Applying Data Science Techniques in Python to Evaluate Ionospheric Perturbations from Earthquakes

Multi-GNSS (Galileo, GPS, and GLONASS) Vertical Total Electron Content Estimates: Applying Data Science techniques in Python to Evaluate Ionospheric Perturbations from Earthquakes

1 Introduction

Today, Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) observations are routinely used to study the physical processes that occur within the Earth’s upper atmosphere. Due to the experienced satellite signal propagation effects the total electron content (TEC) in the ionosphere can be estimated and the derived Global Ionosphere Maps (GIMs) provide an important contribution to monitoring space weather. While large TEC variations are mainly associated with solar activity, small ionospheric perturbations can also be induced by physical processes such as acoustic, gravity and Rayleigh waves, often generated by large earthquakes.

In this study Ionospheric perturbations caused by four earthquake events have been observed and are subsequently used as case studies in order to validate an in-house software developed using the Python programming language. The Python libraries primarily utlised are Pandas, Scikit-Learn, Matplotlib, SciPy, NumPy, Basemap, and ObsPy. A combination of Machine Learning and Data Analysis techniques have been applied. This in-house software can parse both receiver independent exchange format (RINEX) versions 2 and 3 raw data, with particular emphasis on multi-GNSS observables from GPS, GLONASS and Galileo. BDS (BeiDou) compatibility is to be added in the near future.

Several case studies focus on four recent earthquakes measuring above a moment magnitude (MW) of 7.0 and include: the 11 March 2011 MW 9.1 Tohoku, Japan, earthquake that also generated a tsunami; the 17 November 2013 MW 7.8 South Scotia Ridge Transform (SSRT), Scotia Sea earthquake; the 19 August 2016 MW 7.4 North Scotia Ridge Transform (NSRT) earthquake; and the 13 November 2016 MW 7.8 Kaikoura, New Zealand, earthquake.

Ionospheric disturbances generated by all four earthquakes have been observed by looking at the estimated vertical TEC (VTEC) and residual VTEC values. The results generated from these case studies are similar to those of published studies and validate the integrity of the in-house software.

2 Data Cleaning and Data Processing Methodology

Determining the absolute VTEC values are useful in order to understand the background ionospheric conditions when looking at the TEC perturbations, however small-scale variations in electron density are of primary interest. Quality checking processed GNSS data, applying carrier phase leveling to the measurements, and comparing the TEC perturbations with a polynomial fit creating residual plots are discussed in this section.

Time delay and phase advance observables can be measured from dual-frequency GNSS receivers to produce TEC data. Using data retrieved from the Center of Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) site (ftp://ftp.unibe.ch/aiub/CODE), the differential code biases are subtracted from the ionospheric observables.

2.1 Determining VTEC: Thin Shell Mapping Function

The ionospheric shell height, H, used in ionosphere modeling has been open to debate for many years and typically ranges from 300 – 400 km, which corresponds to the maximum electron density within the ionosphere. The mapping function compensates for the increased path length traversed by the signal within the ionosphere. Figure 1 demonstrates the impact of varying the IPP height on the TEC values.

Figure 1 Impact on TEC values from varying IPP heights. The height of the thin shell, H, is increased in 50km increments from 300 to 500 km.

2.2 Phase Smoothing

For dual-frequency GNSS users TEC values can be retrieved with the use of dual-frequency measurements by applying calculations. Calculation of TEC for pseudorange measurements in practice produces a noisy outcome and so the relative phase delay between two carrier frequencies – which produces a more precise representation of TEC fluctuations – is preferred. To circumvent the effect of pseudorange noise on TEC data, GNSS pseudorange measurements can be smoothed by carrier phase measurements, with the use of the carrier phase smoothing technique, which is often referred to as carrier phase leveling.

Figure 2 Phase smoothed code differential delay

2.3 Residual Determination

For the purpose of this study the monitoring of small-scale variations in ionospheric electron density from the ionospheric observables are of particular interest. Longer period variations can be associated with diurnal alterations, and changes in the receiver- satellite elevation angles. In order to remove these longer period variations in the TEC time series as well as to monitor more closely the small-scale variations in ionospheric electron density, a higher-order polynomial is fitted to the TEC time series. This higher-order polynomial fit is then subtracted from the observed TEC values resulting in the residuals. The variation of TEC due to the TID perturbation are thus represented by the residuals. For this report the polynomial order applied was typically greater than 4, and was chosen to emulate the nature of the arc for that particular time series. The order number selected is dependent on the nature of arcs displayed upon calculating the VTEC values after an initial inspection of the VTEC plots.

3 Results

3.1 Tohoku Earthquake

For this particular report, the sampled data focused on what was retrieved from the IGS station, MIZU, located at Mizusawa, Japan. The MIZU site is 39N 08′ 06.61″ and 141E 07′ 58.18″. The location of the data collection site, MIZU, and the earthquake epicenter can be seen in Figure 3.

Figure 3 MIZU IGS station and Tohoku earthquake epicenter [generated using the Python library, Basemap]

Figure 4 displays the ionospheric delay in terms of vertical TEC (VTEC), in units of TECU (1 TECU = 1016 el m-2). The plot is split into two smaller subplots, the upper section displaying the ionospheric delay (VTEC) in units of TECU, the lower displaying the residuals. The vertical grey-dashed lined corresponds to the epoch of the earthquake at 05:46:23 UT (2:46:23 PM local time) on March 11 2011. In the upper section of the plot, the blue line corresponds to the absolute VTEC value calculated from the observations, in this case L1 and L2 on GPS, whereby the carrier phase leveling technique was applied to the data set. The VTEC values are mapped from the STEC values which are calculated from the LOS between MIZU and the GPS satellite PRN18 (on Figure 4 denoted G18). For this particular data set as seen in Figure 4, a polynomial fit of  five degrees was applied, which corresponds to the red-dashed line. As an alternative to polynomial fitting, band-pass filtering can be employed when TEC perturbations are desired. However for the scope of this report polynomial fitting to the time series of TEC data was the only method used. In the lower section of Figure 4 the residuals are plotted. The residuals are simply the phase smoothed delay values (the blue line) minus the polynomial fit line (the red-dashed line). All ionosphere delay plots follow the same layout pattern and all time data is represented in UT (UT = GPS – 15 leap seconds, whereby 15 leap seconds correspond to the amount of leap seconds at the time of the seismic event). The time series shown for the ionosphere delay plots are given in terms of decimal of the hour, so that the format follows hh.hh.

Figure 4 VTEC and residual plot for G18 at MIZU on March 11 2011

3.2 South Georgia Earthquake

In the South Georgia Island region located in the North Scotia Ridge Transform (NSRT) plate boundary between the South American and Scotia plates on 19 August 2016, a magnitude of 7.4 MW earthquake struck at 7:32:22 UT. This subsection analyses the data retrieved from KEPA and KRSA. As well as computing the GPS and GLONASS TEC values, four Galileo satellites (E08, E14, E26, E28) are also analysed. Figure 5 demonstrates the TEC perturbations as computed for the Galileo L1 and L5 carrier frequencies.

Figure 5 VTEC and residual plots at KRSA on 19 August 2016. The plots are from the perspective of the GNSS receiver at KRSA, for four Galileo satellites (a) E08; (b) E14; (c) E24; (d) E26. The y-axes and x-axes in all plots do not conform with one another but are adjusted to fit the data. The y-axes for the residual section of each plot is consistent with one another.

