The Data Scientist Job and the Future

A dramatic upswing of data science jobs facilitating the rise of data science professionals to encounter the supply-demand gap.

By 2024, a shortage of 250,000 data scientists is predicted in the United States alone. Data scientists have emerged as one of the hottest careers in the data world today. With digitization on the rise, IoT and cognitive technologies have generated a large number of data sets, thus, making it difficult for an organization to unlock the value of these data.

With the constant rise in data science, those fail to upgrade their skill set may be putting themselves at a competitive disadvantage. No doubt data science is still deemed as one of the best job titles today, but the battles for expert professionals in this field is fierce.

The hiring market for a data science professional has gone into overdrive making the competition even tougher. New online institutions have come up with credible certification programs for professionals to get skilled. Not to forget, organizations are in a hunt to hire candidates with data science and big data analytics skills, as these are the top skills that are going around in the market today. In addition to this, it is also said that typically it takes around 45 days for these job roles to be filled, which is five days longer than the average U.S. market.

Data science

One might come across several definitions for data science, however, a simple definition states that it is an accumulation of data, which is arranged and analyzed in a manner that will have an effect on businesses. According to Google, a data scientist is one who has the ability to analyze and interpret complex data, being able to make use of the statistic of a website and assist in business decision making. Also, one needs to be able to choose and build appropriate algorithms and predictive models that will help analyze data in a viable manner to uncover positive insights from it.

A data scientist job is now a buzzworthy career in the IT industry. It has driven a wider workforce to get skilled in this job role, as most organizations are becoming data-driven. It’s pretty obnoxious being a data professional will widen job opportunities and offer more chances of getting lucrative salary packages today. Similarly, let us look at a few points that define the future of data science to be bright.

  • Data science is still an evolving technology

A career without upskilling often remains redundant. To stay relevant in the industry, it is crucial that professionals get themselves upgraded in the latest technologies. Data science evolves to have an abundance of job opportunities in the coming decade. Since, the supply is low, it is a good call for professionals looking to get skilled in this field.

  • Organizations are still facing a challenge using data that is generated

Research by 2018 Data Security Confidence from Gemalto estimated that 65% of the organizations could not analyze or categorized the data they had stored. However, 89% said they could easily analyze the information prior they have a competitive edge. Being a data science professional, one can help organizations make progress with the data that is being gathered to draw positive insights.

  • In-demand skill-set

Most of the data scientists possess to have the in-demand skill set required by the current industry today. To be specific, since 2013 it is said that there has been a 256% increase in the data science jobs. Skills such as Machine Learning, R and Python programming, Predictive analytics, AI, and Data Visualization are the most common skills that employers seek from the candidates of today.

  • A humongous amount of data growing everyday

There are around 5 billion consumers that interact with the internet on a daily basis, this number is set to increase to 6 billion in 2025, thus, representing three-quarters of the world’s population.

In 2018, 33 zettabytes of data were generated and projected to rise to 133 zettabytes by 2025. The production of data will only keep increasing and data scientists will be the ones standing to guard these enterprises effectively.

  • Advancement in career

According to LinkedIn, data scientist was found to be the most promising career of 2019. The top reason for this job role to be ranked the highest is due to the salary compensation people were being awarded, a range of $130,000. The study also predicts that being a data scientist, there are high chances or earning a promotion giving a career advancement score of 9 out of 10.

Precisely, data science is still a fad job and will not cease until the foreseeable future.

Closing the AI-skills gap with Upskilling

Closing the AI-skills gap with Upskilling

Artificial Intelligent or as it is fancily referred as AI, has garnered huge popularity worldwide.  And given the career prospects it has, it definitely should. Almost everyone interested in technology sector has them rushing towards it, especially young and motivated fresh computer science graduates. Compared to other IT-related jobs AI pays way higher salary and have opportunities. According to a Glassdoor report, Data Scientist, one of the many related jobs, is the number one job with good salary, job openings and more. AI-related jobs include Data Scientists, Analysts, Machine Learning Engineer, NLP experts etc.

AI has found applications in almost every industry and thus it has picked up demand. Home assistants – Siri, Ok Google, Amazon Echo — chatbots, and more some of the popular applications of AI.

Increasing adoption of AI across Industry

The advantages of AI like increased productivity has increased its adoption among companies. According to Gartner, 37 percent of enterprise currently use AI in one way or the other. In fact, in the last four year adoption of AI technologies among companies has increased by 270 percent. In telecommunications, for instance, 52 percent of companies have chatbots deployed for better and smoother customer experience. Now, about 49 percent of businesses are now on their way to alter business models to integrate and adopt AI-driven processes. Further, industry leaders have gone beyond and voiced their concerns about companies that are lagging in AI adoption.

Unfortunately, it has been extremely difficult for employers to find right skilled or qualified candidates for AI-related positions. A reports suggests that there are total 300,000 AI professionals are available worldwide, while there’s demand for millions. In a recent survey conducted by Ernst & Young, 51 percent AI professionals told that lack of talent was the biggest impediment in AI adoption.

Further, O’Reilly, in 2018 conducted a survey, which found the lack of AI skills, among other things, was the major reason that was holding companies back from implementing AI.
The major reason for this is the lack of skills among people who aspire to get into AI-related jobs. According to a report, there demand for millions for jobs in AI. However, only a handful of qualified people are available.

Bridging the skill gap in AI-related jobs

Top companies and government around the world have taken up initiatives to close this gap. Google and Amazon, for instance, have dedicated facilities which trains in AI skills.  Google’s Brain Toronto is a dedicated facility to expand their talent in AI.  Similarly, Amazon has facility near University of Cambridge which is dedicated to AI. Most companies either already have a facility or are in the process of setting up one.

In addition to this, governments around the world are also taking initiatives to address the skill gap. For instance, government across the world are pushing towards AI advancement and are develop collaborative plans which aims at delivering more AI skilled professionals. Recently, the white house launched ai.gov which is further helping to promote AI in the US. The website will offer updates related to AI projects across different sectors.

Other than these, companies have taken this upon themselves to reskills their employees and prepare them for future roles. According to a report from Towards Data Science, about 63 percent of companies have in-house training programs to train employees in AI-related skills.

Overall, though there is demand for AI professionals, lack of skilled talent is a major problem.

