How the Internet of Things Technology is Impacting the World

Internet of Things, or commonly referred to as IoT, is disrupting industries and arguably making the world a much better place because of it.  Some of the main industries are actually listed below.

Manufacturing

The first industry that is seeing a revival from the Internet of Things technology has to be manufacturing.  The ways that IoT technology is impacting systems and processes are saving companies and a lot of money and making them more efficient for more profits.

On the factory level, they can predict and presume when a machine needs to go, replaced, or improved upon using IoT technology.  On the consumer side of things, they can use the Internet of Things technology to see how customers are using their products, and how they can improve it.

Cars

The automotive industry is also seeing things like connected cars Internet of Things software pop up, and it is changing the industry.  The technology lets users get diagnostic information and it lets them be connected to the internet.

Letting users always be connected to the internet is useful in so many areas, and it really would be hard not to find benefit from it.

Public Transportation

Another thing that is related to the general automotive industry is the transportation industry and how the public moves.  By using the Internet of Things technology, we can track the diagnostics, fuel, and driver patterns of public transportation.

All of this can increase the effectiveness of public transportation and end up saving the public more money if the drivers are more efficient in the routes that they take across cities.

Housing

The real estate and housing market is the biggest in the world, so naturally, they are going to take advantage of something like the Internet of Things software.

We are starting to see the housing sector take up on smart products in their home, but the Internet of Things is going to eventually make the whole home smart.  A refrigerator connected to the internet is most likely coming if you think about it.

While it may seem weird to have everything connected and no appliances are just old school, you can certainly expect this to happen soon.  The only problem is, most of the old appliances need to go bad before people have the urge to go out and get a new appliance that is connected to the internet.

Energy and Utilities

The utility market is exploding with the growth of the IoT software because of its many uses.  Before, we used to have someone come and read your meter or check for leaks.  Now, the connectivity of everything can be monitored from another place, and no one has to show up to your house to read a meter.

It really is a win-win situation for both providers and consumers in the utility and energy sector.  It will be very interesting to see how the Internet of Things impacts the world and flips some industries on their side.

Data Science in Engineering Process - Product Lifecycle Management

How to develop digital products and solutions for industrial environments?

The Data Science and Engineering Process in PLM.

Huge opportunities for digital products are accompanied by huge risks

Digitalization is about to profoundly change the way we live and work. The increasing availability of data combined with growing storage capacities and computing power make it possible to create data-based products, services, and customer specific solutions to create insight with value for the business. Successful implementation requires systematic procedures for managing and analyzing data, but today such procedures are not covered in the PLM processes.

From our experience in industrial settings, organizations start processing the data that happens to be available. This data often does not fully cover the situation of interest, typically has poor quality, and in turn the results of data analysis are misleading. In industrial environments, the reliability and accuracy of results are crucial. Therefore, an enormous responsibility comes with the development of digital products and solutions. Unless there are systematic procedures in place to guide data management and data analysis in the development lifecycle, many promising digital products will not meet expectations.

Various methodologies exist but no comprehensive framework

Over the last decades, various methodologies focusing on specific aspects of how to deal with data were promoted across industries and academia. Examples are Six Sigma, CRISP-DM, JDM standard, DMM model, and KDD process. These methodologies aim at introducing principles for systematic data management and data analysis. Each methodology makes an important contribution to the overall picture of how to deal with data, but none provides a comprehensive framework covering all the necessary tasks and activities for the development of digital products. We should take these approaches as valuable input and integrate their strengths into a comprehensive Data Science and Engineering framework.

In fact, we believe it is time to establish an independent discipline to address the specific challenges of developing digital products, services and customer specific solutions. We need the same kind of professionalism in dealing with data that has been achieved in the established branches of engineering.

Data Science and Engineering as new discipline

Whereas the implementation of software algorithms is adequately guided by software engineering practices, there is currently no established engineering discipline covering the important tasks that focus on the data and how to develop causal models that capture the real world. We believe the development of industrial grade digital products and services requires an additional process area comprising best practices for data management and data analysis. This process area addresses the specific roles, skills, tasks, methods, tools, and management that are needed to succeed.

Figure: Data Science and Engineering as new engineering discipline

More than in other engineering disciplines, the outputs of Data Science and Engineering are created in repetitions of tasks in iterative cycles. The tasks are therefore organized into workflows with distinct objectives that clearly overlap along the phases of the PLM process.

Feasibility of Objectives
  Understand the business situation, confirm the feasibility of the product idea, clarify the data infrastructure needs, and create transparency on opportunities and risks related to the product idea from the data perspective.
Domain Understanding
  Establish an understanding of the causal context of the application domain, identify the influencing factors with impact on the outcomes in the operational scenarios where the digital product or service is going to be used.
Data Management
  Develop the data management strategy, define policies on data lifecycle management, design the specific solution architecture, and validate the technical solution after implementation.
Data Collection
  Define, implement and execute operational procedures for selecting, pre-processing, and transforming data as basis for further analysis. Ensure data quality by performing measurement system analysis and data integrity checks.
Modeling
  Select suitable modeling techniques and create a calibrated prediction model, which includes fitting the parameters or training the model and verifying the accuracy and precision of the prediction model.
Insight Provision
  Incorporate the prediction model into a digital product or solution, provide suitable visualizations to address the information needs, evaluate the accuracy of the prediction results, and establish feedback loops.

Real business value will be generated only if the prediction model at the core of the digital product reliably and accurately reflects the real world, and the results allow to derive not only correct but also helpful conclusions. Now is the time to embrace the unique chances by establishing professionalism in data science and engineering.

Authors

Peter Louis                               

Peter Louis is working at Siemens Advanta Consulting as Senior Key Expert. He has 25 years’ experience in Project Management, Quality Management, Software Engineering, Statistical Process Control, and various process frameworks (Lean, Agile, CMMI). He is an expert on SPC, KPI systems, data analytics, prediction modelling, and Six Sigma Black Belt.


Ralf Russ    

Ralf Russ works as a Principal Key Expert at Siemens Advanta Consulting. He has more than two decades experience rolling out frameworks for development of industrial-grade high quality products, services, and solutions. He is Six Sigma Master Black Belt and passionate about process transparency, optimization, anomaly detection, and prediction modelling using statistics and data analytics.4


Data Science für Smart Home im familiengeführten Unternehmen Miele

Dr. Florian Nielsen ist Principal for AI und Data Science bei Miele im Bereich Smart Home und zuständig für die Entwicklung daten-getriebener digitaler Produkte und Produkterweiterungen. Der studierte Informatiker promovierte an der Universität Ulm zum Thema multimodale kognitive technische Systeme.

Data Science Blog: Herr Dr. Nielsen, viele Unternehmen und Anwender reden heute schon von Smart Home, haben jedoch eher ein Remote Home. Wie machen Sie daraus tatsächlich ein Smart Home?

Tatsächlich entspricht das auch meiner Wahrnehmung. Die bloße Steuerung vernetzter Produkte über digitale Endgeräte macht aus einem vernetzten Produkt nicht gleich ein „smartes“. Allerdings ist diese Remotefunktion ein notwendiges Puzzlestück in der Entwicklung von einem nicht vernetzten Produkt, über ein intelligentes, vernetztes Produkt hin zu einem Ökosystem von sich ergänzenden smarten Produkten und Services. Vernetzte Produkte, selbst wenn sie nur aus der Ferne gesteuert werden können, erzeugen Daten und ermöglichen uns die Personalisierung, Optimierung oder gar Automatisierung von Produktfunktionen basierend auf diesen Daten voran zu treiben. „Smart“ wird für mich ein Produkt, wenn es sich beispielsweise besser den Bedürfnissen des Nutzers anpasst oder über Assistenzfunktionen eine Arbeitserleichterung im Alltag bietet.

Data Science Blog: Smart Home wiederum ist ein großer Begriff, der weit mehr als Geräte für Küchen und Badezimmer betrifft. Wie weit werden Sie hier ins Smart Home vordringen können?

