup.net/?query=${IPADRESSE}” verfügt, kann man die entsprechenden Informationen zu den IP-Adressen mittels eines Pythonskriptes abfragen und auswerten. Als Antwort erhält man eine XML‑Datei welche beispielsweise folgendermaßen aussieht:

Diese kann im Browser z. B. unter der Adresse http://api.geoiplookup.net/?query=77.20.253.87 aufgerufen werden (oder unter: http://api.geoiplookup.net/ für die eigene Adresse).

Um die hierin enthaltenen Informationen mit Hilfe von Python auszulesen lässt sich ElementTree aus aus dem Modul xml.etree, das in der Python-Standartbibliothek vorhanden ist, verwenden. Dies wird im beiliegenden Skript mit der Funktion get_hostinfo() bewerkstelligt:

Diese parst die XML-Datei automatisch zu einem Python-DefaultDict das dann die entsprechenden Informationen enthält (das DefaultDict wird verwendet da normale Python Dictionaries zu Fehlern führen, wenn nicht gesetzte Werte abgefragt werden). Die Ausgabe der Funktion sieht dann wie folgt aus:

3. Plotten der gefundenen Routen mit geoplotlib auf einer Weltkarte

Wichtig für das anschließende Plotten ist hierbei die Geolocation also ‘latitude’ und ‘longitude’. Mit den Werten kann man anschließend die mit traceroute gefundenen Pfade als Basemap plotten. Dies funktioniert mit der Funktion drawroutes2map():

Der Plot einer Verbindungsanfrage an www.google.de aus Berlin sieht beispielsweise folgendermaßen aus:

Hier wird deutlich, dass Datenpakete durchaus nicht immer den kürzesten Weg nehmen, sondern teilweise rund um die Welt gesendet werden (Deutschland – USA – Sydney(!) – USA), bevor sie an ihrem Ziel ankommen und dass das Ziel einer Verbindung zu einer Domain mit der Endung „de“ nicht unbedingt in Deutschland liegen muss.

Mit Default-Einstellungen werden von der Funktion drawroutes2map() alle Routen in zufälligen Farben geplottet, welche in der Datei routen.csv gefunden werden.

Lässt man viele Routen plotten wird hierbei die Netzwerkstruktur deutlich, über die die Daten im Internet verteilt werden. Auf dem obigen Plot kann man recht gut erkennen, dass die meisten Internetseiten in Europa oder den USA gehostet werden, einige noch in China und Japan, dagegen beispielsweise Afrika praktisch unbedeutend ist.

Auf dem nächsten Plot wiederum ist zu erkennen, dass es tatsächlich eine Art “Hotspots” gibt über die fast alle Daten laufen, wie z. B. Frankfurt am Main, Zürich und Madrid.

4. Schematische Darstellung der Routen als directed Graph mit graphviz

Mit graphviz lassen sich schematische Graphen darstellen. Mit dem Paket pygraphviz existiert hiefür auch eine Python-Anbindung. Die schematische Darstellung als Graph ist in vielen Fällen deutlich übersichtlicher als die Darstellung auf einer Weltkarte und die Topologie des Netzwerkes wird besser sichtbar.

Die entsprechende Python-Funktion, die alle Routen aus der Datei routes.csv als geplotteten Graph ausgibt ist drawroutes2graph():

Die Funktion schreibt den erstellten Graph in der Dot-Language in die Datei routes.dot und erstellt zwei verschiedene visuelle Darstellungen als png-Dateien.

Da mit der Funktion get_hostinfo() auch weitere Informationen zu den jeweiligen IP-Adressen verfügbar sind  können diese auch visuell im Graph dargestellt werden. So sind in der folgenden Darstellung Hosts in verschiedenen Ländern in unterschiedlichen Farben dargestellt. (Deutschland in grün, USA in rot, Spanien in gelb, Schweiz in blau, China in magenta und alle übrigen Länder und Hosts ohne Länderinformation in schwarz).

Diese Art der Darstellung vereint damit die Vorteile der schematischen Darstellung mit der Geoinformation zu den jeweiligen Hosts. Aus der Grafik lässt sich beispielsweise sehr gut erkennen, dass, trotz oft vieler Zwischenstationen innerhalb eines Landes, Landesgrenzen überschreitende Verbindungen relativ selten sind.

Auch interessant ist, dass das Netzwerk durchaus Maschen aufweist – mit anderen Worten: Dass ein und dieselbe Station bei verschiedenen Verbindungsanfragen über verschiedene Zwischenstationen angesprochen wird und Daten, die von Punkt A nach Punkt B gesendet werden, nicht immer denselben Weg nehmen.

5. Schlussfolgerung

Was kann man hieraus denn nun letztendlich an Erkenntnissen ziehen? Zum einen natürlich, wie Daten via Internet über viele Zwischenstationen rund um die Welt gesendet und hierbei mit jeder Station neu sortiert werden. Vor allem aber auch, dass mit dem entsprechenden Know-How und etwas Kreativität mit bemerkenswert wenig Code bereits Unmengen an Daten gesammelt, geordnet und ausgewertet werden können. Alle möglichen Daten werden in unserer heutigen Welt gespeichert und sind zu einem nicht unbeträchtlichen Teil auch für jeden, der weiß, wer diese Daten hat oder wie man sie selber ermitteln kann, verfügbar und oft lassen sich hier interessante Einblicke in die Funktionsweise unserer Welt gewinnen.

Aika: Ein semantisches neuronales Netzwerk

Wenn es darum geht Informationen aus natürlichsprachigen Texten zu extrahieren, stehen einem verschiedene Möglichkeiten zur Verfügung. Eine der ältesten und wohl auch am häufigsten genutzten Möglichkeiten ist die der regulären Ausdrücke. Hier werden exakte Muster definiert und in einem Textstring gematcht. Probleme bereiten diese allerdings, wenn kompliziertere semantische Muster gefunden werden sollen oder wenn verschiedene Muster aufeinander aufbauen oder miteinander interagieren sollen. Gerade das ist aber der Normalfall bei der Verarbeitung von natürlichem Text. Muster hängen voneinander ab, verstärken oder unterdrücken sich gegenseitig.
Prädestiniert um solche Beziehungen abzubilden wären eigentlich künstliche neuronale Netze. Diese haben nur das große Manko, dass sie keine strukturierten Informationen verarbeiten können. Neuronale Netze bringen von sich aus keine Möglichkeit mit, die relationalen Beziehungen zwischen Worten oder Phrasen zu verarbeiten. Ein weiteres Problem neuronaler Netze ist die Verarbeitung von Feedback-Schleifen, bei denen einzelne Neuronen von sich selbst abhängig sind. Genau diese Probleme versucht der Aika Algorithmus (www.aika-software.org) zu lösen.