Roles in Artificial Intelligence
Artificial Intelligence is the most dominant role for which companies hire across artificial Intelligence. Other than that, following are some of the popular roles:

  1. Machine learning Engineer: These are the people who make machines learn with complex algorithms. On advance level, Machine learning engineers are required to have good knowledge of computer vision. According to Indeed, in the last year, demand for Machine Learning Engineer has grown by 344 percent.
  2. NLP Experts: These experts are equipped with the understanding of making machines computer understand human language. Their expertise includes knowledge of how machines understand human language. Text-to-speech technologies are the common areas which require NLP experts. Demand for engineers who can program computers to understand human speech is growing continuously. It was the fast growing skills in Upwork’s list of in-demand freelancing skills. In Q4, 2016, it had grown 200 percent and since then has been on continuously growing.
  3. Big Data Engineers: This is majorly an analytics role. These gather huge amount of data available from sources and analyze it to derive insights and understand patter, which may be further used for machine learning, prediction modelling, natural language processing. In Mckinsey annual report 2018, it had reported that there was shortage of 190,000 big data professionals in the US alone.

Other roles like Data Scientists, Analysts, and more also in great demand. Then, again due to insufficient talent in the market, companies are struggling to hire for these roles.

Self-learning and upskilling
Artificial Intelligence is a continuously growing field and it has been advancing at a very fast pace, and it makes extremely difficult to keep up with in-demand skills. Hence, it is imperative to keep yourself up with demand of the industry, or it is just a matter of time before one becomes redundant.

On an individual level, learning new skills is necessary. One has to be agile and keep learning, and be ready to adapt new technologies. For this, AI training programs and certifications are ideal.  There are numerous AI programs which individuals can take to further learn new skills. AI certifications can immensely boost career opportunities. Certification programs offer a structured approach to learning which benefits in learning mostly practical and executional skills while keeping fluff away. It is more hands-on. Plus, certifications programs qualify only when one has passed practical test which is very advantageous in tech. AI certifications like AIE (Artificial Intelligence Engineer) are quite popular.

Online learning platforms also offer good a resource to learn artificial intelligence. Most schools haven’t yet adapted their curriculum to skill for AI, while most universities and grad schools are in their way to do so. In the meantime, online learning platforms offer a good way to learn AI skills, where one can start from basic and reach to advance skills.

Business Intelligence Organizations

I am often asked how the Business Intelligence department should be set up and how it should interact and collaborate with other departments. First and foremost: There is no magic recipe here, but every company must find the right organization for itself.

Before we can talk about organization of BI, we need to have a clear definition of roles for team members within a BI department.

A Data Engineer (also Database Developer) uses databases to save structured, semi-structured and unstructured data. He or she is responsible for data cleaning, data availability, data models and also for the database performance. Furthermore, a good Data Engineer has at least basic knowledge about data security and data privacy. A Data Engineer uses SQL and NoSQL-Technologies.

A Data Analyst (also BI Analyst or BI Consultant) uses the data delivered by the Data Engineer to create or adjust data models and implementing business logic in those data models and BI dashboards. He or she needs to understand the needs of the business. This job requires good communication and consulting skills as well as good developing skills in SQL and BI Tools such like MS Power BI, Tableau or Qlik.

A Business Analyst (also Business Data Analyst) is a person form any business department who has basic knowledge in data analysis. He or she has good knowledge in MS Excel and at least basic knowledge in data analysis and BI Tools. A Business Analyst will not create data models in databases but uses existing data models to create dashboards or to adjust existing data analysis applications. Good Business Analyst have SQL Skills.

A Data Scientist is a Data Analyst with extended skills in statistics and machine learning. He or she can use very specific tools and analytical methods for finding pattern in unknow or big data (Data Mining) or to predict events based on pattern calculated by using historized data (Predictive Analytics). Data Scientists work mostly with Python or R programming.

Organization Type 1 – Central Approach (Data Lab)

The first type of organization is the data lab approach. This organization form is easy to manage because it’s focused and therefore clear in terms of budgeting. The data delivery is done centrally by experts and their method and technology knowledge. Consequently, the quality expectation of data delivery and data analysis as well as the whole development process is highest here. Also the data governance is simple and the responsibilities clearly adjustable. Not to be underestimated is the aspect of recruiting, because new employees and qualified applicants like to join a central team of experts.

However, this form of organization requires that the company has the right working attitude, especially in the business intelligence department. A centralized business intelligence department acts as a shared service. Accordingly, customer-oriented thinking becomes a prerequisite for the company’s success – and customers here are the other departments that need access to the capacities of those centralized data experts. Communication boundaries must be overcome and ways of simple and effective communication must be found.

Organization Type 2 – Stakeholder Focus Approach

Other companies want to shift more responsibility for data governance, and especially data use and analytics, to those departments where data plays a key role right now. A central business intelligence department manages its own projects, which have a meaning for the entire company. The specialist departments, which have a special need for data analysis, have their own data experts who carry out critical projects for the specialist department. The central Business Intelligence department does not only provide the technical delivery of data, but also through methodical consulting. Although most of the responsibility lies with the Business Intelligence department, some other data-focused departments are at least co-responsible.

The advantage is obvious: There are special data experts who work deeper in the actual departments and feel more connected and responsible to them. The technical-business focus lies on pain points of the company.

However, this form of Ogranization also has decisive disadvantages: The danger of developing isolated solutions that are so special in some specific areas that they will not really work company-wide increases. Typically the company has to deal with asymmetrical growth of data analytics
know-how. Managing data governance is more complex and recruitment is becoming more difficult as the business intelligence department is weakened and smaller, and data professionals for other departments need to have more business focus, which means they are looking for more specialized profiles.

Organization Type 3 – Decentral Approach

Some companies are also taking a more extreme approach in the other direction. The Business Intelligence department now has only Data Engineers building and maintaining the data warehouse or data lake. As a result, the central department only provides data; it is used and analyzed in all other departments, specifically for the respective applications.

The advantage lies in the personal responsibility of the respective departments as „pain points“ of the company are in focus in belief that business departments know their problems and solutions better than any other department does. Highly specialized data experts can understand colleagues of their own department well and there is no no shared service mindset neccessary, except for the data delivery.

Of course, this organizational form has clear disadvantages since many isolated solutions are unavoidable and the development process of each data-driven solution will be inefficient. These insular solutions may work with luck for your own department, but not for the whole company. There is no one single source of truth. The recruiting process is more difficult as it requires more specialized data experts with more business background. We have to expect an asymmetrical growth of data analytics know-how and a difficult data governance.

 

Endspurt Bewerbungsphase: Zertifikatsstudium „Data Science and Big Data“ 2019

Anzeige

Bewerben Sie sich noch bis zum 12. November 2018 für das berufsbegleitende Zertifikatsstudium „Data Science and Big Data“. Die 3. Studiengruppe startet im Februar 2019 an der Technischen Universität Dortmund.

Renommierte Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler vermitteln den Teilnehmerinnen und Teilnehmern die neuesten datenwissenschaftlichen Erkenntnisse und zeigen, wie dieses Wissen praxisnah im eigenen Big-Data Projekt umgesetzt werden kann.

Von der Analyse über das Management bis zur zielgerichteten Darstellung der Ergebnisse lernen die Teilnehmenden dabei Methoden der Disziplinen Statistik, Informatik und Journalistik kennen.

