Data Science Knowledge Stack – Abstraction of the Data Science Skillset

What must a Data Scientist be able to do? Which skills does as Data Scientist need to have? This question has often been asked and frequently answered by several Data Science Experts. In fact, it is now quite clear what kind of problems a Data Scientist should be able to solve and which skills are necessary for that. I would like to try to bring this consensus into a visual graph: a layer model, similar to the OSI layer model (which any data scientist should know too, by the way).
I’m giving introductory seminars in Data Science for merchants and engineers and in those seminars I always start explaining what we need to work out together in theory and practice-oriented exercises. Against this background, I came up with the idea for this layer model. Because with my seminars the problem already starts: I am giving seminars for Data Science for Business Analytics with Python. So not for medical analyzes and not with R or Julia. So I do not give a general knowledge of Data Science, but a very specific direction.

A Data Scientist must deal with problems at different levels in any Data Science project, for example, the data access does not work as planned or the data has a different structure than expected. A Data Scientist can spend hours debating its own source code or learning the ropes of new DataScience packages for its chosen programming language. Also, the right algorithms for data evaluation must be selected, properly parameterized and tested, sometimes it turns out that the selected methods were not the optimal ones. Ultimately, we are not doing Data Science all day for fun, but for generating value for a department and a data scientist is also faced with special challenges at this level, at least a basic knowledge of the expertise of that department is a must have.


Read this article in German:
“Data Science Knowledge Stack – Was ein Data Scientist können muss“


Data Science Knowledge Stack

With the Data Science Knowledge Stack, I would like to provide a structured insight into the tasks and challenges a Data Scientist has to face. The layers of the stack also represent a bidirectional flow from top to bottom and from bottom to top, because Data Science as a discipline is also bidirectional: we try to answer questions with data, or we look at the potentials in the data to answer previously unsolicited questions.

The DataScience Knowledge Stack consists of six layers:

Database Technology Knowledge

A Data Scientist works with data which is rarely directly structured in a CSV file, but usually in one or more databases that are subject to their own rules. In particular, business data, for example from the ERP or CRM system, are available in relational databases, often from Microsoft, Oracle, SAP or an open source alternative. A good Data Scientist is not only familiar with Structured Query Language (SQL), but is also aware of the importance of relational linked data models, so he also knows the principle of data table normalization.

Other types of databases, so-called NoSQL databases (Not only SQL) are based on file formats, column or graph orientation, such as MongoDB, Cassandra or GraphDB. Some of these databases use their own programming languages ​​(for example JavaScript at MongoDB or the graph-oriented database Neo4J has its own language called Cypher). Some of these databases provide alternative access via SQL (such as Hive for Hadoop).

A data scientist has to cope with different database systems and has to master at least SQL – the quasi-standard for data processing.

Data Access & Transformation Knowledge

If data are given in a database, Data Scientists can perform simple (and not so simple) analyzes directly on the database. But how do we get the data into our special analysis tools? To do this, a Data Scientist must know how to export data from the database. For one-time actions, an export can be a CSV file, but which separators and text qualifiers should be used? Possibly, the export is too large, so the file must be split.
If there is a direct and synchronous data connection between the analysis tool and the database, interfaces like REST, ODBC or JDBC come into play. Sometimes a socket connection must also be established and the principle of a client-server architecture should be known. Synchronous and asynchronous encryption methods should also be familiar to a Data Scientist, as confidential data are often used, and a minimum level of security is most important for business applications.

Many datasets are not structured in a database but are so-called unstructured or semi-structured data from documents or from Internet sources. And again we have interfaces, a frequent entry point for Data Scientists is, for example, the Twitter API. Sometimes we want to stream data in near real-time, let it be machine data or social media messages. This can be quite demanding, so the data streaming is almost a discipline with which a Data Scientist can come into contact quickly.

Programming Language Knowledge

Programming languages ​​are tools for Data Scientists to process data and automate processing. Data Scientists are usually no real software developers and they do not have to worry about software security or economy. However, a certain basic knowledge about software architectures often helps because some Data Science programs can be going to be integrated into an IT landscape of the company. The understanding of object-oriented programming and the good knowledge of the syntax of the selected programming languages ​​are essential, especially since not every programming language is the most useful for all projects.

At the level of the programming language, there is already a lot of snares in the programming language that are based on the programming language itself, as each has its own faults and details determine whether an analysis is done correctly or incorrectly: for example, whether data objects are copied or linked as reference, or how NULL/NaN values ​​are treated.

Data Science Tool & Library Knowledge

Once a data scientist has loaded the data into his favorite tool, for example, one of IBM, SAS or an open source alternative such as Octave, the core work just began. However, these tools are not self-explanatory and therefore there is a wide range of certification options for various Data Science tools. Many (if not most) Data Scientists work mostly directly with a programming language, but this alone is not enough to effectively perform statistical data analysis or machine learning: We use Data Science libraries (packages) that provide data structures and methods as a groundwork and thus extend the programming language to a real Data Science toolset. Such a library, for example Scikit-Learn for Python, is a collection of methods implemented in the programming language. The use of such libraries, however, is intended to be learned and therefore requires familiarization and practical experience for reliable application.

When it comes to Big Data Analytics, the analysis of particularly large data, we enter the field of Distributed Computing. Tools (frameworks) such as Apache Hadoop, Apache Spark or Apache Flink allows us to process and analyze data in parallel on multiple servers. These tools also provide their own libraries for machine learning, such as Mahout, MLlib and FlinkML.

Data Science Method Knowledge

A Data Scientist is not simply an operator of tools, he uses the tools to apply his analysis methods to data he has selected for to reach the project targets. These analysis methods are, for example, descriptive statistics, estimation methods or hypothesis tests. Somewhat more mathematical are methods of machine learning for data mining, such as clustering or dimensional reduction, or more toward automated decision making through classification or regression.

Machine learning methods generally do not work immediately, they have to be improved using optimization methods like the gradient method. A Data Scientist must be able to detect under- and overfitting, and he must prove that the prediction results for the planned deployment are accurate enough.

Special applications require special knowledge, which applies, for example, to the fields of image recognition (Visual Computing) or the processing of human language (Natural Language Processiong). At this point, we open the door to deep learning.

Expertise

Data Science is not an end in itself, but a discipline that would like to answer questions from other expertise fields with data. For this reason, Data Science is very diverse. Business economists need data scientists to analyze financial transactions, for example, to identify fraud scenarios or to better understand customer needs, or to optimize supply chains. Natural scientists such as geologists, biologists or experimental physicists also use Data Science to make their observations with the aim of gaining knowledge. Engineers want to better understand the situation and relationships between machinery or vehicles, and medical professionals are interested in better diagnostics and medication for their patients.

In order to support a specific department with his / her knowledge of data, tools and analysis methods, every data scientist needs a minimum of the appropriate skills. Anyone who wants to make analyzes for buyers, engineers, natural scientists, physicians, lawyers or other interested parties must also be able to understand the people’s profession.

Engere Data Science Definition

While the Data Science pioneers have long established and highly specialized teams, smaller companies are still looking for the Data Science Allrounder, which can take over the full range of tasks from the access to the database to the implementation of the analytical application. However, companies with specialized data experts have long since distinguished Data Scientists, Data Engineers and Business Analysts. Therefore, the definition of Data Science and the delineation of the abilities that a data scientist should have, varies between a broader and a more narrow demarcation.


A closer look at the more narrow definition shows, that a Data Engineer takes over the data allocation, the Data Scientist loads it into his tools and runs the data analysis together with the colleagues from the department. According to this, a Data Scientist would need no knowledge of databases or APIs, neither an expertise would be necessary …

In my experience, DataScience is not that narrow, the task spectrum covers more than just the core area. This misunderstanding comes from Data Science courses and – for me – I should point to the overall picture of Data Science again and again. In courses and seminars, which want to teach Data Science as a discipline, the focus will of course be on the core area: programming, tools and methods from mathematics & statistics.

Is Data Science the new Statistics?

Table of Contents

1 Introduction

2 Emerging of Data Science

3 Big data technologies

4 Two data worlds: Predictive vs inferential statistics

5 How to study data science

6 Conclusions

7 References

Introduction

As a student of Statistics and the winner of Data Science Scholarship I am often surrounded by computer scientists, mathematicians, physicists and of course statisticians. During conversation, I was asked questions such as “So what actually do I do? What is Data Science?”. These are some very difficult questions and as like you will see during reading this document many before me tried to answer those questions. There is a dispute between statisticians and computer scientists what is the origin of data science and who should teach it. According to the Institute of Mathematical Statistics in the: “The IMS presidential address: let us own data science” we can find a simple recipe for data scientist. [1]

“Putting the traits of Turner and Carver together gives a good portrait of a data scientist:

  • Statistics (S)
  • Domain/Science knowledge (D)
  • Computing (C)
  • Collaboration/teamwork (C)
  • Communication to outsiders (C)

That is, data science = SDCCC = S DC3

However, despite all the challenges that I will need to overcome in answering those questions I will try to do it. I will refer to ideas from several reputable sources, in which I will also tell you: what is in the data science that I am really fascinated about? What is magical in this creation of statistics and computer science that I am drawn to?