Figure 6 Geometry of the Galileo (E08, E14, E24 and E26) satellites’ projected ground track whereby the IPP is set to 300km altitude. The orange lines correspond to tectonic plate boundaries.

4 Conclusion

The proximity of the MIZU site and magnitude of the Tohoku event has provided a remarkable – albeit a poignant – opportunity to analyse the ocean-ionospheric coupling aftermath of a deep submarine seismic event. The Tohoku event has also enabled the observation of the origin and nature of the TIDs generated by both a major earthquake and tsunami in close proximity to the epicenter. Further, the Python software developed is more than capable of providing this functionality, by drawing on its mathematical packages, such as NumPy, Pandas, SciPy, and Matplotlib, as well as employing the cartographic toolkit provided from the Basemap package, and finally by utilizing the focal mechanism generation library, Obspy.

Pre-seismic cursors have been investigated in the past and strongly advocated in particular by Kosuke Heki. The topic of pre-seismic ionospheric disturbances remains somewhat controversial. A potential future study area could be the utilization of the Python program – along with algorithmic amendments – to verify the existence of this phenomenon. Such work would heavily involve the use of Scikit-Learn in order to ascertain the existence of any pre-cursors.

Finally, the code developed is still retained privately and as of yet not launched to any particular platform, such as GitHub. More detailed information on this report can be obtained here:

Download as PDF

Data Science Survey by lexoro.ai

Ergebnisse unserer ersten Data Science Survey

Wie denken Data Scientists über ihre Skills, ihre Karriere und ihre Arbeitgeber? Data Science, Machine Learning, Künstliche Intelligenz – mehr als bloße Hype-Begriffe und entfernte Zukunftsmusik! Wir stecken mitten in massiven strukturellen Veränderungen. Die Digitalisierungswelle der vergangenen Jahre war nur der Anfang. Jede Branche ist betroffen. Schnell kann ein Gefühl von Bedrohung und Angst vor dem Unbekannten aufkommen. Tatsächlich liegen aber nie zuvor dagewesene Chancen und Potentiale vor unseren Füßen. Die Herausforderung ist es diese zu erkennen und dann die notwendigen Veränderungen umzusetzen.
Diese Survey möchte deshalb die Begriffe Data Science und Machine Learning einmal genauer beleuchten. Was steckt überhaupt hinter diesen Begriffen? Was muss ein Data Scientist können? Welche Gedanken macht sich ein Data Scientist über seine Karriere? Und sind Unternehmen hinsichtlich des Themas Machine Learning gut aufgestellt? Nun möchten wir die Ergebnisse dieser Umfrage vorstellen:



Link zu den Ergebnissen der ersten Data Science Survey by lexoro.ai

Interesse an einem Austausch zu verschiedenen Karriereperspektiven im Bereich Data Science/ Machine Learning? Dann registrieren Sie sich direkt auf dem lexoro Talent Check-In und ein lexoro-Berater wird sich bei Ihnen melden.

Self Service Data Preparation mit Microsoft Excel

Get & Transform (vormals Power Query), eine kurze Einführung

 Unter Data Preparation versteht man sinngemäß einen Prozeß der Vorbereitung / Aufbereitung von Rohdaten aus meistens unterschiedlichen Datenquellen und -formaten, verbunden mit dem Ziel, diese effektiv für verschiedene Geschäftszwecke / Analysen (Business Fragen) weiterverwenden/bereitstellen zu können. Rohdaten müssen oft vor ihrem bestimmungsgemäßen Gebrauch transformiert (Datentypen), integriert (Datenkonsistenz, referentielle Integrität), sowie zugeordnet (mapping; Quell- zu Zieldaten) werden.
An diesem neuralgischen Punkt werden bereits die Weichen für Datenqualität gestellt.

Unter Datenqualität soll hier die Beschaffenheit / Geeignetheit von Daten verstanden werden, um konkrete Fragestestellungen beantworten zu können (fitness for use):

Kriterien Datenqualität

  • Eindeutigkeit
  • Vollständigkeit
  • Widerspruchsfreiheit / Konsistenz
  • Aktualität
  • Genauigkeit
  • Verfügbarkeit

Datenqualität bestimmt im Wesentlichen die weitere zielgerichtete Verwendung der Daten in Analysen (Modelle) und Berichten (Reporting). Daten werden in entscheidungsrelevante Kennzahlen (Informationen) überführt. Eine Kennzahl ist gegenüber der Datenqualität immer blind, ihre Aussagekraft (Validität) hängt -neben der Definition – in sehr starkem Maße davon ab:

Gütekriterien von Kennzahlen

  • Objektivität := ist die Interpretation unabhängig vom Beobachter / Verwender?
  • Reliabilität := kann das Ergebnis unter sonst gleichen Bedingungen reproduziert werden ?
  • Validität := sagt die Kennzahl das aus, was sie vorgibt, auszusagen ?

Business Fragen entstehen naturgemäß in den Fachbereichen.Daher ist es nur folgerichtig, Data Preparation als einen ersten Analyseschritt innerhalb des Fachbereichs anzusiedeln (Self Service Data Preparation). Dadurch erhält der Fachbereich einen Teil seiner Autonomie zurück. Welche Teilmenge der Daten relevant für Fragestellungen ist, kann nur der Fachbereich beurteilen; der Anforderer von entscheidungsrelevanten Informationen sollte idealerweiseTeil der Entstehung wertiger Daten sein, das fördert zum einen die Akzeptanz des Ergebnisses, zum anderen wirkt es einem „not-invented-here“ Syndrom frühzeitig entgegen.

Im Folgenden wird anhand 4 Schritten skizziert, wie Microsoft Excel bei dem Thema (Self Service) Data Preparation vor allem den Fachbereich unterstützen kann. Eine Beispieldatei können Sie hier (google drive) einsehen. Sie finden die hierfür verwendete Funktionalität (Get & Transform) in Excel 2016 unter:

Reiter Daten -> Abrufen und Transformieren.

Dem interessierten Leser werden im Text vertiefende Informationen über links zu einzelnen typischen Aufgabenstellungen und Lösungswegen angeboten. Eine kurze Einführung in das Thema finden Sie in diesem Blog Beitrag.

1 Einlesen

Datenquellen anbinden (externe, interne)

Dank der neuen Funktionsgruppe „Abrufen und Transformieren“ ist es in Microsoft Excel möglich, verschiedene externe Datenquellen /-formate anzubinden. Zusätzlich können natürlich auch Tabellen der aktiven / offenen Excel Arbeitsmappe als Datenquelle dienen (interne Datenquellen). Diese Datenquellen werden anschließend als sogenannte Arbeitsmappenabfragen abgebildet.

Praxisbeispiele:

Anbindung mehrerer Dateien, welche in einem Ordner bereitgestellt werden

Anbindung von Webinhalten

2 Transformieren

Daten transformieren (Datentypen, Struktur)

Datentypen (Text, Zahl) können anschließend je Arbeitsmappenabfrage und Spalte(n) geändert werden.
Dies ist zB immer dann notwendig, wenn Abfragen über Schlüsselspalten in Beziehung gesetzt werden sollen (siehe Punkt 3). Gleicher Datentyp (Primär- und Fremdschlüssel) in beiden Tabellen ist hier notwendige Voraussetzung.