Nähere Informationen finden Sie unter: http://www.zhb.tu-dortmund.de/datascience

Bei Fragen oder für weitere Informationen können Sie sich gerne an Frau Maier wenden: simona.maier@tu-dortmund.de

 

Weiterbildungsmodul: Machine Learning mit Python

Anzeige

Lernen ist ein zentraler Faktor von Intelligenz. Die Realisierung intelligenter Systeme durch Computer, die nicht programmiert sondern angelernt werden, ist das Ziel von Künstlicher Intelligenz. Maschinelles Lernen befasst sich mit den dazu notwendigen Methoden und Algorithmen. Diese formulieren unterschiedliche Lernziele, adressieren diverse Anwendungsgebiete und stellen verschiedene Anforderungen an die vorhandenen Daten.

Jeder der beruflich größere Datenmengen intelligent nutzen will, um aus ihnen einen Mehrwert zu erzeugen, braucht daher zum einen ein Überblickswissen über Maschinelles Lernen. Zum anderen wird ein tieferes algorithmisches Verständnis benötigt, um Aufwände abzuschätzen und durch Anpassungen Erfolgsraten zu erhöhen. Ziele des Angebots ist es daher, Teilnehmerinnen und Teilnehmer in diesem Sinne für Maschinelles Lernen (theoretisch und praktisch) fit zu machen. Wir werden mit Python und zugehörigen Bibliotheken arbeiten, die Open Source und State-of-the-Art Implementierungen anbieten. Auch Aspekte des Maschinellen Lernens in der Cloud werden mit konkreten Beispielen behandelt.

Maschinelles Lernen ist der algorithmische Kern vieler aktueller Technologien und Entwicklungen bei denen es darum geht, aus Daten zu lernen und dann optimale Entscheidungen zu treffen. Die Algorithmen können aber auch künstlerisch tätig werden und sogar träumen. Ein paar Prognosen sagen sogar voraus, dass der Computer intelligenter als der Mensch werden wird.

Weiterbildungsangebot der AWW und der TH Brandenburg: Machine Learning mit Python

Die Besonderheit des Weiterbildungsangebotes „Machine Learning mit Python“ ist, dass nicht nur einzelne Algorithmen theoretisch abgehandelt werden. Die praktische Anwendung und das Lösen einer echten Aufgabe stehen im Vordergrund. In einer sogenannten “Data Challenge” können sich die Kursteilnehmer dabei mit den Studierenden der Vorlesung “Data Mining” im Masterstudiengang Informatik der Technischen Hochschule Brandenburg messen.

Beim Maschinellen Lernen verderben viele Köche nicht etwa den Brei, sondern machen ihn besser. Dies geschieht mittels sogenannter Ensemble-Methoden, die mehrere Modelle geeignet kombinieren. Welche zwei Standard-Ansätze es dazu gibt und wie diese funktionieren werden die Teilnehmer ebenfalls im Kurs lernen. Natürlich wird auch „Deep Learning“ als das zurzeit heißeste Gebiet von Maschinellem Lernen ein Thema sein. Damit dies alles gelingt wird als technologische Grundlage Python genutzt.

Mit der Programmiersprache Python ist es möglich sofort interaktiv zu beginnen, so dass man sich ganz auf seine Aufgabe, die Daten und ihre Analyse konzentrieren kann. Auch ohne Informatiker zu sein, kann man so schnell Algorithmen des Maschinellen Lernens anwenden und erste Resultate erzielen. Das geht oft bereits mit 20 bis30 Zeilen Code, so behält man leicht den Überblick.

Mit Python kann man bei seinem vertrauten Betriebssystem bleiben. Python ist plattformunabhängig, so dass man seinen Code überallhin mitnehmen kann. Im Bereich von Machine Learning ist Python mit entsprechenden Bibliotheken sehr gut aufgestellt, oft sind die verfügbaren Algorithmen state-of-the-art. Die Frameworks beim sogenannten Deep Learning, das spektakuläre Resultate in Serie erzeugt, setzen nahezu ausschließlich auf Python. Python ist sehr breit einsetzbar, so dass es auch auf sehr spezifische Themen und Fragestellungen angewendet werden kann. Es wird in vielen unterschiedlichen Gebieten angewendet und weiterentwickelt. Deswegen kennen viele, die ihren Hintergrund nicht in der Informatik haben, Python vielleicht bereits.

Ansprechperson:
Dr. Annette Strauß
T +49 3381 355 750
M annette.strauss@aww-brandenburg.de

Interview – Künstliche Intelligenz im Unternehmen & der Mangel an IT-Fachkräften

Interview mit Sebastian van der Meer über den Einsatz von künstlicher Intelligenz im Unternehmen und dem Mangel an IT-Fachkräften

Sebastian van der Meer

Sebastian van der Meer ist Managing Partner der lexoro Gruppe, einem Technologie- und Beratungsunternehmen in den Zukunftsmärkten: Data-Science, Machine-Learning, Big-Data, Robotics und DevOps. Das Leistungsspektrum ist vielschichtig. Sie vermitteln Top-Experten an Unternehmen (Perm & IT-Contracting), arbeiten mit eigenen Teams für innovative Unternehmen an spannenden IT-Projekten und entwickeln zugleich eigene Produkte und Start-Ups in Zukunftsmärkten. Dabei immer im Mittelpunkt: Menschen und deren Verbindung mit exzellenter Technologiekompetenz.

Data Science Blog: Herr van der Meer, wenn man Google News mit den richtigen Stichwörtern abruft, scheinen die Themen Künstliche Intelligenz, Data Science und Machine Learning bei vielen Unternehmen bereits angekommen zu sein – Ist das so?

Das ist eine sehr gute Frage! Weltweit, vor allem in der USA und China, sind diese bereits „angekommen“, wenn man es so formulieren kann. Allerdings sind wir in Europa leider weit hinterher. Dazu gibt es ja bereits viele Studien und Umfragen, die dies beweisen. Vereinzelt gibt es große mittelständische- und Konzernunternehmen in Deutschland, die bereits eigene Einheiten und Teams in diesen Bereich und auch neue Geschäftsbereiche dadurch ermöglicht haben. Hier gibt es bereits tolle Beispiele, was mit K.I. erreichbar ist. Vor allem die Branchen Versicherungs- und Finanzdienstleistungen, Pharma/Life Science und Automotive sind den anderen in Deutschland etwas voraus.

Data Science Blog: Wird das Thema Data Science oder Machine Learning früher oder später für jedes Unternehmen relevant sein? Muss jedes Unternehmen sich mit K.I. befassen?