Emerging of Data Science

On Tuesday, the 8th of September 2015, University of Michigan announced the 100 million dollars “Data Science Initiative” (DSI), hired 35 new faculty members. On the DSI website we can read about this initiative:

“This coupling of scientific discovery and practice involves the collection, management, processing, analysis, visualisation, and interpretation of vast amounts of heterogeneous data associated with a diverse array of scientific, translational and interdisciplinary applications”2

But that sounds like a bread and butter for statisticians. So, is it really a new creation or is it something that exists for many years but it didn’t sound so sexy as data science? In the article written by Karl Broman, (the University of Wisconsin) we can read:

“When physicists do mathematics, they’re don’t say they’re doing “number science”. They’re doing math. If you’re analyzing data, you’re doing statistics. You can call it data science or informatics or analytics or whatever, but it ‘s still statistics. If you say that one kind of data analysis is statistics and another kind is not, you’re not allowing innovation. We need to define the field broadly. You may not like what some statisticians do. You may feel they don’t share your values. They may embarrass you. But that shouldn’t lead us to abandon the term “statistics”.

Reading the definition of data science on the Data Science Association’s “Professional Code of Conduct”:

“Data scientist means a professional who uses scientific methods to liberate and create meaning from raw data”

These sound like K. Browman maybe right. Maybe I should go on MSc Statistics like many before me did. Maybe Data Science is simply a new sexy name for statistician only data is big, technology more advanced rather than it used to be so you need to have programming skills to handle the data. Maybe let say loudly data science is a modern version of statistics? But maybe not? Because we can also find statements like the following:

“Statistics is the least important part of data science”. [3]

Further, we can read:

“There ‘s so, much that goes on with data that is about computing, not statistics. I do think it would be fair to consider statistics (which includes sampling, experimental design, and data collection as well as data analysis (which itself includes model building, visualization, and model checking as well as inference)) as a subset of data science. . . .”.[3]

So maybe people from computer science are right. Maybe I should go and study programming and forget about expanding my knowledge in statistics? After all, we all know that computer science always had much bigger funding and having MSc computer science was always like a magic star for employers. What should I do? Let me research further.

Big data technologies

Is the data size important to distinguish between data science and statistics? Going back to the “Let us own data science” article we can read that a statistician, Hollerith, invented the punched card reader to allow e cient compilation of a US census, the first elements of machine learning. So, no, machine learning is not an invention of computer scientists. It was well known for statistician for decades already. What about different techniques used in DOE (Design of Experiments) or sampling methods to decrease the sample size. If the data used by statisticians would be only small they wouldn’t have to discover methods such PCA (Principle component analysis) or dimensionality reduction techniques. So, no, data can be big and/or small for statisticians, so what is the difference between data science and statistics and what department should I choose?

When I spoke to computer scientists they try to convince me to choose computer science department. Their reasons being that there are many different programmes that I need to know to deal with large datasets. For instance: Java, Hadoop, SQL, Python, and much more. Moreover, programming can only be taught to the best standard through computer science courses Is it true? Can’t we do the same calculations using statistical software such as R, SAS or even Matlab? But on the other hand, doesn’t the newest technology always work faster? And if so, wouldn’t be better to use the newest technology when we program and write loops?

But, I don’t want to underestimate the effort made by statisticians and data analyst over last 50 years in developing statistical programmes. Their efforts have resulted in the emergence of today’s technology. Early statistical packages such as SPSS or Minitab (from 1960’s) allowed to develop more advanced programmes having roots in mini computer era such as STATA or my favourite R which in turn allowed progress to advanced technology even further and create Python, Hadoop, SQL and so on. Becker and Chambers (with S) and later Ihaka, Gentleman, and members of the R Core team (with R) worked on developing the statistical software. These names should be convincing about how powerful statistical programming languages can be. Many operations that we can do in Hadoop or SQL we can also do easily in R.

Two data worlds: Predictive vs inferential statistics

So maybe Data Science is a creature merged by statisticians working on computer science department? Maybe there are two different approaches to statistics: mathematical statistics and computer science statistics and the computer science statisticians are data scientists because according to Yanir Seroussi in his blog:

“A successful data scientist needs to be able to “become one with the data” by exploring it and applying rigorous statistical analysis (right-hand side of the continuum). But good data scientists also understand what it takes to deploy production systems, and are ready to get their hands dirty by writing code that cleans up the data or performs core system functionality (lefthand side of the continuum). Gaining all these skills takes time.”[4]

Okay, so my reasoning that some statisticians work on computer science department is right, as well as there exists subject like computational statistics, so maybe I should go for computer science department but study statistics.

In fact, I am not the first one to arrive at the conclusion. Everything started from a confession made by John Tukey in “The Future of Data Analysis” article published in “The Annals of Mathematical Statistics” :

For a long time, I have thought I was a statistician, interested in inferences from the particular to the general. But as I have watched mathematical statistics evolve, I have had cause to wonder and to doubt. … All in all I have come to feel that my central interest is in data analysis, which I take to include, among other things: procedures for analyzing data, techniques for interpreting the results of such procedures, ways of planning the gathering of data to make its analysis easier, more precise or more accurate, and all the machinery and results of (mathematical) statistics which apply to analyzing data

If I am right then above confession was a critical moment. The time when mathematical statistics become more inferential and computational statistics concentrated more on predictive statistics. Applied statisticians working on predictive analytics that are more interested in applying the knowledge rather than developing long proofs decided to move on computer science department.

Additionally, the following is crucial discussion made by Leo Biermann in his paper published in Statistical Science titled “Statistical modelling: the two cultures”. It enables us to understand and differentiate views from both types of statistician, namely mathematical and statistical.

Statistics starts with data. Think of the data as being generated by a black box in which a vector of input variables x (independent variables) go in one side, and on the other side the response variables y come out. Inside the black box, nature functions to associate the predictor variables with the response variables … There are two goals in analyzing the data:

  • Prediction. To be able to predict what the responses are going to be to future input variables
  • InferenceTo [infer] how nature is associating the response variables to the input variables.”

Furthermore, in the same dispute we can read:

“The statistical community has been committed to the almost exclusive use of [generative] models. This commitment has led to irrelevant theory, questionable conclusions, and has kept statisticians from working on a large range of interesting current problems. [Predictive] modeling, both in theory and practice, has developed rapidly in fields outside statistics. It can be used both on large complex data sets and as a more accurate and informative alternative to data modeling on smaller data sets. If our goal as a field is to use data to solve problems, then we need to move away from exclusive dependence on [generative] models …”

So, we can say that Data Science evolved from Predictive Analytics which in turn evolved from Statistics but it becomes separate science. Tukey and Wilk 1969 compared this new science to established sciences and further circumscribed the role of Statistics within it:

“ … data analysis is a very di cult field. It must adapt itself to what people can and need to do with data. In the sense that biology is more complex than physics, and the behavioural sciences are more complex than either, it is likely that the general problems of data analysis are more complex than those of all three. It is too much to ask for close and effective guidance for data analysis from any highly formalized structure, either now or in the near future. Data analysis can gain much from formal statistics, but only if the connection is kept adequately loose”

How to study data science

So, what is exactly predictive analytics culture? I think that everyone who used Kaggle competition before can agree with me that description of common task framework (CTF) formulated by Marc Liberman in 2009 is a perfect description of Kaggle competitions, and hackathons events; where latter has worked as training sessions for newbies in the data world. An instance of the CTF has these ingredients:

  1. A publicly available training data set involving, for each observation, a list of (possibly many) feature measurements, and a class label for that observation.
  2. A set of enrolled competitors whose common task is to infer a class prediction rule from the training data.
  3. A scoring referee, to which competitors can submit their prediction rule. The referee runs the prediction rule against a testing dataset which is sequestered behind a Chinese wall. The referee objectively and automatically reports the score (prediction accuracy) achieved by the submitted rule

Kaggle competitions are not only training platforms for newbies like me but also very challenging statistical competitions where experienced statisticians can win “pocket money”. A famous example is the Netflix Challenge where the common task was to predict Netflix user movie selection. The winning team (which included ATT Statistician Bob Bell) won 1 mln dollars.

Comparing modules that are available on master in data science at University of Berkley[6]:

  1. Both
  • Applied machine learning
  • Experiments and causality
  1. Statistics
  • Research design and application for data and analysis
  • Statistics for Data Science
  • Behind the data: humans and values
  • Statistical methods for discrete response, Time Series and panel data
  • Data visualisation
  1. Computer Science
  • Python for Data Science
  • Storing and Retrieving Data
  • Scalling up! Really Big Data
  • Machine Learning at scale
  • Natural Language Processing with Deep Learning

We can really see that data science is a subject that demands skills from both computer science and statistics. So, it is another confirmation for me that it is the best time to change department for my postgraduate study, that is, to study statistics on computer science department.

