In-memory Caching in Finance

Big data has been gradually creeping into a number of industries through the years, and it seems there are no exceptions when it comes to what type of business it plans to affect. Businesses, understandably, are scrambling to catch up to new technological developments and innovations in the areas of data processing, storage, and analytics. Companies are in a race to discover how they can make big data work for them and bring them closer to their business goals. On the other hand, consumers are more concerned than ever about data privacy and security, taking every step to minimize the data they provide to the companies whose services they use. In today’s ever-connected, always online landscape, however, every company and consumer engages with data in one way or another, even if indirectly so.

Despite the reluctance of consumers to share data with businesses and online financial service providers, it is actually in their best interest to do so. It ensures that they are provided the best experience possible, using historical data, browsing histories, and previous purchases. This is why it is also vital for businesses to find ways to maximize the use of data so they can provide the best customer experience each time. Even the more traditional industries like finance have gradually been exploring the benefits they can gain from big data. Big data in the financial services industry refers to complex sets of data that can help provide solutions to the business challenges financial institutions and banking companies have faced through the years. Considered today as a business imperative, data management is increasingly leveraged in finance to enhance processes, their organization, and the industry in general.

How Caching Can Boost Performance in Finance

In computing, caching is a method used to manage frequently accessed data saved in a system’s main memory (RAM). By using RAM, this method allows quick access to data without placing too much load on the main data stores. Caching also addresses the problems of high latency, network congestion, and high concurrency. Batch jobs are also done faster because request run times are reduced—from hours to minutes and from minutes to mere seconds. This is especially important today, when a host of online services are available and accessible to users. A delay of even a few seconds can lead to lost business, making both speed and performance critical factors to business success. Scalability is another aspect that caching can help improve by allowing finance applications to scale elastically. Elastic scalability ensures that a business is equipped to handle usage peaks without impacting performance and with the minimum required effort.

Below are the main benefits of big data and in-memory caching to financial services:

  • Big data analytics integration with financial models
    Predictive modeling can be improved significantly with big data analytics so it can better estimate business outcomes. Proper management of data helps improve algorithmic understanding so the business can make more accurate predictions and mitigate inherent risks related to financial trading and other financial services.
    Predictive modeling can be improved significantly with big data analytics so it can better estimate business outcomes. Proper management of data helps improve algorithmic understanding so the business can make more accurate predictions and mitigate inherent risks related to financial trading and other financial services.
  • Real-time stock market insights
    As data volumes grow, data management becomes a vital factor to business success. Stock markets and investors around the globe now rely on advanced algorithms to find patterns in data that will help enable computers to make human-like decisions and predictions. Working in conjunction with algorithmic trading, big data can help provide optimized insights to maximize portfolio returns. Caching can consequently make the process smoother by making access to needed data easier, quicker, and more efficient.
  • Customer analytics
    Understanding customer needs and preferences is the heart and soul of data management, and, ultimately, it is the goal of transforming complex datasets into actionable insights. In banking and finance, big data initiatives focus on customer analytics and providing the best customer experience possible. By focusing on the customer, companies are able to Ieverage new technologies and channels to anticipate future behaviors and enhance products and services accordingly. By building meaningful customer relationships, it becomes easier to create customer-centric financial products and seize market opportunities.
  • Fraud detection and risk management
    In the finance industry, risk is the primary focus of big data analytics. It helps in identifying fraud and mitigating operational risk while ensuring regulatory compliance and maintaining data integrity. In this aspect, an in-memory cache can help provide real-time data that can help in identifying fraudulent activities and the vulnerabilities that caused them so that they can be avoided in the future.

What Does This Mean for the Finance Industry?

Big data is set to be a disruptor in the finance sector, with 70% of companies citing big data as a critical factor of the business. In 2015 alone, financial service providers spent $6.4 billion on data-related applications, with this spending predicted to increase at a rate of 26% per year. The ability to anticipate risk and pre-empt potential problems are arguably the main reasons why the finance industry in general is leaning toward a more data-centric and customer-focused model. Data analysis is also not limited to customer data; getting an overview of business processes helps managers make informed operational and long-term decisions that can bring the company closer to its objectives. The challenge is taking a strategic approach to data management, choosing and analyzing the right data, and transforming it into useful, actionable insights.

Turbocharge Business Analytics With In-memory Computing

One of the customer traits that’s been gradually diminishing through the years is patience; if a customer-facing website or application doesn’t deliver real-time or near-instant results, it can be a reason for a customer to look elsewhere. This trend has pushed companies to turn to in-memory computing to get the speed needed to address customer demands in real-time. It simplifies access to multiple data sources to provide super-fast performance that’s thousands of times faster than disk-based storage systems. By storing data in RAM and processing in parallel against the full dataset, in-memory computing solutions allow for real-time insights that lead to informed business decisions and improved performance.