Data Science, Machine Learning, künstliche Intelligenz – das sind mehr als bloße Hype-Begriffe und entfernte Zukunftsmusik! Wir stecken mitten in massiven strukturellen Veränderungen. Die Digitalisierungswelle der vergangenen Jahre war nur der Anfang. Jede Branche ist betroffen. Schnell kann ein Gefühl von Bedrohung und Angst vor dem Unbekannten aufkommen. Tatsächlich liegen aber nie zuvor dagewesene Chancen und Potentiale vor unseren Füßen. Die Herausforderung ist es diese zu erkennen und dann die notwendigen Veränderungen umzusetzen. Daher sind wir der Meinung, dass jedes Unternehmen sich damit befassen muss und soll, wenn es in der Zukunft noch existieren will.

Wir unterstützen Unternehmen dabei ihre individuellen Herausforderungen, Hürden und Möglichkeiten zu identifizieren, die der große Hype „künstliche Intelligenz“ mit sich bringt. Hier geht es darum genau zu definieren, welche KI-Optionen überhaupt für das Unternehmen existieren. Mit Use-Cases zeigen wir, welchen Mehrwert sie dem Unternehmen bieten. Wenn die K.I. Strategie festgelegt ist, unterstützen wir bei der technischen Implementierung und definieren und rekrutieren bei Bedarf die relevanten Mitarbeiter.

Data Science Blog: Die Politik strebt stets nach Vollbeschäftigung. Die K.I. scheint diesem Leitziel entgegen gerichtet zu sein. Glauben Sie hier werden vor allem Ängste geschürt oder sind die Auswirkungen auf den Arbeitsmarkt durch das Vordringen von K.I. wirklich so gravierend?

Zu diesem Thema gibt es bereits viele Meinungen und Studien, die veröffentlicht worden sind. Eine interessante Studie hat vorhergesagt, dass in den nächsten 5 Jahren, weltweit 1.3 Millionen Stellen/Berufe durch K.I. wegfallen werden. Dafür aber in den gleichen Zeitnahmen 1.7 Millionen neue Stellen und Berufe entstehen werden. Hier gehen die Meinungen aber ganz klar auseinander. Die Einen sehen die Chancen, die Möglichkeiten und die Anderen sehen die Angst oder das Ungewisse. Eins steht fest, der Arbeitsmarkt wird sich in den nächsten 5 bis 10 Jahren komplett verändern und anpassen. Viele Berufe werden wegfallen, dafür werden aber viele neue Berufe hinzukommen. Vor einigen Jahren gab es noch keinen „Data Scientist“ Beruf und jetzt ist es einer der best bezahltesten IT Stellen in Unternehmen. Allein das zeigt doch auch, welche Chancen es in der Zukunft geben wird.

Data Science Blog: Wie sieht der Arbeitsmarkt in den Bereichen Data Science, Machine Learning und Künstliche Intelligenz aus?

Der Markt ist sehr intransparent. Jeder definiert einen Data Scientist anders. Zudem wird sich der Beruf und seine Anforderungen aufgrund des technischen Fortschritts stetig verändern. Der heutige Data Scientist wird sicher nicht der gleiche Data Scientist in 5 oder 10 Jahren sein. Die Anforderungen sind enorm hoch und die Konkurrenz, der sogenannte „War of Talents“ ist auch in Deutschland angekommen. Der Anspruch an Veränderungsbereitschaft und technisch stets up to date und versiert zu sein, ist extrem hoch. Das gleiche gilt auch für die anderen K.I. Berufe von heute, wie z.B. den Computer Vision Engineer, der Robotics Spezialist oder den DevOps Engineer.

Data Science Blog: Worauf sollten Unternehmen vor, während und nach der Einstellung von Data Scientists achten?

Das Allerwichtigste ist der Anfang. Es sollte ganz klar definiert sein, warum die Person gesucht wird, was die Aufgaben sind und welche Ergebnisse sich das Unternehmen mit der Einstellung erwartet bzw. erhofft. Oftmals hören wir von Unternehmen, dass sie Spezialisten in dem Bereich Data Science / Machine Learning suchen und große Anforderungen haben, aber diese gar nicht umgesetzt werden können, weil z.B. die Datengrundlage im Unternehmen fehlt. Nur 5% der Data Scientists in unserem Netzwerk sind der Ansicht, dass vorhandene Daten in ihrem Unternehmen bereits optimal verwertet werden. Der Data Scientist sollte schnell ins Unternehmen integriert werde um schnellstmöglich Ergebnisse erzielen zu können. Um die wirklich guten Leute für sich zu gewinnen, muss ein Unternehmen aber auch bereit sein finanziell tiefer in die Tasche zu greifen. Außerdem müssen die Unternehmen den top Experten ein technisch attraktives Umfeld bieten, daher sollte auch die Unternehmen stets up-to-date sein mit der heutigen Technologie.

Data Science Blog: Was macht einen guten Data Scientist eigentlich aus?

Ein guter Data Scientist sollte in folgenden Bereichen sehr gut aufgestellt sein: Präsentations- und Kommunikationsfähigkeiten, Machine Learning Kenntnisse, Programmiersprachen und ein allgemeines Business-Verständnis. Er sollte sich stets weiterentwickeln und von den Trends up to date sein. Auf relevanten Blogs, wie dieser Data Science Blog, aktiv sein und sich auf Messen/Meetups etc bekannt machen.

Außerdem sollte er sich mit uns in Verbindung setzen. Denn ein weiterer, wie wir finden, sehr wichtiger Punkt, ist es sich gut verkaufen zu können. Hierzu haben wir uns in dem letzten Jahr sehr viel Gedanken gemacht und auch Studien durchgeführt. Wir wollen es jedem K.I. -Experten ermöglichen einen eigenen Fingerabdruck zu haben. Bei uns ist dies als der SkillPrint bekannt. Hierfür haben wir eine holistische Darstellung entwickelt, die jeden Kandidaten einen individuellen Fingerabdruck seiner Kompetenzen abbildet. Hierfür durchlaufen die Kandidaten einen Online-Test, der von uns mit top K.I. Experten entwickelt wurde. Dieser bildet folgendes ab: Methoden Expertise, Applied Data Science Erfahrung, Branchen know-how, Technology & Tools und Business knowledge. Und die immer im Detail in 3 Ebenen.

Der darauf entstehende SkillPrint/Fingerprint ist ein Qualitätssigel für den Experten und damit auch für das Unternehmen, das den Experten einstellt.

Interesse an einem Austausch zu verschiedenen Karriereperspektiven im Bereich Data Science/ Machine Learning? Dann registrieren Sie sich direkt auf dem lexoro Talent Check-In und ein lexoro-Berater wird sich bei Ihnen melden.