Des Weiteren wird in dieser Phase typischerweise festgelegt, welche Zeile der Abfrage die Spaltenbeschriftungen enthält.

Praxisbeispiele:

Fehlerbehandlung

Leere Zellen auffüllen

Umgang mit wechselnden Spaltenbeschriftungen

3 Zusammenführen / Anreichern

Daten zusammenführen (SVERWEIS mal anders)

Um unterschiedliche Tabellen / Abfragen über gemeinsame Schlüsselspalten zusammenzuführen, stellt der Excel Abfrage Editor eine Reihe von JOIN-Operatoren zur Verfügung, welche ohne SQL-Kenntnisse nur durch Anklicken ausgewählt werden können.

Praxisbeispiele

JOIN als Alternative zu Excel Formel SVERWEIS()

Daten anreichern (benutzerdefinierte Spalte anfügen)

Bei Bedarf können weitere Daten, welche sich nicht in der originären Struktur der Datenquelle befinden, abgeleitet werden. Die Sprache Language M stellt einen umfangreichen Katalog an Funktionen zur Verfügung. Wie Sie eine Übersicht über die verfügbaren Funktionen erhalten können erfahren Sie hier.

Praxisbeispiele

Geschäftsjahr aus Datum ableiten

Extraktion Textteil aus Text (Trunkation)

Mehrfache Fallunterscheidung, Datenbereinigung /-harmonisierung

4 Laden

Daten laden

Die einzelnen Arbeitsmappenabfragen können abschließend in eine Exceltabelle, eine Verbindung und / oder in das Power Pivot Datemodell zur weiteren Bearbeitung (Modellierung, Kennzahlenbildung) geladen werden.

Praxisbeispiele

Datenverbindung erstellen

Process Mining – Der Trend für 2018

Etwa seit dem Jahr 2010 erlebt Process Mining einerseits als Technologie und Methode einen Boom, andererseits fristet Process Mining noch ein gewisses Nischendasein. Wie wird sich dieser Trend 2018 und 2019 entwickeln?

Was ist Process Mining?

Process Mining (siehe auch: Artikel über Process Mining) ist ein Verfahren der Datenanalyse mit dem Ziel der Visualisierung und Analyse von Prozessflüssen. Es ist ein Data Mining im Sinne der Gewinnung von Informationen aus Daten heraus, nicht jedoch Data Mining im Sinne des unüberwachten maschinellen Lernens. Konkret formuliert, ist Process Mining eine Methode, um Prozess datenbasiert zur Rekonstruieren und zu analysieren. Im Mittelpunkt stehen dabei Zeitstempel (TimeStamps), die auf eine Aktivität (Event) in einem IT-System hinweisen und sich über Vorgangnummern (CaseID) verknüpfen lassen.

Process Mining als Analyseverfahren ist zweiteilig: Als erstes muss über eine Programmiersprache (i.d.R. PL/SQL oder T-SQL, seltener auch R oder Python) ein Skript entwickelt werden, dass auf die Daten eines IT-Systems (meistens Datenbank-Tabellen eines ERP-Systems, manchmal auch LogFiles z. B. von Webservern) zugreift und die darin enthaltenden (und oftmals verteilten) Datenspuren in ein Protokoll (ein sogenanntes EventLog) überführt.

Ist das EventLog erstellt, wird diese in ein Process Mining Tool geladen, dass das EventLog visuell als Flow-Chart darstellt, Filter- und Analysemöglichkeiten anbietet. Auch Alertings, Dashboards mit Diagrammen oder Implementierungen von Machine Learning Algorithmen (z. B. zur Fraud-Detection) können zum Funktionsumfang dieser Tools gehören. Die angebotenen Tools unterscheiden sich von Anbieter zu Anbieter teilweise erheblich.

Welche Branchen setzen bislang auf Process Mining?

Diese Analysemethodik hat sicherlich bereits in allen Branchen ihren Einzug gefunden, jedoch arbeiten gegenwärtig insbesondere größere Industrieunternehmen, Energieversorger, Handelsunternehmen und Finanzdienstleister mit Process Mining. Process Mining hat sich bisher nur bei einigen wenigen Mittelständlern etabliert, andere denken noch über die Einführung nach oder haben noch nie etwas von Process Mining gehört.

Auch Beratungsunternehmen (Prozess-Consulting) und Wirtschaftsprüfungen (Audit) setzen Process Mining seit Jahren ein und bieten es direkt oder indirekt als Leistung für ihre Kunden an.

Welche IT-Systeme und Prozesse werden analysiert?

Und auch hier gilt: Alle möglichen operativen Prozesse werden analysiert, beispielsweise der Gewährleistungsabwicklung (Handel/Hersteller), Kreditgenehmigung (Banken) oder der Vertragsänderungen (Kundenübergabe zwischen Energie- oder Telekommunikationsanbietern). Entsprechend werden alle IT-Systeme analysiert, u. a. ERP-, CRM-, PLM-, DMS- und ITS-Systeme.

Allen voran werden Procure-to-Pay- und Order-to-Cash-Prozesse analysiert, die für viele Unternehmen typische Einstiegspunkte in Process Mining darstellen, auch weil einige Anbieter von Process Mining Tools die nötigen Skripte (ggf. als automatisierte Connectoren) der EventLog-Generierung aus gängigen ERP-Systemen für diese Prozesse bereits mitliefern.

Welche Erfolge wurden mit Process Mining bereits erreicht?

Die Erfolge von Process Mining sind in erster Linie mit der gewonnenen Prozesstransparenz zu verbinden. Process Mining ist eine starke Analysemethode, um Potenziale der Durchlaufzeiten-Optimierung aufzudecken. So lassen sich recht gut unnötige Wartezeiten und störende Prozesschleifen erkennen. Ebenfalls eignet sich Process Mining wunderbar für die datengetriebene Prozessanalyse mit Blick auf den Compliance-Check bis hin zur Fraud-Detection.

Process Mining ist als Methode demnach sehr erfolgreich darin, die Prozessqualität zu erhöhen. Das ist natürlich an einen gewissen Personaleinsatz gebunden und funktioniert nicht ohne Schulungen, bedingt jedoch i.d.R. weniger eingebundene Mitarbeiter als bei klassischen Methoden der Ist-Prozessanalyse.

Ferner sollten einige positive Nebeneffekte Erwähnung finden. Durch den Einsatz von Process Mining, gerade wenn dieser erst nach einigen Herausforderungen zum Erfolg wurde, konnte häufig beobachtet werden, dass involvierte Mitarbeiter ein höheres Prozessbewustsein entwickelt haben, was sich auch indirekt bemerkbar machte (z. B. dadurch, dass Soll-Prozessdokumentationen realitätsnäher gestaltet wurden). Ein großer Nebeneffekt ist ganz häufig eine verbesserte Datenqualität und das Bewusstsein der Mitarbeiter über Datenquellen, deren Inhalte und Wissenspotenziale.

Wo haperte es bisher?

Ins Stottern kam Process Mining bisher insbesondere an der häufig mangelhaften Datenverfügbarkeit und Datenqualität in vielen IT-Systemen, insbesondere bei mittelständischen Unternehmen. Auch die Eigenständigkeit der Process Mining Tools (Integration in die BI, Anbindung an die IT, Lizenzkosten) und das fehlen von geschulten Mitarbeiter-Kapazitäten für die Analyse sorgen bei einigen Unternehmen für Frustration und Zweifel am langfristigen Erfolg.