The in-memory computing solutions market has been on the rise in recent years because it has been heralded as the platform that will accelerate IT modernization. In-memory data grids, in particular, show great promise because it addresses the main limitation of an in-memory relational database. While the latter is designed to scale up, the former is designed to scale out. This scalability is one of the main draws of an in-memory data grid, since a scale-up architecture is not sustainable in the long term and will always have a breaking point. In-memory data grids on the other hand, benefit from horizontal scalability and computing elasticity. Scaling an in-memory data grid is as simple as adding nodes to a cluster and removing it when it’s no longer needed. This is especially useful for businesses that demand speed in the management of hundreds of terabytes of data across multiple networked computers in geographically distributed data centers.

Since big data is complex and fast-moving, keeping data synchronized across data centers is vital to preserve data integrity. Keeping data in memory removes the bottleneck caused by constant access to disk -based storage and allows applications and their data to collocate in the same memory space. This allows for optimization that allows the amount of data to exceed the amount of available memory. Speed and efficiency is also improved by keeping frequently accessed data in memory and the rest on disk, consequently allowing data to reside both in memory and on disk.

Future-proofing Businesses With In-memory Computing

Data analytics is as much a part of every business as other marketing and business intelligence tools. Because data constantly grows at an exponential rate, in-memory computing serves as the enabler of data analytics because it provides speed, high availability, and straightforward scalability. Speeds more than 100 times faster than other solutions enable in-memory computing solutions to provide real-time insights that are applicable in a host of industries and use cases.

Location-based Marketing

A report from 2019 shows that location-based marketing helped 89% of marketers increase sales, 86% grow their customer base, and 84% improve customer engagement. Location data can be leveraged to identify patterns of behavior by analyzing frequently visited locations. By understanding why certain customers frequent specific locations and knowing when they are there, you can better target your marketing messages and make more strategic customer acquisitions. Location data can also be used as a demographic identifier to help you segment your customers and tailor your offers and messaging accordingly.

Fraud Detection

In-memory computing helps improve operational intelligence by detecting anomalies in transaction data immediately. Through high-speed analysis of large amounts of data, potential risks are detected early on and addressed as soon as possible. Transaction data is fast-moving and changes frequently, and in-memory computing is equipped to handle data as it changes. This is why it’s an ideal platform for payment processing; it helps make comparisons of current transactions with the history of all transactions on record in a matter of seconds. Companies typically have several fraud detection measures in place, and in-memory computing allows running these algorithms concurrently without compromising overall system performance. This ensures responsiveness of systems despite peak volume levels and avoids interruptions to customer service.

Tailored Customer Experiences

The real-time insights delivered by in-memory computing helps personalize experiences based on customer data. Because customer experiences are time-sensitive, processing and analyzing data at super-fast speeds is vital in capturing real-time event data that can be used to craft the best experience possible for each customer. Without in-memory computing, getting real-time data and other necessary information that ensures a seamless customer experience would have been near impossible.

Real-time data analytics helps provide personalized recommendations based on both existing and new customer data. By looking at historical data like previously visited pages and comparing them with newer data from the stream, businesses can craft the proper messaging and plan the next course of action. The anticipation and forecasting of customers’ future actions and behavior is the key to improving conversion rates and customer satisfaction—ultimately leading to higher revenues and more loyal customers.

Conclusion

Big data is the future, and companies that don’t use it to their advantage would find it hard to compete in this ever-connected world that demands results in an instant. Processing and analyzing data can only become more complex and challenging through time, and for this reason, in-memory computing should be a solution that companies should consider. Aside from improving their business from within, it will also help drive customer acquisition and revenue, while also providing a viable low-latency, high throughput platform for high-speed data analytics.

OLAP-Würfel

Der OLAP-Würfel

Alles ist relativ! So auch die Anforderungen an Datenbanksysteme. Je nachdem welche Arbeitskollegen/innen dazu gefragt werden, können unterschiedliche Wünschen und Anforderungen an Datenbanksysteme dabei zu Tage kommen.

Die optimale Ausrichtung des Datenbanksystems auf seine spezielle Anwendung hin, setzt den Grundstein für eine performante und effizientes Informationssystem und sollte daher wohl überlegt sein. Eine klassische Unterscheidung für die Anwendung von Datenbanksystemen lässt sich hierbei zwischen OLTP (Online Transaction Processing) und OLAP (Online Analytical Processing) machen.

OLTP-Datenbanksysteme zeichnen sich insbesondere durch die direkte Verarbeitung bei hohem Durchsatz von Transaktionen, sowie den parallelen Zugriff auf Informationen aus und werden daher vor allem für die Erfassung von operativen Geschäftsfällen eingesetzt. Im Gegensatz zu OLTP-Systemen steht bei OLAP-Systemen die analytische Verarbeitung von großen Datenbeständen im Vordergrund. Die folgende Grafik veranschaulicht das Zusammenwirken von OLTP und OLAP.