Der Aika Algorithmus ist als Open Source Java-Bibliothek implementiert und dient dazu semantische Informationen in Texten zu erkennen und zu verarbeiten. Da semantische Informationen sehr häufig mehrdeutig sind, erzeugt die Bibliothek für jede dieser Bedeutungen eine eigene Interpretation und wählt zum Schluss die am höchsten gewichtete aus. Aika kombiniert dazu aktuelle Ideen und Konzepte aus den Bereichen des maschinellen Lernens und der künstlichen Intelligenz, wie etwa künstliche neuronale Netze, Frequent Pattern Mining und die auf formaler Logik basierenden Expertensysteme. Aika basiert auf der heute gängigen Architektur eines künstlichen neuronalen Netzwerks (KNN) und nutzt diese, um sprachliche Regeln und semantische Beziehungen abzubilden.

Die Knackpunkte: relationale Struktur und zyklische Abhängigkeiten

Das erste Problem: Texte haben eine von Grund auf relationale Struktur. Die einzelnen Worte stehen über ihre Reihenfolge in einer ganz bestimmten Beziehung zueinander. Gängige Methoden, um Texte für die Eingabe in ein KNN auszuflachen, sind beispielsweise Bag-of-Words oder Sliding-Window. Mittlerweile haben sich auch rekurrente neuronale Netze etabliert, die das gesamte Netz in einer Schleife für jedes Wort des Textes mehrfach hintereinander schalten. Aika geht hier allerdings einen anderen Weg. Aika propagiert die relationalen Informationen, also den Textbereich und die Wortposition, gemeinsam mit den Aktivierungen durch das Netzwerk. Die gesamte relationale Struktur des Textes bleibt also erhalten und lässt sich jederzeit zur weiteren Verarbeitung nutzen.

Das zweite Problem ist, dass bei der Verarbeitung von Text häufig nicht klar ist, in welcher Reihenfolge einzelne Informationen verarbeitet werden müssen. Wenn wir beispielsweise den Namen „August Schneider“ betrachten, können sowohl der Vor- als auch der Nachname in einem anderen Zusammenhang eine völlig andere Bedeutung annehmen. August könnte sich auch auf den Monat beziehen. Und genauso könnte Schneider eben auch den Beruf des Schneiders meinen. Einfache Regeln, um hier dennoch den Vor- und den Nachnamen zu erkennen, wären: „Wenn das nachfolgende Wort ein Nachname ist, handelt es sich bei August um einen Vornamen“ und „Wenn das vorherige Wort ein Vorname ist, dann handelt es sich bei Schneider um einen Nachnamen“. Das Problem dabei ist nur, dass unsere Regeln nun eine zyklische Abhängigkeit beinhalten. Aber ist das wirklich so schlimm? Aika erlaubt es, genau solche Feedback-Schleifen abzubilden. Wobei die Schleifen sowohl positive, als auch negative Gewichte haben können. Negative rekurrente Synapsen führen dazu, dass zwei sich gegenseitig ausschließende Interpretationen entstehen. Der Trick ist nun zunächst nur Annahmen zu treffen, also etwa dass es sich bei dem Wort „Schneider“ um den Beruf handelt und zu schauen wie das Netzwerk auf diese Annahme reagiert. Es bedarf also einer Evaluationsfunktion und einer Suche, die die Annahmen immer weiter variiert, bis schließlich eine optimale Interpretation des Textes gefunden ist. Genau wie schon der Textbereich und die Wortposition werden nun auch die Annahmen gemeinsam mit den Aktivierungen durch das Netzwerk propagiert.

Die zwei Ebenen des Aika Algorithmus

Aber wie lassen sich diese Informationen mit den Aktivierungen durch das Netzwerk propagieren, wo doch der Aktivierungswert eines Neurons für gewöhnlich nur eine Fließkommazahl ist? Genau hier liegt der Grund, weshalb Aika unter der neuronalen Ebene mit ihren Neuronen und kontinuierlich gewichteten Synapsen noch eine diskrete Ebene besitzt, in der es eine Darstellung aller Neuronen in boolscher Logik gibt. Aika verwendet als Aktivierungsfunktion die obere Hälfte der Tanh-Funktion. Alle negativen Werte werden auf 0 gesetzt und führen zu keiner Aktivierung des Neurons. Es gibt also einen klaren Schwellenwert, der zwischen aktiven und inaktiven Neuronen unterscheidet. Anhand dieses Schwellenwertes lassen sich die Gewichte der einzelnen Synapsen in boolsche Logik übersetzen und entlang der Gatter dieser Logik kann nun ein Aktivierungsobjekt mit den Informationen durch das Netzwerk propagiert werden. So verbindet Aika seine diskrete bzw. symbolische Ebene mit seiner subsymbolischen Ebene aus kontinuierlichen Synapsen-Gewichten.

Die Logik Ebene in Aika erlaubt außerdem einen enormen Effizienzgewinn im Vergleich zu einem herkömmlichen KNN, da die gewichtete Summe von Neuronen nur noch für solche Neuronen berechnet werden muss, die vorher durch die Logikebene aktiviert wurden. Im Falle eines UND-verknüpfenden Neurons bedeutet das, dass das Aktivierungsobjekt zunächst mehrere Ebenen einer Lattice-Datenstruktur aus UND-Knoten durchlaufen muss, bevor das eigentliche Neuron berechnet und aktiviert werden kann. Diese Lattice-Datenstruktur stammt aus dem Bereich des Frequent Pattern Mining und enthält in einem gerichteten azyklischen Graphen alle Teilmuster eines beliebigen größeren Musters. Ein solches Frequent Pattern Lattice kann in zwei Richtungen betrieben werden. Zum Einen können damit bereits bekannte Muster gematcht werden, und zum Anderen können auch völlig neue Muster damit erzeugt werden.