Interview – Von der Utopie zur Realität der KI: Möglichkeiten und Grenzen

Interview mit Prof. Dr. Sven Buchholz über die Evolution von der Utopie zur Realität der KI – Möglichkeiten und Grenzen

Prof. Sven Buchholz hat eine Professur für die Fachgebiete Data Management und Data Mining am Fachbereich Informatik und Medien an der TH Brandenburg inne. Er ist wissenschaftlicher Leiter des an der Agentur für wissenschaftliche Weiterbildung und Wissenstransfer – AWW e. V. angesiedelten Projektes „Datenkompetenz 4.0 für eine digitale Arbeitswelt“ und Dozent des Vertiefungskurses „Machine Learning mit Python“, der seit 2018 von der AWW e. V. in Kooperation mit der TH Brandenburg angeboten wird.

Data Science Blog: Herr Prof. Buchholz, künstliche Intelligenz ist selbst für viele datenaffine Fachkräfte als Begriff noch zu abstrakt und wird mit Filmen wir A.I. von Steven Spielberg oder Terminator assoziiert. Gibt es möglicherweise unterscheidbare Stufen bzw. Reifegrade einer KI?

Für den Reifegrad einer KI könnte man, groß gedacht, ihre kognitiven Leistungen bewerten. Was Kognition angeht, dürfte Hollywood zurzeit aber noch meilenweit führen.  Man kann natürlich KIs im selben Einsatzgebiet vergleichen. Wenn von zwei Robotern einer lernt irgendwann problemlos durch die Tür zu fahren und der andere nicht, dann gibt es da schon einen Sieger. Wesentlich ist hier das Lernen, und da geht es dann auch weiter. Kommt er auch durch andere Türen, auch wenn ein Sensor
ausfällt?

Data Science Blog: Künstliche Intelligenz, Machine Learning und Deep Learning sind sicherlich die Trendbegriffe dieser Jahre. Wie stehen sie zueinander?

Deep Learning ist ein Teilgebiet von Machine Learning und das ist wiederum ein Teil von KI. Deep Learning meint eigentlich nur tiefe neuronale Netze (NN). Das sind Netze, die einfach viele Schichten von Neuronen haben und folglich als tief bezeichnet werden. Viele Architekturen, insbesondere auch die oft synonym mit Deep Learning assoziierten sogenannten Convolutional NNs gibt es seit Ewigkeiten. Solche Netze heute einsetzen zu können verdanken wir der Möglichkeit auf Grafikkarten rechnen zu können. Ohne Daten würde das uns aber auch nichts nützen. Netze lernen aus Daten (Beispielen) und es braucht für erfolgreiches Deep Learning sehr viele davon. Was wir oft gerade sehen ist also, was man mit genug vorhandenen Daten „erschlagen“ kann. Machine Learning sind alle Algorithmen, die ein Modell als Ouput liefern. Die Performanz von Modellen ist messbar, womit ich quasi auch noch eine Antwort zur ersten Frage nachreichen will.

Data Science Blog: Sie befassen sich beruflich seit Jahren mit künstlicher Intelligenz. Derzeitige Showcases handeln meistens über die Bild- oder Spracherkennung. Zweifelsohne wichtige Anwendungen, doch für Wirtschaftsunternehmen meistens zu abstrakt und zu weit weg vom Kerngeschäft. Was kann KI für Unternehmen noch leisten?

Scherzhaft oder vielleicht boshaft könnte man sagen, alles was Digitalisierung ihnen versprochen hat.
Wenn sie einen Chat-Bot einsetzen, sollte der durch KI besser werden. Offensichtlich ist das jetzt kein Anwendungsfall, der jedes Unternehmen betrifft. Mit anderen Worten, es hängt vom Kerngeschäft ab. Das klingt jetzt etwas ausweichend, meint aber auch ganz konkret die Ist-Situation.
Welche Prozesse sind jetzt schon datengetrieben, welche Infrastruktur ist vorhanden. Wo ist schon wie optimiert worden? Im Einkauf, im Kundenmanagement und so weiter.

Data Science Blog: Es scheint sich also zu lohnen, in das Thema fachlich einzusteigen. Was braucht man dazu? Welches Wissen sollte als Grundlage vorhanden sein? Und: Braucht man dazu einen Mindest-IQ?

Gewisse mathematische und informatorische Grundlagen braucht man sicher relativ schnell. Zum Beispiel: Wie kann man Daten statistisch beschreiben, was darf man daraus folgern? Wann ist etwas signifikant? Einfache Algorithmen für Standardprobleme sollte man formal hinschreiben können und implementieren können. Welche Komplexität hat der Algorithmus, wo genau versteckt sie sich? Im Prinzip geht es aber erst einmal darum, dass man mit keinem Aspekt von Data Science Bauchschmerzen hat. Einen Mindest-IQ braucht es also nur insofern, um diese Frage für sich selbst beantworten zu können.

Data Science Blog: Gibt es aus Ihrer Sicht eine spezielle Programmiersprache, die sich für das Programmieren einer KI besonders eignet?

Das dürfte für viele Informatiker fast eine Glaubensfrage sein, auch weil es natürlich davon abhängt,
was für eine KI das sein soll. Für Machine Learning und Deep Learning lautet meine Antwort aber ganz klar Python. Ein Blick auf die bestimmenden Frameworks und Programmierschnittstellen ist da
ziemlich eindeutig.

Data Science Blog: Welche Trends im Bereich Machine Learning bzw. Deep Learning werden Ihrer Meinung nach im kommenden Jahr 2019 von Bedeutung werden?

Bei den Deep Learning Anwendungen interessiert mich, wie es mit Sprache weitergeht. Im Bereich Machine Learning denke ich, dass Reinforcement Learning weiter an Bedeutung gewinnt. KI-Chips halte ich für einen der kommenden Trends.

Data Science Blog: Es heißt, dass Data Scientist gerade an ihrer eigenen Arbeitslosigkeit arbeiten, da zukünftige Verfahren des maschinellen Lernens Data Mining selbstständig durchführen können. Werden Tools Data Scientists bald ersetzen?

Die Prognosen für das jährliche Datenwachstum liegen ja momentan so bei 30%. Wichtiger als diese Zahl alleine ist aber, dass dieses Wachstum von Daten kommt, die von Unternehmen generiert werden. Dieser Anteil wird über die nächsten Jahre ständig und rasant weiter wachsen. Nach den einfachen Problemen kommen also erst einmal mehr einfache Probleme und/oder mehr anspruchsvollere Probleme statt Arbeitslosigkeit. Richtig ist aber natürlich, dass Data Scientists zukünftig methodisch mehr oder speziellere Kompetenzen abdecken müssen. Deswegen haben die AWW e. V. und die TH Brandenburg ihr Weiterbildungsangebot um das Modul ‚Machine Learning mit Python‘ ergänzt.