Da OLAP-Systeme eine mehrdimensionale und subjektbezogen Datenstruktur aufweisen, können statistisch-analytische Verarbeitungen auf diese Datenmengen effizient angewandt werden. Basierend auf dem Sternen-Schema, werden in diesem Zusammenhang häufig sogenannte OLAP-Würfel (engl. „Cube“) verwendet, welcher die Grundlage für multidimensionale Analysen bildet. Im Folgenden werden wir den OLAP-Würfel etwas näher beleuchten.

Aufbau des OLAP-Würfels

Der OLAP-Würfel ist eine Zusammensetzung aus multidimensionale Datenarrays. Die logische Anordnung der Daten über mehrere Dimensionen erlaubt dem Benutzer verschiedene Ansichten auf die Daten in gleicher Weise zu erlangen. Der Begriff „Würfel“ („Cube“) referenziert hierbei auf die Darstellung eines OLAP-Würfels mit drei Dimensionen. OLAP-Würfel mit mehr als drei Dimensionen werden daher auch „Hypercubes“ genannt.

Die Achsen des Würfels entsprechen den Dimensionen, also den Attributen/ Eigenschaften des Würfels, welche den Würfel aufspannen. Typische Dimensionen sind: Produkt, Ort und Zeit.

Die Zellen im Schnittpunkt der Koordinaten entsprechen den Kennzahlen auch Maßzahlen (engl. „measures“) genannt. Die Kennzahlen stehen im Mittelpunkt der Datenanalyse und können sowohl Basisgrößen (atomare Werte) als auch abgeleitete Zahlen (berechnete Werte) sein. Oftmals handelt es sich bei den Kennzahlen um numerische Werte wie z.B.: Umsatz, Kosten und Gewinn.

Hierarchien beschreiben eine logische Struktur einzelner Elemente in den Dimensionen und nehmen dabei meist ein hierarchisches Schema an z.B.:  Tag -> Monat -> Jahr ->TOP. Die Werte der jeweils übergeordneten Elemente ergeben sich meistens aus einer Konsolidierung aller untergeordneten Elemente. Das größte Element „TOP“ steht dabei für „alles“ und fasst somit die gesamten Elemente der Dimension zusammen.

Je nachdem in welcher Detailstufe, auch Granularität genannt, die Kennzahlen der einzelnen Dimensionen vorliegen, können verschiedene Würfel-Operationen für Daten bis auf der kleinsten Ebenen ausgeführt werden wie z.B.: einzelne Transaktionen in einer Geschäftsstellen für einen bestimmten Tag betrachten. Bei der Wahl der Granularität ist jedoch unbedingt der Zweck sowie die Leistungsfähigkeit der Datenbank mit zu Berücksichtigen.

 

 

 

 

 

Operationen des OLAP-Würfels

Für die Auswertung von OLAP-Würfeln haben sich spezielle Operationsbezeichnungen durchgesetzt, welche im Folgenden mit grafischen Beispielen vorgestellt werden.

Die Slice Operation wird durch die Selektion bzw. Einschränkung einer Dimension auf ein Dimensionselement erwirkt. In dem hier aufgezeigten Beispiel wird durch das Selektieren auf die Produktsparte „Anzüge“,die entsprechende Scheibe aus dem Würfel „herausgeschnitten“.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Bei der Dice-Operation wird der Würfel auf mehreren Dimensionen, durch eine Menge von Dimensionselementen eingeschränkt. Als Resultat ergibt sich ein neuer verkleinerter, mehrdimensionaler Datenraum. Das Beispiel zeigt, wie der Würfel auf die Zeit-Dimensionselemente: „Q1 „und „Q2“ sowie die Produkt- Dimensionselemente: „Anzüge“ und „Hosen“ beschränkt wird.

 

 

 

 

 


Mit der Pivotiting/Rotation-Operation wird der Würfel um die eigene Achse rotiert. Diese Operation ermöglicht dem Benutzer unterschiedliche Sichten auf die Daten zu erhalten, da neue Kombinationen von Dimensionen sichtbar werden.

Im abgebildeten Beispiel wird der Datenwürfel nach rechts und um die Zeitachse gedreht. Die dadurch sichtbar gewordene Kombination von Ländern und Zeit ermöglicht dem Benutzer eine neue Sicht auf den Datenwürfel.


Die Operationen: Drill-down oder Drill-up werden benutzt, um durch die Hierarchien der Dimensionen zu navigieren. Je nach Anwendung verdichten sich die Daten bei der Drill-up Operation, während die Drill-down Operation einen höheren Detailgrad ermöglicht.

Beispiel werden die Dimensionen auf die jeweils höchste Klassifikationsstufe verdichtet. Das Ergebnis zeigt das TOP-Element der aggregierten Daten, mit einem Wert von 9267 €.