Da es schwierig ist Netze mit Millionen von Neuronen im Speicher zu halten, nutzt Aika das Provider Architekturpattern um selten verwendete Neuronen oder Logikknoten in einen externen Datenspeicher (z.B. eine Mongo DB) auszulagern, und bei Bedarf nachzuladen.

Ein Beispielneuron

Hier soll nun noch beispielhaft gezeigt werden wie ein Neuron innerhalb des semantischen Netzes angelegt werden kann. Zu beachten ist, dass Neuronen sowohl UND- als auch ODER-Verknüpfungen abbilden können. Das Verhalten hängt dabei alleine vom gewählten Bias ab. Liegt der Bias bei 0.0 oder einem nur schwach negativen Wert reicht schon die Aktivierung eines positiven Inputs aus um auch das aktuelle Neuron zu aktivieren. Es handelt sich dann um eine ODER-Verknüpfung. Liegt der Bias hingegen tiefer im negativen Bereich dann müssen mitunter mehrere positive Inputs gleichzeitig aktiviert werden damit das aktuelle Neuron dann auch aktiv wird. Jetzt handelt es sich dann um eine UND-Verknüpfung. Der Bias Wert kann der initNeuron einfach als Parameter übergeben werden. Um jedoch die Berechnung des Bias zu erleichtern bietet Aika bei den Inputs noch den Parameter BiasDelta an. Der Parameter BiasDelta nimmt einen Wert zwischen 0.0 und 1.0 entgegen. Bei 0.0 wirkt sich der Parameter gar nicht aus. Bei einem höheren Wert hingegen wird er mit dem Betrag des Synapsengewichts multipliziert und von dem Bias abgezogen. Der Gesamtbias lautet in diesem Beispiel also -55.0. Die beiden positiven Eingabesynapsen müssen also aktiviert werden und die negative Eingabesynapse darf nicht aktiviert werden, damit dieses Neuron selber aktiv werden kann. Das Zusammenspiel von Bias und Synpasengewichten ist aber nicht nur für die Aktivierung eines Neurons wichtig, sondern auch für die spätere Auswahl der finalen Interpretation. Je stärker die Aktivierungen innerhalb einer Interpretation aktiv sind, desto höher wird diese Interpretation gewichtet.
Um eine beliebige Graphstruktur abbilden zu können, trennt Aika das Anlegen der Neuronen von der Verknüpfung mit anderen Neuronen. Mit createNeuron(“E-Schneider (Nachname)”) wird also zunächst einmal ein unverknüpftes Neuron erzeugt, das dann über die initNeuron Funktion mit den Eingabeneuronen wortSchneiderNeuron, kategorieVornameNeuron und unterdrueckendesNeuron verknüpft wird. Über den Parameter RelativeRid wird hier angegeben auf welche relative Wortposition sich die Eingabesynapse bezieht. Die Eingabesynpase zu der Kategorie Vorname bezieht sich also mit -1 auf die vorherige Wortposition. Der Parameter Recurrent gibt an ob es sich bei dieser Synpase um eine Feedback-Schleife handelt. Über den Parameter RangeMatch wird angegeben wie sich der Textbereich, also die Start- und die Endposition zwischen der Eingabe- und der Ausgabeaktivierung verhält. Bei EQUALS sollen die Bereiche also genau übereinstimmen, bei CONTAINED_IN reicht es hingegen wenn der Bereich der Eingabeaktivierung innerhalb des Bereichs der Ausgabeaktivierung liegt. Dann kann noch über den Parameter RangeOutput angegeben werden, dass der Bereich der Eingabeaktivierung an die Ausgabeaktivierung weiterpropagiert werden soll.

Fazit

Mit Aika können sehr flexibel umfangreiche semantische Modelle erzeugt und verarbeitet werden. Aus Begriffslisten verschiedener Kategorien, wie etwa: Vor- und Nachnamen, Orten, Berufen, Strassen, grammatikalischen Worttypen usw. können automatisch Neuronen generiert werden. Diese können dann dazu genutzt werden, Worte und Phrasen zu erkennen, einzelnen Begriffen eine Bedeutung zuzuordnen oder die Kategorie eines Begriffs zu bestimmen. Falls in dem zu verarbeitenden Text mehrdeutige Begriffe oder Phrasen auftauchen, kann Aika für diese jeweils eigene Interpretationen erzeugen und gewichten. Die sinnvollste Interpretation wird dann als Ergebnis zurück geliefert.

Statistical Relational Learning – Part 2

In the first part of this series onAn Introduction to Statistical Relational Learning”, I touched upon the basic Machine Learning paradigms, some background and intuition of the concepts and concluded with how the MLN template looks like. In this blog, we will dive in to get an in depth knowledge on the MLN template; again with the help of sample examples. I would then conclude by highlighting the various toolkit available and some of its differentiating features.

MLN Template – explained

A Markov logic network can be thought of as a group of formulas incorporating first-order logic and also tied with a weight. But what exactly does this weight signify?

Weight Learning

According to the definition, it is the log odds between a world where F is true and a world where F is false,

and captures the marginal distribution of the corresponding predicate.

Each formula can be associated with some weight value, that is a positive or negative real number. The higher the value of weight, the stronger the constraint represented by the formula. In contrast to classical logic, all worlds (i.e., Herbrand Interpretations) are possible with a certain probability [1]. The main idea behind this is that the probability of a world increases as the number of formulas it violates decreases.

Markov logic networks with its probabilistic approach combined to logic posit that a world is less likely if it violates formulas unlike in pure logic where a world is false if it violates even a single formula. Consider the case when a formula with high weight i.e. more significance is violated implying that it is less likely in occurrence.

Another important concept during the first phase of Weight Learning while applying an MLN template is “Grounding”. Grounding means to replace each variable/function in predicate with constants from the domain.