In the 50 Years of Data Science article we can read: “The activities of Greater Data Science are classified into 6 divisions:

  1. Data exploration and preparation
  2. Data representation and transformation
  3. Computing with data
  4. Data visualization and presentation
  5. Data Modelling
  6. Science about data science [5]

I will quickly go through all of them using my Ebola research example, this required using machine learning on time series data.

  1. The most demanding part. Many people told me before starting this project that: collecting, cleaning, wrangling and preparing data take 60% of all the time that you need to spend on data science project. I didn’t realise how much this 60% means in real time. I didn ‘t realise that the 60 percent will take so much time and that after this I will be exhausted. Exhausted but ready for the next step.
  2. This point is actually part of the first one, or maybe just like many other things in statistics: everything is one huge connected bunch.Data that you can find can be very nice, well behaving, written in CSV or JSON or any other format file that you can quickly download and use, but what if not? What if your data is ‘dirty’and not stored as a file (e.g. only appear on a website)? What if data is coded? Do you need to decode it?
  3. The even bigger challenge, but what a fun? You need to know a few different programming languages or least as I do know a little bit of R, a little bit of Python, quite well Tableau and Excel. So you can use different program in different scenarios or for different tasks. For example, using Panda to do EDA and ggplot 2 to do data vis.
  4. Graphs are pretty, right? If you are still reading my article, I bet you know what is heat map, spatial vis in big cities or different infographics. Surely, I would like to highlight, that we respect only the ones that are not only pretty but also valid. Nevertheless, time that is required to create these visualisations is another matter.
  5. The data modelling, finally? I don’t need to say a lot about this. All forms of inferential and predictive analytic are allowed and accepted.
  6. My favourite part, not the end yet. All the conferences and meetups that I can attend on. All the seminars where we all present our current projects.

Conclusions

After graduation, I will be graduated Statistician. Even more, I will be a mathematical statistician whom mostly during degree dealt with inferential statistics. On the other hand, winning data science scholarship gave me exposure to predictive analytic which I highly enjoyed. Therefore, for my next stage, I will just change my department and concentrate more on predictive analytic. There are many statisticians working on computer science department. They possess both statistical knowledge and advanced software engineering skills, they are called data scientists. It would be a pleasure for me to join them. I don’t mind if it will be MSc. Computer Science, MSc. Data Science, MSc. Big Data or whatever the name will be. I do mind to have sufficient exposure to deal with “dirty” data using statistical modelling and machine learning using modern technology. This is what data science is for me. Maybe for you, it will be something else. Maybe you will be more satisfied with expanding massively programming skills. But for me, programming is a tool, modern technology is my friend and my bread and butter will be predictive analytic.

References

  1. IMS Presidential Address: Let us own data science
  2. Data science is statistics
  3. A Gelman, Columbia University
  4. Yanir Seroussi: What is data Science?
  5. 50 Years Data Science
  6. Curriculum: data science@Berkley

Die fünf Schritte zur Datenstrategie

Big Data ist allgegenwärtig – die Datenrevolution bietet in nahezu allen Branchen vielfältige Nutzungsmöglichkeiten. Bevor Sie jedoch investieren, sollten Sie sehr sorgfältig analysieren, welche Strategie auf Ihr Unternehmen exakt zugeschnitten ist: Ihre Datenstrategie.

Der Artikel Unternehmen brauchen eine Datenstrategie erläutert, wozu Unternehmen eine Datenstrategie erarbeiten sollten, dieser Artikel skizziert eine erprobte Vorgehensweise dafür. Diese Vorgehensweise basiert auf der  Strategiearbeit  unseres Teams, erhebt jedoch keinen Anspruch auf Vollständigkeit. Das überlegte Ausformulieren einer Datenstrategie ist eine individuelle Arbeit und so fällt es vielen Führungskräften und Mitarbeitern schwer, hierfür eine strukturierte Vorgehensweise zu finden.

Data Driven Thinking spielt bei der Formulierung der Datenstrategie eine wesentliche Rolle: Es ist die, an das Design Thinking angelehnte, Denkweise, Daten zu nutzen, um Fragen zu beantworten und damit verbundene Probleme zu lösen. Geübten Data Thinkern fällt das Durchdenken einer Datenstrategie relativ leicht. Für gedankliche Neueinsteiger in dieses Thema soll die folgende Vorgehensweise eine Hilfe bieten, denn aus meiner Erfahrung zeigten sich bisher folgende fünf Schritte als besonders erfolgskritisch. Diese Schritte sind einer Reihenfolge von der Vision bis zur Datenstrategie vorgegeben, mit dem Ziel, anfänglich ein Bewusstsein dafür zu schaffen, welche Datenquellen zur Verfügung stehen und welche Art von Daten in denen enthalten sind.

Die fünf Schritte zur Datenstrategie

1. Die Vision [Kick-Off]

Jedes Unternehmen benötigt eine individuelle Datenstrategie, die auf die spezielle Ausgangssituation und den gesetzten Unternehmenszielen zugeschnitten ist. Jede Datenstrategie hat eine klare Standortbestimmung und verfolgt oder unterstützt eine bestimmte Vision für das Unternehmen, an der die zu erstellende Datenstrategie auszurichten ist. Der Kick-Off zur Datenstrategie geht u.a. folgenden Fragen nach: Wie sieht die Marktsituation aus? Wie genau funktionieren die Geschäftsmodelle und welche Vision sehen die involvierten Mitarbeiter für ihr Unternehmen?

2. Die Datenquellen

Zum Data Driven Thinking gehört es, Daten zu finden, die Antworten auf Ihre Fragen liefern. Ebenso funktioniert es, vorhandene Daten zu betrachten und daraus Lösungsideen zu entwickeln. Eine Grundvoraussetzung für die Beantwortung von Fragen mit Daten ist es, dass alle verfügbaren Datenquellen gut dokumentiert wurden und die Mitarbeiter Kenntnis sowohl über die Datenquellen als auch über deren Dokumentation haben. Ist das nicht der Fall, ist dies der erste wichtige Schritt zur Erstellung einer Datenstrategie.

Dafür brauchen Sie Ihre IT-Administratoren, einen guten Data Engineer (Was ist ein Data Engineer? Und was ein Data Scientist?) und Ihre, für die Datenstrategie abgestellten Mitarbeiter aus den Fachbereichen.

Das Ergebnis ist die Gewissheit, über welche Daten Sie bereits verfügen und über welche Sie verfügen könnten, würden Sie es wünschen. Zudem werden mit den Datenquellen verbundene Fragen geklärt: Wie sieht es mit der Datensicherheit und dem Datenschutz aus? Nur so betrachten Sie Ihre Datenpotenziale in den weiteren Schritten ganzheitlich und rechtssicher.

3. Die Konzeptionierung der Informationsgewinnung

Sowohl in der Informatik als auch in der Managementlehre ist bekannt, dass aus Daten Informationen werden, wenn die einzelnen Datenpunkte miteinander verknüpft werden. Dennoch hapert es bei den meisten Unternehmen gerade an dieser Stelle. Bisher werden gerade einmal 1% aller Daten genutzt. Daten zu nutzen bedeutet dabei konkret, diese in Informationsflüsse umzuwandeln. Der Schritt der Konzeptionierung der Informationsgewinnung ist ein Ideenprozess darüber, wie – je nach Detailgrad – ganze Datenquellen oder auch nur einzelne Datentabellen innerhalb von Datenbanken miteinander verknüpft werden können – so wie es bisher noch nicht der Fall ist. Es ist ein gedanklicher Prozess des Data Engineering, mit der Fragestellung: Welche Informationsflüsse haben wir bereits und welche Datenquellen erschaffen neue Informationsflüsse (ggf. wenn sie miteinander verknüpft werden)?

Dafür brauchen Sie Ihre Mitarbeiter aus den Fachbereichen, den Data Engineer und idealerweise ab diesen Schritt einen Data Scientist.

Das Ergebnis ist eine Beschreibung der neuen Informationsgewinnung durch Zugriff auf bestimmte Daten.

4. Die Konzeptionierung der Wissensgenerierung

Werden Informationen in einem bestimmten Kontext betrachtet, entsteht Wissen. Im Kontext der Geschäftssitutation Ihres Unternehmens entsteht für Ihr Geschäft relevantes Wissen. In diesem Schritt der Erstellung Ihrer Datenstrategie wird beleuchtet, welche Informationen zur Wissensgenerierung von besonderem Interesse sein könnten und welches Wissen Sie über welche Informationen generieren.

Dafür brauchen Sie Ihren Data Scientist und Ihre Mitarbeiter aus den Fachbereichen

Als Ergebnis werden Analyseverfahren beschrieben, die die Generierung eines gewünschten Wissens (z. B. über Ihre Kunden, Lieferanten, Produkte oder besondere Ereignisse) wahrscheinlich machen (Data Mining) bis hin zur Errichtung eines Assistenzsystems (datengestützte Entscheidungsfindung) oder eines autonomen Systems (datengetriebene Entscheidungsfindung).

