4 Industries Likely to Be Further Impacted by Data and Analytics in 2020

The possibilities for collecting and analyzing data have skyrocketed in recent years. Company leaders no longer must rely primarily on guesswork when making decisions. They can look at the hard statistics to get verification before making a choice.

Here are four industries likely to notice continuing positive benefits while using data and analytics in 2020.

  1. Transportation

If the transportation sector suffers from problems like late arrivals or buses and trains never showing up, people complain. Many use transportation options to reach work or school, and use long-term solutions like planes to visit relatives or enjoy vacations.

Data analysis helps transportation authorities learn about things such as ridership numbers, the most efficient routes and more. Digging into data can also help professionals in the sector verify when recent changes pay off.

For example, New York City recently enacted a plan called the 14th Street Busway. It stops cars from traveling on 14th Street for more than a couple of blocks from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. every day. One of the reasons for making the change was to facilitate the buses that carry passengers along 14th Street. Data confirms the Busway did indeed encourage people to use the bus. Ridership jumped 24% overall, and by 20% during the morning rush hour.

Data analysis could also streamline air travel. A new solution built with artificial intelligence can reportedly make flights more on time and reduce fuel consumption by improving traffic flow in the terminals. The system also crunches numbers to warn people about long lines in an airport. Then, some passengers might make schedule adjustments to avoid those backups.

These examples prove why it’s smart for transportation professionals to continually see what the data shows. Becoming more aware of what’s happening, where problems exist and how people respond to different transit options could lead to better decision-making.

  1. Agriculture

People in the agriculture industry face numerous challenges, such as climate change and the need to produce food for a growing global population. There’s no single, magic fix for these challenges, but data analytics could help.

For example, MIT researchers are using data to track the effects of interventions on underperforming African farms. The outcome could make it easier for farmers to prove that new, high-tech equipment will help them succeed, which could be useful when applying for loans.

Elsewhere, scientists developed a robot called the TerraSentia that can collect information about a variety of crop traits, such as the height and biomass. The machine then transfers that data to a farmer’s laptop or computer. The robot’s developers say their creation could help farmers figure out which kinds of crops would give the best yields in specific locations, and that the TerraSentia will do it much faster than humans.

Applying data analysis to agriculture helps farmers remove much of the guesswork from what they do. Data can help them predict the outcome of a growing season, target a pest or crop disease problem and more. For these reasons and others, data analysis should remain prominent in agriculture for the foreseeable future.

  1. Energy 

Statistics indicate global energy demand will increase by at least 30% over the next two decades. Many energy industry companies have turned to advanced data analysis technologies to prepare for that need. Some solutions examine rocks to improve the detection of oil wells, while others seek to maximize production over the lifetime of an oilfield.

Data collection in the energy sector is not new, but there’s been a long-established habit of only using a small amount of the overall data collected. That’s now changing as professionals are more frequently collecting new data, plus converting information from years ago into usable data.

Strategic data analysis could also be a good fit for renewable energy efforts. A better understanding of weather forecasts could help energy professionals pinpoint how much a solar panel or farm could contribute to the electrical grid on a given day.

Data analysis helps achieve that goal. For example, some solutions can predict the weather up to a month in advance. Then, it’s possible to increase renewable power generation by up to 10%.

  1. Construction

Construction projects can be costly and time-consuming, although the results are often impressive. Construction professionals must work with a vast amount of data as they meet customers’ needs. Site plans, scheduling specifics, weather information and regulatory documents all help define how the work progresses and whether everything stays under budget.

Construction firms increasingly use big data analysis software to pull all the information into one place and make it easier to use. That data often streamlines customer communications and helps with meeting expectations. In one instance, a construction company depended on a real-time predictive modeling solution and combined it with in-house estimation software.

The outcome enabled instantly showing a client how much a new addition would cost. Other companies that are starting to use big data in construction note that having the option substantially reduces their costs — especially during the planning phase before construction begins. Another company is working on a solution that can analyze job site photos and use them to spot injury risks.