Weight Learning – An Example

Note: All examples are highlighted in the Alchemy MLN format

Let us consider an example where we want to identify the relationship between 2 different types of verb-noun pairs i.e noun subject and direct object.

The input predicateFormula.mln file contains

  1. The predicates nsubj(verb, subject) and dobj(verb, object) and
  2. Formula of nsubj(+ver, +s) and dobj(+ver, +o)

These predicates or rules are to learn all possible SVO combinations i.e. what is the probability of a Subject-Verb-Object combination. The + sign ensures a cross product between the domains and learns all combinations. The training database consists of the nsubj and dobj tuples i.e. relations is the evidence used to learn the weights.

When we run the above command for this set of rules against the training evidence, we learn the weights as here:

Note that the formula is now grounded by all occurrences of nsubj and dobj tuples from the training database or evidence and the weights are attached to it at the start of each such combination.

But it should be noted that there is no network yet and this is just a set of weighted first-order logic formulas. The MLN template we created so far will generate Markov networks from all of our ground formulas. Internally, it is represented as a factor graph.where each ground formula is a factor and all the ground predicates found in the ground formula are linked to the factor.

Inference

The definition goes as follows:

Estimate probability distribution encoded by a graphical model, for a given data (or observation).

Out of the many Inference algorithms, the two major ones are MAP & Marginal Inference. For example, in a MAP Inference we find the most likely state of world given evidence, where y is the query and x is the evidence.

which is in turn equivalent to this formula.

Another is the Marginal Inference which computes the conditional probability of query predicates, given some evidence. Some advanced inference algorithms are Loopy Belief Propagation, Walk-SAT, MC-SAT, etc.

The probability of a world is given by the weighted sum of all true groundings of a formula i under an exponential function, divided by the partition function Z i.e. equivalent to the sum of the values of all possible assignments. The partition function acts a normalization constant to get the probability values between 0 and 1.

Inference – An Example

Let us draw inference on the the same example as earlier.

After learning the weights we run inference (with or without partial evidence) and query the relations of interest (nsubj here), to get inferred values.

Tool-kits

Let’s look at some of the MLN tool-kits at disposal to do learning and large scale inference. I have tried to make an assorted list of all tools here and tried to highlight some of its main features & problems.

For example, BUGS i.e. Bayesian Logic uses a Swift Compiler but is Not relational! ProbLog has a Python wrapper and is based on Horn clauses but has No Learning feature. These tools were invented in the initial days, much before the present day MLN looks like.

ProbCog developed at Technical University of Munich (TUM) & the AI Lab at Bremen covers not just MLN but also Bayesian Logic Networks (BLNs), Bayesian Networks & ProLog. In fact, it is now GUI based. Thebeast gives a shell to analyze & inspect model feature weights & missing features.

Alchemy from University of Washington (UoW) was the 1st First Order (FO) probabilistic logic toolkit. RockIt from University of Mannheim has an online & rest based interface and uses only Conjunctive Normal Forms (CNF) i.e. And-Or format in its formulas.

Tuffy scales this up by using a Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) whereas Felix allows Large Scale inference! Elementary makes use of secondary storage and Deep Dive is the current state of the art. All of these tools are part of the HAZY project group at Stanford University.

Lastly, LoMRF i.e. Logical Markov Random Field (MRF) is Scala based and has a feature to analyse different hypothesis by comparing the difference in .mln files!

 

Hope you enjoyed the read. The content starts from basic concepts and ends up highlighting key tools. In the final part of this 3 part blog series I would explain an application scenario and highlight the active research and industry players. Any feedback as a comment below or through a message is more than welcome!

Back to Part I – Statistical Relational Learning

Additional Links:

[1] Knowledge base files in Logical Markov Random Fields (LoMRF)

[2] (still) nothing clever Posts categorized “Machine Learning” – Markov Logic Networks

[3] A gentle introduction to statistical relational learning: maths, code, and examples

Eine Hadoop Architektur mit Enterprise Sicherheitsniveau

Dies ist Teil 2 von 3 der Artikelserie zum Thema Eine Hadoop-Architektur mit Enterprise Sicherheitsniveau.

Der aktuelle Stand der Technologie

Zum Glück ist Hadoop heutzutage ein bisschen reifer, als es noch vor zehn Jahren war. Es gibt viele Tools, einige davon OpenSource und einige lizenziert, die den Sicherheitsmangel im Hadoop zu lösen versuchen. Die Tabelle unten zeigt eine Auswahl der am meisten genutzten Sicherheitstools. Da jedes Tool von einer anderen Hadoop Distribution bevorzugt wird, habe ich diese Parameter mit berücksichtigt.

Es ist zu beachten, dass die zwei populärsten Hadoop Distributions (Hortonworks und Cloudera) kaum Unterschiede aufweisen, wenn man sie auf funktionaler Ebene vergleicht. Der größte Unterschied  besteht darin, dass Hortonworks ein Open Source und Cloudera ein kommerzielles Produkt ist. Abgesehen davon hat jeder Vendor den einen oder anderen Vorteil, ein ausführlicher Vergleich würde jedoch den Rahmen dieses Artikels sprengen.

sicherheitsmerkmale-hadoop-hortenworks-cloudera-other

Hadoop kommt von der Stange ohne aktivierte Authentisierung. Die Hadoop Dienste vertrauen jedem User, egal als was er oder sie sich ausgibt. Das sieht  folgendermaßen aus:

Angenommen Mike arbeitet an einer Maschine, die ihm Zugriff auf den Hadoop Cluster erlaubt und Sudo-Rechte gibt. Aber Mike hat das Passwort für den hdfs Superuser nicht. Er kann sich jetzt einfach als der hdfs User ausgeben, indem er die folgenden Kommandos ausführt. Dabei bekommt er fatalerweise alle Rechten des hdfs Superusers und ist in der Lage das gesamte HDFS Filesystem zu löschen. Es würde sogar bereits der Environment variabel USER ausreichen, um einen anderen User umzuwandeln.

hadoop-linux-useradd-hdfs

Kerberos ist im Moment der einzige Weg um Authentisierung im Hadoop zu gewährleisten. Kein Weg führt daran vorbei, es sei denn, man ist verrückt genug, um ein hochkompliziertes System auf Linux basierter ACLs auf jeder Maschine zu installieren und zu verwalten, um User daran zu hindern sich falsch zu authentifizieren. Es ist zudem wichtig zu beachten, dass Kerberos als einziges Sicherheitsmerkmal zur Authentifizierung dient, aber ohne richtige Authentisierung gibt es auch keine richtige Autorisierung. Wenn User jetzt selbst in der Lage sind, sich beliebig als jemand anderes auszugeben, können sie so selbst zu den sensibelsten Daten unbefugten Zugriff erlangen.