Übrigens: Data Driven Thinking ermöglicht Ihnen, bisher als nahezu unlösbar betrachtete Probleme doch noch zu lösen. Diese datengetriebene Denkweise wird für Führungskräfte der Zukunft unverzichtbar und gilt gegenwärtig als Karriere-Turbo in Richtung Führungsetage.

5. Die Planung der Umsetzung

Nachdem nun ein Bewusstsein dafür entstanden ist, welche Daten zur Verfügung stehen, wie aus ihnen Informationen erschaffen und Geschäftswissen zu generieren ist, kommt nun die Frage auf, wie dieses Gedankenkonstrukt in die Realität umzusetzen ist. Für die Umsetzung sind nun eine Menge Fragen zu klären, wie beispielsweise: Welche Tools sollen verwendet werden? Welches Team (Skillset) wird benötigt? Sollen Lösungen eingekauft oder selbst realisiert werden?

Dafür brauchen Sie Ihre Mitarbeiter aus den Fachbereichen, Ihren Data Scientist (Data Mining, Machine Learning) sowie – wenn Sie die Wissensgenerierung automatisieren möchten – erfahrene Software Entwickler.

Als Ergebnis erhalten Sie einen Plan, wie Ihre Datenstrategie technisch realisiert werden soll.

6. Die Datenstrategie [Resultat]

Nachdem Sie alle Fragen von der Vision bis zur konkreten Umsetzungsplanung beantwortet haben, fehlt nur noch die Ausformulierung Ihrer Ideen, Konzepte und der zu erwartenden Ergebnisse für jeden verständlich als ein Dokument namens Datenstrategie. Diese Datenstrategie soll Ihren Plan transparent machen und ist die Grundlage dafür, Ihre Mitarbeiter, Partner und letztendlich auch Ihre Vorgesetzten von Ihrer Strategie zu überzeugen.


Mein Vortrag zur Datenstrategie am Data Leader Day 2017

Am Data Leader Day am 09. November 2017 in Berlin erläutere ich als Keynote “Wie Sie für Ihr Unternehmen die richtige Datenstrategie entwickeln!”
Führungskräfte von Unternehmen wie Otto, Allianz, Deutsche Bahn und  SAP ergänzen mit ihren eigenen Erfahrungen hinsichtlich Big Data Projekten zur Geschäftsoptimierung. Jetzt hier Tickets sichern und dabei sein!

 

Unternehmen brauchen eine Datenstrategie

Viele Unternehmen stecken gerade in der Digitalisierung fest, digitalisieren Prozesse und Dokumente, vernetzen immer mehr Maschinen und Endgeräte, und generieren dabei folglich immer mehr Daten. Aber auch ungeachtet der aktuellen Digitalisierungs- und Vernetzungsinitiativen verfügen Unternehmen bereits längst über einen wahren Datenschatz in Ihren ERP-, CRM- und sonstigen IT-Systemen. Hinzu kommt ein beinahe unerschöpfliches Datenpotenzial aus externen Quellen hinzu, insbesondere dem Social Media, den Finanzportalen und behördlichen Instituten (Open Data).

Nur die wenigsten Unternehmen – jene dürfen wir ohne Zweifel zu den Gewinnern der Digitalisierung zählen – verfügen über eine konkrete Strategie, wie Daten aus unternehmensinternen und -externen Datenquellen zur Geschäftsoptimierung genutzt werden können: Die Datenstrategie.

Was ist eine Datenstrategie?

Die Datenstrategie ist ein ausformulierter und zielorientierter Verfahrensplan, um Daten in Mehrwert zu verwandeln. Er bringt während seiner Formulierung alle nötigen Funktionsbereichen zusammen, also IT-Administratoren, kaufmännische Entscheider und natürlich Data Scientists bzw. Datenexperten (welche genaue Berufsbezeichnung auch immer damit verbunden sein mag).

Die Datenstrategie ist ein spezieller Business Plan zur gewinnorientierten Datennutzung. In ihr werden klare Ziele und Zeitvorgaben (kurz-, mittel-, langfristig) definiert, der voraussichtliche Ressourcen-Einsatz und die Rahmenbedingungen benannt. Dazu gehören sowohl die technischen (Hardware, Software) als auch die rechtlichen Rahmen (Datenschutz, Datensicherheit, Urheberrecht usw.). Die Datenstrategie die Herausforderungen nachvollziehbar heraus und stellt im Abgleich fest, ob die bestehende Belegschaft im aktuellen Zustand die nötigen Kapazitäten und Qualifikationen hat bzw. ob Maßnahmen zum Erwerb von Know-How (Qualifizierung, Recruiting) ergriffen werden sollten.

Wozu braucht ein Unternehmen eine Datenstrategie?

Viele Unternehmen – ich bin zumindest mit vielen solcher Unternehmen im Gespräch – wissen oft nicht, wie sie am Trend zur Datennutzung partizipieren können, bevor es der Wettbewerb tut bzw. man für neue Märkte unzureichend / zu spät vorbereitet ist. Sie wissen, dass es Potenziale für die Nutzung von Daten gibt, jedoch nicht, welche Tragweite derartige Projekte hinsichtlich des Einsatzes und des Ergebnisses haben werden. Diesen Unternehmen fehlt eine Datenstrategie als ein klarer Fahrplan, um über Datenanalyse die bestehenden Geschäfte zu optimieren. Und möglicherweise auch, um neue Geschäftsmöglichkeiten zu erschließen.

Demgegenüber steht eine andere Art von Unternehmen: Diese sind bereits seit Jahren in die Nutzung von Big Data eingestiegen und haben nun viele offene Baustellen, verschiedene neue Tools und eine große Vielfalt an Projektergebnissen. Einige dieser Unternehmen sehen sich nunmehr mit einer Komplexität konfrontiert, für die der Wunsch nach Bereinigung aufkommt. Hier dient die Datenstrategie zur Fokussierung der Ressourcen auf die individuell besten, d.h. gewinnträchtigsten bzw. nötigsten Einsatzmöglichkeiten, anstatt alle Projekte auf einmal machen.

Zusammenfassend kann demnach gesagt werden, dass eine Datenstrategie dazu dient, sich nicht in Big Data bzw. Data Science Projekte zu verrennen oder mit den falschen Projekten anzufangen. Die Strategie soll Frustration vermeiden und schon vom Ansatz her dafür sorgen, dass die nächst höhere Etage – bis hin zum Vorstand – Big Data Projekte nicht für sinnlos erklärt und die Budgets streicht.

Wie entsteht eine Datenstrategie?

Ein ganz wesentlicher Punkt ist, dass die Datenstrategie kein Dokument wird, welches mühsam nur für die Schublade erstellt wurde. Der Erfolg entsteht schließlich nicht auf schönen Strategiefolien, sondern aus zielgerichteter Hands-on-Arbeit. Zudem ist es erfolgskritisch, dass die Datenstrategie für jeden beteiligten Mitarbeiter verständlich ist und keine Beraterfloskeln enthält, jedoch fachlich und umsetzungsorientiert bleibt. Im Kern steht sicherlich in der Regel eine Analysemethodik (Data Science), allerdings soll die Datenstrategie alle relevanten Fachbereiche im Unternehmen mitnehmen und somit ein Gemeinschaftsgefühl (Wir-Gefühl) erschaffen, und keinesfalls die Erwartung vermitteln, die IT mache da schon irgendwas. Folglich muss die Datenstrategie gemeinschaftlich entwickelt werden, beispielsweise durch die Gründung eines Komitees, welches aus Mitarbeitern unterschiedlichster Hintergründe besetzt ist, die der Interdisziplinität gerecht wird. Eine entsprechend nötige Interdisziplinität des Teams bringt übrigens – das wird häufig verschwiegen – auch Nachteile mit sich, denn treffen die führenden Köpfe aus den unterschiedlichen Fachbereichen aufeinander, werden Vorschläge schnell abgehoben und idealistisch, weil sie die Erwartungen aller Parteien erfüllen sollen. Eine gute Datenstrategie bleibt jedoch auf dem Boden und hat realistische Ziele, sie orientiert sich an den Gegebenheiten und nicht an zukünftigen Wunschvorstellungen einzelner Visionäre.

Idealerweise wird die Entwicklung der Datenstrategie von jemanden begleitet, der sowohl Erfahrung in Verarbeitung von Daten als auch vom Business hat, und der über explizite Erfahrung mit Big Data Projekten verfügt. Gerade auch das Einbeziehen externer Experten ermöglicht, dass indirekt durch den Erfahrungseinfluss aus bereits gemachten Fehlern in anderen Unternehmen gelernt werden kann.


Mehr dazu im nächsten Artikel: Die fünf Schritte zur Datenstrategie! 