Data Analysis Increases Success

The four industries mentioned here have already enjoyed success by investigating the potential data analysis offers. People should expect them to continue making gains through 2020.

Seeing the Big Picture: Combining Enterprise Architecture with Process Management

Ever tried watching a 3D movie without those cool glasses people like to take home? Two hours of blurred flashing images is no-one’s idea of fun. But with the right equipment, you get an immersive experience, with realistic, clear, and focused images popping out of the screen. In the same way, the right enterprise architecture brings the complex structure of an organization into focus.

We know that IT environments in today’s modern businesses consist of a growing number of highly complex, interconnected, and often difficult-to-manage IT systems. Balancing customer service and efficiency imperatives associated with social, mobile, cloud, and big data technologies, along with effective day-to-day IT functions and support, can often feel like an insurmountable challenge.

Enterprise architecture can help organizations achieve this balance, all while managing risk, optimizing costs, and implementing innovations. Its main aim is to support reform and transformation programs. To do this, enterprise architecture relies on the accuracy of an enterprise’s complex data systems, and takes into account changing standards, regulations, and strategic business demands.

Components of effective enterprise architecture

In general, most widely accepted enterprise architecture frameworks consist of four interdependent domains:

  • Business Architecture

A blueprint of the enterprise that provides a common understanding of the organization, and used to align strategic objectives and tactical demands. An example would be representing business processes using business process management notation.

  • Data Architecture

The domain that shows the dependencies and connections between an organization’s data, rules, models, and standards.

  • Applications Architecture

The layer that shows a company’s complete set of software solutions and their relationships with each other.

  • Infrastructure Architecture

Positioned at the lowest level, this component shows the relationships and connections of an organization’s existing hardware solutions.

Effective EA implementation means employees within a business can build a clear understanding of the way their company’s IT systems execute their specific work processes, as well as how they interact and relate to each other. It allows users to identify and analyze application and business performance, with the goal of enabling underperforming IT systems to be promptly and efficiently managed.

In short, EA helps businesses answer questions like:

  • Which IT systems are in use, and where, and by whom?
  • Which business processes relate to which IT systems?
  • Who is responsible for which IT systems?
  • How well are privacy protection requirements upheld?
  • Which server is each application run on?

The same questions, shifted slightly to refer to business processes rather than IT systems, are what drive enterprise-level business process management as well. Is it any wonder the two disciplines go together like popcorn and a good movie?

Combining enterprise architecture with process management

Successful business/IT alignment involves effectively leveraging an organization’s IT to achieve company goals and requirements. Standardized language and images (like flow charts and graphs) are often helpful in fostering mutual understanding between highly technical IT services and the business side of an organization.

In the same way, combining EA with collaborative business process management establishes a common language throughout a company. Once this common ground is established, misunderstandings can be avoided, and the business then has the freedom to pursue organizational or technical transformation goals effectively.

At this point, strengthened links between management, IT specialists, and a process-aware workforce mean more informed decisions become the norm. A successful pairing of process management, enterprise architecture, and IT gives insight into how changes in any one area impact the others, ultimately resulting in a clearer understanding of how the organization actually functions. This translates into an easier path to optimized business processes, and therefore a corresponding improvement in customer satisfaction.

Effective enterprise architecture provides greater transparency inside IT teams, and allows for efficient management of IT systems and their respective interfaces. Along with planning continual IT landscape development, EA supports strategic development of an organization’s structure, just as process management does.

Combining the two leads to a quantum leap in the efficiency and effectiveness of IT systems and business processes, and locks them into a mutually-reinforcing cycle of optimization, meaning improvements will continue over time. Both user communities can contribute to creating a better understanding using a common tool, and the synergy created from joining EA and business process management adds immediate value by driving positive changes company-wide.