Apache Ranger oder Sentry erlauben die Definition und Verwaltung von Access Control Lists (ACLs). Diese Listen legen fest, welche User Zugriff auf welchen Bereich des HDFS Filesystems haben Der gleiche Effekt kann auch ohne diese Tools, durch einfache  Hadoop ACLs erreicht werden, die den normalen Linux ACLs ähneln. Es empfiehlt sich jedoch die neuesten Tools zu benutzen, wegen a) ihrer Benutzerfreundlichkeit, b) ihrer ausgearbeiteten APIs, die einem Administrator erlauben die Listen ohne GUI zu verwalten und beim Programmieren sogar zu automatisieren, und c) wegen ihrer Auditingfähigkeiten, die das Nachverfolgen von Zugriffen und Aktionen ermöglichen.

Anbei ist das Bild einer Ranger Policy, die der Gruppe der User rekursiv Lese- und Ausführungsrechte auf das Verzeichnis /projects/autonomous_driving gibt.

Alle einzelne Stücke des Puzzles kommen zusammen

Nachdem wir ermittelt haben, welche Technologien es gibt, die uns zu einem sicheren Cluster verhelfen, müssen diese im nächsten Schritt zusammengesetzt werden. Zum Glück hat jeder Vendor seine eigene Technologie, um Tools aus dem  Hadoop Ecosystem zu integrieren und zu verwalten. Cloudera beispielsweise bietet den sehr wirksamen Cloudera Manager und Hortonworks das Apache Ambari an. Die beiden Tools kümmern sich um das Anlegung der technischen Hadoop User (hdfs, hadoop, hive, ranger, e.t.c.) und der entsprechenden Kerberos Keytabs, die den technischen Usern erlauben, sich gegenüber Hadoop zu authentisieren. Am Ende der Installation hat man sämtliche Konfigurationen zentral platziert und kann neue personalisierte Accounts anlegen. Man kann sich dann im Ranger oder Sentry Web UI anmelden und ACLs für die User und Gruppen definieren.

Das ist allerdings nicht der Idealzustand. Jedes Unternehmen verwaltet ihre User bereits in bestimmten Verwaltungssystemen, die sich innerhalb der IT Infrastruktur befinden. Diese Systeme (oder auch Identity Management Systems) sind ein wichtiges vertikales, abteilungsübergreifendes Element der unternehmerischen IT Architektur. Jedes EDS Tool im Unternehmen ist an ein Identity Management System, wie Active Directory oder LDAP, gekoppelt und muss damit die User nicht selbst verwalten.

Der Stellenwert solcher Tools wird sofort erkennbar, wenn man die strengen Sicherheitsregeln eines modernen Unternehmens betrachtet: Passwörter müssen bestimmte Kriterien erfüllen und alle 30 Tagen gewechselt werden. Außerdem darf niemand eins seiner letzten zehn Passwörter benutzen.

Eine IT Architektur, die die Implementierung solcher unternehmensbreiten  Anforderungen in jeder einzelne Applikation fördert ist der Alptraum jedes Applikationsentwicklers und zeigt das Versagen des IT-Architekten.

Aber lassen Sie uns zurück zu unserem Hauptthema kommen. Wie können wir ein System wie Active Directory oder LDAP in Hadoop integrieren?  Der nächste Abschnitt gibt die Antwort auf diese Frage.


Weiter zu  Teil 3 von 3 – Eine Einterprise Hadoop Architektur für beste Sicherheit

Zurück zu Teil 1 von 3 – Motivation und Anforderungen einer Data Science Plattform

Toolkits & Services für Semantische Textanalysen

Named Entity Recognition ist ein Teilgebiet von Information Extraction. Ziel von Information Extraction ist die Gewinnung semantischer Informationen aus Texten (im Gegensatz zum verwandten Gebiet des Information Retrieval, bei dem es um das möglichst intelligente Finden von Informationen, die u.U. vorab mit Information Extraction gewonnen wurden, geht). Named Entity Recognition (kurz NER) bezeichnet die Erkennung von Entitäten wie z.B. Personen, Organisationen oder Orten in Texten.

[box]Beispiel:
Albert Einstein war ein theoretischer Physiker, der am 14. März 1879 in Ulm geboren wurde. Er erhielt 1921 den Nobelpreis für Physik. Isaac Newton, Einstein und Stephen Hawking werden oft als die größten Physiker seit der Antike bezeichnet.”[/box]

Die Disambiguierung von Entitäten ist ein weiterer wichtiger Schritt auf dem Weg zu einem semantischen Verständnis von Texten. Wenn man so in obigem Text erkennen kann, dass “Albert Einstein“, “Er” und “Einstein” die gleiche Person bezeichnen, so kann ein Analyseverfahren z.B. daraus schließen, dass in diesem Text Einstein eine wichtigere Rolle spielt, als Newton, der nur einmal erwähnt wurde. Die Hyperlinks hinter den jeweiligen Entitäten zeigen eine Möglichkeit der semantischen Anreicherung von Texten an – in diesem Fall wurden die Entitäten mit entsprechenden Einträgen bei DBpedia automatisch verlinkt.

Named Entity Recognition dient vorrangig zwei Zwecken:

  • Anreicherung von Texten mit Metadaten
  • Abstraktion von Texten zur besseren Erkennung von Mustern

Punkt 1 dient direkt dem Information Retrieval. Anwender können so z.B. gezielt nach bestimmten Personen suchen, ohne alle möglichen Schreibweisen oder Berufsbezeichnungen auflisten zu müssen.