Data Science Blog: Für alle Studenten, die demnächst ihren Bachelor, beispielsweise in Informatik, Mathematik, Ingenieurwesen oder Wirtschaftswissenschaften, abgeschlossen haben, was würden Sie diesen jungen Damen und Herren raten, wie sie gute Data Scientists mit gutem Verständnis für Machine Learning werden können?

Neugierig sein wäre ein Tipp von mir. Im Bereich Deep Learning gibt es ja ständig neue Ideen, neue Netze. Die Implementierungen sind meist verfügbar, also kann und sollte man die Sachen ausprobieren. Je mehr Netze sie selbst zum Laufen gebracht und angewendet haben, umso besser werden sie.  Und auch nur so  verlieren sie nicht den Anschluss.

Data Science Survey by lexoro.ai

Ergebnisse unserer zweiten Data Science Survey

Künstliche Intelligenz, Data Science, Machine Learning – über die Bedeutung dieser Themen für einzelne Unternehmen und Branchen herrscht weiterhin viel Unsicherheit und Unklarheit. Zudem stellt sich die Frage: Welche Fähigkeiten und Kompetenzen braucht ein guter Data Scientist eigentlich?

Es lässt sich kaum bestreiten, dass wir vor einem Paradigmenwechsel stehen, vorangetrieben durch einen technologischen Fortschritt dessen Geschwindigkeit exponentiell zunimmt.
Der Arbeitsmarkt im Speziellen sieht sich auch einem starken Veränderungsprozess unterworfen. Es entstehen neue Jobs, neue Rollen und neue Verantwortungsbereiche. Data Scientist, Machine Learning Expert, RPA Developer – die Trend-Jobs der Stunde. Aber welche Fähigkeiten und Skills verbergen sich eigentlich hinter diesen Jobbeschreibungen? Hier scheint es noch eine große Divergenz zu geben.

Unser zweiter Data Science Leaks-Survey soll hier für mehr Transparenz und Aufklärung sorgen. Die Ergebnisse fließen zudem in die Entwicklung unseres SkillPrint ein, einer individuellen Analyse der Kompetenzen eines jeden Daten-Experten. Eine erste Version davon wird in Kürze fertiggestellt sein.

Link zu den Ergebnissen der zweiten Data Science Survey by lexoro.ai

Viel Spaß beim Lesen unserer Ministudie zum Thema: Data Science… mehr als Python, TensorFlow & Neural Networks

 

Interesse an einem Austausch zu verschiedenen Karriereperspektiven im Bereich Data Science/ Machine Learning? Dann registrieren Sie sich direkt auf dem lexoro Talent Check-In und ein lexoro-Berater wird sich bei Ihnen melden.

Interview – Nutzen und Motivation der medizinischen Datenanalyse

Interview mit Prof. Thomas Schrader zur Motivation des Erlernens von Clinical Data Analytics

Prof. Dr. Thomas Schrader ist Fachbereichsleiter Informatik und Medien an der TH Brandenburg und hat seinen Projekt- und Lehrschwerpunkt in der Medizininformatik. Als Experte für Data Science verknüpft er das Wissen um Informatik und Statistik mit einem medizinischen Verständnis. Dieses Wissen wird genutzt, um eine beweisorientierte Diagnose stellen, aber auch, um betriebswirtschaftliche Prozesse zu verbessern. Prof. Thomas Schrader ist zudem Dozent und Mitgestalter des Zertifikatskurses Clinical Data Analytics.

Data Science Blog: Wie steht es um die medizinische Datenanalyse? Welche Motivation gibt es dafür, diese zu erlernen und anzuwenden?

Die Digitalisierung ist inzwischen auch in der Medizin angekommen. Befunde, Laborwerte und Berichte werden elektronisch ausgetauscht und stehen somit digital zur Verfügung. Ob im Krankenhaus, im Medizinischen Versorgungszentrum oder in der ambulanten Praxis, medizinische Daten dienen zur Befunderhebung, Diagnosestellung oder zur Therapiekontrolle.

Über mobile Anwendungen, Smart Phones und Smart Watches werden ebenfalls Daten erhoben und PatientInnen stellen diese zur Einsicht zur Verfügung.

Die Verwaltung der Daten und die richtige Nutzung der Daten wird zunehmend zu einer notwendigen Kompetenz im medizinischen Berufsalltag. Jetzt besteht die Chance, den Umgang mit Daten zu erlernen, deren Qualität richtig zu beurteilen und den Prozess der fortschreitenden Digitalisierung zu gestalten.

Daten haben Eigenschaften, Daten haben eine Lebenszeit, einen Lebenszyklus. Ähnlich einem Auto, sind verschiedene Personen in unterschiedlichen Rollen daran beteiligt und verantwortlich , Daten zu erheben, zu speichern oder Daten zur Verfügung zu stellen. Je nach Art der Daten, abhängig von der Datenqualität lassen sich diese Daten weiterverwenden und ggf. Schlussfolgerungen ziehen. Die Möglichkeit aus Daten Wissen zu generieren, ist für die medizinische Arbeit eine große Chance und Herausforderung.

Data Science Blog: Bedeutet MDA gleich BigData?

Big Data ist inzwischen ein Buzzwort: Alles soll mit BigData und der Anwendung von künstlicher Intelligenz gelöst werden. Es entsteht aber der Eindruck, dass nur die großen Firmen (Google, Facebook u.a.) von BigData profitieren. Sie verwenden ihre Daten, um Zielgruppen zu differenzieren, zu identifizieren und Werbung zu personalisieren.

Medizinische Datenanalyse ist nicht BigData! Medizinische Datenanalyse kann lokal mit den Daten eines Krankenhauses, eines MVZ oder ambulanten Praxis durchgeführt werden. Explorativ wird das Wissen aus diesen Daten erschlossen. Es können schon auf dieser Ebene Indikatoren der medizinischen Versorgung erhoben werden. Es lassen sich Kriterien berechnen, die als Indikatoren für die Detektion von kritischen Fällen dienen.

Mit einer eigenen Medizinischen Datenanalyse lassen sich eigene Daten analysieren, ohne jemals die Kontrolle über die Daten abzugeben. Es werden dabei Methoden verwendet, die teilweise auch bei Big Data Anwendung finden.

Data Science Blog: Für wen ist das Erlernen der medizinischen Datenanalyse interessant?

Die Medizinische Datenanalyse ist für alle interessant, die sich mit Daten und Zahlen in der Medizin auseinandersetzen. Die Frage ist eigentlich, wer hat nichts mit Daten zu tun?