Als Methode schwächelt Process Mining bei der Aufdeckung von Möglichkeiten der Reduzierung von Prozesskosten. Es mag hier einige gute Beispiele für die Prozesskostenreduzierung geben, jedoch haben insbesondere Mittelständische Unternehmen Schwierigkeiten darin, mit Process Mining direkt Kosten zu senken. Dieser Aspekt lässt insbesondere kostenfokussierte Unternehmer an Process Mining zweifeln, insbesondere wenn die Durchführung der Analyse mit hohen Lizenz- und Berater-Kosten verbunden ist.

Was wird sich an Process Mining ändern müssen?

Bisher wurde Process Mining recht losgelöst von anderen Themen des Prozessmanagements betrachtet, woran die Tool-Anbieter nicht ganz unschuldig sind. Process Mining wird sich zukünftig mehr von der Stabstelle mit Initiativ-Engagement hin zur Integration in den Fachbereichen entwickeln und Teil des täglichen Workflows werden. Auch Tool-seitig werden aktuelle Anbieter für Process Mining Software einem verstärkten Wettbewerb stellen müssen. Process Mining wird toolseitig enger Teil der Unternehmens-BI und somit ein Teil einer gesamtheitlichen Business Intelligence werden.

Um sich von etablierten BI-Anbietern abzusetzen, implementieren und bewerben einige Anbieter für Process Mining Software bereits Machine Learning oder Deep Learning Algorithmen, die selbstständig Prozessmuster auf Anomalien hin untersuchen, die ein Mensch (vermutlich) nicht erkennen würde. Process Mining mit KI wird zu Process Analytics, und somit ein Trend für die Jahre 2018 und 2019.

Für wen wird Process Mining 2018 interessant?

Während größere Industrieunternehmen, Großhändler, Banken und Versicherungen längst über Process Mining Piloten hinaus und zum produktiven Einsatz übergegangen sind (jedoch von einer optimalen Nutzung auch heute noch lange entfernt sind!), wird Process Mining zunehmend auch für mittelständische Unternehmen interessant – und das für alle geschäftskritischen Prozesse.

Während Process Mining mit ERP-Daten bereits recht verbreitet ist, wurden andere IT-Systeme bisher seltener analysiert. Mit der höheren Datenverfügbarkeit, die dank Industrie 4.0 und mit ihr verbundene Konzepte wie M2M, CPS und IoT, ganz neue Dimensionen erlangt, wird Process Mining auch Teil der Smart Factory und somit der verstärkte Einsatz in der Produktion und Logistik absehbar.

Lesetipp: Process Mining 2018 – If you can’t measure it, you can’t improve it: Process Mining bleibt auch im neuen Jahr mit hoher Wahrscheinlichkeit ein bestimmendes Thema in der Datenanalytik. Sechs Experten teilen ihre Einschätzungen zur weiteren Entwicklung 2018 und zeigen auf, warum das Thema von so hoher Relevanz ist. (www.internet-of-things.de – 10. Januar 2018)

Datenanalytische Denkweise: Müssen Führungskräfte Data Science verstehen?

Die Digitalisierung ist in Deutschland bereits seit Jahrzehnten am Voranschreiten. Im Gegensatz zum verbreiteten Glauben, dass die Digitalisierung erst mit der Innovation der Smartphones ihren Anfang fand, war der erste Schritt bereits die Einführung von ERP-Systemen. Sicherlich gibt es hier noch einiges zu tun, jedoch hat die Digitalisierung meines Erachtens nach das Plateau der Produktivität schon bald erreicht – Ganz im Gegensatz zur Datennutzung!

Die Digitalisierung erzeugt eine exponentiell anwachsende Menge an Daten, die ein hohes Potenzial an neuen Erkenntnissen für Medizin, Biologie, Agrawirtschaft, Verkehrswesen und die Geschäftswelt bedeuten. Es mag hier und da an Fachexperten fehlen, die wissen, wie mit großen und heterogenen Daten zu hantieren ist und wie sie zu analysieren sind. Das Aufleben dieser Experenberufe und auch neue Studengänge sorgen jedoch dafür, dass dem Mangel ein gewisser Nachwuchs entgegen steht.

Doch wie sieht es mit Führungskräften aus? Müssen Entscheider verstehen, was ein Data Engineer oder ein Data Scientist tut, wie seine Methoden funktionieren und an welche Grenzen eingesetzte Software stößt?

Datenanalytische Denkweise ist ein strategisches Gut

Als Führungskraft müssen Sie unternehmerisch denken und handeln. Wenn Sie eine neue geschäftliche Herausforderung erfolgreich bewältigen möchten, müssen Sie selbst Ideen entwickeln – oder diese zumindest bewerten – können, wie in Daten Antworten für eine Lösung gefunden werden können. Die meisten Führungskräfte reden sich erfahrungsgemäß damit heraus, dass sie selbst keine höheren Datenanalysen durchführen müssen. Unternehmen werden gegenwärtig bereits von Datenanalysten vorangetrieben und für die nahe Zukunft besteht kein Zweifel an der zunehmenden Bedeutung von Datenexperten für die Entscheidungsfindung nicht nur auf der operativen Ebene, bei der Dateningenieure sehr viele Entscheidungen automatisieren werden, sondern auch auf der strategischen Ebene.

Sie müssen kein Data Scientist sein, aber Grundkenntnisse sind der Schlüssel zum Erfolg

Hinter den Begriffen Big Data und Advanced Analytics – teilweise verhasste Buzzwords – stecken reale Methoden und Technologien, die eine Führungskraft richtig einordnen können muss, um über Projekte und Invesitionen entscheiden zu können. Zumindest müssen Manager ihre Mitarbeiter kennen und deren Rollen und Fähigkeiten verstehen, dabei dürfen sie sich keinesfalls auf andere verlassen. Übrigens wissen auch viele Recruiter nicht, wen genau sie eigentlich suchen!

Der Weg zum Data-Driven Decision Making: Abgrenzung von IT-Administration, Data Engineering und Data Science, in Anlehnung an Data Science for Business: What you need to know about data mining and data-analytic thinking

Stark vereinfacht betrachtet, dreht sich dabei alles um Analysemethodik, Datenbanken und Programmiersprachen. Selbst unabhängig vom aktuellen Analytcs-Trend, fördert eine Einarbeitung in diese Themenfelder das logische denken und kann auch sehr viel Spaß machen. Als positiven Nebeneffekt werden Sie eine noch unternehmerischere und kreativere Denkweise entwickeln!

Datenaffinität ist ein Karriere-Turbo!

Nicht nur der Bedarf an Fachexperten für Data Science und Data Engineering steigt, sondern auch der Bedarf an Führungskräften bzw. Manager. Sicherlich ist der Bedarf an Führungskräften quantitativ stets geringer als der für Fachexperten, immerhin braucht jedes Team nur eine Führung, jedoch wird hier oft vergessen, dass insbesondere Data Science kein Selbstzweck ist, sondern für alle Fachbereiche (mit unterschiedlicher Priorisierung) Dienste leisten kann. Daten-Projekte scheitern entweder am Fehlen der datenaffinen Fachkräfte oder am Fehlen von datenaffinen Führungskräften in den Fachabteilungen. Unverständnisvolle Fachbereiche tendieren schnell zur Verweigerung der Mitwirkung – bis hin zur klaren Arbeitsverweigerung – auf Grund fehlender Expertise bei Führungspersonen.