Smart Home ist für mich schon fast ein verbrannter Begriff. Der Nutzer assoziiert hiermit doch vor allem die Steuerung von Heizung und Rollladen. Im Prinzip geht es doch um eine Vision in der sich smarte, vernetzte Produkt in ein kontextbasiertes Ökosystem einbetten um den jeweiligen Nutzer in seinem Alltag, nicht nur in seinem Zuhause, Mehrwert mit intelligenten Produkten und Services zu bieten. Für uns fängt das beispielsweise nicht erst beim Starten des Kochprozesses mit Miele-Geräten an, sondern deckt potenziell die komplette „User Journey“ rund um Ernährung (z. B. Inspiration, Einkaufen, Vorratshaltung) und Kochen ab. Natürlich überlegen wir verstärkt, wie Produkte und Services unser existierendes Produktportfolio ergänzen bzw. dem Nutzer zugänglicher machen könnten, beschränken uns aber hierauf nicht. Ein zusätzlicher für uns als Miele essenzieller Aspekt ist allerdings auch die Privatsphäre des Kunden. Bei der Bewertung potenzieller Use-Cases spielt die Privatsphäre unserer Kunden immer eine wichtige Rolle.

Data Science Blog: Die meisten Data-Science-Abteilungen befassen sich eher mit Prozessen, z. B. der Qualitätsüberwachung oder Prozessoptimierung in der Produktion. Sie jedoch nutzen Data Science als Komponente für Produkte. Was gibt es dabei zu beachten?

Kundenbedürfnisse. Wir glauben an nutzerorientierte Produktentwicklung und dementsprechend fängt alles bei uns bei der Identifikation von Bedürfnissen und potenziellen Lösungen hierfür an. Meist starten wir mit „Design Thinking“ um die Themen zu identifizieren, die für den Kunden einen echten Mehrwert bieten. Wenn dann noch Data Science Teil der abgeleiteten Lösung ist, kommen wir verstärkt ins Spiel. Eine wesentliche Herausforderung ist, dass wir oft nicht auf der grünen Wiese starten können. Zumindest wenn es um ein zusätzliches Produktfeature geht, das mit bestehender Gerätehardware, Vernetzungsarchitektur und der daraus resultierenden Datengrundlage zurechtkommen muss. Zwar sind unsere neuen Produktgenerationen „Remote Update“-fähig, aber auch das hilft uns manchmal nur bedingt. Dementsprechend ist die Antizipation von Geräteanforderungen essenziell. Etwas besser sieht es natürlich bei Umsetzungen von cloud-basierten Use-Cases aus.

Data Science Blog: Es heißt häufig, dass Data Scientists kaum zu finden sind. Ist Recruiting für Sie tatsächlich noch ein Thema?

Data Scientists, hier mal nicht interpretiert als Mythos „Unicorn“ oder „Full-Stack“ sind natürlich wichtig, und auch nicht leicht zu bekommen in einer Region wie Gütersloh. Aber Engineers, egal ob Data, ML, Cloud oder Software generell, sind der viel wesentlichere Baustein für uns. Für die Umsetzung von Ideen braucht es nun mal viel Engineering. Es ist mittlerweile hinlänglich bekannt, dass Data Science einen zwar sehr wichtigen, aber auch kleineren Teil des daten-getriebenen Produkts ausmacht. Mal abgesehen davon habe ich den Eindruck, dass immer mehr „Data Science“- Studiengänge aufgesetzt werden, die uns einerseits die Suche nach Personal erleichtern und andererseits ermöglichen Fachkräfte einzustellen die nicht, wie früher einen PhD haben (müssen).

Data Science Blog: Sie haben bereits einige Analysen erfolgreich in Ihre Produkte integriert. Welche Herausforderungen mussten dabei überwunden werden? Und welche haben Sie heute noch vor sich?

Wir sind, wie viele Data-Science-Abteilungen, noch ein relativ junger Bereich. Bei den meisten unserer smarten Produkte und Services stecken wir momentan in der MVP-Entwicklung, deshalb gibt es einige Herausforderungen, die wir aktuell hautnah erfahren. Dies fängt, wie oben erwähnt, bei der Berücksichtigung von bereits vorhandenen Gerätevoraussetzungen an, geht über mitunter heterogene, inkonsistente Datengrundlagen, bis hin zur Etablierung von Data-Science- Infrastruktur und Deploymentprozessen. Aus meiner Sicht stehen zudem viele Unternehmen vor der Herausforderung die Weiterentwicklung und den Betrieb von AI bzw. Data- Science- Produkten sicherzustellen. Verglichen mit einem „fire-and-forget“ Mindset nach Start der Serienproduktion früherer Zeiten muss ein Umdenken stattfinden. Daten-getriebene Produkte und Services „leben“ und müssen dementsprechend anders behandelt und umsorgt werden – mit mehr Aufwand aber auch mit der Chance „immer besser“ zu werden. Deshalb werden wir Buzzwords wie „MLOps“ vermehrt in den üblichen Beraterlektüren finden, wenn es um die nachhaltige Generierung von Mehrwert von AI und Data Science für Unternehmen geht. Und das zu Recht.

Data Science Blog: Data Driven Thinking wird heute sowohl von Mitarbeitern in den Fachbereichen als auch vom Management verlangt. Gerade für ein Traditionsunternehmen wie Miele sicherlich eine Herausforderung. Wie könnten Sie diese Denkweise im Unternehmen fördern?

Data Driven Thinking kann nur etabliert werden, wenn überhaupt der Zugriff auf Daten und darauf aufbauende Analysen gegeben ist. Deshalb ist Daten-Demokratisierung der wichtigste erste Schritt. Aus meiner Perspektive geht es darum initial die Potenziale aufzuzeigen, um dann mithilfe von Daten Unsicherheiten zu reduzieren. Wir haben die Erfahrung gemacht, dass viele Fachbereiche echtes Interesse an einer daten-getriebenen Analyse ihrer Hypothesen haben und dankbar für eine daten-getriebene Unterstützung sind. Miele war und ist ein sehr innovatives Unternehmen, dass „immer besser“ werden will. Deshalb erfahren wir momentan große Unterstützung von ganz oben und sind sehr positiv gestimmt. Wir denken, dass ein Schritt in die richtige Richtung bereits getan ist und mit zunehmender Zahl an Multiplikatoren ein „Data Driven Thinking“ sich im gesamten Unternehmen etablieren kann.

Interview: Künstliche Intelligenz in der Pharma-Forschung und -Entwicklung

Interview mit Anna Bauer-Mehren, Head of Data Science in der Pharma-Forschung und -Entwicklung bei Roche in Penzberg

Frau Dr. Bauer-Mehren ist Head of Data Science im Bereich Pharma-Forschung und -Entwicklung bei Roche in Penzberg. Sie studierte Bioinformatik an der LMU München und schloss ihre Promotion im Bereich Biomedizin an der Pompeu Fabra Universität im Jahr 2010 in Spanien ab. Heute befasst sie sich mit dem Einsatz von Data Science zur Verbesserung der medizinischen Produkte und Prozesse bei Roche. Ferner ist sie Speaker der Predictive Analytics World Healthcare (Virtual Conference, Mai 2020).

Data Science Blog: Frau Bauer-Mehren, welcher Weg hat Sie bis an die Analytics-Spitze bei Roche geführt?

Ehrlich gesagt bin ich eher zufällig zum Thema Data Science gekommen. In der Schule fand ich immer die naturwissenschaftlich-mathematischen Fächer besonders interessant. Deshalb wollte ich eigentlich Mathematik studieren. Aber dann wurde in München, wo ich aufgewachsen und zur Schule gegangen bin, ein neuer Studiengang eingeführt: Bioinformatik. Diese Kombination aus Biologie und Informatik hat mich so gereizt, dass ich die Idee des Mathe-Studiums verworfen habe. Im Bioinformatik-Studium ging es unter anderem um Sequenzanalysen, etwa von Gen- oder Protein-Sequenzen, und um Machine Learning. Nach dem Masterabschluss habe ich an der Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona in biomedizinischer Informatik promoviert. In meiner Doktorarbeit und auch danach als Postdoktorandin an der Stanford School of Medicine habe ich mich mit dem Thema elektronische Patientenakten beschäftigt. An beiden Auslandsstationen kam ich auch immer wieder in Berührung mit Themen aus dem Pharma-Bereich. Bei meiner Rückkehr nach Deutschland hatte ich die Pharmaforschung als Perspektive für meine berufliche Zukunft fest im Blick. Somit kam ich zu Roche und leite seit 2014 die Abteilung Data Science in der Pharma-Forschung und -Entwicklung.

Data Science Blog: Was sind die Kernfunktionen der Data Science in Ihrem Bereich der Pharma-Forschung und -Entwicklung?