Im ersten Augenblick fallen die ambulant und klinisch tätigen ÄrztInnen ein, für die MDA wichtig wäre: in einer Ambulanz kommt ein für diese Praxis typisches Spektrum an PatientInnen mit ihren Erkrankungsmustern. MDA kann diese spezifischen Eigenschaften charakterisieren, denn darin liegt ja Wissen: Wie häufig kommen meine PatientInnen mit der Erkrankung X zu mir in die Praxis? Dauert bei einigen PatientInnen die Behandlungszeit eigentlich zu lange? Bleiben PatientInnen weg, obwohl sie noch weiter behandelt werden müssten? Dahinter liegen also viele Fragen, die sich sowohl mit der Wirtschaftlichkeit als auch mit der Behandlungsqualität auseinandersetzen. Diese sehr spezifischen Fragen wird Big Data übrigens niemals beantworten können.

Aber auch die Pflegekräfte benötigen eigentlich dringend Werkzeuge für die Bereitstellung und Analyse der Pflegedaten. Aktuell wird sehr über die richtige Personalbesetzung von Stationen und Pflegeeinrichtungen diskutiert. Das eigentliche Problem dabei ist, dass für die Beantwortung dieser Frage Zahlen notwendig sind: über dokumentierte Pflegehandlungen, Arbeitszeiten und Auslastung. Inzwischen wird damit begonnen, dieses Daten zu erheben, aber es fehlen eine entsprechende Infrastruktur dieses Daten systematisch zu erfassen, auszuwerten und in einen internationalen, wissenschaftlichen Kontext zu bringen. Auch hier wird Big Data keine Erkenntnisse bringen: weil keine Daten vorhanden sind und weil keine ExpertIn aus diesem Bereich die Daten untersucht.

Die Physio-, ErgotherapeutInnen und LogopädInnen stehen aktuell unter dem hohen Druck, einen Nachweis ihrer therapeutischen Intervention zu bringen. Es geht auch hier schlicht darum, ob auch zukünftig alle Therapieformen bezahlt werden. Über die Wirksamkeit von Physio-, Ergo- und Logopädie können nur Statistiken Auskunft geben. Auch diese Berufsgruppen profitieren von der Medizinischen Datenanalyse.

In den Kliniken gibt es Qualitäts- und Risikomanager. Deren Arbeit basiert auf Zahlen und Statistiken. Die Medizinische Datenanalyse kann helfen, umfassender, besser über die Qualität und bestehende Risiken Auskunft zu geben.

Data Science Blog: Was kann genau kann die medizinische Datenanalyse leisten?

Die Technische Hochschule Brandenburg bietet einen Kurs Medizinische/ Klinische Datenanalyse an. In diesem Kurs wird basierend auf dem Lebenszyklus von Daten vermittelt, welche Aufgaben zu leisten sind, um gute Analysen durchführen zu können. Das fängt bei der Datenerhebung an, geht über die richtige und sichere Speicherung der Daten unter Beachtung des Datenschutzes und die Analyse der Daten. Da aber gerade im medizinischen Kontext die Ergebnisse eine hohe Komplexität aufweisen können, kommt auch der Visualisierung und Präsentation von Daten eine besondere Bedeutung zu. Eine zentrale Frage, die immer beantwortet werden muss, ist, ob die Daten für bestimmte Aussagen oder Entscheidungen tauglich sind. Es geht um die Datenqualität. Dabei ist nicht immer die Frage zu beantworten, ob das “gute” oder “schlechte” Daten sind, sondern eher um die Beschreibung der spezifischen Eigenschaften von Daten und die daraus resultierenden Verwendungsmöglichkeiten.

Data Science Blog: Sie bieten an der TH Brandenburg einen Zertifikatskurs zum Erlernen der Datenanalyse im Kontext der Medizin an. Was sind die Inhalte des Kurses?

Der Kurs gliedert sich in drei Module:

– Modul 1 – Daten aus Klinik und Pflege – Von den Daten zur Information: In diesem Modul wird auf die unterschiedlichen Datenquellen eingegangen und deren Qualität näher untersucht. Daten allein sagen zuweilen sehr wenig, sie müssen in einen Zusammenhang gebracht werden, damit daraus verwertbare Informationen. Im Mittelpunkt stehen die Teile des Datenlebenszyklus, die sich mit der Erhebung und Speicherung der Daten beschäftigen.

– Modul 2 – Anwenden der Werkzeuge: Analysieren, Verstehen und Entscheiden – Von Information zum Wissen. Der Schritt von Information zu Wissen wird dann begangen, wenn eine Strukturierung und Analyse der Informationen erfolgt: Beschreiben, Zusammenfassen und Zusammenhänge aufdecken.

– Modul 3 – Best practice – Fallbeispiele: Datenanalyse für die Medizin von morgen – von smart phone bis smart home, von Registern bis sozialen Netzen: In diesem Modul wird an Hand von verschiedenen Beispielen der gesamte Datenlebenszyklus dargestellt und mit Analysen sowie Visualisierung abgeschlossen.

Data Science Blog: Was unterscheidet dieser Kurs von anderen? Und wie wird dieser Kurs durchgeführt?

Praxis, Praxis, Praxis. Es ist ein anwendungsorientierter Kurs, der natürlich auch seine theoretische Fundierung erhält aber immer unter dem Gesichtspunkt, wie kann das theoretische Wissen direkt für die Lösung eines Problems angewandt werden. Es werden Problemlösungsstrategien vermittelt, die dabei helfen sollen verschiedenste Fragestellung in hoher Qualität aufarbeiten zu können.

In wöchentlichen Online-Meetings wird das Wissen durch Vorlesungen vermittelt und in zahlreichen Übungen trainiert. In den kurzen Präsenzzeiten am Anfang und am Ende eines Moduls wird der Einstieg in das Thema gegeben, offene Fragen diskutiert oder abschließend weitere Tipps und Tricks gezeigt. Jedes Modul wird mit einer Prüfung abgeschlossen und bei Bestehen vergibt die Hochschule ein Zertifikat. Für den gesamten Kurs gibt es dann das Hochschulzertifikat „Clinical Data Analyst“.

Der Zertifikatskurs „Clinical Data Analytics“ umfasst die Auswertung von klinischen Daten aus Informationssystemen im Krankenhaus und anderen medizinischen und pflegerischen Einrichtungen. Prof. Thomas Schrader ist einer der Mitgestalter des Kurses. Weitere Informationen sind stets aktuell auf www.th-brandenburg.de abrufbar.

R oder Python – Die Sprache der Wahl in einem Data Science Weiterbildungskurs

Die KDnuggets, ein einflussreicher Newletter zu Data Mining und inzwischen auch zu Data Science, überraschte kürzlich mit der Meldung „Python eats away at R: Top Software for Analytics, Data Science, Machine Learning in 2018. Trends and Analysis“.[1] Grundlage war eine Befragung, an der mehr als 2300 KDNuggets Leser teilnahmen. Nach Bereinigung um die sogenannten „Lone Voters“, gingen insgesamt 2052 Stimmen in die Auswertung ein.