The Future of CRM Systems

Growth comes hand in hand with technology advancement. Today CRM software help in handling all customer data including buying habits for as long as they are attached to the company. With all the data collected, what next? How can CRM systems make things better? Most companies find themselves with a lot of data on their hands but fewer tools to capitalize on it.

To have a glimpse at the future of CRM systems, we ought to recognize the problems businesses have now. The critical issue for most companies is to offer personalized communication and products. What should we expect from these systems in the future? Why the need for improved CRM systems?

Retaining customers is easier than pitching new ones. Your clients also become an essential marketing tool. Most of the referrals you get will be from proud customers. With this said, there is the need of a system that enables a business to offer targeted information and products to the customers.

Systems that can Collect all Customer Data even from Other Markets

At the moment, your client information is only based on what you have collected internally. But wouldn’t you want to have a sneak preview of what your customer’s buying habits are outside your business? This will help you come up with relevant data that will meet customer needs. When there is a centralized unit that collects customer data from several sources and shares appropriately, business owners benefit more from the information they garner.

The Birth of Intelligent Units for Business Owners

In the future, we see business owners accessing software or multiple units that can bring order in data collection, analyzing and grouping. With all the data collected, companies are overwhelmed when it comes to utilization. Intelligent systems can analyze and even recommend proper usage of each set of data. This means customized products, recommendations, and appropriate sales formulas.

With all the data collected, businesses are overwhelmed when coming up with sales campaigns. Most of the effort is not recognized because it is not unique to customer needs. Many clients don’t even open emails from shopping outlets because they deem it as a waste of time. It is time to change this notion.

The Need to Use Different Marketing Channels

What if based on the customer data you have collected, you can reach clients through various means? Technology allows a person to use different devices all at the same time. Mobile marketing has not been delved into exhaustively, yet mobile devices are more popular nowadays because of the convenience they bring along. Some people no longer use PCs. When systems target mobile devices, chances of getting a better response are higher.

Social Media Integration

How can you profit from your clients’ social trends? Marketing can be easier when CRMs take into account social media habits. These should be customer specific with approaches that are both friendly, engaging and to the point.

Personalized Services

CRMs in the future will be able to detect customer preferences, styles, and tastes. What is your favorite color? How do you like your products packaged? Have you changed your address? Future systems will be able to detect this quickly and even update business data. No more wrong shipments or guessing what your customers would prefer? The systems will even be able to identify future buying trends that companies can use to their advantage. Customer understanding is vital when offering personalized services.

Customer Involvement

Through improved CRM systems customers can find it easier to make recommendations, offer suggestions and even get involved in the developments in the company. The more interactive a business is, the longer the clients will stay around meaning more sales. Systems can periodically interact with customers on given topics such as new product suggestions, the feedback of which can be useful for growth.

Customer interaction is also essential in promoting product knowledge. All the emails, inquiries and questions coming in can be overwhelming, but when a business has artificial intelligent units handling the incoming traffic, things get easier and tailor made to satisfy customer requests.

Sales Automation

In the future, the need to go through every order and dispatch will be a thing of the past. Systems will automatically detect orders, specifications and make appropriate shipments. This will make things easier and even reduce time spent on each order. CRMs will be able to work on multiple orders efficiently without human supervision. This will enhance a 24-hour working economy. The intelligent units will work day and night meaning that most business operations will go on past the regular working hours without having to employ more staff.

Efficient CRM use will reduce operating costs for most businesses. The need to have many employees or bigger operational space will go down. Customer expectations will be met which will mean better relations. This will result in a vibrant economy.

Ways AI & ML Are Changing How We Live

From Amazon’s Alexa, a personal assistant that can do anything from making your to-do list to giving a wide range of real-time information about the world around you, to Google’s DeepMind that has very recently made headlines for possibly being able to predict the future, AI and ML are the biggest development in human history.

Machine Learning Used by Hospitals

We hear a lot about Artificial Intelligence (AI) in the realm of insurance Big Data, but there isn’t much buzz around how AI and ML are revolutionising hospitals. The national health expenditures were around $3.4 trillion and estimated to increase from 17.8 percent of GDP to 19.9 percent between 2015 and 2025. By 2021, industry analysts have predicted that the AI health market will reach $6.6 billion. By 2026, such increases in AI technology in the healthcare sector will save the economy around $150 billion annually.

Some of the most popular Artificial Intelligence applications used in hospitals now are:

  • Predictive Health Trackers – Technology that has the ability to monitor patients’ health status using real-time data collection. One such technology is the Health and Environmental Tracker (HET) which can predict if someone is about to have an asthma attack.
  • Chatbots – It isn’t only retail customer service that uses chatbots to deal with consumers. Now hospitals have automated physicians that inquire and route clinicians to the right specialists.
  • Predictive AnalyticsCleveland Clinics have partnered with Microsoft (Cortana) while John Hopkins has partnered up with GE in order to create Machine Learning technology that has the ability to monitor patients and prevent patient emergencies before they happen. It does this by analysing data for primary indicators of potential risks.

Cognitive Marketing – Content Marketing on Steroids

Customer experience and content marketing are terms often tossed around in the world of business and advertising these days. Why do we bring them up now, you ask? Well, things are about to be kicked into sixth gear, thanks to Cognitive Marketing. To explain what that is, let’s go back a bit: remember when Google’s DeepMind AlphaGo bested the top human player at the game? This wasn’t some computer beating a bored office clerk at the game of Solitaire. In order to achieve that victory, Google’s AI had to “actually show its cognitive capability to ‘think’ like humans, because to win the game, ‘intuition’ was needed rather than just ‘logical reasoning’.” Similar algorithm-powered AI’s are enabling machines to learn and grow on their own. Soon, they’ll reach the potential to create content for marketeers at a massive scale. Not only that, but they’ll always deliver the right content, to the right kind of audience, at just the right time.

More Ways Than One: How Retail Is Harnessing AI & ML

  1. Developing Store That Don’t Need Checkout Lines

Tech companies and online retail giants such as Amazon want to create cashier-free stores, at least they are trying to. Last year Amazon launched its Amazon Go which uses sensors and hundreds of cameras to track what customers pick up and then charge the amount to an application on their smart phone, put simply. But only months into the experiment Amazon has said they need to work out some kinks in the system. As of now, Amazon Go’s system can only handle 20 or so customers at a time.

Among other issues, The Guardian, citing an unnamed source, wrote in an article, stated “…if an item has been moved from its specific spot on the shelf.”  Located in Seattle, Washington, Amazon Go is now running in “beta mode” only for Amazon employees as it tests its systems. And these tests are showing that Amazon’s attempt at a cashier-free brick-and-mortar convenience store is far from ready for the real world. A Journal report stated, “For now, the technology functions flawlessly only if there are a small number of customers present, or when their movements are slow.”

  1. Could Drones Be Delivering Goods to Your Home One Day?

Imagine ordering something online from, let’s say, Amazon, and it arrives at your door in 30 minutes or so via drone. Does that sound like something out of the movie The Fifth Element? Maybe, but this technology is already is already here.

Amazon Prime Air made its first delivery to a customer via a GPS-guided flying drone on December 7th, 2016. It only took 13 minutes for the drone to deliver the merchandise to the customer. This sort of technology will be a huge game changer for retail. The supply chain industry is headed for a revolution – drone delivery is coming, and retailers who want to keep up really should adopt such technologies.

Even in 2016, consumers were totally ready to accept drone delivery. The Walk Sands Future of Retail 2016 Study showed that 79 percent of US consumers said they would be “very likely” or “somewhat likely” to choose drone delivery if their product could be delivered within an hour. For me, I’d choose it just to see how cool it was. I think it would be pretty rad to have a drone land in my yard with my package, don’t you? Furthermore, other consumers stated they would pay up to $10 for a drone delivery. Lastly, 26 percent of consumers are already expecting to have their packages delivered to them in the next two years or so.

Driverless Delivery Vehicles Already Here as Well

There was a movie I watched some months ago – you most likely heard of it or even watched it. It was the latest movie about Wolverine titled Logan. There was a certain scene that never left my memory (basically because I found it awesome) where Logan and his companions were driving along a freeway full of driverless tractor trailers that had no tractor.

In an article written for pastemagazine.com, Carlos Alvarez of Getty wrote: “… Logan’s writer and director James Mangold’s inclusion of the self-driving trucking machines make it clear that the filmmaker understands the writing on the wall about the future of shipping. It’s a future without truck drivers.” He continues to explain that the movie takes place a little over 10 years from now in 2029.

“The change may well be here long before 2029. It’s only 2017, and already we’re seeing the beginnings of automated trucking taking over the industry. At the 2017 Consumer Electronics Show this January, Peloton Technology demonstrated “platooning,” where trucks are kept in a row on the highway to reduce wind resistance and save fuel. The trucks are controlled by computers on a “Level One” of autonomous driving,” Alvarez continued in his article.