Ich bin Abteilungsleiterin für Data Science von pREDi (Pharma Research and Early Development Informatics), also von Roches Pharma-Forschungsinformatik. Dieser Bereich betreut alle Schritte von der Erhebung der Daten bis zur Auswertung und unterstützt alle Forschungsgebiete von Roche, von den Neurowissenschaften und der Onkologie bis hin zu unseren Biologie- und Chemielaboren, die die Medikamente herstellen. Meine Abteilung ist für die Auswertung der Daten zuständig. Wir beschäftigen uns damit, Daten so aufzubereiten und auszuwerten, dass daraus neue Erkenntnisse für die Erforschung und Entwicklung sowie die Optimierung von pharmazeutischen Produkten und Therapien gewonnen werden könnten. Das heißt, wir wollen die Daten verstehen, interpretieren und zum Beispiel einen Biomarker finden, der erklärt, warum manche Patienten auf ein Medikament ansprechen und andere nicht.

Data Science Blog: Die Pharmaindustrie arbeitet schon seit Jahrzehnten mit Daten z. B. über Diagnosen, Medikationen und Komplikationen. Was verbessert sich hier gerade und welche Innovationen geschehen hier?

Für die medizinische Forschung ist die Qualität der Daten sehr wichtig. Wenn ein Medikament entwickelt wird, fallen sehr große Datenmengen an. Früher hat niemand dafür gesorgt, dass diese Daten so strukturiert und aufbereitet werden, dass sie später auch in der Forschung oder bei der Entwicklung anderer Medikamente genutzt werden können. Es gab noch kein Bewusstsein dafür, dass die Daten auch über den eigentlichen Zweck ihrer Erhebung hinaus wertvoll sein könnten. Das hat sich mittlerweile deutlich verbessert, auch dank des Bereichs Data Science. Heute ist es normal, die eigenen Daten „FAIR“ zu machen. Das Akronym FAIR steht für findable, accessible, interoperable und reusable. Das heißt, dass man die Daten so sauber managen muss, dass Forscher oder andere Entwickler sie leicht finden, und dass diese, wenn sie die Berechtigung dafür haben, auch wirklich auf die Daten zugreifen können. Außerdem müssen Daten aus unterschiedlichen Quellen zusammengebracht werden können. Und man muss die Daten auch wiederverwenden können.

Data Science Blog: Was sind die Top-Anwendungsfälle, die Sie gerade umsetzen oder für die Zukunft anstreben?

Ein Beispiel, an dem wir zurzeit viel forschen, ist der Versuch, so genannte Kontrollarme in klinischen Studien zu erstellen. In einer klinischen Studie arbeitet man ja immer mit zwei Patientengruppen: Eine Gruppe der Patienten bekommt das Medikament, das getestet werden soll, während die anderen Gruppe, die Kontrollgruppe, beispielsweise ein Placebo oder eine Standardtherapie erhält. Und dann wird natürlich verglichen, welche der zwei Gruppen besser auf die Therapie anspricht, welche Nebenwirkungen auftreten usw. Wenn wir jetzt in der Lage wären, diesen Vergleich anhand von schon vorhanden Patientendaten durchzuführen, quasi mit virtuellen Patienten, dann würden wir uns die Kontrollgruppe bzw. einen Teil der Kontrollgruppe sparen. Wir sprechen hierbei auch von virtuellen oder externen Kontrollarmen. Außerdem würden wir dadurch auch Zeit und Kosten sparen: Neue Medikamente könnten schneller entwickelt und zugelassen werden, und somit den ganzen anderen Patienten mit dieser speziellen Krankheit viel schneller helfen.

Data Science Blog: Mit welchen analytischen Methoden arbeiten Sie und welche Tools stehen dabei im Fokus?

Auch wir arbeiten mit den gängigen Programmiersprachen und Frameworks. Die meisten Data Scientists bevorzugen R und/oder Python, viele verwenden PyTorch oder auch TensorFlow neben anderen.  Generell nutzen wir durchaus viel open-source, lizenzieren aber natürlich auch Lösungen ein. Je nachdem um welche Fragestellungen es sich handelt, nutzen wir eher statistische Modelle- Wir haben aber auch einige Machine Learning und Deep Learning use cases und befassen uns jetzt auch stark mit der Operationalisierung von diesen Modellen. Auch Visualisierung ist sehr wichtig, da wir die Ergebnisse und Modelle ja mit Forschern teilen, um die richtigen Entscheidungen für die Forschung und Entwicklung zu treffen. Hier nutzen wir z.B. auch RShiny oder Spotfire.

Data Science Blog: Was sind Ihre größten Herausforderungen dabei?

In Deutschland ist die Nutzung von Patientendaten noch besonders schwierig, da die Daten hier, anders als beispielsweise in den USA, dem Patienten gehören. Hier müssen erst noch die notwendigen politischen und rechtlichen Rahmenbedingungen geschaffen werden. Das Konzept der individualisierten Medizin funktioniert aber nur auf Basis von großen Datenmengen. Aktuell müssen wir uns also noch um die Fragen kümmern, wo wir die Datenmengen, die wir benötigen, überhaupt herbekommen. Leider sind die Daten von Patienten, ihren Behandlungsverläufen etc. in Deutschland oft noch nicht einmal digitalisiert. Zudem sind die Daten meist fragmentiert und auch in den kommenden Jahren wird uns sicherlich noch die Frage beschäftigen, wie wir die Daten so sinnvoll erheben und sammeln können, dass wir sie auch integrieren können. Es gibt Patientendaten, die nur der Arzt erhebt. Dann gibt es vielleicht noch Daten von Fitnessarmbändern oder Smartphones, die auch nützlich wären. Das heißt, dass wir aktuell, auch intern, noch vor der Herausforderung stehen, dass wir die Daten, die wir in unseren klinischen Studien erheben, nicht ganz so einfach mit den restlichen Datenmengen zusammenbringen können – Stichwort FAIRification. Zudem reicht es nicht nur, Daten zu besitzen oder Zugriff auf Daten zu haben, auch die Datenqualität und -organisation sind entscheidend. Ich denke, es ist sehr wichtig, genau zu verstehen, um was für Daten es sich handelt, wie diese Erhoben wurden und welche (wissenschaftliche) Frage ich mit den Daten beantworten möchte. Ein gutes Verständnis der Biologie bzw. Medizin und der dazugehörigen Daten sind also für uns genauso wichtig wie das Verständnis von Methoden des Machine Learning oder der Statistik.

Data Science Blog: Wie gehen Sie dieses Problem an? Arbeiten Sie hier mit dedizierten Data Engineers? Binden Sie Ihre Partner ein, die über Daten verfügen? Freuen Sie sich auf die Vorhaben der Digitalisierung wie der digitalen Patientenakte?

Roche hat vor ein paar Jahren die Firma Flatiron aus den USA übernommen. Diese Firma bereitet Patientendaten zum Beispiel aus der Onkologie für Krankenhäuser und andere Einrichtungen digital auf und stellt sie für unsere Forschung – natürlich in anonymisierter Form – zur Verfügung. Das ist möglich, weil in den USA die Daten nicht den Patienten gehören, sondern dem, der sie erhebt und verwaltet. Zudem schaut Roche auch in anderen Ländern, welche patientenbezogenen Daten verfügbar sind und sucht dort nach Partnerschaften. In Deutschland ist der Schritt zur elektronischen Patientenakte (ePA) sicherlich der richtige, wenn auch etwas spät im internationalen Vergleich. Dennoch sind die Bestrebungen richtig und ich erlebe auch in Deutschland immer mehr Offenheit für eine Wiederverwendung der Daten, um die Forschung voranzutreiben und die Patientenversorgung zu verbessern.

Data Science Blog: Sollten wir Deutsche uns beim Datenschutz lockern, um bessere medizinische Diagnosen und Behandlungen zu erhalten? Was wäre Ihr Kompromiss-Vorschlag?

Generell finde ich Datenschutz sehr wichtig und erachte unser Datenschutzgesetz in Deutschland als sehr sinnvoll. Ich versuche aber tatsächlich auf Veranstaltungen und bei anderen Gelegenheiten Vertreter der Politik und der Krankenkassen immer wieder darauf aufmerksam zu machen, wie wichtig und wertvoll für die Gesellschaft eine Nutzung der Versorgungsdaten in der Pharmaforschung wäre. Aber bei der Lösung der Problematik kommen wir in Deutschland nur sehr langsam voran. Ich sehe es kritisch, dass viel um dieses Thema diskutiert wird und nicht einfach mal Modelle ausprobiert werden. Wenn man die Patienten fragen würde, ob sie ihre Daten für die Forschung zur Verfügung stellen möchte, würden ganz viele zustimmen. Diese Bereitschaft vorher abzufragen, wäre technisch auch möglich. Ich würde mir wünschen, dass man in kleinen Pilotprojekten mal schaut, wie wir hier mit unserem Datenschutzgesetz zu einer ähnlichen Lösung wie beispielsweise Flatiron in den USA kommen können. Ich denke auch, dass wir mehr und mehr solcher Pilotprojekte sehen werden.