Andersrum betrachtet, werden Sie als Führungskraft Ihren Marktwert deutlich steigern, wenn Sie ein oder zwei erfolgreiche Projekte in Ihr Portfolio aufnehmen können, die im engen Bezug zur Datennutzung stehen.

Mit einem Data Science Team: Immer einen Schritt voraus!

Führungskräfte, die zukünftige Herausforderungen meistern möchten, müssen selbst zwar nicht Data Scientist werden, jedoch dazu in der Lage sein, ein kleines Data Science Team führen zu können. Möglicherweise handelt es sich dabei nicht direkt um Ihr Team, vielleicht ist es jedoch Ihre Aufgabe, das Team durch Ihren Fachbereich zu leiten. Data Science Teams können zwar auch direkt in einer Fachabteilung angesiedelt sein, sind häufig jedoch zentrale Stabstellen.

Müssen Sie ein solches Team für Ihren Fachbereich begleiten, ist es selbstverständlich notwendig, dass sie sich über gängige Verfahren der Datenanalyse, also auch der Statistik, und der maschinellen Lernverfahren ein genaueres Bild machen. Erkennen Data Scientists, dass Sie sich als Führungskraft mit den Verfahren auseinander gesetzt haben, die wichtigsten Prozeduren, deren Anforderungen und potenziellen Ergebnisse kennen oder einschätzen können, werden Sie mit entsprechendem Respekt belohnt und Ihre Data Scientists werden Ihnen gute Berater sein, wie sie Ihre unternehmerischen Ziele mit Daten erreichen werden.

Buchempfehlung:

Data Science für Unternehmen: Data Mining und datenanalytisches Denken praktisch anwenden (mitp Business)

Lesetipps:

Process Analytics – Data Analysis for Process Audit & Improvement

Process Mining: Innovative data analysis for process optimization and audit

Step-by-Step: New ways to detect compliance violations with Process Analytics

In the course of the advancing digitization, an enormous upheaval of everyday work is currently taking place to ensure the complete recording of all steps in IT systems. In addition, companies are increasingly confronted with increasingly demanding regulatory requirements on their IT systems.


Read this article in German:
“Process Mining: Innovative Analyse von Datenspuren für Audit und Forensik “


The unstoppable trend towards a connected world will further increase the possibilities of process transparency, but many processes in the company area are already covered by one or more IT systems. Each employee, as well as any automated process, leaves many data traces in IT backend systems, from which processes can be replicated retroactively or in real time. These include both obvious processes, such as the entry of a recorded purchase order or invoice, as well as partially hidden processes, such as the modification of certain entries or deletion of these business objects.

1 Understanding Process Analytics

Process Analytics is a data-driven methodology of the actual process analysis, which originates in forensics. In the wake of the increasing importance of computer crime, it became necessary to identify and analyze the data traces that potential criminals left behind in IT systems in order to reconstruct the event as much as possible.

With the trend towards Big Data Analytics, Process Analytics has not only received new data bases, but has also been further developed as an analytical method. In addition, the visualization enables the analyst or the report recipient to have a deeper understanding of even more complex business processes.

While conventional process analysis primarily involves employee interviews and monitoring of the employees at the desk in order to determine actual processes, Process Analytics is a leading method, which is purely fact-based and thus objectively approaching the processes. It is not the employees who are asked, but the IT systems, which not only store all the business objects recorded in a table-oriented manner, but also all process activities. Every IT system for enterprise purposes log all relevant activities of the whole business process, in the background and invisible to the users, such as orders, invoices or customer orders, with a time stamp.

2 The right choice of the processes to analyze

Today almost every company works with at least one ERP system. As other systems are often used, it is clear which processes can not be analyzed: Those processes, which are still carried out exclusively on paper and in the minds of the employees, which are typical decision-making processes at the strategic level and not logged in IT systems.

Operational processes, however, are generally recorded almost seamlessly in IT systems. Furthermore, almost all operational decisions are recorded by status flags in datasets.

The operational processes, which can be reconstructed and analyzed with Process Mining very well and which are of equal interest from the point of view of compliance, include for example:

– Procurement

– Logistics / Transport

– Sales / Ordering

– Warranty / Claim Management

– Human Resource Management

Process Analytics enables the greatest possible transparency across all business processes, regardless of the sector and the department. Typical case IDs are, for example, sales order number, procurement order number, customer or material numbers.

3 Selection of relevant IT systems

In principle, every IT system used in the company should be examined with regard to the relevance for the process to be analyzed. As a rule, only the ERP system (SAP ERP or others) is relevant for the analysis of the purchasing processes. However, for other process areas there might be other IT systems interesting too, for example separate accounting systems, a CRM or a MES system, which must then also be included.

Occasionally, external data should also be integrated if they provide important process information from externally stored data sources – for example, data from logistics partners.

4 Data Preparation

Before the start of the data-driven process analysis, the data directly or indirectly indicating process activities must be identified, extracted and processed in the data sources. The data are stored in database tables and server logs and are collected via a data warehousing procedure and converted into a process protocol or – also called – event log.

The event log is usually a very large and wide table which, in addition to the actual process activities, also contains parameters which can be used to filter cases and activities. The benefit of this filter option is, for example, to show only process flows where special product groups, prices, quantities, volumes, departments or employee groups are involved.

5 Analysis Execution

The actual inspection is done visually and thus intuitively with an interactive process flow diagram, which represents the actual processes as they could be extracted from the IT systems. The event log generated by the data preparation is loaded into a data visualization software (e.g. Celonis PM Software), which displays this log by using the case IDs and time stamps and transforms this information in a graphical process network. The process flows are therefore not modeled by human “process thinkers”, as is the case with the target processes, but show the real process flows given by the IT systems. Process Mining means, that our enterprise databases “talk” about their view of the process.

The process flows are visualized and statistically evaluated so that concrete statements can be made about the process performance and risk estimations relevant to compliance.

6 Deviation from target processes

The possibility of intuitive filtering of the process presentation also enables an analysis of all deviation of our real process from the desired target process sequences.

The deviation of the actual processes from the target processes is usually underestimated even by IT-affine managers – with Process Analytics all deviations and the general process complexity can now be investigated.

6 Detection of process control violations

The implementation of process controls is an integral part of a professional internal control system (ICS), but the actual observance of these controls is often not proven. Process Analytics allows circumventing the dual control principle or the detection of functional separation conflicts. In addition, the deliberate removal of internal control mechanisms by executives or the incorrect configuration of the IT systems are clearly visible.

7 Detection of previously unknown behavioral patterns

After checking compliance with existing controls, Process Analytics continues to be used to recognize previously unknown patterns in process networks, which point to risks or even concrete fraud cases and are not detected by any control due to their previously unknown nature. In particular, the complexity of everyday process interlacing, which is often underestimated as already mentioned, only reveals fraud scenarios that would previously not have been conceivable.

8 Reporting – also possible in real time

As a highly effective audit analysis, Process Analytics is already an iterative test at intervals of three to twelve months. After the initial implementation, compliance violations, weak or even ineffective controls, and even cases of fraud, are detected reliably. The findings can be used in the aftermath to stop the weaknesses. A further implementation of the analysis after a waiting period makes it possible to assess the effectiveness of the measures taken.