Punkt 2 dient der Vorverarbeitung von Texten als Input für Machine Learning Verfahren. So ist es (je nach Anwendung!) oft nicht von Bedeutung, welche Person, welcher Ort oder auch welche Uhrzeit in einem Text steht sondern nur die Tatsache, dass Personen, Orte oder Zeiten erwähnt wurden.

Sirrus Shakeri veranschaulicht die zentrale Bedeutung semantischer Analyse in seinem Beitrag From Big Data to Intelligent Applications:

intelligent-applications-cirrus-shakeri

Abbildung 1: Von Big Data zu Intelligent Applications von Cirrus Shakeri

Sein “Semantic Graph” setzt voraus, dass Entitäten mittels “Natural Language Processing” erkannt und zueinander in Beziehung gesetzt wurden.

Es ist interessant zu vermerken, dass Natural Language Processing und Data Mining / Machine Learning über viele Jahre als Alternativen zueinander und nicht als Ergänzungen voneinander gesehen wurden. In der Tat springen die meisten Vorgehensmodelle heutzutage von “Data Preparation” zu “Machine Reasoning”. Wir argumentieren, dass sich in vielen Anwendungen, die auf unstrukturierten Daten basieren, signifikante Qualitätsverbesserungen erzielen lassen, wenn man zumindest NER (inklusive Disambiguierung) in die Pipeline mit einbezieht.

Toolkits und Services für NER

Es existiert eine Vielzahl von Toolkits für Natural Language Processing, die Sie mehr oder weniger direkt in Ihre Programme einbinden können. Exemplarisch seien drei Toolkits für Java, Python und R erwähnt:

Diese Toolkits enthalten Modelle, die auf Korpora für die jeweils unterstützten Sprachen trainiert wurden. Sie haben den Vorteil, dass sie auch vollkommen neue Entitäten erkennen können (wie z.B. neue Politiker oder Fernsehstars, die zur Trainingszeit noch unbekannt waren). Je nach Einstellung haben diese Systeme aber auch eine relativ hohe Falsch-Positiv-Rate.

Wer NER nur ausprobieren möchte oder lediglich gelegentlich kleinere Texte zu annotieren hat, sei auf die folgenden Web Services verwiesen, die auch jeweils eine REST-Schnittstelle anbieten.

DBpedia

Das DBpedia Projekt nutzt die strukturierten Informationen der verschieden-sprachigen Wikipedia Sites für den Spotlight Service. Im Unterschied zu den reinen Toolkits nutzen die nun genannten Werkzeuge zusätzlich zu den trainierten Modellen eine Wissensbasis zur Verringerung der Falsch-Positiv-Rate. Die mehrsprachige Version unter http://dbpedia-spotlight.github.io/demo zeigt die Möglichkeiten des Systems auf. Wählen Sie unter “Language” “German“) und dann über “SELECT TYPES…” die zu annotierenden Entitätstypen. Ein Beispieltext wird automatisch eingefügt. Sie können ihn natürlich durch beliebige andere Texte ersetzen. Im folgenden Beispiel wurden “Organisation”, “Person”, und “Place“ ausgewählt:

DBprediaSpotlight

Abbildung 2: DBpedia Demo (de.dbpedia.org)

Die erkannten Entitäten werden direkt mit ihren DBpedia Datenbankeinträgen verlinkt. Im Beispiel wurden die Orte Berlin, Brandenburg und Preußen sowie die Organisationen Deutsches Reich, Deutsche Demokratische Republik, Deutscher Bundestag und Bundesrat erkannt. Personen wurden in dem Beispieltext nicht erkannt. Die Frage, ob man “Sitz des Bundespräsidenten” als Ort (Sitz), Organisation (das Amt des Bundespräsidenten) und / oder Person (der Bundespräsident) bezeichnen sollte, hängt durchaus vom Anwendungsszenario ab.

OpeNER

Das OpeNER Projekt ist das Ergebnis eines europäischen Forschungsprojekts und erweitert die Funktionalität von DBpedia Spotlight mit weiteren semantischen Analysen. Die Demo unter http://demo2-opener.rhcloud.com/welcome.action (Tab “Live Analysis Demo“, “Named Entity Recognition and Classification” und “Named Entity Linking” auswählen und “Analyse” drücken, dann auf der rechten Seite das Tab “NERC” anwählen) ergibt für den gleichen Beispieltext:

opeNER-projekt

Abbildung 3: OpeNER Projekt (opener-project.eu)

Organisationen sind blau hinterlegt, während Orte orange markiert werden. Auch hier werden erkannte Entitäten mit ihren DBpedia Datenbankeinträgen verknüpft. Die Bedeutung dieser Verknüpfung erkennt man wenn man auf das Tab “Map” wechselt. Berlin wurde als Ort erkannt und über die Geo-Koordinaten (geo:long = 13.4083, geo.lat = 52.5186) im DBpedia Eintrag von Berlin konnte das Wort “Berlin” aus obigem Text automatisch auf der Weltkarte referenziert werden.

Es gibt eine Vielzahl weiterer Services für NLP wie z.B. OpenCalais. Einige dieser Services bieten bestimmte Funktionalitäten (wie z.B. Sentiment Analysis) oder andere Sprachen neben Englisch nur gegen eine Gebühr an.

Listen Tagger

Der Vollständigkeit halber sei noch erwähnt, dass in den meisten Anwendungsszenarien die oben genannten Werkzeuge durch sogenannte Listen-Tagger (englisch Dictionary Tagger) ergänzt werden. Diese Tagger verwenden Listen von Personen, Organisationen oder auch Marken, Bauteilen, Produktbezeichnern oder beliebigen anderen Gruppen von Entitäten. Listen-Tagger arbeiten entweder unabhängig von den oben genannten statistischen Taggern (wie z.B. dem Standford Tagger) oder nachgeschaltet. Im ersten Fall markieren diese Tagger alle Vorkommen bestimmter Worte im Text (z.B. „Zalando“ kann so direkt als Modemarke erkannt werden). Im zweiten Fall werden die Listen genutzt, um die statistisch erkannten Entitäten zu verifizieren. So könnte z.B. der Vorschlag des statistischen Taggers automatisch akzeptiert werden wenn die vorgeschlagene Person auch in der Liste gefunden wird. Ist die Person jedoch noch nicht in der Liste enthalten, dann könnte ein Mitarbeiter gebeten werden, diesen Vorschlag zu bestätigen oder zu verwerfen. Im Falle einer Bestätigung wird die neu erkannte Person dann in die Personenliste aufgenommen während sie im Falle einer Ablehnung in eine Negativliste übernommen werden könnte damit dieser Vorschlag in Zukunft automatisch unterdrückt wird.