Want to find out more? Put on your 3D glasses, and test your EA initiatives with Signavio! Sign up for your free 30-day trial of the Signavio Business Transformation Suite today.

Machen Sie mehr aus Ihrem Prozessmanagement

Jedes neue Unternehmen steht vor den Fragen: Haben wir das richtige Produkt/den richtigen Marktansatz?  Funktioniert das Geschäftsmodell? Haben wir genug Liquidität? In der Regel konzentrieren sich neu gegründete Unternehmen auf das Überleben und verschieben alles, was für dieses Ziel zunächst nicht unmittelbar relevant ist, auf einen späteren Zeitpunkt.  


Read this article in English:

Scaling up your Process Management 


Die meisten Unternehmen stellen jedoch schnell fest, dass ihr Überleben vor allem davon abhängt, ob sie ihren Kunden innovative Produkte und effiziente Dienstleistungen anbieten können. Infolgedessen rückt die Arbeitsweise des Unternehmens in den Fokus, denn Manager und Mitarbeiter möchten auf effiziente Weise gute Ergebnisse erzielen. Der schnellste Weg zum Ziel: Effiziente Prozesse. 

Das Festlegen von Rollen und Verantwortlichkeiten führt dazu, dass Arbeitsabläufe im Unternehmen optimiert werden und Mitarbeiter ihre Aufgaben reibungsloser und schneller erledigen können.

Unternehmenswachstum mit Prozessmanagement

Jedes Unternehmen will sich schnell am Markt etablieren, das eigene Wachstum vorantreiben und neue Kunden gewinnen. Auch mit diesem Ziel vor Augen ist es nicht immer leicht, effiziente Prozesse zu gestalten. Nehmen Sie zum Beispiel die Rekrutierung und das Onboarding neuer Mitarbeiter. 

Einstellungsprozesse auf Ad-hoc-Basis können für ein Start-up funktionieren, nicht aber unbedingt für ein wachstumsorientiertes, mittelständisches Unternehmen. Hier müssen immer mehr Mitarbeiter in kürzerer Zeit eingearbeitet werden. Abteilungsleiter müssen sicherstellen, dass sie über die richtigen Informationen für ihre Arbeit verfügen. Die Lösung ist ein dokumentierter, skalierbarer und wiederholbarer Prozess, der unabhängig vom Standort oder der zu besetzenden Funktion beliebig oft ausgeführt werden kann. 

Wenn neue Mitarbeiter eingestellt werden, müssen sie wissen, wie sie ihre Aufgaben künftig erledigen müssen. Auch hier führt ein klar definierter Prozess dazu, dass die notwendigen Abläufe, Rollen und Dokumente bekannt und zugänglich sind – und das alles über Standortgrenzen hinweg. Unternehmenswachstum bedeutet auch, dass sich immer mehr Personen mit ihren Fähigkeiten und Ideen einbringen.

 

Kollaboratives Prozessmanagement

Führungskräfte sollten auf das kollektive Know-how ihrer Mitarbeiter setzen und ihnen die Möglichkeit zu geben, zur Verbesserung der Arbeitsweise des Unternehmens beizutragen. In einem Unternehmen mit einem effektiven Rahmen zur Prozessmodellierung bedeutet dies, dass alle Mitarbeiter Prozesse selbst entwerfen und modellieren können. 

Dass die Modellierung von Geschäftsprozessen in den Aufgabenbereich des Managements oder bestimmter Experten gehört, –ist eine überholte Sichtweise. Niemand möchte auf das wertvolle Wissen des Einzelnen verzichten: Denn je mehr Erkenntnisse über einen Prozess vorliegen, desto effizienter lassen sich die Prozesse modellieren und optimieren. Unternehmen, die auf die Nutzung einer gemeinsamen Informationsquelle für ihre Prozesse setzen, können eine kollaborative und transparente Arbeitsumgebung aufbauen. Dies führt nicht nur zu zufriedenen Mitarbeitern, sondern auch zu effizienteren Arbeitsabläufen und besseren Unternehmensergebnissen. 