Technische Umsetzung

In den meisten Fällen werden OLAP-Systeme oberhalb des Data Warehouses platziert und nutzen dieses als Datenquelle.  Für die Datenspeicherung wird vor allem zwischen den klassischen Konzepten „MOLAP“ und „ROLAP“ unterschieden. Die folgende Gegenüberstellung, zeigt die wesentlichen Unterschiede der beiden Konzepte auf.

ROLAP

MOLAP

Bedeutung
Relationales-OLAP Multidimensionales-OLAP
Datenspeicherung
Daten liegen in relationalen Datenbanken vor. Daten werden in multidimensionalen Datenbanken als Datenwürfel gespeichert
Daten Form
Relationale Tabellen Multidimensionale Arrays
Datenvolumen
Hohes Datenvolumen und hohe Nutzerzahl Mittleres Datenvolum, da Detaildaten in komprimiertem Format vorliegen
Technologie
Benötigt Komplexe SQL Abfragen, um Daten zu beziehen Vorberechneter Datenwürfel hält Aggregationen vor
Skalierbarkeit
Beliebig Eingeschränkt
Antwortgeschwindigkeit
Langsam Schnell

Fazit

OLAP Würfel können effizient dafür genutzt werden, Informationen in logische Strukturen zu speichern. Die Dimensionierung sowie der Aufbau von logischen Hierarchien, erlauben dem Benutzer ein intuitives Navigieren und Betrachten des Datenbestandes. Durch die Vorberechnung der Aggregationen bei MOLAP-Systemen, können sehr komplexe Analyseabfragen mit hoher Geschwindigkeit und unabhängig von der Datenquelle durchgeführt werden. Für die betriebliche Datenanalyse ist die Nutzung des Datenwürfels insbesondere für fortgeschrittene Datenanalyse, daher eine enorme Bereicherung.

Was ist eigentlich Apache Spark?

Viele Technologieanbieter versprechen schlüsselfertige Lösungen für Big Data Analytics, dabei kann keine proprietäre Software-Lösung an den Umfang und die Mächtigkeit einiger Open Source Projekten heranreichen.

Seit etwa 2010 steht das Open Source Projekt Hadoop, ein Top-Level-Produkt der Apache Foundation, als einzige durch Hardware skalierbare Lösung zur Analyse von strukturierten und auch unstrukturierten Daten. Traditionell im Geschäftsbereich eingesetzte Datenbanken speichern Daten in einem festen Schema ab, das bereits vor dem Laden der Daten definiert sein muss. Dieses Schema-on-Write-Prinzip stellt zwar sicher, dass Datenformate bekannt und –konflikte vermieden werden. Es bedeutet jedoch auch, dass bereits vor dem Abspeichern bekannt sein muss, um welche Daten es sich handelt und ob diese relevant sind. Im Hadoop File System (HDFS) wird ein Schema für erst bei lesenden Zugriff erstellt.

Apache Spark ist, ähnlich wie Hadoop, dank Parallelisierung sehr leistungsfähig und umfangreich mit Bibliotheken (z. B. für Machine Learning) und Schnittstellen (z. B. HDFS) ausgestattet. Allerdings ist Apache Spark nicht für jede Big Data Analytics Aufgabe die beste Lösung, Als Einstiegslektüre empfiehlt sich das kostenlose Ebook Getting Started with Spark: From Inception to Production. Wer jedoch erstmal wissen möchte, erfährt nachfolgend die wichtigsten Infos, die es über Apache Spark zu wissen gilt.

Was ist Apache Spark?

Apache Spark ist eine Allzweck-Tool zur Datenverarbeitung, eine sogenannte Data Processing Engine. Data Engineers und Data Scientists setzen Spark ein, um äußerst schnelle Datenabfragen (Queries) auf große Datenmengen im Terabyte-Bereich ausführen zu können.

Spark wurde 2013 zum Incubator-Projekt der Apache Software Foundation, eine der weltweit wichtigsten Organisationen für Open Source. Bereits 2014 es wie Hadoop zum Top-Level-Produkt. Aktuell ist Spark eines der bedeutensten Produkte der Apache Software Foundation mit viel Unterstützung von Unternehmen wie etwa Databricks, IBM und Huawei.

Was ist das Besondere an Spark?