Regular Expression Tagger

Manche Entitätstypen folgen klaren Mustern und können mit hoher Zuverlässigkeit durch reguläre Ausdrücke erkannt werden. Hierzu zählen z.B. Kreditkarten- oder Telefon- oder Versicherungsnummern aber auch in vielen Fällen Bauteilbezeichner oder andere firmeninterne Identifikatoren.

Fazit

Natural Language Processing und insbesondere Named Entity Recognition und Disambiguierung sollte Teil der Werkzeugkiste eines jeden Anwenders bei der Analyse von unstrukturierten Daten sein. Es existieren mehrere mächtige Toolkits und Services, die allerdings je nach Anwendungsgebiet kombiniert und verfeinert werden müssen. So erkennt DBpedia Spotlight nur Entitäten, die auch einen Wikipedia Eintrag haben, kann für diese aber reichhaltige Metadaten liefern. Der Stanford Tagger hingegen kann auch vollkommen unbekannte Personennamen aus dem textuellen Kontext erkennen, hat aber bei manchen Texten eine relativ hohe Falsch-Positiv-Rate. Eine Kombination der beiden Technologien und anwendungsspezifischen Listen von Entitäten kann daher zu qualitativ sehr hochwertigen Ergebnissen führen.

Data Science on a large scale – can it be done?

Analytics drives business

In today’s digital world, data has become the crucial success factor for businesses as they seek to maintain a competitive advantage, and there are numerous examples of how companies have found smart ways of monetizing data and deriving value accordingly.

On the one hand, many companies use data analytics to streamline production lines, optimize marketing channels, minimize logistics costs and improve customer retention rates.  These use cases are often described under the umbrella term of operational BI, where decisions are based on data to improve a company’s internal operations, whether that be a company in the manufacturing industry or an e-commerce platform.

On the other hand, over the last few years, a whole range of new service-oriented companies have popped up whose revenue models wholly depend on data analytics.  These Data-Driven Businesses have contributed largely to the ongoing development of new technologies that make it possible to process and analyze large amounts of data to find the right insights.  The better these technologies are leveraged, the better their value-add and the better for their business success.  Indeed, without data and data analytics, they don’t have a business.

Data Science – hype or has it always been around?Druck

In my opinion, there is too much buzz around the new era of data scientists.  Ten years ago, people simply called it data mining, describing similar skills and methods.  What has actually changed is the fact that businesses are now confronted with new types of data sources such as mobile devices and data-driven applications rather than statistical methodologies.  I described that idea in detail in my recent post Let’s replace the Vs of Big Data with a single D.

But, of course, you cannot deny that the importance of these data crunchers has increased significantly. The art of mining data mountains (or perhaps I should say “diving through data lakes”) to find appropriate insights and models and then find the right answers to urgent, business-critical questions has become very popular these days.

The challenge: Data Science with large volumes?

Michael Stonebraker, winner of the Turing Award 2014, has been quoted as saying: “The change will come when business analysts who work with SQL on large amounts of data give way to data EXASOL Pipelinescientists, which will involve more sophisticated analysis, predictive modeling, regressions and Bayesian classification. That stuff at scale doesn’t work well on anyone’s engine right now. If you want to do complex analytics on big data, you have a big problem right now.”

And if you look at the limitations of existing statistical environments out there using R, Python, Java, Julia and other languages, I think he is absolutely right.  Once the data scientists have to handle larger volumes, the tools are just not powerful and scalable enough.  This results in data sampling or aggregation to make statistical algorithms applicable at all.

A new architecture for “Big Data Science”

We at EXASOL have worked hard to develop a smart solution to respond to this challenge.  Imagine that it is possible to use raw data and intelligent statistical models on very large data sets, directly at the place where the data is stored.  Where the data is processed in-memory to achieve optimal performance, all distributed across a powerful MPP cluster of servers, in an environment where you can now “install” the programming language of your choice.

Sounds far-fetched?  If you are not convinced, then I highly recommend you have a look at our brand-new in-database analytic programming platform, which is deeply integrated in our parallel in-memory engine and extensible through using nearly any programming language and statistical library.

For further information on our approach to big data science, go ahead and download a copy of our technical whitepaper:  Big Data Science – The future of analytics.

Data Science mit Neo4j und R

Traurig, aber wahr: Data Scientists verbringen 50-80% ihrer Zeit damit, Daten zu bereinigen, zu ordnen und zu bearbeiten. So bleibt nur noch wenig Zeit, um tatsächlich vorausschauende Vorhersagemodelle zu entwickeln. Vor allem bei klassischen Stacks, besteht die Datenanalyse zum Großteil darin, Zeile für Zeile in SQL zu überführen. Zeit zum Schreiben von Modell-Codes in einer statistischen Sprache wie R bleibt da kaum noch. Die langen, kryptischen SQL-Abfragen verlangsamen aber nicht nur die Entwicklungszeit. Sie stehen auch einer sinnvollen Zusammenarbeit bei Analyse-Projekten im Weg, da alle Beteiligten zunächst damit beschäftigt sind, die SQL-Abfragen der jeweils anderen zu verstehen.

Komplexität der Daten steigt

Der Grund für diese Schwierigkeiten: Die Datenstrukturen werden immer komplexer, die Vernetzung der Daten untereinander nimmt immer stärker zu. Zwängt man diese hochgradig verbundenen Datensätze in eine SQL-Datenbank, in der Beziehungen naturgemäß abstrakt über Fremdschlüssel dargestellt werden, erhält man als Ergebnis übermäßig komplizierte Schematas und Abfragen. Als Alternative gibt es jedoch einige NoSQL-Lösungen – allen voran Graphdatenbanken – die solche hochkomplexen und heterogenen Daten ohne Informationsverlust speichern können – und zwar nicht nur die Entitäten an sich, sondern auch besonders die Beziehungen der Daten untereinander.