Data Science Blog: Gehört die Zukunft weiterhin den Data Scientists oder eher den selbstlernenden Tools, die Analysen automatisiert für die Produkt- oder Prozessverbesserung entwickeln und durchführen?

In Bezug auf Künstliche Intelligenz (KI) gibt es ein interessantes Sprichwort: Garbage in, Garbage out. Wenn ich also keine hochqualitativen Daten in ein Machine Learning Modell reinstecke, dann wird höchstwahrscheinlich auch nichts qualitativ Hochwertiges rauskommen. Das ist immer die Illusion, die beim Gedanken an KI entsteht: Ich lass einfach mal die KI über diesen Datenwust laufen und dann wird die gute Muster erkennen und wird mir sagen, was funktioniert. Das ist aber nicht so. Ich brauche schon gute Daten, ich muss die Daten gut organisieren und gut verstehen, damit meine KI wirklich etwas Sinnvolles berechnen kann. Es reichen eben nicht irgendwelche Daten, sondern die Daten müssen auch eine hohe Qualität haben, da sie sich sonst nicht integrieren und damit auch nicht interpretieren lassen. Dennoch arbeiten wir auch mit der Vision “Data Science” daran, immer mehr zu demokratisieren, d.h. es möglichst vielen Forschern zu ermöglichen, die Daten selbst auszuwerten, oder eben gewisse Prozessschritte in der Forschung durch KI zu ersetzen. Auch hierbei ist es wichtig, genau zu verstehen, was in welchem Bereich möglich ist. Und wieder denke ich, dass die richtige Erfassung/Qualität der Daten auch hier das A und O ist und dennoch oft unterschätzt wird.

Data Science Blog: Welches Wissen und welche Erfahrung setzen Sie für Ihre Data Scientists voraus? Und nach welchen Kriterien stellen Sie Data Science Teams für Ihre Projekte zusammen?

Generell sucht Roche als Healthcare-Unternehmen Bewerber mit einem Hintergrund in Informatik und Life Sciences zum Beispiel über ein Nebenfach oder einen Studiengang wie Biotechnologie oder Bioinformatik. Das ist deswegen wichtig, weil man bei Roche in allen Projekten mit Medizinern, Biologen oder Chemikern zusammenarbeitet, deren Sprache und Prozesse man verstehen sollte. Immer wichtiger werden zudem Experten für Big Data, Datenanalyse, Machine Learning, Robotics, Automatisierung und Digitalisierung.

Data Science Blog: Für alle Studenten, die demnächst ihren Bachelor, beispielsweise in Informatik, Mathematik oder auch der Biologie, abgeschlossen haben, was würden sie diesen jungen Damen und Herren raten, wie sie einen guten Einstieg ins Data Science bewältigen können?

Generell empfehle ich jungen Absolventen herauszufinden für welchen Bereich ihr Herz schlägt: Interessiere ich mich dafür, tief in die Biologie einzusteigen und grundlegende Prozesse zu verstehen? Möchte ich nahe am Patienten sei? Ooder ist mir wichtiger, dass ich auf möglichst große Datenmengen zugreifen kann?  Je nachdem, kann ich als Einstieg durchaus Traineeprogramme empfehlen, die es ermöglichen, in mehrere Abteilungen einer Firma Einblicke zu bekommen, oder würde eher eine Promotion empfehlen. Ich denke, das lässt sich eben nicht pauschalisieren. Für die Arbeit bei Roche ist sicherlich entscheidend, dass ich mich neben der Informatik/Data Science auch für das Thema Medizin und Biologie interessiere. Nur dann kann ich in den interdisziplinären Teams einen wertvollen Beitrag leisten und gleichzeitig auch meiner Leidenschaft folgen. Ich denke, dass das auch in anderen Branchen ähnlich ist.


Frau Bauer-Mehren ist Speaker der Predictive Analytics World Healthcare zum Thema Unlocking the Potential of FAIR Data Using AI at Roche.

The Predictive Analytics World Healthcare is the premier machine learning conference for the Healthcare Industry. Due to the corona virus crisis, this conference will be a virtual edition from 11 to 12 MAY 2020.

Interview – IT-Netzwerk Werke überwachen und optimieren mit Data Analytics

Interview mit Gregory Blepp von NetDescribe über Data Analytics zur Überwachung und Optimierung von IT-Netzwerken

Gregory Blepp ist Managing Director der NetDescribe GmbH mit Sitz in Oberhaching im Süden von München. Er befasst sich mit seinem Team aus Consultants, Data Scientists und IT-Netzwerk-Experten mit der technischen Analyse von IT-Netzwerken und der Automatisierung der Analyse über Applikationen.

Data Science Blog: Herr Blepp, der Name Ihres Unternehmens NetDescribe beschreibt tatsächlich selbstsprechend wofür Sie stehen: die Analyse von technischen Netzwerken. Wo entsteht hier der Bedarf für diesen Service und welche Lösung haben Sie dafür parat?

Unsere Kunden müssen nahezu in Echtzeit eine Visibilität über die Leistungsfähigkeit ihrer Unternehmens-IT haben. Dazu gehört der aktuelle Status der Netzwerke genauso wie andere Bereiche, also Server, Applikationen, Storage und natürlich die Web-Infrastruktur sowie Security.

Im Bankenumfeld sind zum Beispiel die uneingeschränkten WAN Verbindungen für den Handel zwischen den internationalen Börsenplätzen absolut kritisch. Hierfür bieten wir mit StableNetⓇ von InfosimⓇ eine Netzwerk Management Plattform, die in Echtzeit den Zustand der Verbindungen überwacht. Für die unterlagerte Netzwerkplattform (Router, Switch, etc.) konsolidieren wir mit GigamonⓇ das Monitoring.

Für Handelsunternehmen ist die Performance der Plattformen für den Online Shop essentiell. Dazu kommen die hohen Anforderungen an die Sicherheit bei der Übertragung von persönlichen Informationen sowie Kreditkarten. Hierfür nutzen wir SplunkⓇ. Diese Lösung kombiniert in idealer Form die generelle Performance Überwachung mit einem hohen Automatisierungsgrad und bietet dabei wesentliche Unterstützung für die Sicherheitsabteilungen.

Data Science Blog: Geht es den Unternehmen dabei eher um die Sicherheitsaspekte eines Firmennetzwerkes oder um die Performance-Analyse zum Zwecke der Optimierung?

Das hängt von den aktuellen Ansprüchen des Unternehmens ab.
Für viele unserer Kunden standen und stehen zunächst Sicherheitsaspekte im Vordergrund. Im Laufe der Kooperation können wir durch die Etablierung einer konsequenten Performance Analyse aufzeigen, wie eng die Verzahnung der einzelnen Abteilungen ist. Die höhere Visibilität erleichtert Performance Analysen und sie liefert den Sicherheitsabteilung gleichzeitig wichtige Informationen über aktuelle Zustände der Infrastruktur.

Data Science Blog: Haben Sie es dabei mit Big Data – im wörtlichen Sinne – zu tun?

Wir unterscheiden bei Big Data zwischen

  • dem organischen Wachstum von Unternehmensdaten aufgrund etablierter Prozesse, inklusive dem Angebot von neuen Services und
  • wirklichem Big Data, z. B. die Anbindung von Produktionsprozessen an die Unternehmens IT, also durch die Digitalisierung initiierte zusätzliche Prozesse in den Unternehmen.

Beide Themen sind für die Kunden eine große Herausforderung. Auf der einen Seite muss die Leistungsfähigkeit der Systeme erweitert und ausgebaut werden, um die zusätzlichen Datenmengen zu verkraften. Auf der anderen Seite haben diese neuen Daten nur dann einen wirklichen Wert, wenn sie richtig interpretiert werden und die Ergebnisse konsequent in die Planung und Steuerung der Unternehmen einfließen.

Wir bei NetDescribe kümmern uns mehrheitlich darum, das Wachstum und die damit notwendigen Anpassungen zu managen und – wenn Sie so wollen – Ordnung in das Datenchaos zu bringen. Konkret verfolgen wir das Ziel den Verantwortlichen der IT, aber auch der gesamten Organisation eine verlässliche Indikation zu geben, wie es der Infrastruktur als Ganzes geht. Dazu gehört es, über die einzelnen Bereiche hinweg, gerne auch Silos genannt, die Daten zu korrelieren und im Zusammenhang darzustellen.