Das kollaborative Prozessmanagement hilft wachsenden Unternehmen dabei, ineffiziente Abläufe, wie zeitaufwändigen E-Mail-Verkehr oder das Suchen nach der neuesten Dokumentenversion und andere Wachstumsbremsen zu vermeiden. 

Stattdessen können Prozessinhalte jederzeit von allen Mitarbeitern erstellt und freigegeben werden. Auf diese Weise werden die digitalen und cloudbasierten Strategien eines Unternehmens vorangetrieben, Analysen verbessert, Prozesse optimiert und Business-Transformation-Initiativen unterstützt. Kurz gesagt: Eine derartige Prozesstransparenz kann als Basis für die nächste Wachstumsphase eines Unternehmens genutzt werden. 

Sie möchten gern weitere Informationen über eine erfolgreiche Unternehmenstransformation erhalten? Gern stellen wir Ihnen unser Whitepaper In 7 Schritten zur Unternehmenstransformation kostenlos zur Verfügung.

Das Gesamtbild im Fokus: Enterprise Architecture und Prozessmanagement verbinden

Haben Sie jemals versucht, einen 3D-Film ohne 3D-Brille zu schauen? Zwei Stunden undeutliche Bilder zu sehen, ist alles andere als ein Vergnügen. Doch mit der richtigen Ausrüstung genießen Sie ein beeindruckendes Erlebnis mit realistischen, klaren und scharfen Aufnahmen. Auf die gleiche Weise rückt die richtige Enterprise Architecture die komplexe Struktur einer Organisation in den Mittelpunkt des Geschehens.

Die IT-Umgebungen moderner Unternehmen bestehen aus einer wachsenden Anzahl hochkomplexer, miteinander verbundener und oft schwierig zu verwaltender IT-Systeme. Und so scheint es häufig eine unüberwindliche Herausforderung zu sein, eine Balance zwischen Kundenservice und Effizienzanforderungen herzustellen. Dies gilt insbesondere im Zusammenhang mit Social-, Mobile-, Cloud- und Big-Data-Technologien und effektiven täglichen IT-Funktionen und -Support.

Die Unternehmensarchitektur kann Organisationen dabei helfen, dieses Gleichgewicht herzustellen und zugleich Risiken zu handhaben, Kosten zu optimieren und Innovationen einzuführen. Hier steht vor allem die erfolgreiche Umsetzung von Reform- und Transformationsprogrammen im Fokus. Dabei stützt sich die Unternehmensarchitektur auf die Genauigkeit der komplexen Datensysteme eines Unternehmens. Zugleich berücksichtigt sie      die sich ändernden Standards, Vorschriften und strategischen Geschäftsanforderungen.

Komponenten einer effektiven Enterprise Architecture

Im Allgemeinen bestehen Unternehmensarchitektur-Frameworks aus vier voneinander abhängigen Disziplinen:

  • Geschäftsarchitektur

Der Blueprint des Unternehmens, der ein allgemeines Verständnis der Organisation vermittelt und dazu dient, strategische Ziele und taktische Anforderungen aufeinander abzustimmen. Ein Beispiel hierfür ist die Abbildung von Geschäftsprozessen mithilfe von Business Process Management Notation.

  • Datenarchitektur

Die Domäne, die die Abhängigkeiten und Verbindungen zwischen den Daten, Richtlinien, Modellen und Standards einer Organisation aufzeigt.

  • Anwendungsarchitektur

Die Ebene, die alle Softwarelösungen eines Unternehmens und ihre Beziehungen untereinander aufzeigt.

  • Infrastrukturarchitektur

Diese Komponente befindet sich auf der untersten Architekturebene und zeigt die Beziehungen und Verbindungen der vorhandenen Hardwarelösungen eines Unternehmens auf.