Mit Spark können Daten transformiert, zu fusioniert und auch sehr mathematische Analysen unterzogen werden.
Typische Anwendungsszenarien sind interactive Datenabfragen aus verteilten Datenbeständen und Verarbeitung von fließenden Daten (Streaming) von Sensoren oder aus dem Finanzbereich. Die besondere Stärke von Spark ist jedoch das maschinelle Lernen (Machine Learning) mit den Zusätzen MLib (Machine Learning Bibliothek) oder SparkR (R-Bibliotheken direkt unter Spark verwenden), denn im Gegensatz zum MapReduce-Algorithmus von Hadoop, der einen Batch-Prozess darstellt, kann Spark sehr gut iterative Schleifen verarbeiten, die für Machine Learning Algorithmen, z. B. der K-Nearest Neighbor Algorithmus, so wichtig sind.spark-stack

Spark war von Beginn an darauf ausgelegt, Daten dynamisch im RAM (Arbeitsspeicher) des Server-Clusters zu halten und dort zu verarbeiten. Diese sogenannte In-Memory-Technologie ermöglicht die besonders schnelle Auswertung von Daten. Auch andere Datenbanken, beispielsweise SAP Hana, arbeiten In-Memory, doch Apache Spark kombiniert diese Technik sehr gut mit der Parallelisierung von Arbeitsschritten über ein Cluster und setzt sich somit deutlich von anderen Datenbanken ab. Hadoop ermöglicht über MapReduce zwar ebenfalls eine Prallelisierung, allerdings werden bei jedem Arbeitsschrit Daten von einer Festplatte zu einer anderen Festplatte geschrieben. Im Big Data Umfeld kommen aus Kostengründen überwiegend noch mechanisch arbeitende Magnet-Festplatten zum Einsatz, aber selbst mit zunehmender Verbreitung von sehr viel schnelleren SSD-Festplatten, ist der Arbeitsspeicher hinsichtlich der Zeiten für Zugriff auf und Schreiben von Daten unschlagbar. So berichten Unternehmen, die Spark bereits intensiv einsetzen, von einem 100fachen Geschwindigkeitsvorteil gegenüber Hadoop MapReduce.

Spark kann nicht nur Daten im Terabyte, sondern auch im Petabyte-Bereich analysieren, ein entsprechend großes Cluster, bestehend aus tausenden physikalischer oder virtueller Server, vorausgesetzt. Ähnlich wie auch bei Hadoop, skaliert ein Spark-Cluster mit seiner Größe linear in seiner Leistungsfähigkeit. Spark ist neben Hadoop ein echtes Big Data Framework.
Spark bringt sehr viele Bibliotheken und APIs mit, ist ferner über die Programmiersprachen Java, Python, R und Scala ansprechbar – das sind ohne Zweifel die im Data Science verbreitetsten Sprachen. Diese Flexibilität und geringe Rüstzeit rechtfertigt den Einsatz von Spark in vielen Projekten. Es kann sehr herausfordernd sein, ein Data Science Team mit den gleichen Programmiersprachen-Skills aufzubauen. In Spark kann mit mehreren Programmiersprachen gearbeitet werden, so dass dieses Problem teilweise umgangen werden kann.spark-runs-everywhere

In der Szene wird Spark oftmals als Erweiterung für Apache Hadoop betrachtet, denn es greift nahtlos an HDFS an, das Hadoop Distributed File System. Dank der APIs von Spark, können jedoch auch Daten anderer Systeme abgegriffen werden, z. B. von HBase, Cassandra oder MongoDB.

Was sind gängige Anwendungsbeispiele für Spark?

  • ETL / Datenintegration: Spark und Hadoop eignen sich sehr gut, um Daten aus unterschiedlichen Systemen zu filtern, zu bereinigen und zusammenzuführen.
  • Interaktive Analyse: Spark eignet sich mit seinen Abfragesystemen fantastisch zur interaktiven Analyse von großen Datenmengen. Typische Fragestellungen kommen aus dem Business Analytics und lauten beispielsweise, welche Quartalszahlen für bestimmte Vertriebsregionen vorliegen, wie hoch die Produktionskapazitäten sind oder welche Lagerreichweite vorhanden ist. Hier muss der Data Scientist nur die richtigen Fragen stellen und Spark liefert die passenden Antworten.
  • Echtzeit-Analyse von Datenströmen: Anfangs vor allem zur Analyse von Server-Logs eingesetzt, werden mit Spark heute auch Massen von Maschinen- und Finanzdaten im Sekundentakt ausgewertet. Während Data Stream Processing für Hadoop noch kaum möglich war, ist dies für Spark ein gängiges Einsatzgebiet. Daten, die simultan von mehreren Systemen generiert werden, können mit Spark problemlos in hoher Geschwindigkeit zusammengeführt und analysiert werden.
    In der Finanzwelt setzen beispielsweise Kreditkarten-Unternehmen Spark ein, um Finanztransaktionen in (nahezu) Echtzeit zu analysieren und als potenziellen Kreditkartenmissbrauch zu erkennen.
  • Maschinelles Lernen: Maschinelles Lernen (ML – Machine Learning) funktioniert desto besser, je mehr Daten in die ML-Algorithmen einbezogen werden. ML-Algorithmen haben in der Regel jedoch eine intensive, vom Data Scientist betreute, Trainingsphase, die dem Cluster viele Iterationen an Arbeitsschritten auf die großen Datenmengen abverlangen. Die Fähigkeit, Iterationen auf Daten im Arbeitsspeicher, parallelisiert in einem Cluster, durchführen zu können, macht Spark zurzeit zu dem wichtigsten Machine Learning Framework überhaupt.
    Konkret laufen die meisten Empfehlungssysteme (beispielsweise von Amazon) auf Apache Spark.