Now in Germany, Mercedes-Benz is has been developing and testing their Actros truck which is fitted with a ‘highway pilot’ system, which acts like an auto-pilot and includes a radar and stereo camera system. So far, German carmaker Daimler has restricted testing on a German autobahn. The autobahn is generally safer than testing in city conditions since the curves are not as steep. Since the tests have started, this autonomous truck has already driven over 20,000 kilometres.

Did I Say Flying Taxis? Huh, Yeah I Did!

But, if you are still not amazed, then I am about to blow your socks off. Dubai has promised to build a fully autonomous public transportation system by 2030, including autonomous flying drone taxis! Now that is really something. And it isn’t a matter of when they’ll be produced and in use because they already are.

Manufactured in China by the drone-making firm EHang, these really freaking cool quad drones on steroids can carry one person weighing up to 100 kilogrammes (I weigh over that, guess I’m walking) plus maybe a backpack or suitcase. They can fly about 30 kilometres (or 19 miles), at a speed of 60 miles per hour, give or take. And, if that isn’t the cool part, you won’t need any lessons on how to fly it. Simply push a button and it flies you from point A to point B. Whether or not you have to give it directions, don’t know. Either way, this is mostly likely the coolest piece of tech out there right now.

Copyright @ CBS Interactive Inc.

Überwachtes vs unüberwachtes maschinelles Lernen

Dies ist Artikel 1 von 4 aus der Artikelserie – Was ist eigentlich Machine Learning?

Der Unterschied zwischen überwachten und unüberwachtem Lernen ist für Einsteiger in das Gebiet des maschinellen Lernens recht verwirrend. Ich halte die Bezeichnung “überwacht” und “unüberwacht” auch gar nicht für besonders gut, denn eigentlich wird jeder Algorithmus (zumindest anfangs) vom Menschen überwacht. Es sollte besser in trainierte und untrainierte Verfahren unterschieden werden, die nämlich völlig unterschiedliche Zwecke bedienen sollen:

Während nämlich überwachte maschinelle Lernverfahren über eine Trainingsphase regelrecht auf ein (!) Problem abgerichtet werden und dann produktiv als Assistenzsystem (bis hin zum Automated Decision Making) funktionieren sollen, sind demgegenüber unüberwachte maschinelle Lernverfahren eine Methodik, um unübersichtlich viele Zeilen und Spalten von folglich sehr großen Datenbeständen für den Menschen leichter interpretierbar machen zu können (was nicht immer funktioniert).

Trainiere dir deinen Algorithmus mit überwachtem maschinellen Lernen

Wenn ein Modell anhand von mit dem Ergebnis (z. B. Klassifikationsgruppe) gekennzeichneter Trainingsdaten erlernt werden soll, handelt es sich um überwachtes Lernen. Die richtige Antwort muss während der Trainingsphase also vorliegen und der Algorithmus muss die Lücke zwischen dem Input (Eingabewerte) und dem Output (das vorgeschriebene Ergebnis) füllen.

Die Überwachung bezieht sich dabei nur auf die Trainingsdaten! Im produktiven Lauf wird grundsätzlich nicht überwacht (und das Lernen könnte sich auf neue Daten in eine ganz andere Richtung entwickeln, als dies mit den Trainingsdaten der Fall war). Die Trainingsdaten

Eine besondere Form des überwachten Lernens ist die des bestärkenden Lernens. Bestärkendes Lernen kommt stets dann zum Einsatz, wenn ein Endergebnis noch gar nicht bestimmbar ist, jedoch der Trend hin zum Erfolg oder Misserfolg erkennbar wird (beispielsweise im Spielverlauf – AlphaGo von Google Deepmind soll bestärkend trainiert worden sein). In der Trainingsphase werden beim bestärkenden Lernen die korrekten Ergebnisse also nicht zur Verfügung gestellt, jedoch wird jedes Ergebnis bewertet, ob dieses (wahrscheinlich) in die richtige oder falsche Richtung geht (Annäherungslernen).

Zu den überwachten Lernverfahren zählen alle Verfahren zur Regression oder Klassifikation, beispielsweise mit Algorithmen wir k-nearest-Neighbour, Random Forest, künstliche neuronale Netze, Support Vector Machines oder auch Verfahren der Dimensionsreduktion wie die lineare Diskriminanzanalyse.

Mit unüberwachtem Lernen verborgene Strukturen identifizieren

Beim unüberwachten Lernen haben wir es mit nicht mit gekennzeichneten Daten zu tun, die möglichen Antworten/Ergebnisse sind uns gänzlich unbekannt. Folglich können wir den Algorithmus nicht trainieren, indem wir ihm die Ergebnisse, auf die er kommen soll, im Rahmen einer Trainingsphase vorgeben (überwachtes Lernen), sondern wir nutzen Algorithmen, die die Struktur der Daten erkunden und für uns Menschen sinnvolle Informationen aus Ihnen bilden (oder auch nicht – denn häufig bleibt es beim Versuch, denn der Erfolg ist nicht garantiert!).Unüberwachte Verfahren des maschinellen Lernens dienen dem Data Mining, also der Erkennung von Inhalten in Daten anhand von sichtbar werdenden Strukturen. Die Verfahren müssen nicht unbedingt mit Datenvisualisierung arbeiten, oft ist das aber der Fall, denn erst die visuellen Strukturen ermöglichen unseren menschlichen Gehirnen die Daten in einen Kontext zu bringen. Mir sind zwei Kategorien des unüberwachten Lernens bekannt, zum einem das Clustering, welches im Grunde ein unüberwachtes Klassifikationsverfahren darstellt, und zum anderen die Dimensionsreduktion PCA (Hauptkomponentenanalyse). Es gibt allerdings noch andere Verfahren, die mir weniger vertraut sind, beispielsweise unüberwacht lernende künstliche neuronale Netze, die Rauschen lernen, um Daten von eben diesem Rauschen zu befreien.

Establish a Collaborative Culture – Process Mining Rule 4 of 4

This is article no. 4 of the four-part article series Privacy, Security and Ethics in Process Mining.

Read this article in German:
Datenschutz, Sicherheit und Ethik beim Process Mining – Regel 4 von 4

Perhaps the most important ingredient in creating a responsible process mining environment is to establish a collaborative culture within your organization. Process mining can make the flaws in your processes very transparent, much more transparent than some people may be comfortable with. Therefore, you should include change management professionals, for example, Lean practitioners who know how to encourage people to tell each other “the truth”, in your team.

Furthermore, be careful how you communicate the goals of your process mining project and involve relevant stakeholders in a way that ensures their perspective is heard. The goal is to create an atmosphere, where people are not blamed for their mistakes (which only leads to them hiding what they do and working against you) but where everyone is on board with the goals of the project and where the analysis and process improvement is a joint effort.

Do:

  • Make sure that you verify the data quality before going into the data analysis, ideally by involving a domain expert already in the data validation step. This way, you can build trust among the process managers that the data reflects what is actually happening and ensure that you have the right understanding of what the data represents.
  • Work in an iterative way and present your findings as a starting point for discussion in each iteration. Give people the chance to explain why certain things are happening and let them ask additional questions (to be picked up in the next iteration). This will help to improve the quality and relevance of your analysis as well as increase the buy-in of the process stakeholders in the final results of the project.

Don’t:

  • Jump to conclusions. You can never assume that you know everything about the process. For example, slower teams may be handling the difficult cases, people may deviate from the process for good reasons, and you may not see everything in the data (for example, there might be steps that are performed outside of the system). By consistently using your observations as a starting point for discussion, and by allowing people to join in the interpretation, you can start building trust and the collaborative culture that process mining needs to thrive.
  • Force any conclusions that you expect, or would like to have, by misrepresenting the data (or by stating things that are not actually supported by the data). Instead, keep track of the steps that you have taken in the data preparation and in your process mining analysis. If there are any doubts about the validity or questions about the basis of your analysis, you can always go back and show, for example, which filters have been applied to the data to come to the particular process view that you are presenting.

Was ist eigentlich Machine Learning? Artikelserie

Machine Learning ist Technik und Mythos zugleich. Nachfolgend der Versuch einer verständlichen Erklärung, mit folgenden Artikeln:

  • Unüberwachtes vs überwachtes Lernen
  • Regression vs Klassifikation [Veröffentlichung demnächst!]
  • Parametrische vs nicht-parametrisches Lernen [Veröffentlichung demnächst!]
  • Online- vs Offline-Lernen [Veröffentlichung demnächst!]

Machine Learning ist nicht neu, aber innovativ!

Machine Learning oder maschinelles Lernen ist eine Bezeichnung, die dank industrieller Trends wie der Industrie 4.0, Smart Grid oder dem autonomen Fahrzeug zur neuen Blüte verhilft. Machine Learning ist nichts Neues und die Algorithmen sind teilweise mehrere Jahrzehnte alt. Dennoch ist Machine Learning ein Innovationsinstrument, denn während früher nur abstrakte Anwendungen, mit vornehmlich wissenschaftlichen Hintergrund, auf maschinellem Lernen setzten, finden entsprechende Algorithmen Einzug in alltägliche industrielle bzw. geschäftliche, medizinische und gesellschaftsorientierte Anwendungen. Machine Learning erhöht demnach sowohl unseren Lebensstandard als auch unsere Lebenserwartung!