In some application scenarios, the seamless integration of the process analysis with the visual dashboard to the IT system landscape is recommended so that processes can be monitored in near real-time. This connection can also be supplemented by notification systems, so that decision makers and auditors are automatically informed about the latest process bottlenecks or violations via SMS or e-mail.

Fazit

Process Analytics is, in the course of the digitalization, the highly effective methodology from the area of ​​Big Data Analysis for detecting compliance-relevant events throughout the company and also providing visual support for forensic data analysis. Since this is a method, and not a software, an expansion of the IT system landscape, especially for entry, is not absolutely necessary, but can be carried out by internal or external employees at regular intervals.

My Desk for Data Science

In my last post I anounced a blog parade about what a data scientist’s workplace might look like.

Here are some photos of my desk and my answers to the questions:

How many monitors do you use (or wish to have)?

I am mostly working at my desk in my office with a tower PC and three monitors.
I definitely need at least three monitors to work productively as a data scientist. Who does not know this: On the left monitor the data model is displayed, on the right monitor the data mapping and in the middle I do my work: programming the analysis scripts.

What hardware do you use? Apple? Dell? Lenovo? Others?

I am note an Apple guy. When I need to work mobile, I like to use ThinkPad notebooks. The ThinkPads are (in my experience) very robust and are therefore particularly good for mobile work. Besides, those notebooks look conservative and so I’m not sad if there comes a scratch on the notebook. However, I do not solve particularly challenging analysis tasks on a notebook, because I need my monitors for that.

Which OS do you use (or prefer)? MacOS, Linux, Windows? Virtual Machines?

As a data scientist, I have to be able to communicate well with my clients and they usually use Microsoft Windows as their operating system. I also use Windows as my main operating system. Of course, all our servers run on Linux Debian, but most of my tasks are done directly on Windows.
For some notebooks, I have set up a dual boot, because sometimes I need to start native Linux, for all other cases I work with virtual machines (Linux Ubuntu or Linux Mint).

What are your favorite databases, programming languages and tools?

I prefer the Microsoft SQL Server (T-SQL), C# and Python (pandas, numpy, scikit-learn). This is my world. But my customers are kings, therefore I am working with Postgre SQL, MongoDB, Neo4J, Tableau, Qlik Sense, Celonis and a lot more. I like to get used to new tools and technologies again and again. This is one of the benefits of being a data scientist.

Which data dou you analyze on your local hardware? Which in server clusters or clouds?

There have been few cases yet, where I analyzed really big data. In cases of analyzing big data we use horizontally scalable systems like Hadoop and Spark. But we also have customers analyzing middle-sized data (more than 10 TB but less than 100 TB) on one big server which is vertically scalable. Most of my customers just want to gather data to answer questions on not so big amounts of data. Everything less than 10TB we can do on a highend workstation.

If you use clouds, do you prefer Azure, AWS, Google oder others?

Microsoft Azure! I am used to tools provided by Microsoft and I think Azure is a well preconfigured cloud solution.

Where do you make your notes/memos/sketches. On paper or digital?

My calender is managed digital, because I just need to know everywhere what appointments I have. But my I prefer to wirte down my thoughts on paper and that´s why I have several paper-notebooks.

Now it is your turn: Join our Blog Parade!

So what does your workplace look like? Show your desk on your blog until 31/12/2017 and we will show a short introduction of your post here on the Data Science Blog!

 

Show your Data Science Workplace!

The job of a data scientist is often a mystery to outsiders. Of course, you do not really need much more than a medium-sized notebook to use data science methods for finding value in data. Nevertheless, data science workplaces can look so different and, let’s say, interesting. And that’s why I want to launch a blog parade – which I want to start with this article – where you as a Data Scientist or Data Engineer can show your workplace and explain what tools a data scientist in your opinion really needs.

I am very curious how many monitors you prefer, whether you use Apple, Dell, HP or Lenovo, MacOS, Linux or Windows, etc., etc. And of course, do you like a clean or messy desk?

What is a Blog Parade?

A blog parade is a call to blog owners to report on a specific topic. Everyone who participates in the blog parade, write on their blog a contribution to the topic. The organizer of the blog parade collects all the articles and will recap those articles in a short form together, of course with links to the articles.

How can I participate?

Write an article on your blog! Mention this blog parade here, show and explain your workplace (your desk with your technical equipment) in an article. If you’re missing your own blog, articles can also be posted directly to LinkedIn (LinkedIn has its own blogging feature that every LinkedIn member can use). Alternative – as a last resort – it would also be possible to send me your article with a photo about your workplace directly to: redaktion@data-science-blog.com.
Please make me aware of an article, via e-mail or with a comment (below) on this article.

Who can participate?

Any data scientist or anyone close to Data Science: Everyone concerned with topics such as data analytics, data engineering or data security. Please do not over-define data science here, but keep it in a nutshell, so that all professionals who manage and analyze data can join in with a clear conscience.

And yes, I will participate too. I will propably be the first who write an article about my workplace (I just need a new photo of my desk).

When does the article have to be finished?

By 31/12/2017, the article must have been published on your blog (or LinkedIn or wherever) and the release has to be reported to me.
But beware: Anyone who has previously written an article will also be linked earlier. After all, reporting on your article will take place immediately after I hear about it.
If you publish an artcile tomorrow, it will be shown the day after tomorrow here on the Data Science Blog.

What is in it for me to join?

Nothing! Except perhaps the fun factor of sharing your idea of ​​a nice desk for a data expert with others, so as to share creativity or a certain belief in what a data scientist needs.
Well and for bloggers: There is a great backlink from this data science blog for you 🙂

What should I write? What are the minimum requirements of content?

The article does not have to (but may be) particularly long. Anyway, here on this data science blog only a shortened version of your article will appear (with a link, of course).

Minimum requirments:

  • Show a photo (at least one!) of your workplace desk!
  • And tell us something about:
    • How many monitors do you use (or wish to have)?
    • What hardware do you use? Apple? Dell? Lenovo? Others?
    • Which OS do you use (or prefer)? MacOS, Linux, Windows? Virtual Machines?
    • What are your favorite databases, programming languages and tools? (e.g. Python, R, SAS, Postgre, Neo4J,…)
    • Which data dou you analyze on your local hardware? Which in server clusters or clouds?
    • If you use clouds, do you prefer Azure, AWS, Google oder others?
    • Where do you make your notes/memos/sketches. On paper or digital?

Not allowed:
Of course, please do not provide any information, which could endanger your company`s IT security.

Absolutly allowed:
Bringing some joke into the matter 🙂 We are happy to vote in the comments on the best or funniest desk for election, there may be also a winner later!


The resulting Blog Posts: https://data-science-blog.com/data-science-insights/show-your-desk/


 

The importance of domain knowledge – A healthcare data science perspective

Data scientists have (and need) many skills. They are frequently either former academic researchers or software engineers, with knowledge and skills in statistics, programming, machine learning, and many other domains of mathematics and computer science. These skills are general and allow data scientists to offer valuable services to almost any field. However, data scientists in some cases find themselves in industries they have relatively little knowledge of.

This is especially true in the healthcare field. In healthcare, there is an enormous amount of important clinical knowledge that might be relevant to a data scientist. It is unreasonable to expect a data scientist to not only have all of the skills typically required of a data scientist, but to also have all of the knowledge a medical professional may have.