Eine effektive EA-Implementierung bedeutet, dass Unternehmensmitarbeiter ein klares Verständnis dafür entwickeln, wie die IT-Systeme ihres Unternehmens die spezifischen Arbeitsprozesse ausführen und in welcher Verbindung sie zueinanderstehen. Sie ermöglicht Benutzern, die Anwendungs- und Business-Leistung zu analysieren und leistungsschwache IT-Systeme schnell und effizient in Angriff zu nehmen.

Kurz gesagt: EA hilft Unternehmen bei der Beantwortung von Fragen wie:

  • Welche IT-Systeme werden von wem wo genutzt?
  • Welche Geschäftsprozesse stehen mit welchem IT-System in Verbindung?
  • Wer ist für welche IT-Systeme verantwortlich?
  • Wie gut werden die Datenschutzanforderungen eingehalten?
  • Auf welchem ​​Server werden die jeweiligen Anwendungen ausgeführt?

Dieselben Fragen können auch auf die Geschäftsprozesse angewandt werden und bestimmen in diesem Fall das Business Process Management auf Unternehmensebene. Kein Wunder also, dass die beiden Disziplinen zusammenpassen wie Popcorn und ein guter Film, oder?

Enterprise Architecture und Prozessmanagement verbinden

Für die erfolgreiche Ausrichtung von Business und IT müssen die IT-Lösungen eines Unternehmens effektiv genutzt werden. So können sie die Unternehmensziele und -Anforderungen erfüllen. Standardisierte Sprache und Bilder (wie Flussdiagramme und Grafiken) sind oftmals hilfreich, um eine gemeinsame Brücke zwischen dem Fachbereich und der IT zu schaffen.

Auf die gleiche Weise sorgt die Kombination aus EA und kollaborativem Business Process Management für eine gemeinsame Sprache im gesamten Unternehmen. Eine solche Basis ermöglicht es, Missverständnisse zu vermeiden und organisatorische oder technische Transformationsziele effektiv zu verfolgen.

Eine stärkere Verknüpfung von Management, IT und einer prozessorientierten Belegschaft führt dazu, dass fundiertere Entscheidungen zur Norm werden. Eine erfolgreiche Kombination aus Prozessmanagement, Unternehmensarchitektur und IT gibt nicht nur Aufschluss darüber, wie sich Änderungen in einem Bereich auf die anderen Gebiete auswirken, sondern sorgt letztendlich auch für ein besseres Verständnis der tatsächlichen Funktionsweise des Unternehmens. Dies führt wiederum zu einer leichteren Optimierung der Geschäftsprozesse und einer damit einhergehenden höheren Kundenzufriedenheit.

Eine effektive Unternehmensarchitektur bietet IT-Teams mehr Transparenz und ermöglicht eine effiziente Verwaltung der IT-Systeme und ihrer jeweiligen Schnittstellen. Neben der Planung der kontinuierlichen Entwicklung der IT-Landschaft unterstützt EA – ebenso wie das Process Management – auch die strategische Entwicklung der Organisationsstruktur.

Mit der Kombination aus Enterprise Architecture und Process Management profitieren Sie von neuen Maßstäben in den Bereichen effiziente  IT-Systeme und Geschäftsprozesse sowie synchrone Optimierung und kontinuierliche Verbesserungen. Die Nutzung eines Tools für Enterprise Architecture und Business Process Management bringt Business und IT näher zusammen und erzeugt Synergien, die unmittelbaren Mehrwert schaffen und positive Veränderungen im gesamten Unternehmen vorantreiben.

Möchten Sie mehr erfahren? Setzen Sie auf 3-D-Ansichten und verleihen Sie Ihren EA-Initiativen mehr Tiefe mit Signavio! Registrieren Sie sich noch heute für eine kostenlose 30-Tage-Testversion der Business Transformation Suite.