 

Hyperkonvergenz: Mehr Intelligenz für das Rechenzentrum

Wer heute dafür verantwortlich ist, die IT-Infrastruktur seines Unternehmens oder einer Organisation zu steuern, der steht vor einer ganzen Reihe Herausforderungen: Skalierbar, beliebig flexibel und mit möglichst kurzer „time-to-market“ für neue Services – so sollte es sein. Die Anforderungen an Kapazität und Rechenpower können sich schnell ändern. Mit steigenden Nutzerzahlen oder neuen Anwendungen, die geliefert werden sollen. Weder Kunden noch Management haben Zeit oder Verständnis dafür, dass neue Dienste wegen neuer Hardwareanforderungen nur langsam oder mit langem Vorlauf ausgerollt werden können.

Unternehmen wollen deshalb schnell und flexibel auf neue Anforderungen und Produkterweiterungen reagieren können. Dabei kommt in der Praxis häufig sehr heterogene Infrastruktur zum Einsatz: On-Premise-Systeme vor Ort, externe Data Center und Cloud-Lösungen müssen zuverlässig, nahtlos und insbesondere auch sicher die Services bereit stellen, die Kunden oder Mitarbeiter nutzen. Wichtig dabei: die Storage- und Computing-Kapazität sollte flexibel skalierbar sein und sich auch kurzfristig geänderten Anforderungen und Prioritäten anpassen können. Zum Beispiel: Innerhalb von kurzer Zeit deutlich mehr virtuelle Desktopsysteme für User bereit stellen.

Smarte Software für Rechenzentren

Der beste Weg für den CIO und die IT-Abteilung, diese neuen Herausforderungen zu lösen, sind „Hyperkonvergenz“-Systeme. Dabei handelt es sich um kombinierte Knoten für Storage und Computing-Leistung im Rechenzentrum, die dank smarter Software beliebig erweitert oder ausgetauscht werden können. Hierbei handelt es sich um SDS-Systeme („Software defined Storage“) – die Speicherkapazität und Rechenleistung der einzelnen Systeme wird von der Software smart abstrahiert und gebündelt.

Das Unternehmen Cisco zeigt, wie die Zukunft im Rechenzentrum aussehen wird: die neue Plattform HyperFlex setzt genau hier an. Wie der Name andeutet, bietet HyperFlex eine Hyperkonvergenz-Plattform für das Rechenzentrum auf Basis von Intel® Xeon® Prozessoren*. Der Kern ist hier die Software, die auf dem eigenen Filesystem „HX Data Platform“ aufsetzt. Damit erweitern Kunden ihr bestehendes System schnell und einfach. Diese Hyperkonvergenz-Lösung ist darauf ausgelegt, nicht als Silo parallel zu bereits bestehender Infrastruktur zu stehen, sondern zu einem Teil der bestehenden Hard- und Software zu werden.

Denn die Verwaltung von HyperFlex-Knoten ist in Ciscos bestehendem UCS Management integriert. So dauert es nur wenige Minuten, bis neue Nodes zu einem System hinzugefügt sind. Nach wenigen Klicks sind die zusätzlichen Knoten installiert, konfiguriert, provisioniert und somit live in Betrieb. Besonders hilfreich für dynamische Unternehmen: HyperFlex macht es sehr einfach möglich, im Betrieb selektiv Storage-, RAM-c oder Computing-Kapazität zu erweitern – unabhängig voneinander.  Sollten Knoten ausfallen, verkraftet das System dies ohne Ausfall oder Datenverlust.

Weiterführende Informationen zu den Cisco HyperFlex Systemen finden Sie mit einem Klick hier.

Dieser Sponsored Post entstand in Zusammenarbeit mit Cisco & Intel.

*Intel, the Intel logo, Xeon, and Xeon Inside are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation in the U.S. and/or other countries.

Data Science on a large scale – can it be done?

Analytics drives business

In today’s digital world, data has become the crucial success factor for businesses as they seek to maintain a competitive advantage, and there are numerous examples of how companies have found smart ways of monetizing data and deriving value accordingly.

On the one hand, many companies use data analytics to streamline production lines, optimize marketing channels, minimize logistics costs and improve customer retention rates.  These use cases are often described under the umbrella term of operational BI, where decisions are based on data to improve a company’s internal operations, whether that be a company in the manufacturing industry or an e-commerce platform.

On the other hand, over the last few years, a whole range of new service-oriented companies have popped up whose revenue models wholly depend on data analytics.  These Data-Driven Businesses have contributed largely to the ongoing development of new technologies that make it possible to process and analyze large amounts of data to find the right insights.  The better these technologies are leveraged, the better their value-add and the better for their business success.  Indeed, without data and data analytics, they don’t have a business.