Why is domain knowledge necessary?

This lack of domain knowledge, while perfectly understandable, can be a major barrier to healthcare data scientists. For one thing, it’s difficult to come up with project ideas in a domain that you don’t know much about. It can also be difficult to determine the type of data that may be helpful for a project – if you want to build a model to predict a health outcome (for example, whether a patient has or is likely to develop a gastrointestinal bleed), you need to know what types of variables might be related to this outcome so you can make sure to gather the right data.

Knowing the domain is useful not only for figuring out projects and how to approach them, but also for having rules of thumb for sanity checks on the data. Knowing how data is captured (is it hand-entered? Is it from machines that can give false readings for any number of reasons?) can help a data scientist with data cleaning and from going too far down the wrong path. It can also inform what true outliers are and which values might just be due to measurement error.

Often the most challenging part of building a machine learning model is feature engineering. Understanding clinical variables and how they relate to a health outcome is extremely important for this. Is a long history of high blood pressure important for predicting heart problems, or is only very recent history? How long a time horizon is considered ‘long’ or ‘short’ in this context? What other variables might be related to this health outcome? Knowing the domain can help direct the data exploration and greatly speed (and enhance) the feature engineering process.

Once features are generated, knowing what relationships between variables are plausible helps for basic sanity checks. If you’re finding the best predictor of hospitalization is the patient’s eye color, this might indicate an issue with your code. Being able to glance at the outcome of a model and determine if they make sense goes a long way for quality assurance of any analytical work.

Finally, one of the biggest reasons a strong understanding of the data is important is because you have to interpret the results of analyses and modeling work. Knowing what results are important and which are trivial is important for the presentation and communication of results. An analysis that determines there is a strong relationship between age and mortality is probably well-known to clinicians, while weaker but more surprising associations may be of more use. It’s also important to know what results are actionable. An analysis that finds that patients who are elderly are likely to end up hospitalized is less useful for trying to determine the best way to reduce hospitalizations (at least, without further context).

How do you get domain knowledge?

In some industries, such as tech, it’s fairly easy and straightforward to see an end-user’s prospective. By simply viewing a website or piece of software from the user’s point of view, a data scientist can gain a lot of the needed context and background knowledge needed to understand where their data is coming from and how their model output is being used. In the healthcare industry, it’s more difficult. A data scientist can’t easily choose to go through med school or the experience of being treated for a chronic illness. This means there is no easy single answer to where to gain domain knowledge. However, there are many avenues available.

Reading literature and attending presentations can boost one’s domain knowledge. However, it’s often difficult to find resources that are penetrable for someone who is not already a clinician. To gain deep knowledge, one needs to be steeped in the topic. One important avenue to doing this is through the establishment of good relationships with clinicians. Clinicians can be powerful allies that can help point you in the right direction for understanding your data, and simply by chatting with them you can gain important insights. They can also help you visit the clinics or practices to interact with the people that perform the procedures or even watch the procedures being done. At Fresenius Medical Care, where I work, members of my team regularly visit clinics. I have in the last year visited one of our dialysis clinics, a nephrology practice, and a vascular care unit. These experiences have been invaluable to me in developing my knowledge of the treatment of chronic illnesses.

In conclusion, it is crucial for data scientists to acquire basic familiarity in the field they are working in and in being part of collaborative teams that include people who are technically knowledgeable in the field they work in. This said, acquiring even an essential understanding (such as “Medicine 101”) may go a long way for the data scientists in being able to become self-sufficient in essential feature selection and design.

 

Process Mining: Innovative Analyse von Datenspuren für Audit und Forensik

Step-by-Step:

Neue Möglichkeiten zur Aufdeckung von Compliance-Verstößen mit Process Analytics

Im Zuge der fortschreitenden Digitalisierung findet derzeit ein enormer Umbruch der alltäglichen Arbeit hin zur lückenlosen Erfassung aller Arbeitsschritte in IT-Systemen statt. Darüber hinaus sehen sich Unternehmen mit zunehmend verschärften Regulierungsanforderungen an ihre IT-Systeme konfrontiert.

Der unaufhaltsame Trend hin zur vernetzten Welt („Internet of Things“) wird die Möglichkeiten der Prozesstransparenz noch weiter vergrößern – jedoch werden bereits jetzt viele Prozesse im Unternehmensbereich über ein oder mehrere IT-Systeme erfasst. Jeder Mitarbeiter, aber auch jeder automatisiert ablaufende Prozess hinterlässt viele Datenspuren in IT-Backend-Systemen, aus denen Prozesse rückwirkend oder in Echtzeit nachgebildet werden können. Diese umfassen sowohl offensichtliche Prozesse, wie etwa den Eintrag einer erfassten Bestellung oder Rechnung, als auch teilweise verborgene Prozesse, wie beispielsweise die Änderung bestimmter Einträge oder Löschung dieser Geschäftsobjekte. 


english-flagRead this article in English:
“Process Analytics – Data Analysis for Process Audit & Improvement”


1 Das Verständnis von Process Analytics

Process Analytics ist eine datengetriebene Methodik der Ist-Prozessanalyse, die ihren Ursprung in der Forensik hat. Im Kern des dieser am Zweck orientierten Analyse steht das sogenannte Process Mining, eine auf die Rekonstruktion von Prozessen ausgerichtetes Data Mining. Im Zuge der steigenden Bedeutung der Computerkriminalität wurde es notwendig, die Datenspuren, die potenzielle Kriminelle in IT-Systemen hinterließen, zu identifizieren und zu analysieren, um das Geschehen so gut wie möglich zu rekonstruieren.

Mit dem Trend hin zu Big Data Analytics hat Process Analytics nicht nur neue Datengrundlagen erhalten, sondern ist als Analysemethode weiterentwickelt worden. Zudem ermöglicht die Visualisierung dem Analysten oder Berichtsempfänger ein tief gehendes Verständnis auch komplexerer Geschäftsprozesse.

Während in der konventionellen Prozessanalyse vor allem Mitarbeiterinterviews und Beobachtung der Mitarbeiter am Schreibtisch durchgeführt werden, um tatsächlich gelebte Prozesse zu ermitteln, ist Process Analytics eine führende Methode, die rein faktenbasiert und damit objektiv an die Prozesse herangeht. Befragt werden nicht die Mitarbeiter, sondern die IT-Systeme, die nicht nur alle erfassten Geschäftsobjekte tabellenorientiert abspeichern, sondern auch im Hintergrund – unsichtbar für die Anwender – jegliche Änderungsvorgänge z. B. an Bestellungen, Rechnungen oder Kundenaufträgen lückenlos mit einem Zeitstempel (oft Sekunden- oder Millisekunden-genau) protokollieren.

2 Die richtige Auswahl der zu betrachtenden Prozesse

Heute arbeitet nahezu jedes Unternehmen mit mindestens einem ERP-System. Da häufig noch weitere Systeme eingesetzt werden, lässt sich klar herausstellen, welche Prozesse nicht analysiert werden können: Solche Prozesse, die noch ausschließlich auf Papier und im Kopf der Mitarbeiter ablaufen, also typische Entscheiderprozesse auf oberster, strategischer Ebene, die nicht in IT-Systemen erfasst und dementsprechend nicht ausgewertet werden können. Operative Prozesse werden hingegen in der Regel nahezu lückenlos in IT-Systemen erfasst und operative Entscheidungen protokolliert.