Maschinelles Lernen vs künstliche Intelligenz

Künstliche Intelligenz (Artificial Intelligence) ist eine Bezeichnung, die in der Wissenschaft immer noch viel diskutiert wird. Wo beginnt künstliche Intelligenz, wann entsteht natürliche Intelligenz und was ist Intelligenz überhaupt? Wenn diese Wortkombination künstliche Intelligenz fällt, denken die meisten Zuhörer an Filme wie Terminator von James Cameron oder AI von Steven Spielberg. Diese Filme wecken Erwartungen (und Ängste), denen wir mir unseren selbstlernenden Systemen noch lange nicht gerecht werden können. Von künstlicher Intelligenz sollte als mit Bedacht gesprochen werden.

Maschinelles Lernen ist Teilgebiet der künstlichen Intelligenz und eine Sammlung von mathematischen Verfahren zur Mustererkennung, die entweder über generelle Prinzipien (das Finden von Gemeinsamkeiten oder relativen Abgrenzungen) funktioniert [unüberwachtes Lernen] oder durch das Bilden eines Algorithmus als Bindeglied zwischen Input und gewünschten Output aus Trainingsdaten heraus.

Machine Learning vs Deep Learning

Deep Learning ist eine spezielle Form des maschinellen Lernens, die vermutlich in den kommenden Jahren zum Standard werden wird. Gemeint sind damit künstliche neuronale Netze, manchmal auch verschachtelte “herkömmliche” Verfahren, die zum einen mehrere Ebenen bilden (verborgene Schichten eines neuronalen Netzes) zum anderen viel komplexere Zusammenhänge erlernen können, was den Begriff Deep Learning rechtfertigt.

Machine Learning vs Data Mining

Data Mining bezeichnet die Erkenntnisgewinnung aus bisher nicht oder nicht hinreichend erforschter Daten. Unüberwachte Verfahren des maschinellen Lernens, dazu gehören einige Verfahren aus dem Clustering und der Dimensionsreduktion, dienen explizit dem Zweck des Data Minings. Es sind Verfahren, die uns Menschen dabei helfen, vielfältige und große Datenmengen leichter interpretieren zu können. Machine Learning ermöglicht jedoch noch weit mehr als Data Mining.

Scikit-Learn Machine Learning Roadmap

Darstellung der vier Gebiete des Machine Learning: Die scikit-learn-Roadmap. Die Darstellung ist nicht vollständig, sondern umfasst nur die in scikit-learn implementierten Verfahren. Das Original-Bild ist interaktiv und zu finden auf scikit-learn.org

Geht mit Künstlicher Intelligenz nur „Malen nach Zahlen“?

Mit diesem Beitrag möchte ich darlegen, welche Grenzen uns in komplexen Umfeldern im Kontext Steuerung und Regelung auferlegt sind. Auf dieser Basis strebe ich dann nachgelagert eine Differenzierung in Bezug des Einsatzes von Data Science und Big Data, ab sofort mit Big Data Analytics bezeichnet, an. Aus meiner Sicht wird oft zu unreflektiert über Data Science und Künstliche Intelligenz diskutiert, was nicht zuletzt die Angst vor Maschinen schürt.

Basis meiner Ausführungen im ersten Part meines Beitrages ist der Kategorienfehler, der von uns Menschen immer wieder in Bezug auf Kompliziertheit und Komplexität vollführt wird. Deshalb werde ich am Anfang einige Worte über Kompliziertheit und Komplexität verlieren und dabei vor allem auf die markanten Unterschiede eingehen.

Kompliziertheit und Komplexität – der Versuch einer Versöhnung

Ich benutze oft die Begriffe „tot“ und „lebendig“ im Kontext von Kompliziertheit und Komplexität. Themenstellungen in „lebendigen“ Kontexten können niemals kompliziert sein. Sie sind immer komplex. Themenstellungen in „toten“ Kontexten sind stets kompliziert. Das möchte ich am Beispiel eines Uhrmachers erläutern, um zu verdeutlichen, dass auch Menschen in „toten“ Kontexten involviert sein können, obwohl sie selber lebendig sind. Deshalb die Begriffe „tot“ und „lebendig“ auch in Anführungszeichen.

Ein Uhrmacher baut eine Uhr zusammen. Dafür gibt es ein ganz klar vorgegebenes Rezept, welches vielleicht 300 Schritte beinhaltet, die in einer ganz bestimmten Reihenfolge abgearbeitet werden müssen. Werden diese Schritte befolgt, wird definitiv eine funktionierende Uhr heraus kommen. Ist der Uhrmacher geübt, hat er also genügend praktisches Wissen, ist diese Aufgabe für ihn einfach. Für mich als Ungelernten wird diese Übung schwierig sein, niemals komplex, denn ich kann ja einen Plan befolgen. Mit Übung bin ich vielleicht irgendwann so weit, dass ich diese Uhr zusammen gesetzt bekomme. Der Bauplan ist fix und ändert sich nicht. Man spricht hier von Monokontexturalität. Solche Tätigkeiten könnte man auch von Maschinen ausführen lassen, da klar definierte Abfolgen von Schritten programmierbar sind.

Nun stellen wir uns aber mal vor, dass eine Schraube fehlt. Ein Zahnrad kann nicht befestigt werden. Hier würde die Maschine einen Fehler melden, weil jetzt der Kontext verlassen wird. Das Fehlen der Schraube ist nicht Bestandteil des Kontextes, da es nicht Bestandteil des Planes und damit auch nicht Bestandteil des Programmcodes ist. Die Maschine weiß deshalb nicht, was zu tun ist. Der Uhrmacher ist in der Lage den Kontext zu wechseln. Er könnte nach anderen Möglichkeiten der Befestigung suchen oder theoretisch probieren, ob die Uhr auch ohne Zahnrad funktioniert oder er könnte ganz einfach eine Schraube bestellen und später den Vorgang fortsetzen. Der Uhrmacher kann polykontextural denken und handeln. In diesem Fall wird dann der komplizierte Kontext ein komplexer. Der Bauplan ist nicht mehr gültig, denn Bestellung einer Schraube war in diesem nicht enthalten. Deshalb meldet die Maschine einen Fehler. Der Bestellvorgang müsste von einem Menschen in Form von Programmcode voraus gedacht werden, so dass die Maschine diesen anstoßen könnte. Damit wäre diese Option dann wieder Bestandteil des monokontexturalen Bereiches, in dem die Maschine agieren kann.

Kommen wir in diesem Zusammenhang zum Messen und Wahrnehmen. Maschinen können messen. Messen passiert in monokontexturalen Umgebungen. Die Maschine kann messen, ob die Schraube festgezogen ist, die das Zahnrad hält: Die Schraube ist „fest“ oder „lose“. Im Falle des Fehlens der Schraube verlässt man die Ebene des Messens und geht in die Ebene der Wahrnehmung über. Die Maschine kann nicht wahrnehmen, der Uhrmacher schon. Beim Wahrnehmen muss man den Kontext erst einmal bestimmen, da dieser nicht per se gegeben sein kann. „Die Schraube fehlt“ setzt die Maschine in den Kontext „ENTWEDER fest ODER lose“ und dann ist Schluss. Die Maschine würde stetig zwischen „fest“ und „lose“ iterieren und niemals zum Ende gelangen. Eine endlose Schleife, die mit einem Fehler abgebrochen werden muss. Der Uhrmacher kann nach weiteren Möglichkeiten suchen, was gleichbedeutend mit dem Suchen nach einem weiteren Kontext ist. Er kann vielleicht eine neue Schraube suchen oder versuchen das Zahnrad irgendwie anders geartet zu befestigen.

In „toten“ Umgebungen ist der Mensch mit der Umwelt eins geworden. Er ist trivialisiert. Das ist nicht despektierlich gemeint. Diese Trivialisierung ist ausreichend, da ein Rezept in Form eines Algorithmus vorliegt, welcher zielführend ist. Wahrnehmen ist also nicht notwendig, da kein Kontextwechsel vorgenommen werden muss. Messen reicht aus.

In einer komplexen und damit „lebendigen“ Welt gilt das Motto „Sowohl-Als-Auch“, da hier stetig der Kontext gewechselt wird. Das bedeutet Widersprüchlichkeiten handhaben zu müssen. Komplizierte Umgebungen kennen ausschließlich ein „Entweder-Oder“. Damit existieren in komplizierten Umgebungen auch keine Widersprüche. Komplizierte Sachverhalte können vollständig in Programmcode oder Algorithmen geschrieben und damit vollständig formallogisch kontrolliert werden. Bei komplexen Umgebungen funktioniert das nicht, da unsere Zweiwertige Logik, auf die jeder Programmcode basieren muss, Widersprüche und damit Polykontexturalität ausschließen. Komplexität ist nicht kontrollier-, sondern bestenfalls handhabbar.