Data Science Blog: Log-Datenanalyse gibt es seit es Log-Dateien gibt. Was hält ein BI-Team davon ab, einen Data Lake zu eröffnen und einfach loszulegen?

Das stimmt absolut, Log-Datenanalyse gibt es seit jeher. Es geht hier schlichtweg um die Relevanz. In der Vergangenheit wurde mit Wireshark bei Bedarf ein Datensatz analysiert um ein Problem zu erkennen und nachzuvollziehen. Heute werden riesige Datenmengen (Logs) im IoT Umfeld permanent aufgenommen um Analysen zu erstellen.

Nach meiner Überzeugung sind drei wesentliche Veränderungen der Treiber für den flächendeckenden Einsatz von modernen Analysewerkzeugen.

  • Die Inhalte und Korrelationen von Log Dateien aus fast allen Systemen der IT Infrastruktur sind durch die neuen Technologien nahezu in Echtzeit und für größte Datenmengen überhaupt erst möglich. Das hilft in Zeiten der Digitalisierung, wo aktuelle Informationen einen ganz neuen Stellenwert bekommen und damit zu einer hohen Gewichtung der IT führen.
  • Ein wichtiger Aspekt bei der Aufnahme und Speicherung von Logfiles ist heute, dass ich die Suchkriterien nicht mehr im Vorfeld formulieren muss, um dann die Antworten aus den Datensätzen zu bekommen. Die neuen Technologien erlauben eine völlig freie Abfrage von Informationen über alle Daten hinweg.
  • Logfiles waren in der Vergangenheit ein Hilfswerkzeug für Spezialisten. Die Information in technischer Form dargestellt, half bei einer Problemlösung – wenn man genau wusste was man sucht. Die aktuellen Lösungen sind darüber hinaus mit einer GUI ausgestattet, die nicht nur modern, sondern auch individuell anpassbar und für Nicht-Techniker verständlich ist. Somit erweitert sich der Anwenderkreis des “Logfile Managers” heute vom Spezialisten im Security und Infrastrukturbereich über Abteilungsverantwortliche und Mitarbeiter bis zur Geschäftsleitung.

Der Data Lake war und ist ein wesentlicher Bestandteil. Wenn wir heute Technologien wie Apache/KafkaⓇ und, als gemanagte Lösung, Confluent für Apache/KafkaⓇ betrachten, wird eine zentrale Datendrehscheibe etabliert, von der alle IT Abteilungen profitieren. Alle Analysten greifen mit Ihren Werkzeugen auf die gleiche Datenbasis zu. Somit werden die Rohdaten nur einmal erhoben und allen Tools gleichermaßen zur Verfügung gestellt.

Data Science Blog: Damit sind Sie ein Unternehmen das Datenanalyse, Visualisierung und Monitoring verbindet, dies jedoch auch mit der IT-Security. Was ist Unternehmen hierbei eigentlich besonders wichtig?

Sicherheit ist natürlich ganz oben auf die Liste zu setzen. Organisation sind naturgemäß sehr sensibel und aktuelle Medienberichte zu Themen wie Cyber Attacks, Hacking etc. zeigen große Wirkung und lösen Aktionen aus. Dazu kommen Compliance Vorgaben, die je nach Branche schneller und kompromissloser umgesetzt werden.

Die NetDescribe ist spezialisiert darauf den Bogen etwas weiter zu spannen.

Natürlich ist die sogenannte Nord-Süd-Bedrohung, also der Angriff von außen auf die Struktur erheblich und die IT-Security muss bestmöglich schützen. Dazu dienen die Firewalls, der klassische Virenschutz etc. und Technologien wie Extrahop, die durch konsequente Überwachung und Aktualisierung der Signaturen zum Schutz der Unternehmen beitragen.

Genauso wichtig ist aber die Einbindung der unterlagerten Strukturen wie das Netzwerk. Ein Angriff auf eine Organisation, egal von wo aus initiiert, wird immer über einen Router transportiert, der den Datensatz weiterleitet. Egal ob aus einer Cloud- oder traditionellen Umgebung und egal ob virtuell oder nicht. Hier setzen wir an, indem wir etablierte Technologien wie zum Beispiel ´flow` mit speziell von uns entwickelten Software Modulen – sogenannten NetDescibe Apps – nutzen, um diese Datensätze an SplunkⓇ, StableNetⓇ  weiterzuleiten. Dadurch entsteht eine wesentlich erweiterte Analysemöglichkeit von Bedrohungsszenarien, verbunden mit der Möglichkeit eine unternehmensweite Optimierung zu etablieren.

Data Science Blog: Sie analysieren nicht nur ad-hoc, sondern befassen sich mit der Formulierung von Lösungen als Applikation (App).

Das stimmt. Alle von uns eingesetzten Technologien haben ihre Schwerpunkte und sind nach unserer Auffassung führend in ihren Bereichen. InfosimⓇ im Netzwerk, speziell bei den Verbindungen, VIAVI in der Paketanalyse und bei flows, SplunkⓇ im Securitybereich und Confluent für Apache/KafkaⓇ als zentrale Datendrehscheibe. Also jede Lösung hat für sich alleine schon ihre Daseinsberechtigung in den Organisationen. Die NetDescribe hat es sich seit über einem Jahr zur Aufgabe gemacht, diese Technologien zu verbinden um einen “Stack” zu bilden.

Konkret: Gigaflow von VIAVI ist die wohl höchst skalierbare Softwarelösung um Netzwerkdaten in größten Mengen schnell und und verlustfrei zu speichern und zu analysieren. SplunkⓇ hat sich mittlerweile zu einem Standardwerkzeug entwickelt, um Datenanalyse zu betreiben und die Darstellung für ein großes Auditorium zu liefern.

NetDescribe hat jetzt eine App vorgestellt, welche die NetFlow-Daten in korrelierter Form aus Gigaflow, an SplunkⓇ liefert. Ebenso können aus SplunkⓇ Abfragen zu bestimmten Datensätzen direkt an die Gigaflow Lösung gestellt werden. Das Ergebnis ist eine wesentlich erweiterte SplunkⓇ-Plattform, nämlich um das komplette Netzwerk mit nur einem Knopfdruck (!!!).
Dazu schont diese Anbindung in erheblichem Umfang SplunkⓇ Ressourcen.

Dazu kommt jetzt eine NetDescribe StableNetⓇ App. Weitere Anbindungen sind in der Planung.

Das Ziel ist hier ganz pragmatisch – wenn sich SplunkⓇ als die Plattform für Sicherheitsanalysen und für das Data Framework allgemein in den Unternehmen etabliert, dann unterstützen wir das als NetDescribe dahingehend, dass wir die anderen unternehmenskritischen Lösungen der Abteilungen an diese Plattform anbinden, bzw. Datenintegration gewährleisten. Das erwarten auch unsere Kunden.

Data Science Blog: Auf welche Technologien setzen Sie dabei softwareseitig?

Wie gerade erwähnt, ist SplunkⓇ eine Plattform, die sich in den meisten Unternehmen etabliert hat. Wir machen SplunkⓇ jetzt seit über 10 Jahren und etablieren die Lösung bei unseren Kunden.

SplunkⓇ hat den großen Vorteil dass unsere Kunden mit einem dedizierten und überschaubaren Anwendung beginnen können, die Technologie selbst aber nahezu unbegrenzt skaliert. Das gilt für Security genauso wie Infrastruktur, Applikationsmonitoring und Entwicklungsumgebungen. Aus den ständig wachsenden Anforderungen unserer Kunden ergeben sich dann sehr schnell weiterführende Gespräche, um zusätzliche Einsatzszenarien zu entwickeln.

Neben SplunkⓇ setzen wir für das Netzwerkmanagement auf StableNetⓇ von InfosimⓇ, ebenfalls seit über 10 Jahren schon. Auch hier, die Erfahrungen des Herstellers im Provider Umfeld erlauben uns bei unseren Kunden eine hochskalierbare Lösung zu etablieren.

Confluent für Apache/KafkaⓇ ist eine vergleichbar jüngere Lösung, die aber in den Unternehmen gerade eine extrem große Aufmerksamkeit bekommt. Die Etablierung einer zentralen Datendrehscheibe für Analyse, Auswertungen, usw., auf der alle Daten zur Performance zentral zur Verfügung gestellt werden, wird es den Administratoren, aber auch Planern und Analysten künftig erleichtern, aussagekräftige Daten zu liefern. Die Verbindung aus OpenSource und gemanagter Lösung trifft hier genau die Zielvorstellung der Kunden und scheinbar auch den Zahn der Zeit. Vergleichbar mit den Linux Derivaten von Red Hat Linux und SUSE.