Demnach stieg der Anteil der Python-Nutzer von 2017 bis 2018 um 11% auf 65%, während mit 48% weniger als die Hälfte der Befragungsteilnehmer noch R nannten. Gegenüber 2017 ging der Anteil von R um 14% zurück. Dies ist umso bemerkenswerter, als dass bei keinem der übrigen Top Tools eine Verminderung des Anteils gemessen wurde.

Wir verzichten an dieser Stelle darauf, die Befragungsergebnisse selbst in Frage zu stellen oder andere Daten herbeizuziehen. Stattdessen nehmen wir erst einmal die Zahlen wie sie sind und konzedieren einen gewissen Python Hype. Das Python Konjunktur hat, zeigt sich z.B. in der wachsenden Zahl von Buchtiteln zu Python und Data Science oder in einem Machine Learning Tutorial der Zeitschrift iX, das ebenfalls auf Python fußt. Damit stellt sich die Frage, ob ein Weiterbildungskurs zu Data Science noch guten Gewissens auf R als Erstsprache setzen kann.

Der Beantwortung dieser Frage seien zwei Bemerkungen vorangestellt:

  1. Ob die eine Sprache „besser“ als die andere ist, lässt sich nicht abschließend beantworten. Mit Blick auf die Teilarbeitsgebiete des Data Scientists, also Datenzugriff, Datenmanipulation und Transformation, statistische Analysen und visuelle Aufbereitung zeigt sich jedenfalls keine prinzipielle Überlegenheit der einen über die andere Sprache.
  2. Beide Sprachen sind quicklebendig und werden bei insgesamt steigenden Nutzerzahlen dynamisch weiterentwickelt.

Das Beispiel der kürzlich gegründeten Ursa Labs[2] zeigt überdies, dass es zukünftig weniger darum gehen wird „Werkzeuge für eine einzelne Sprache zu bauen…“ als darum „…portable Bibliotheken zu entwickeln, die in vielen Programmiersprachen verwendet werden können“[3].

Die zunehmende Anwendung von Python in den Bereichen Data Science und Machine Learning hängt auch damit zusammen, dass Python ursprünglich als Allzweck-Programmiersprache konzipiert wurde. Viele Entwickler und Ingenieure arbeiteten also bereits mit Python ohne dabei mit analytischen Anwendungen in Kontakt zu kommen. Wenn diese Gruppen gegenwärtig mehr und mehr in den Bereichen Datenanalyse, Statistik und Machine Learning aktiv werden, dann greifen sie naturgemäß zu einem bekannten Werkzeug, in diesem Fall zu einer bereits vorhandenen Python Implementation.

Auf der anderen Seite sind Marketingfachleute, Psychologen, Controller und andere Analytiker eher mit SPSS und Excel vertraut. In diesen Fällen kann die Wahl der Data Science Sprache freier erfolgen. Für R spricht dann zunächst einmal seine Kompaktheit. Obwohl inzwischen mehr als 10.000 Erweiterungspakete existieren, gibt es mit www.r-project.org immer noch eine zentrale Anlaufstelle, von der über einen einzigen Link der Download eines monolithischen Basispakets erreichbar ist.

Demgegenüber existieren für Python mit Python 2.7 und Python 3.x zwei nach wie vor aktive Entwicklungszweige. Fällt die Wahl z.B. auf Python 3.x, dann stehen mit Python3 und Ipython3 wiederum verschiedene Interpreter zur Auswahl. Schließlich gibt es noch Python Distributionen wie Anaconda. Anaconda selbst ist in zwei „Geschmacksrichtungen“ (flavors) verfügbar als Miniconda und eben als Anaconda.

R war von Anfang an als statistische Programmiersprache konzipiert. Nach allen subjektiven Erfahrungen eignet es sich allein schon deshalb besser zur Erläuterung statistischer Methoden. Noch vor wenigen Jahren galt R als „schwierig“ und Statistikern vorbehalten. In dem Maße, in dem wissenschaftlich fundierte Software Tools in den Geschäftsalltag vordringen wird klar, dass viele der zunächst als „schwierig“ empfundenen Konzepte letztlich auf Rationalität und Arbeitsersparnis abzielen. Fehler, Bugs und Widersprüche finden sich in R so selbstverständlich wie in allen anderen Programmiersprachen. Bei der raschen Beseitigung dieser Schwächen kann R aber auf eine große und wache Gemeinschaft zurückgreifen.

Die Popularisierung von R erhielt durch die Gründung des R Consortiums zu Beginn des Jahres 2015 einen deutlichen Schub. Zu den Initiatoren dieser Interessengruppe gehörte auch Microsoft. Tatsächlich unterstützt Microsoft R auf vielfältige Weise unter anderem durch eine eigene Distribution unter der Bezeichnung „Microsoft R Open“, die Möglichkeit R Code in SQL Anweisungen des SQL Servers absetzen zu können oder die (angekündigte) Weitergabe von in Power BI erzeugten R Visualisierungen an Excel.

Der Vergleich von R und Python in einem fiktiven Big Data Anwendungsszenario liefert kein Kriterium für die Auswahl der Unterrichtssprache in einem Weiterbildungskurs. Aussagen wie x ist „schneller“, „performanter“ oder „besser“ als y sind nahezu inhaltsleer. In der Praxis werden geschäftskritische Big Data Anwendungen in einem Umfeld mit vielen unterschiedlichen Softwaresystemen abgewickelt und daher von vielen Parametern beeinflusst. Wo es um Höchstleistungen geht, tragen R und Python häufig gemeinsam zum Ergebnis bei.

Der Zertifikatskurs „Data Science“ der AWW e. V. und der Technischen Hochschule Brandenburg war schon bisher nicht auf R beschränkt. Im ersten Modul geben wir z.B. auch eine Einführung in SQL und arbeiten mit ETL-Tools. Im gerade zu Ende gegangenen Kurs wurde Feature Engineering auf der Grundlage eines Python Lehrbuchs[4] behandelt und die Anweisungen in R übersetzt. In den kommenden Durchgängen werden wir dieses parallele Vorgehen verstärken und wann immer sinnvoll auch auf Lösungen in Python hinweisen.

Im Vertiefungsmodul „Machine Learning mit Python“ schließlich ist Python die Sprache der Wahl. Damit tragen wir der Tatsache Rechnung, dass es zwar Sinn macht in die grundlegenden Konzepte mit einer Sprache einzuführen, in der Praxis aber Mehrsprachigkeit anzutreffen ist.

[1] https://www.kdnuggets.com/2018/05/poll-tools-analytics-data-science-machine-learning-results.html

[2] https://ursalabs.org/

[3] Statement auf der Ursa Labs Startseite, eigene Übersetzung.

[4] Sarkar, D et al. Practical Machine Learning with Python, S. 177ff.