Data Science – hype or has it always been around?Druck

In my opinion, there is too much buzz around the new era of data scientists.  Ten years ago, people simply called it data mining, describing similar skills and methods.  What has actually changed is the fact that businesses are now confronted with new types of data sources such as mobile devices and data-driven applications rather than statistical methodologies.  I described that idea in detail in my recent post Let’s replace the Vs of Big Data with a single D.

But, of course, you cannot deny that the importance of these data crunchers has increased significantly. The art of mining data mountains (or perhaps I should say “diving through data lakes”) to find appropriate insights and models and then find the right answers to urgent, business-critical questions has become very popular these days.

The challenge: Data Science with large volumes?

Michael Stonebraker, winner of the Turing Award 2014, has been quoted as saying: “The change will come when business analysts who work with SQL on large amounts of data give way to data EXASOL Pipelinescientists, which will involve more sophisticated analysis, predictive modeling, regressions and Bayesian classification. That stuff at scale doesn’t work well on anyone’s engine right now. If you want to do complex analytics on big data, you have a big problem right now.”

And if you look at the limitations of existing statistical environments out there using R, Python, Java, Julia and other languages, I think he is absolutely right.  Once the data scientists have to handle larger volumes, the tools are just not powerful and scalable enough.  This results in data sampling or aggregation to make statistical algorithms applicable at all.

A new architecture for “Big Data Science”

We at EXASOL have worked hard to develop a smart solution to respond to this challenge.  Imagine that it is possible to use raw data and intelligent statistical models on very large data sets, directly at the place where the data is stored.  Where the data is processed in-memory to achieve optimal performance, all distributed across a powerful MPP cluster of servers, in an environment where you can now “install” the programming language of your choice.

Sounds far-fetched?  If you are not convinced, then I highly recommend you have a look at our brand-new in-database analytic programming platform, which is deeply integrated in our parallel in-memory engine and extensible through using nearly any programming language and statistical library.

For further information on our approach to big data science, go ahead and download a copy of our technical whitepaper:  Big Data Science – The future of analytics.

Man redet gerne über Daten, genutzt werden sie nicht

Der Big Data Hype ist vorbei und auf dem Anstieg zum „ Plateau of Productivity“. Doch bereits in dieser Phase klafft die Einschätzung von Analysten mit der Verbreitung von Big Data Predictive Analytics/Data Mining noch weit von der Realität in Deutschland auseinander. Dies belegt u.a. eine Studie der T-Systems Multimedia Solutions, zu welcher in der FAZ* der Artikel Man redet gerne über Daten, genutzt werden sie nicht, erschienen ist. Mich überrascht diese Studie nicht,  sondern bestätigt meine langjährige Markterfahrung.

Die Gründe sind vielfältig: keine Zeit, keine Priorität, keine Kompetenz, kein Data Scientist, keine Zuständigkeit, Software zu komplex – Daten und Use-Cases sind aber vorhanden.

Im folgenden Artikel wird die Datenanalyse- und Data-Mining Software der Synop Systems vorgestellt, welche „out-of-the-box“ alle Funktionen bereitstellt, um Daten zu verknüpfen, zu strukturieren, zu verstehen, Zusammenhänge zu entdecken, Muster in Daten zu lernen und Prognose-Modelle zu entwickeln.

Anforderung an „Advanced-Data-Analytics“-Software

Um Advanced-Data-Analytics-Software zu einer hohen Verbreitung zu bringen, sind folgende Aspekte zu beachten:

  1. Einfachheit in der Nutzung der Software
  2. Schnelligkeit in der Bearbeitung von Daten
  3. Analyse von großen Datenmengen
  4. Große Auswahl an vorgefertigten Analyse-Methoden für unterschiedliche Fragestellungen
  5. Nutzung (fast) ohne IT-Projekt
  6. Offene Architektur für Data-Automation und Integration in operative Prozesse

Synop Analyzer – Pionier der In-Memory Analyse

Um diese Anforderungen zu erfüllen, entstand der Synop Analyzer, welcher seit 2013 von der Synop Systems in den Markt eingeführt wird. Im Einsatz ist die Software bei einem DAX-Konzern bereits seit 2010 und zählt somit zum Pionier einer In-Memory-basierenden Data-Mining Software in Deutschland. Synop Analyzer hat besondere Funktionen für technische Daten. Anwender der Software sind aber in vielen Branchen zu finden: Automotive, Elektronik, Maschinenbau, Payment Service Provider, Handel, Versandhandel, Marktforschung.