VIAVI Gigaflow hatte ich für Netzwerkanalyse schon erwähnt. Hier wird in den kommenden Wochen mit der neuen Version der VIAVI Apex Software ein Scoring für Netzwerke etabliert. Stellen sie sich den MOS score von VoIP für Unternehmensnetze vor. Das trifft es sehr gut. Damit erhalten auch wenig spezialisierte Administratoren die Möglichkeit mit nur 3 (!!!) Mausklicks konkrete Aussagen über den Zustand der Netzwerkinfrastruktur, bzw. auftretende Probleme zu machen. Ist es das Netz? Ist es die Applikation? Ist es der Server? – der das Problem verursacht. Das ist eine wesentliche Eindämmung des derzeitigen Ping-Pong zwischen den Abteilungen, von denen oft nur die Aussage kommt, “bei uns ist alles ok”.

Abgerundet wird unser Software Portfolio durch die Lösung SentinelOne für Endpoint Protection.

Data Science Blog: Inwieweit spielt Künstliche Intelligenz (KI) bzw. Machine Learning eine Rolle?

Machine Learning spielt heute schon ein ganz wesentliche Rolle. Durch konsequentes Einspeisen der Rohdaten und durch gezielte Algorithmen können mit der Zeit bessere Analysen der Historie und komplexe Zusammenhänge aufbereitet werden. Hinzu kommt, dass so auch die Genauigkeit der Prognosen für die Zukunft immens verbessert werden können.

Als konkretes Beispiel bietet sich die eben erwähnte Endpoint Protection von SentinelOne an. Durch die Verwendung von KI zur Überwachung und Steuerung des Zugriffs auf jedes IoT-Gerät, befähigt  SentinelOne Maschinen, Probleme zu lösen, die bisher nicht in größerem Maßstab gelöst werden konnten.

Hier kommt auch unser ganzheitlicher Ansatz zum Tragen, nicht nur einzelne Bereiche der IT, sondern die unternehmensweite IT ins Visier zu nehmen.

Data Science Blog: Mit was für Menschen arbeiten Sie in Ihrem Team? Sind das eher die introvertierten Nerds und Hacker oder extrovertierte Consultants? Was zeichnet Sie als Team fachlich aus?

Nerds und Hacker würde ich unsere Mitarbeiter im technischen Consulting definitiv nicht nennen.

Unser Consulting Team besteht derzeit aus neun Leuten. Jeder ist ausgewiesener Experte für bestimmte Produkte. Natürlich ist es auch bei uns so, dass wir introvertierte Kollegen haben, die zunächst lieber in Abgeschiedenheit oder Ruhe ein Problem analysieren, um dann eine Lösung zu generieren. Mehrheitlich sind unsere technischen Kollegen aber stets in enger Abstimmung mit dem Kunden.

Für den Einsatz beim Kunden ist es sehr wichtig, dass man nicht nur fachlich die Nase vorn hat, sondern dass man auch  kommunikationsstark und extrem teamfähig ist. Eine schnelle Anpassung an die verschiedenen Arbeitsumgebungen und “Kollegen” bei den Kunden zeichnet unsere Leute aus.

Als ständig verfügbares Kommunikationstool nutzen wir einen internen Chat der allen jederzeit zur Verfügung steht, so dass unser Consulting Team auch beim Kunden immer Kontakt zu den Kollegen hat. Das hat den großen Vorteil, dass das gesamte Know-how sozusagen “im Pool” verfügbar ist.

Neben den Consultants gibt es unser Sales Team mit derzeit vier Mitarbeitern*innen. Diese Kollegen*innen sind natürlich immer unter Strom, so wie sich das für den Vertrieb gehört.
Dedizierte PreSales Consultants sind bei uns die technische Speerspitze für die Aufnahme und das Verständnis der Anforderungen. Eine enge Zusammenarbeit mit dem eigentlichen Consulting Team ist dann die  Voraussetzung für die vorausschauende Planung aller Projekte.

Wir suchen übrigens laufend qualifizierte Kollegen*innen. Details zu unseren Stellenangeboten finden Ihre Leser*innen auf unserer Website unter dem Menüpunkt “Karriere”.  Wir freuen uns über jede/n Interessenten*in.

Über NetDescribe:

NetDescribe steht mit dem Claim Trusted Performance für ausfallsichere Geschäftsprozesse und Cloud-Anwendungen. Die Stärke von NetDescribe sind maßgeschneiderte Technologie Stacks bestehend aus Lösungen mehrerer Hersteller. Diese werden durch selbst entwickelte Apps ergänzt und verschmolzen.

Das ganzheitliche Portfolio bietet Datenanalyse und -visualisierung, Lösungskonzepte, Entwicklung, Implementierung und Support. Als Trusted Advisor für Großunternehmen und öffentliche Institutionen realisiert NetDescribe hochskalierbare Lösungen mit State-of-the-Art-Technologien für dynamisches und transparentes Monitoring in Echtzeit. Damit erhalten Kunden jederzeit Einblicke in die Bereiche Security, Cloud, IoT und Industrie 4.0. Sie können agile Entscheidungen treffen, interne und externe Compliance sichern und effizientes Risikomanagement betreiben. Das ist Trusted Performance by NetDescribe.

How Important is Customer Lifetime Value?

This is the third article of article series Getting started with the top eCommerce use cases.

Customer Lifetime Value

Many researches have shown that cost for acquiring a new customer is higher than the cost of retention of an existing customer which makes Customer Lifetime Value (CLV or LTV) one of the most important KPI’s. Marketing is about building a relationship with your customer and quality service matters a lot when it comes to customer retention. CLV is a metric which determines the total amount of money a customer is expected to spend in your business.

CLV allows marketing department of the company to understand how much money a customer is going  to spend over their  life cycle which helps them to determine on how much the company should spend to acquire each customer. Using CLV a company can better understand their customer and come up with different strategies either to retain their existing customers by sending them personalized email, discount voucher, provide them with better customer service etc. This will help a company to narrow their focus on acquiring similar customers by applying customer segmentation or look alike modeling.

One of the main focus of every company is Growth in this competitive eCommerce market today and price is not the only factor when a customer makes a decision. CLV is a metric which revolves around a customer and helps to retain valuable customers, increase revenue from less valuable customers and improve overall customer experience. Don’t look at CLV as just one metric but the journey to calculate this metric involves answering some really important questions which can be crucial for the business. Metrics and questions like:

  1. Number of sales
  2. Average number of times a customer buys
  3. Full Customer journey
  4. How many marketing channels were involved in one purchase?
  5. When the purchase was made?
  6. Customer retention rate
  7. Marketing cost
  8. Cost of acquiring a new customer

and so on are somehow associated with the calculation of CLV and exploring these questions can be quite insightful. Lately, a lot of companies have started to use this metric and shift their focuses in order to make more profit. Amazon is the perfect example for this, in 2013, a study by Consumers Intelligence Research Partners found out that prime members spends more than a non-prime member. So Amazon started focusing on Prime members to increase their profit over the past few years. The whole article can be found here.

How to calculate CLV?

There are several methods to calculate CLV and few of them are listed below.

Method 1: By calculating average revenue per customer

 

Figure 1: Using average revenue per customer

 

Let’s suppose three customers brought 745€ as profit to a company over a period of 2 months then:

CLV (2 months) = Total Profit over a period of time / Number of Customers over a period of time

CLV (2 months) = 745 / 3 = 248 €

Now the company can use this to calculate CLV for an year however, this is a naive approach and works only if the preferences of the customer are same for the same period of time. So let’s explore other approaches.

Method 2

This method requires to first calculate KPI’s like retention rate and discount rate.