Zu den operativen Prozessen, die mit Process Analytics sehr gut rekonstruiert und analysiert werden können und gleichermaßen aus Compliance-Sicht von höchstem Interesse sind, gehören beispielsweise Prozesse der:

  • Beschaffung
  • Logistik / Transport
  • Vertriebs-/Auftragsvorgänge
  • Gewährleistungsabwicklung
  • Schadensregulierung
  • Kreditgewährung

Process Analytics bzw. Process Mining ermöglicht unabhängig von der Branche und dem Fachbereich die größtmögliche Transparenz über alle operativen Geschäftsprozesse. Für die Audit-Analyse ist dabei zu beachten, dass jeder Prozess separat betrachtet werden sollte, denn die Rekonstruktion erfolgt anhand von Vorgangsnummern, die je nach Prozess unterschiedlich sein können. Typische Vorgangsnummern sind beispielsweise Bestell-, Auftrags-, Kunden- oder Materialnummern.

3 Auswahl der relevanten IT-Systeme

Grundsätzlich sollte jedes im Unternehmen eingesetzte IT-System hinsichtlich der Relevanz für den zu analysierenden Prozess untersucht werden. Für die Analyse der Einkaufsprozesse ist in der Regel nur das ERP-System (z. B. SAP ERP) von Bedeutung. Einige Unternehmen verfügen jedoch über ein separates System der Buchhaltung (z.B. DATEV) oder ein CRM/SRM (z. B. von Microsoft), die dann ebenfalls einzubeziehen sind.

Bei anderen Prozessen können außer dem ERP-/CRM-System auch Daten aus anderen IT-Systemen eine entscheidende Rolle spielen. Gelegentlich sollten auch externe Daten integriert werden, wenn diese aus extern gelagerten Datenquellen wichtige Prozessinformationen liefern – beispielsweise Daten aus der Logistik.

4 Datenaufbereitung

Vor der datengetriebenen Prozessanalyse müssen die Daten, die auf Prozessaktivitäten direkt oder indirekt hindeuten, in den Datenquellen identifiziert, extrahiert und aufbereitet werden. Die Daten liegen in Datenbanktabellen und Server-Logs vor und werden über ein Data Warehousing Verfahren zusammengeführt und in ein Prozessprotokoll (unter den Process Minern i.d.R. als Event Log bezeichnet) umformuliert.

Das Prozessprotokoll ist in der Regel eine sehr große und breite Tabelle, die neben den eigentlichen Prozessaktivitäten auch Parameter enthält, über die sich Prozesse filtern lassen, beispielsweise Informationen über Produktgruppen, Preise, Mengen, Volumen, Fachbereiche oder Mitarbeitergruppen.

5 Prüfungsdurchführung

Die eigentliche Prüfung erfolgt visuell und somit intuitiv vor einem Prozessflussdiagramm, das die tatsächlichen Prozesse so darstellt, wie sie aus den IT-Systemen extrahiert werden konnten.

Process Mining – Beispielhafter Process Flow mit Fluxicon Disco (www.fluxicon.com)

Das durch die Datenaufbereitung erstellte Prozessprotokoll wird in eine Datenvisualisierungssoftware geladen, die dieses Protokoll über die Vorgangsnummern und Zeitstempel in einem grafischen Prozessnetzwerk darstellt. Die Prozessflüsse werden also nicht modelliert, wie es bei den Soll-Prozessen der Fall ist, sondern es „sprechen“ die IT-Systeme.

Die Prozessflüsse werden visuell dargestellt und statistisch ausgewertet, so dass konkrete Aussagen über die im Hinblick auf Compliance relevante Prozess-Performance und -Risiken getroffen werden können.

6 Abweichung von Soll-Prozessen

Die Möglichkeit des intuitiven Filterns der Prozessdarstellung ermöglicht auch die gezielte Analyse von Ist-Prozessen, die von den Soll-Prozessverläufen abweichen.

Die Abweichung der Ist-Prozesse von den Soll-Prozessen wird in der Regel selbst von IT-affinen Führungskräften unterschätzt – mit Process Analytics lassen sich nun alle Abweichungen und die generelle Prozesskomplexität auf ihren Daten basierend untersuchen.

6 Erkennung von Prozesskontrollverletzungen

Die Implementierung von Prozesskontrollen sind Bestandteil eines professionellen Internen Kontrollsystems (IKS), die tatsächliche Einhaltung dieser Kontrollen in der Praxis ist jedoch häufig nicht untersucht oder belegt. Process Analytics ermöglicht hier die Umgehung des Vier-Augen-Prinzips bzw. die Aufdeckung von Funktionstrennungskonflikten. Zudem werden auch die bewusste Außerkraftsetzung von internen Kontrollmechanismen durch leitende Mitarbeiter oder die falsche Konfiguration der IT-Systeme deutlich sichtbar.

7 Erkennung von bisher unbekannten Verhaltensmustern

Nach der Prüfung der Einhaltung bestehender Kontrollen, also bekannter Muster, wird Process Analytics weiterhin zur Neuerkennung von bislang unbekannten Mustern in Prozessnetzwerken, die auf Risiken oder gar konkrete Betrugsfälle hindeuten und aufgrund ihrer bisherigen Unbekanntheit von keiner Kontrolle erfasst werden, genutzt. Insbesondere durch die – wie bereits erwähnt – häufig unterschätzte Komplexität der alltäglichen Prozessverflechtung fallen erst durch diese Analyse Fraud-Szenarien auf, die vorher nicht denkbar gewesen wären. An dieser Stelle erweitert sich die Vorgehensweise des Process Mining um die Methoden des maschinellen Lernens (Machine Learning), typischerweise unter Einsatz von Clustering, Klassifikation und Regression.

8 Berichterstattung – auch in Echtzeit möglich

Als hocheffektive Audit-Analyse ist Process Analytics bereits als iterative Prüfung in Abständen von drei bis zwölf Monaten ausreichend. Nach der erstmaligen Durchführung werden bereits Compliance-Verstöße, schwache oder gar unwirksame Kontrollen und gegebenenfalls sogar Betrugsfälle zuverlässig erkannt. Die Erkenntnisse können im Nachgang dazu genutzt werden, um die Schwachstellen abzustellen. Eine weitere Durchführung der Analyse nach einer Karenzzeit ermöglicht dann die Beurteilung der Wirksamkeit getroffener Maßnahmen.

In einigen Anwendungsszenarien ist auch die nahtlose Anbindung der Prozessanalyse mit visuellem Dashboard an die IT-Systemlandschaft zu empfehlen, so dass Prozesse in nahezu Echtzeit abgebildet werden können. Diese Anbindung kann zudem um Benachrichtigungssysteme ergänzt werden, so dass Entscheider und Revisoren via SMS oder E-Mail automatisiert über aktuellste Prozessverstöße informiert werden. Process Analytics wird somit zum Realtime Analytics.

Fazit

Process Analytics ist im Zuge der Digitalisieurng die hocheffektive Methodik aus dem Bereich der Big Data Analyse zur Aufdeckung Compliance-relevanter Tatbestände im gesamten Unternehmensbereich und auch eine visuelle Unterstützung bei der forensischen Datenanalyse.