Datenanalysen zielen immer stärker darauf ab, das Verhalten und die Wünsche von Kunden besser verstehen zu können. Die Fragen lauten z. B.:

  • Wie hoch ist die Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass ein Besucher auf eine bestimmte Anzeige klickt?
  • Welcher Kunde sollte in welchem Kontext welche Produktempfehlungen erhalten?
  • Wie kann man aus der bisherigen Interaktionshistorie des Kunden sein Ziel vorhersagen, bevor er selbst dort ankommt?
  • In welchen Beziehungen steht Nutzer A zu Nutzer B?

Menschen sind bekanntermaßen von Natur aus sozial. Einige dieser Fragen lassen sich daher beantworten, wenn man weiß, wie Personen miteinander in Verbindung stehen: Unsere Zielperson, Nutzer A ähnelt in seinem Kontext und Verhalten Benutzer B. Und da Benutzer B ein bestimmtes Produkt (z. B. ein Spielfilm) gefällt, empfehlen wir diesen Film auch Nutzer A. In diese Auswertung fließen natürlich auch noch weitere Faktoren mit ein, z. B. die Demographie und der soziale Status des Nutzers, seine Zuordnung zu Peer Groups, vorher gesehene Promotions oder seine bisherigen Interaktionen.

Visualisierung eines Graphen mit RNeo4j

Mit R und Neo4j lassen sich Graphen und Teilgraphen ganz einfach mit RNeo4j, igraph und visNetwork libraries visualisieren.

 

Das folgende Beispiel zeigt wie in einem Graphen Schauspieler und Filme sowie ihre Beziehungen zueinander anschaulich dargestellt werden können, z. B. um Empfehlungen innerhalb eines Filmportals zu generieren. Dabei sind zwei Schauspieler über eine Kante miteinander verbunden, wenn sie beide im gleichen Film mitspielen.

Im ersten Schritt werden dazu in Neo4j die Film-Datensätze importiert (Achtung: Dieser Vorgang löscht die aktuelle Datenbank).

Als nächstes wird mit Cypher eine entsprechende Liste von Beziehungen aus Neo4j gezogen. Wie man sehen kann, ist die Darstellung des gewünschten Graph-Musters innerhalb der Abfrage sehr anschaulich.

Die visNetwork Funktion erwartet sowohl Kanten-Dataframes als auch Knoten-Dataframes. Ein Knoten-Dataframe lässt sich daher über die eindeutigen Werte des Kanten-Dataframes generieren.

Im Anschluss können die Knoten- und Kanten-Dataframes in das visNetwork übertragen werden.
visNetwork(nodes, edges)

Nun kommt igraph mit ins Spiel, eine Bibliothek von Graph-Algorithmen. Durch Einbindung der Kantenliste lässt sich einfach ein igraph Graph-Objekt erstellen, das den Teilgraphen miteinschließt.

Die Größe der Knoten kann als Funktion der Edge-Betweeness-Centrality definiert werden. In visNetwork entspricht dabei jede “value”-Spalte im Knoten-Dataframe der Größe des Knoten.
nodes$value = betweenness(ig)

Mit Einführung der “Value”-Spalte werden die Knoten nun alle unterschiedlich groß dargestellt.
visNetwork(nodes, edges)

Mit Hilfe eines Community-Detection-Algorithmus lassen sich im Graphen nun Cluster finden. In diesem Beispiel wird der „Girvan-Newman”-Algorithmus verwendet, der in igraph als cluster_edge_betweenness bezeichnet wird.

In der Liste oben sind alle Schauspieler der ersten zwei Cluster zu sehen. Insgesamt konnten sechs Cluster identifiziert werden.

Durch Hinzufügen einer “Group”-Spalte im Knoten-Dataframe, werden alle Knoten in visNetwork entsprechend ihrer Gruppenzugehörigkeit farblich markiert. Diese Cluster-Zuordnung erfolgt über clusters$membership. Durch Entfernen der “Value”-Spalte lassen sich die Knoten wieder auf eine einheitliche Größe bringen.

Werden die Knoten- und Kanten-Datenframes erneut in visNetwork übertragen, sind nun alle Knoten eines Clusters in derselben Farbe dargestellt.
visNetwork(nodes, edges)

Mit diesem Workflow lassen sich Teilgraphen in Neo4j einfach abfragen und Cluster-Algorithmen einfach darstellen.

Generell eignen sich Graphdatenbanken wie Neo4j besonders gut, um stark vernetzte und beliebig strukturierte Informationen zu handhaben – egal ob es sich um Schauspieler, Filme, Kunden, Produkte, Kreditkarten oder Bankkonten handelt. Zudem können sowohl den Knoten als auch den Kanten beliebige qualitative und quantitative Eigenschaften zugeordnet werden. Beziehungen zwischen Daten sind also nicht mehr bloße Strukturinformationen, sondern stehen vielmehr im Zentrum des Modells.

Cypher: intuitiv nutzbare Programmiersprache

Die Zeiten, in denen Data Science zum Großteil aus Datenbereinigung und -mapping besteht, sind damit vorbei. Mit dem entsprechenden Ansatz laufen Entwicklungsprozesse deutlich schneller und einfacher ab. Data Scientists kommen mit weniger Code schneller ans Ziel und können mehr Zeit in das tatsächliche Entwickeln von relevanten Modellen investieren. Dabei nutzen sie die Flexibilität einer quelloffenen NoSQL-Graphdatenbank wie Neo4j kombiniert mit der Reife und weiten Verbreitung der Statistiksprache R für statistisches Rechnen und Visualisierung. Programmierer müssen nicht mehr stundenlang komplexe SQL-Anweisungen schreiben oder den ganzen Tag damit verbringen, eine Baumstruktur in SQL zu überführen. Sie benutzen einfach Cypher, eine musterbasierte, für Datenbeziehungen und Lesbarkeit optimierte Abfragesprache und legen los.