 

The Importance of Equipment Calibration in Maintaining Data Integrity

Image by Unsplash.

New data-collection technologies, like internet of things (IoT) sensors, enable businesses across industries to collect accurate, minute-to-minute data that they can use to improve business processes and drive decision-making.

However, as data becomes more central to business processes and as more and more data is collected, collection errors become both more possible and more costly.

Here is why equipment calibration is key in maintaining data integrity — in every industry.

Bad Calibration, Bad Data

If a sensor or piece of equipment is improperly calibrated, the data it records could be incomplete, inaccurate or totally incorrect. This misinformation could be detrimental for businesses that integrate data-driven policies and strategies, as they rely on complete, up-to-date and accurate data.

In fact, poor calibration cost manufacturers an average of $1.7 million every year, according to a 2008 survey.

Poorly calibrated sensors and testing equipment can also present risks for consumers — which is why some industries control calibration. In medicine, for example, the FDA regulates equipment calibration. Medical manufacturers must regularly inspect and test monitoring equipment. Effective measuring and test equipment are vital for producing batches of drugs that are useful and safe for patient health.

Bad calibration can even lead to machine failure in businesses that rely on predictive maintenance, which is the use of IoT sensors to collect machine data that can help analysts predict machine failure before it happens. If a business’ data scientists are working with bad information, they are less likely to realize a particular machine or robot is failing. As a result, they won’t intervene with a repair until failure has occurred — a costly error that can effectively shut down some workflows.

Worse, if a business has come to depend on predictive maintenance, it may be caught off-guard by that machine’s failure — even more than if the same company relied on traditional maintenance strategies, rather than predictive analytics.

How to Ensure Equipment Calibration

Fortunately, businesses can ensure the continued quality of their data-collecting processes by committing to regular equipment calibration.

While not all industries are subject to equipment calibration regulations, standards from other industries — like those established by the FDA — could provide useful best practice frameworks.

Businesses that don’t have a dedicated equipment maintenance team can choose an external calibration solution or hire or train a team to handle equipment calibration. Some businesses — such as manufacturers who work with numerous advanced or highly sensitive machines — might need multiple calibration teams or companies with specialized experience.

In general, businesses and manufacturers should establish a regular calibration and inspection schedule. Each time someone calibrates a piece of equipment, they should document that process. Documentation should include the date of the last calibration, the results of any tests conducted and the due date for the next calibration. This process can help establish a pattern of sensor error that equipment maintenance teams can use to better predict and respond to glitches.

Even if a business only uses a certain kind of data from one sensor on a piece of testing equipment, workers should test every sensor on that machine. Errors from other sensors can influence properly calibrated sensors, even if no one is actively using the data they collect. This will become even truer as smart analysis technologies and IoT platforms become more common and algorithms handle larger portions of the data analysis process.

Calibrating Equipment for Accurate Data

Data is one of the most valuable resources available to modern businesses. However, a cost comes with relying too heavily on data and not properly calibrating the equipment that collects that data.

Equipment calibration is key to maintaining data integrity. If testing equipment and sensors aren’t properly calibrated, they can record incorrect data, which may lead to delays or lower product quality. Regular equipment calibration can help businesses ensure the data they receive is accurate and of the highest caliber.

AI For Advertisers: How Data Analytics Can Change The Maths Of Advertising?

All Images Credit: Freepik

The task of understanding a customer’s journey and designing your marketing strategy accordingly can be difficult in this data-driven world. Today, the customer expresses their needs in myriad forms of requests.

Consumers express their needs and want attitudes, and values in various forms through search, comments, blogs, Tweets, “likes,” videos, and conversations and access such data across many channels like web, mobile, and face to face. Volume, variety, velocity and veracity of the data accumulated through these customer interactions are huge.

BigData and data analytics can be leveraged to understand several phases of the customer journey. There are risks involved in using Artificial Intelligence for the marketing data analysis of data breach and even manipulation. But, AI do have brighter prospects when it comes to marketing and advertiser applications.