 

CLV = Gross margin per lifespan ( Retention rate per month / 1 + Discount rate – Retention rate per month)

Where

Retention rate = Customer at the end of the month – Customer during the month / Customer at the beginning of the month ) * 100

Method 3

This method will allow us to look at other metrics also and can be calculated in following steps:

  1. Calculate average number of transactions per month (T)
  2. Calculate average order value (OV)
  3. Calculate average gross margin (GM)
  4. Calculate customer lifespan in months (ALS)

After calculating these metrics CLV can be calculated as:

 

CLV = T*OV*GM*ALS / No. of Clients for the period

where

Transactions (T) = Total transactions / Period

Average order value (OV) = Total revenue / Total orders

Gross margin (GM) = (Total revenue – Cost of sales/ Total revenue) * 100 [but how you calculate cost of sales is debatable]

Customer lifespan in months (ALS) = 1 / Churn Rate %

 

CLV can be calculated using any of the above mentioned methods depending upon how robust your company wants the analysis to be. Some companies are also using Machine learning models to predict CLV, maybe not directly but they use ML models to predict customer churn rate, retention rate and other marketing KPI’s. Some companies take advantage of all the methods by taking an average at the end.

Multi-touch attribution: A data-driven approach

This is the first article of article series Getting started with the top eCommerce use cases.

What is Multi-touch attribution?

Customers shopping behavior has changed drastically when it comes to online shopping, as nowadays, customer likes to do a thorough market research about a product before making a purchase. This makes it really hard for marketers to correctly determine the contribution for each marketing channel to which a customer was exposed to. The path a customer takes from his first search to the purchase is known as a Customer Journey and this path consists of multiple marketing channels or touchpoints. Therefore, it is highly important to distribute the budget between these channels to maximize return. This problem is known as multi-touch attribution problem and the right attribution model helps to steer the marketing budget efficiently. Multi-touch attribution problem is well known among marketers. You might be thinking that if this is a well known problem then there must be an algorithm out there to deal with this. Well, there are some traditional models  but every model has its own limitation which will be discussed in the next section.

Traditional attribution models

Most of the eCommerce companies have a performance marketing department to make sure that the marketing budget is spent in an agile way. There are multiple heuristics attribution models pre-existing in google analytics however there are several issues with each one of them. These models are:

First touch attribution model

100% credit is given to the first channel as it is considered that the first marketing channel was responsible for the purchase.

Figure 1: First touch attribution model

Last touch attribution model

100% credit is given to the last channel as it is considered that the first marketing channel was responsible for the purchase.

Figure 2: Last touch attribution model

Linear-touch attribution model

In this attribution model, equal credit is given to all the marketing channels present in customer journey as it is considered that each channel is equally responsible for the purchase.

Figure 3: Linear attribution model

U-shaped or Bath tub attribution model

This is most common in eCommerce companies, this model assigns 40% to first and last touch and 20% is equally distributed among the rest.

Figure 4: Bathtub or U-shape attribution model

Data driven attribution models

Traditional attribution models follows somewhat a naive approach to assign credit to one or all the marketing channels involved. As it is not so easy for all the companies to take one of these models and implement it. There are a lot of challenges that comes with multi-touch attribution problem like customer journey duration, overestimation of branded channels, vouchers and cross-platform issue, etc.

Switching from traditional models to data-driven models gives us more flexibility and more insights as the major part here is defining some rules to prepare the data that fits your business. These rules can be defined by performing an ad hoc analysis of customer journeys. In the next section, I will discuss about Markov chain concept as an attribution model.

Markov chains

Markov chains concepts revolves around probability. For attribution problem, every customer journey can be seen as a chain(set of marketing channels) which will compute a markov graph as illustrated in figure 5. Every channel here is represented as a vertex and the edges represent the probability of hopping from one channel to another. There will be an another detailed article, explaining the concept behind different data-driven attribution models and how to apply them.

Figure 5: Markov chain example

Challenges during the Implementation

Transitioning from a traditional attribution models to a data-driven one, may sound exciting but the implementation is rather challenging as there are several issues which can not be resolved just by changing the type of model. Before its implementation, the marketers should perform a customer journey analysis to gain some insights about their customers and try to find out/perform:

  1. Length of customer journey.
  2. On an average how many branded and non branded channels (distinct and non-distinct) in a typical customer journey?
  3. Identify most upper funnel and lower funnel channels.
  4. Voucher analysis: within branded and non-branded channels.

When you are done with the analysis and able to answer all of the above questions, the next step would be to define some rules in order to handle the user data according to your business needs. Some of the issues during the implementation are discussed below along with their solution.

Customer journey duration

Assuming that you are a retailer, let’s try to understand this issue with an example. In May 2016, your company started a Fb advertising campaign for a particular product category which “attracted” a lot of customers including Chris. He saw your Fb ad while working in the office and clicked on it, which took him to your website. As soon as he registered on your website, his boss called him (probably because he was on Fb while working), he closed everything and went for the meeting. After coming back, he started working and completely forgot about your ad or products. After a few days, he received an email with some offers of your products which also he ignored until he saw an ad again on TV in Jan 2019 (after 3 years). At this moment, he started doing his research about your products and finally bought one of your products from some Instagram campaign. It took Chris almost 3 years to make his first purchase.

Figure 6: Chris journey

Now, take a minute and think, if you analyse the entire journey of customers like Chris, you would realize that you are still assigning some of the credit to the touchpoints that happened 3 years ago. This can be solved by using an attribution window. Figure 6 illustrates that 83% of the customers are making a purchase within 30 days which means the attribution window here could be 30 days. In simple words, it is safe to remove the touchpoints that happens after 30 days of purchase. This parameter can also be changed to 45 days or 60 days, depending on the use case.

Figure 7: Length of customer journey

Removal of direct marketing channel

A well known issue that every marketing analyst is aware of is, customers who are already aware of the brand usually comes to the website directly. This leads to overestimation of direct channel and branded channels start getting more credit. In this case, you can set a threshold (say 7 days) and remove these branded channels from customer journey.

Figure 8: Removal of branded channels

Cross platform problem

If some of your customers are using different devices to explore your products and you are not able to track them then it will make retargeting really difficult. In a perfect world these customers belong to same journey and if these can’t be combined then, except one, other paths would be considered as “non-converting path”. For attribution problem device could be thought of as a touchpoint to include in the path but to be able to track these customers across all devices would still be challenging. A brief introduction to deterministic and probabilistic ways of cross device tracking can be found here.

Figure 9: Cross platform clash

How to account for Vouchers?

To better account for vouchers, it can be added as a ‘dummy’ touchpoint of the type of voucher (CRM,Social media, Affiliate or Pricing etc.) used. In our case, we tried to add these vouchers as first touchpoint and also as a last touchpoint but no significant difference was found. Also, if the marketing channel of which the voucher was used was already in the path, the dummy touchpoint was not added.

Figure 10: Addition of Voucher as a touchpoint

Let me know in comments if you would like to add something or if you have a different perspective about this use case.

4 Industries Likely to Be Further Impacted by Data and Analytics in 2020

The possibilities for collecting and analyzing data have skyrocketed in recent years. Company leaders no longer must rely primarily on guesswork when making decisions. They can look at the hard statistics to get verification before making a choice.

Here are four industries likely to notice continuing positive benefits while using data and analytics in 2020.

  1. Transportation

If the transportation sector suffers from problems like late arrivals or buses and trains never showing up, people complain. Many use transportation options to reach work or school, and use long-term solutions like planes to visit relatives or enjoy vacations.

Data analysis helps transportation authorities learn about things such as ridership numbers, the most efficient routes and more. Digging into data can also help professionals in the sector verify when recent changes pay off.

For example, New York City recently enacted a plan called the 14th Street Busway. It stops cars from traveling on 14th Street for more than a couple of blocks from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. every day. One of the reasons for making the change was to facilitate the buses that carry passengers along 14th Street. Data confirms the Busway did indeed encourage people to use the bus. Ridership jumped 24% overall, and by 20% during the morning rush hour.

Data analysis could also streamline air travel. A new solution built with artificial intelligence can reportedly make flights more on time and reduce fuel consumption by improving traffic flow in the terminals. The system also crunches numbers to warn people about long lines in an airport. Then, some passengers might make schedule adjustments to avoid those backups.

These examples prove why it’s smart for transportation professionals to continually see what the data shows. Becoming more aware of what’s happening, where problems exist and how people respond to different transit options could lead to better decision-making.

  1. Agriculture

People in the agriculture industry face numerous challenges, such as climate change and the need to produce food for a growing global population. There’s no single, magic fix for these challenges, but data analytics could help.

For example, MIT researchers are using data to track the effects of interventions on underperforming African farms. The outcome could make it easier for farmers to prove that new, high-tech equipment will help them succeed, which could be useful when applying for loans.

Elsewhere, scientists developed a robot called the TerraSentia that can collect information about a variety of crop traits, such as the height and biomass. The machine then transfers that data to a farmer’s laptop or computer. The robot’s developers say their creation could help farmers figure out which kinds of crops would give the best yields in specific locations, and that the TerraSentia will do it much faster than humans.