Diese Erkenntnisse möchte ich nun nutzen, um das bekannte Cynefin Modell von Dave Snowden zu erweitern, da dieses in der ursprünglichen Form zu Kategorienfehler zwischen Kompliziertheit und Komplexität verleitet. Nach dem Cynefin Modell werden die Kategorien „einfach“, „kompliziert“ und „komplex“ auf einer Ebene platziert. Das ist aus meiner Sicht nicht passfähig. Die Einstufung „einfach“ und damit auch „schwierig“, die es im Modell nicht gibt, existiert eine Ebene höher in beiden Kategorien, „kompliziert“ und „komplex“. „Einfach“ ist also nicht gleich „einfach“.

„Einfach“ in der Kategorie „kompliziert“ bedeutet, dass das ausreichende Wissen, sowohl praktisch als auch theoretisch, gegeben ist, um eine komplizierte Fragestellung zu lösen. Grundsätzlich ist ein Lösungsweg vorhanden, den man theoretisch kennen und praktisch anwenden muss. Wird eine komplizierte Fragestellung als „schwierig“ eingestuft, ist der vorliegende Lösungsweg nicht bekannt, aber grundsätzlich vorhanden. Er muss erlernt werden, sowohl praktisch als auch theoretisch. In der Kategorie „kompliziert“ rede ich also von Methoden oder Algorithmen, die an den bekannten Lösungsweg an-gelehnt sind.

Für „komplexe“ Fragestellungen kann per Definition kein Wissen existieren, welches in Form eines Rezeptes zu einem Lösungsweg geformt werden kann. Hier sind Erfahrung, Talent und Können essentiell, die Agilität im jeweiligen Kontext erhöhen. Je größer oder kleiner Erfahrung und Talent sind, spreche ich dann von den Wertungen „einfach“, „schwierig“ oder „chaotisch“. Da kein Rezept gegeben ist, kann man Lösungswege auch nicht vorweg in Form von Algorithmen programmieren. Hier sind Frameworks und Heuristiken angebracht, die genügend Freiraum für das eigene Denken und Fühlen lassen.

Die untere Abbildung stellt die Abhängigkeiten und damit die Erweiterung des Cynefin Modells dar.

Data Science und „lebendige“ Kontexte – der Versuch einer Versöhnung

Gerade beim Einsatz von Big Data Analytics sind wir dem im ersten Part angesprochenen Kategorienfehler erlegen, was mich letztlich zu einer differenzierten Sichtweise auf Big Data Analytics verleitet. Darauf komme ich nun zu sprechen.

In vielen Artikeln, Berichten und Büchern wird Big Data Analytics glorifiziert. Es gibt wenige Autoren, die eine differenzierte Betrachtung anstreben. Damit meine ich, klare Grenzen von Big Data Analytics, insbesondere in Bezug zum Einsatz auf Menschen, aufzuzeigen, um damit einen erfolgreichen Einsatz erst zu ermöglichen. Auch viele unserer Hirnforscher tragen einen erheblichen Anteil zum Manifestieren des Kategorienfehlers bei, da sie glauben, Wirkmechanismen zwischen der materiellen und der seelischen Welt erkundet zu haben. Unser Gehirn erzeugt aus dem Feuern von Neuronen, also aus Quantitäten, Qualitäten, wie „Ich liebe“ oder „Ich hasse“. Wie das funktioniert ist bislang unbekannt. Man kann nicht mit Algorithmen aus der komplizierten Welt Sachverhalte der komplexen Welt erklären. Die Algorithmen setzen auf der Zweiwertigen Logik auf und diese lässt keine Kontextwechsel zu. Ich habe diesen Fakt ja im ersten Teil eingehend an der Unterscheidung zwischen Kompliziertheit und Komplexität dargelegt.

Es gibt aber auch erfreulicherweise, leider noch zu wenige, Menschen, die diesen Fakt erkennen und thematisieren. Ich spreche hier stellvertretend Prof. Harald Walach an und zitiere aus seinem Artikel »Sowohl als auch« statt »Entweder-oder« – oder: wie man Kategorienfehler vermeidet.

„Die Wirklichkeit als Ganzes ist komplexer und lässt sich genau nicht mit solchen logischen Instrumenten komplett analysieren. … Weil unser Überleben als Art davon abhängig war, dass wir diesen logischen Operator so gut ausgeprägt haben ist die Gefahr groß dass wir nun alles so behandeln. … Mit Logik können wir nicht alle Probleme des Lebens lösen. … Geist und neuronale Entladungen sind Prozesse, die unterschiedlichen kategorialen Ebenen angehören, so ähnlich wie „blau“ und „laut“.

Aus diesen Überlegungen habe ich eine Big Data Analytics Matrix angefertigt, mit welcher man einen Einsatz von Big Data Analytics auf Menschen, also in „lebendige“ Kontexte, verorten kann.

Die Matrix hat zwei Achsen. Die x-Achse stellt dar, auf welcher Basis, einzelne oder viele Menschen, Erkenntnisse direkt aus Daten und den darauf aufsetzenden Algorithmen gezogen werden sollen. Die y-Achse bildet ab, auf welcher Basis, einzelne oder viele Menschen, diese gewonnenen Erkenntnisse dann angewendet werden sollen. Um diese Unterteilung anschaulicher zu gestalten, habe ich in den jeweiligen Quadranten Beispiele eines möglichen Einsatzes von Big Data Analytics im Kontext Handel zugefügt.

An der Matrix erkennen wir, dass wir auf Basis von einzelnen Individuen keine Erkenntnisse maschinell über Algorithmen errechnen können. Tun wir das, begehen wir den von mir angesprochenen Kategorienfehler zwischen Kompliziertheit und Komplexität. In diesem Fall kennzeichne ich den gesamten linken roten Bereich der Matrix. Anwendungsfälle, die man gerne in diesen Bereich platzieren möchte, muss man über die anderen beiden gelben Quadranten der Matrix lösen.

Für das Lösen von Anwendungsfällen innerhalb der beiden gelben Quadranten kann man sich den Fakt zu Nutze machen, dass sich komplexe Vorgänge oft durch einfache Handlungsvorschriften beschreiben lassen. Achtung! Hier bitte nicht dem Versuch erlegen sein, „einfach“ und „einfach“ zu verwechseln. Ich habe im ersten Teil bereits ausgeführt, dass es sowohl in der Kategorie „kompliziert“, als auch in der Kategorie „komplex“, einfache Sachverhalte gibt, die aber nicht miteinander ob ihrer Schwierigkeitsstufe verglichen werden dürfen. Tut man es, dann, ja sie wissen schon: Kategorienfehler. Es ist ähnlich zu der Fragestellung: “Welche Farbe ist größer, blau oder rot?” Für Details hierzu verweise ich Sie gerne auf meinen Beitrag Komplexitäten entstehen aus Einfachheiten, sind aber schwer zu handhaben.

Möchten sie mehr zu der Big Data Analytics Matrix und den möglichen Einsätzen er-fahren, muss ich sie hier ebenfalls auf einen Beitrag von mir verweisen, da diese Ausführungen diesen Beitrag im Inhalt sprengen würden.

Mensch und Maschine – der Versuch einer Versöhnung

Wie Ihnen sicherlich bereits aufgefallen ist, enthält die Big Data Analytics Matrix keinen grünen Bereich. Den Grund dafür habe ich versucht, in diesem Beitrag aus meiner Sicht zu untermauern. Algorithmen, die stets monokontextural aufgebaut sein müssen, können nur mit größter Vorsicht im „lebendigen“ Kontext angewendet werden.

Erste Berührungspunkte in diesem Thema habe ich im Jahre 1999 mit dem Schreiben meiner Diplomarbeit erlangt. Die Firma, in welcher ich meine Arbeit verfasst habe, hat eine Maschine entwickelt, die aufgenommene Bilder aus Blitzgeräten im Straßenverkehr automatisch durchzieht, archiviert und daraus Mahnschreiben generiert. Ein Problem dabei war das Erkennen der Nummernschilder, vor allem wenn diese verschmutzt waren. Hier kam ich ins Spiel. Ich habe im Rahmen meiner Diplomarbeit ein Lernverfahren für ein Künstlich Neuronales Netz (KNN) programmiert, welches genau für diese Bilderkennung eingesetzt wurde. Dieses Lernverfahren setzte auf der Backpropagation auf und funktionierte auch sehr gut. Das Modell lag im grünen Bereich, da nichts in Bezug auf den Menschen optimiert werden sollte. Es ging einzig und allein um Bilderkennung, also einem „toten“ Kontext.

Diese Begebenheit war der Startpunkt für mich, kritisch die Strömungen rund um die Künstliche Intelligenz, vor allem im Kontext der Modellierung von Lebendigkeit, zu erforschen. Einige Erkenntnisse habe ich in diesem Beitrag formuliert.