Die wesentlichen Kernfunktionen des  Synop Analyzer sind:

a. Eigene In-Memory-Datenhaltung:

Optimiert für große Datenmengen und analytische Fragestellungen. Ablauffähig auf jedem Standard-Rechner können Dank der spaltenbasierenden Datenhaltung und der Komprimierung große Datenmengen sehr schnell analysiert werden. Das Einlesen der Daten erfolgt direkt aus Datenbanktabellen der Quellsysteme oder per Excel, CSV, Json oder XML. Unterschiedliche Daten können verknüpf und synchronisiert werden. Hohe Investitionen für Big-Data-Datenbanken entfallen somit. Eine Suche von Mustern von diagnostic error codes (dtc), welche mind. 300 Mal (Muster) innerhalb 100 Mio. Datenzeilen vorkommen, dauert auf einem I5-Proz. ca. 1200 Sek., inkl. Ausgabe der Liste der Muster. Ein Prognosemodel mittels Naive-Bayes für das Produkt „Kreditkarte“ auf 800 Tsd. Datensätzen wird in ca. 3 Sek. berechnet.

b. Vielzahl an Analyse-Methoden

Um eine hohe Anzahl an Fragestellungen zu beantworten, hat der Synop Analyzer eine Vielzahl an vorkonfigurierten Analyse- und Data-Mining-Verfahren (siehe Grafik) implementiert. Daten zu verstehen wird durch Datenvisualisierung stark vereinfacht. Die multivariate Analyse ist quasi interaktives Data-Mining, welches auch von Fachanwendern schnell genutzt wird. Ad hoc Fragen werden unmittelbar beantwortet – es entstehen aber auch neue Fragen dank der interaktiven Visualisierungen. Data-Mining-Modelle errechnen und deren Modellgüte durch eine Testgruppe zu validieren ist in wenigen Minuten möglich. Dank der Performance der In-Memory-Analyse können lange Zeitreihen und alle sinnvollen Datenmerkmale in die Berechnungen einfließen. Dadurch werden mehr Einflussgrößen erkannt und bessere Modelle errechnet. Mustererkennung ist kein Hokuspokus, sondern Dank der exzellenten Trennschärfe werden nachvollziehbare, signifikante Muster gefunden. Dateninkonsistenzen werden quasi per Knopfdruck identifiziert.

synop-systems-module

c. Interaktives User Interface

Sämtliche Analyse-Module sind interaktiv und ohne Programmierung zu nutzen. Direkt nach dem Einlesen werden Grafiken automatisiert, ohne Datenmodellierung, erstellt.  Schulung ist kaum oder minimal notwendig und Anwender können erstmals fundierte statistische Analysen und Data-Mining in wenigen Schritten umsetzen. Data-Miner und Data Scientisten ersparen sich viel Zeit und können sich mehr auf die Interpretation und Ableitung von Handlungsmaßnahmen fokussieren.

d. Einfacher Einstieg – modular und mitwachsend

Der Synop Analyzer ist in unterschiedlichen Versionen verfügbar:

– Desktop-Version: in dieser Version sind alle Kernfunktionen in einer Installation kombiniert. In wenigen Minuten mit den Standard-Betriebssystemen MS-Windows, Apple Mac, Linux installiert. Außer Java-Runtime ist keine weitere Software notwendig. Somit fast, je nach Rechte am PC, ohne IT-Abt. installierbar. Ideal zum Einstieg und Testen, für Data Labs, Abteilungen und für kleine Unternehmen.

– Client/Server-Version: In dieser Version befinden die Analyse-Engines und die Datenhaltung auf dem Server. Das User-Interface ist auf dem Rechner des Anwenders installiert. Eine Cloud-Version ist demnächst verfügbar. Für größere Teams von Analysten mit definierten Zielen.

– Sandbox-Version: entspricht der C/S-Server Version, doch das User-Interface wird spezifisch auf einen Anwenderkreis oder einen Anwendungsfall bereitgestellt. Ein typischer Anwendungsfall ist, dass gewisse Fachbereiche oder Data Science-Teams eine Daten-Sandbox erhalten. In dieser Sandbox werden frei von klassischen BI-Systemen, Ad-hoc Fragen beantwortet und proaktive Analysen erstellt. Die Daten werden per In-Memory-Instanzen bereitgestellt.

Fazit:  Mit dem Synop Analyzer erhalten Unternehmen die Möglichkeit Daten sofort zu analysieren. Aus vorhandenen Daten wird neues Wissen mit bestehenden Ressourcen gewonnen! Der Aufwand für die Einführung ist minimal. Der Preis für die Software liegt ja nach Ausstattung zw. 2.500 Euro und 9.500 Euro. Welche Ausrede soll es jetzt noch geben?

Nur wer früh beginnt, lernt die Hürden und den Nutzen von Datenanalyse und Data-Mining kennen. Zu Beginn wird der Reifegrad klein sein: Datenqualität ist mäßig, Datenzugriffe sind schwierig. Wie in anderen Disziplinen gilt auch hier: Übung macht den Meister und ein Meister ist noch nie von Himmel gefallen.