As the CEO of a technology firm Chop Dawg and marketer, Joshua Davidson puts it, “AI-powered apps are going to be the future for us, and there are several industries that are ripe for this.” The mobile-first strategy of many enterprises has powered the use of AI for digital marketing and developing technologies and innovations to power industries with intelligent systems.

How AI and Machine learning are affecting customer journeys?

Any consumer journey begins with the recognition of a problem and then stages like initial consideration, active evaluation, purchase, and postpurchase come through up till the consumer journey is over. The need for identifying the purchasing and need patterns of the consumers and finding the buyer personas to strategize the marketing for them.

Need and Want Recognition:

Identifying a need is quite difficult as it is the most initial level of a consumer’s journey and it is more on the category level than at a brand level. Marketers and advertisers are relying on techniques like market research, web analytics, and data mining to build consumer profiles and buyer’s persona for understanding the needs and influencing the purchase of products. AI can help identify these wants and needs in real-time as the consumers usually express their needs and wants online and help build profiles more quickly.

AI technologies offered by several firms help in consumer profiling. Firms like Microsoft offers Azure that crunches billions of data points in seconds to determine the needs of consumers. It then personalizes web content on specific platforms in real-time to align with those status-updates. Consumer digital footprints are evolving through social media status updates, purchasing behavior, online comments and posts. Ai tends to update these profiles continuously through machine learning techniques.

Initial Consideration:

A key objective of advertising is to insert a brand into the consideration set of the consumers when they are looking for deliberate offerings. Advertising includes increasing the visibility of brands and emphasize on the key reasons for consideration. Advertisers currently use search optimization, paid search advertisements, organic search, or advertisement retargeting for finding the consideration and increase the probability of consumer consideration.

AI can leverage machine learning and data analytics to help with search, identify and rank functions of consumer consideration that can match the real-time considerations at any specific time. Take an example of Google Adwords, it analyzes the consumer data and helps advertisers make clearer distinctions between qualified and unqualified leads for better targeting.

Google uses AI to analyze the search-query data by considering, not only the keywords but also context words and phrases, consumer activity data and other BigData. Then, Google identifies valuable subsets of consumers and more accurate targeting.

Active Evaluation: 

When consumers narrow it down to a few choices of brands, advertisers need to insert trust and value among the consumers for brands. A common technique is to identify the higher purchase consumers and persuade them through persuasive content and advertisement. AI can support these tasks using some techniques:

Predictive Lead Scoring: Predictive lead scoring by leveraging machine learning techniques of predictive analytics to allow marketers to make accurate predictions related to the intent of purchase for consumers. A machine learning algorithm runs through a database of existing consumer data, then recognize trends and patterns and after processing the external data on consumer activities and interests, creates robust consumer profiles for advertisers.

Natural Language Generation: By leveraging the image, speech recognition and natural language generation, machine learning enables marketers to curate content while learning from the consumer behavior in real-time scenarios and adjusts the content according to the profiles on the fly.

Emotion AI: Marketers use emotion AI to understand consumer sentiment and feel about the brand in general. By tapping into the reviews, blogs or videos they understand the mood of customers. Marketers also use emotion AI to pretest advertisements before its release. The famous example of Kelloggs, which used emotion AI to help devise an advertising campaign for their cereal, eliminating the advertisement executions whenever the consumer engagement dropped.

Purchase: 

As the consumers decide which brands to choose and what it’s worth, advertising aims to move them out of the decision process and push for the purchase by reinforcing the value of the brand compared with its competition.

Advertisers can insert such value by emphasizing convenience and information about where to buy the product, how to buy the product and reassuring the value through warranties and guarantees. Many marketers also emphasize on rapid return policies and purchase incentives.