Applying data analysis to agriculture helps farmers remove much of the guesswork from what they do. Data can help them predict the outcome of a growing season, target a pest or crop disease problem and more. For these reasons and others, data analysis should remain prominent in agriculture for the foreseeable future.

  1. Energy 

Statistics indicate global energy demand will increase by at least 30% over the next two decades. Many energy industry companies have turned to advanced data analysis technologies to prepare for that need. Some solutions examine rocks to improve the detection of oil wells, while others seek to maximize production over the lifetime of an oilfield.

Data collection in the energy sector is not new, but there’s been a long-established habit of only using a small amount of the overall data collected. That’s now changing as professionals are more frequently collecting new data, plus converting information from years ago into usable data.

Strategic data analysis could also be a good fit for renewable energy efforts. A better understanding of weather forecasts could help energy professionals pinpoint how much a solar panel or farm could contribute to the electrical grid on a given day.

Data analysis helps achieve that goal. For example, some solutions can predict the weather up to a month in advance. Then, it’s possible to increase renewable power generation by up to 10%.

  1. Construction

Construction projects can be costly and time-consuming, although the results are often impressive. Construction professionals must work with a vast amount of data as they meet customers’ needs. Site plans, scheduling specifics, weather information and regulatory documents all help define how the work progresses and whether everything stays under budget.

Construction firms increasingly use big data analysis software to pull all the information into one place and make it easier to use. That data often streamlines customer communications and helps with meeting expectations. In one instance, a construction company depended on a real-time predictive modeling solution and combined it with in-house estimation software.

The outcome enabled instantly showing a client how much a new addition would cost. Other companies that are starting to use big data in construction note that having the option substantially reduces their costs — especially during the planning phase before construction begins. Another company is working on a solution that can analyze job site photos and use them to spot injury risks.

Data Analysis Increases Success

The four industries mentioned here have already enjoyed success by investigating the potential data analysis offers. People should expect them to continue making gains through 2020.

The Importance of Equipment Calibration in Maintaining Data Integrity

Image by Unsplash.

New data-collection technologies, like internet of things (IoT) sensors, enable businesses across industries to collect accurate, minute-to-minute data that they can use to improve business processes and drive decision-making.

However, as data becomes more central to business processes and as more and more data is collected, collection errors become both more possible and more costly.

Here is why equipment calibration is key in maintaining data integrity — in every industry.

Bad Calibration, Bad Data

If a sensor or piece of equipment is improperly calibrated, the data it records could be incomplete, inaccurate or totally incorrect. This misinformation could be detrimental for businesses that integrate data-driven policies and strategies, as they rely on complete, up-to-date and accurate data.

In fact, poor calibration cost manufacturers an average of $1.7 million every year, according to a 2008 survey.

Poorly calibrated sensors and testing equipment can also present risks for consumers — which is why some industries control calibration. In medicine, for example, the FDA regulates equipment calibration. Medical manufacturers must regularly inspect and test monitoring equipment. Effective measuring and test equipment are vital for producing batches of drugs that are useful and safe for patient health.

Bad calibration can even lead to machine failure in businesses that rely on predictive maintenance, which is the use of IoT sensors to collect machine data that can help analysts predict machine failure before it happens. If a business’ data scientists are working with bad information, they are less likely to realize a particular machine or robot is failing. As a result, they won’t intervene with a repair until failure has occurred — a costly error that can effectively shut down some workflows.

Worse, if a business has come to depend on predictive maintenance, it may be caught off-guard by that machine’s failure — even more than if the same company relied on traditional maintenance strategies, rather than predictive analytics.

How to Ensure Equipment Calibration

Fortunately, businesses can ensure the continued quality of their data-collecting processes by committing to regular equipment calibration.

While not all industries are subject to equipment calibration regulations, standards from other industries — like those established by the FDA — could provide useful best practice frameworks.

Businesses that don’t have a dedicated equipment maintenance team can choose an external calibration solution or hire or train a team to handle equipment calibration. Some businesses — such as manufacturers who work with numerous advanced or highly sensitive machines — might need multiple calibration teams or companies with specialized experience.

In general, businesses and manufacturers should establish a regular calibration and inspection schedule. Each time someone calibrates a piece of equipment, they should document that process. Documentation should include the date of the last calibration, the results of any tests conducted and the due date for the next calibration. This process can help establish a pattern of sensor error that equipment maintenance teams can use to better predict and respond to glitches.

Even if a business only uses a certain kind of data from one sensor on a piece of testing equipment, workers should test every sensor on that machine. Errors from other sensors can influence properly calibrated sensors, even if no one is actively using the data they collect. This will become even truer as smart analysis technologies and IoT platforms become more common and algorithms handle larger portions of the data analysis process.

Calibrating Equipment for Accurate Data

Data is one of the most valuable resources available to modern businesses. However, a cost comes with relying too heavily on data and not properly calibrating the equipment that collects that data.

Equipment calibration is key to maintaining data integrity. If testing equipment and sensors aren’t properly calibrated, they can record incorrect data, which may lead to delays or lower product quality. Regular equipment calibration can help businesses ensure the data they receive is accurate and of the highest caliber.

Why Retailers Are Making the Push for Stronger Data Science and AI

Retail relies on what the customer wants and needs at that moment, no matter the size of the company. Making judgments without consumer input would probably work for a little while but will fall flat as soon as the business model becomes outdated. In today’s technology-run world, things can become obsolete in a matter of days or even hours.

Retailers are the businesses most in need of capitalizing on what the customer wants in real-time. They have started to use data science and information from the Internet of Things (IoT) to not only stay in business, but also get ahead of other brands.

Artificial intelligence (AI) adds a new layer by using modern technology. The details of why retailers want to use these new practices are a bit more specific, though.

Data Targets Audiences

By using current customer data compared to information from the IoT, retailers can learn more about their audience and find better means of targeting them. Demographics like age, location and many other factors could affect advertising and even shopping, not to mention holidays throughout the year an audience celebrates.

Websites also need to be customized to suit the target audience. Those that are mobile-friendly and focused on what shoppers want can increase revenue, but the wrong approach can drive away new and existing customers. AI can help companies understand that data and present it back to the customer seamlessly, providing different options for various audiences.

Customer Base Expansion

Customer success should mean business success, as well. Growing a client base is something data science can assist with. However, helping customers grow is another type of service few companies provide but all people appreciate. A business can expand by offering new products and services that are relevant to their audience through the use of data.

Once a company learns what current customers want and begin to fit their needs, it can expand to more audiences. With data science, a business can ensure it does so slowly to give more of what current customers want while also finding new ones. The data can tell what sort of interests they all share so companies can capitalize on the venture.

AI Helps Customer Service

AI helps out customer service on both ends. Employees don’t have to focus on common problems that could easily be resolved, and clients often walk away happier than if they were to speak to a real person. This doesn’t work for every problem, especially ones that are specific in nature, but they can assist with more common issues. This is where chatbots enter the stage.

An AI-supported chatbot can give immediate support, provide suggestions, answer direct questions and offer almost any other form of help needed. Customers get personalized attention, and businesses can work faster toward customer loyalty.

Again, speaking to a real person when they have problems is a big plus for customers, but not for issues they know could be resolved in the time it takes to wait on the line for a representative.

Supply and Demand

Price optimization has taken on a bigger role than it has in the past. Mostly, data science is looking at supply and demand in real-time rather than having price fluctuations occur months after the business loses money. Having the right price can also help create more promotions for products and services, rewarding loyal customers for their shopping.

The data has to be gained from multiple channels by using price optimization tools, which focus on using data correctly in a company’s favor. The information doesn’t just look at supply and demand, but also examines locations, times, customer attitudes, competitor pricing and many other factors. All these pieces of information can be delivered in real-time so prices can be changed accordingly.

Taking the Competition

The thing about data science is that businesses are already utilizing it to their full potential and getting more customers than ever. The only way to get ahead of the competition is to at least start using the tools they’ve had at their disposal for years.

Target was one such company that took up the data helm. During 2012 and 2013, it saw a pretty sizeable dip in sales, but its online sales went up by almost 30% during the same time.

Data and Retail

When running a retail business, especially one that’s branching off into a franchise, using data is imperative. Data science and AI have become extremely important to companies both big and small.

Applying it correctly can help enterprises of any size and in every industry take things to the next level.

Even if a company is just starting out, sticking the first landing with a target audience is a fantastic way to begin the adventure and find success.