AI can completely change the purchase process through dynamic pricing, which encompasses real-time price adjustments on the basis of information such as demand and other consumer-behavior variables, seasonality, and competitor activities.

Post-Purchase: 

Aftersales services can be improved through intelligent systems using AI technologies and machine learning techniques. Marketers and advertisers can hire dedicated developers to design intelligent virtual agents or chatbots that can reinforce the value and performance of a brand among consumers.

Marketers can leverage an intelligent technique known as Propensity modeling to identify the most valuable customers on the basis of lifetime value, likelihood of reengagement, propensity to churn, and other key performance measures of interest. Then advertisers can personalize their communication with these customers on the basis of these data.

Conclusion:

AI has shifted the focus of advertisers and marketers towards the customer-first strategies and enhanced the heuristics of customer engagement. Machine learning and IoT(Internet of Things) has already changed the way customer interact with the brands and this transition has come at a time when advertisers and marketers are looking for new ways to tap into the customer mindset and buyer’s persona.

All Images Credit: Freepik

The importance of being Data Scientist

Header-Image by Clint Adair on Unsplash.

The incredible results of Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence, Deep Learning in particular, could give the impression that Data Scientist are like magician. Just think of it. Recognising faces of people, translating from one language to another, diagnosing diseases from images, computing which product should be shown for us next to buy and so on from numbers only. Numbers which existed for centuries. What a perfect illusion. But it is only an illusion, as Data Scientist existed as well for centuries. However, there is a difference between the one from today compared to the one from the past: evolution.

The main activity of Data Scientist is to work with information also called data. Records of data are as old as mankind, but only within the 16 century did it include also numeric forms — as numbers started to gain more and more ground developing their own symbols. Numerical data, from a given phenomenon — being an experiment or the counts of sheep sold by week over the year –, was from early on saved in tabular form. Such a way to record data is interlinked with the supposition that information can be extracted from it, that knowledge — in form of functions — is hidden and awaits to be discovered. Collecting data and determining the function best fitting them let scientist to new insight into the law of nature right away: Galileo’s velocity law, Kepler’s planetary law, Newton theory of gravity etc.

Such incredible results where not possible without the data. In the past, one was able to collect data only as a scientist, an academic. In many instances, one needed to perform the experiment by himself. Gathering data was tiresome and very time consuming. No sensor which automatically measures the temperature or humidity, no computer on which all the data are written with the corresponding time stamp and are immediately available to be analysed. No, everything was performed manually: from the collection of the data to the tiresome computation.

More then that. Just think of Michael Faraday and Hermann Hertz and there experiments. Such endeavour where what we will call today an one-man-show. Both of them developed parts of the needed physics and tools, detailed the needed experiment settings, conducting the experiment and collect the data and, finally, computing the results. The same is true for many other experiments of their time. In biology Charles Darwin makes its case regarding evolution from the data collected in his expeditions on board of the Beagle over a period of 5 years, or Gregor Mendel which carry out a study of pea regarding the inherence of traits. In physics Blaise Pascal used the barometer to determine the atmospheric pressure or in chemistry Antoine Lavoisier discovers from many reaction in closed container that the total mass does not change over time. In that age, one person was enough to perform everything and was the reason why the last part, of a data scientist, could not be thought of without the rest. It was inseparable from the rest of the phenomenon.

With the advance of technology, theory and experimental tools was a specialisation gradually inescapable. As the experiments grow more and more complex, the background and condition in which the experiments were performed grow more and more complex. Newton managed to make first observation on light with a simple prism, but observing the line and bands from the light of the sun more than a century and half later by Joseph von Fraunhofer was a different matter. The small improvements over the centuries culminated in experiments like CERN or the Human Genome Project which would be impossible to be carried out by one person alone. Not only was it necessary to assign a different person with special skills for a separate task or subtask, but entire teams. CERN employs today around 17 500 people. Only in such a line of specialisation can one concentrate only on one task alone. Thus, some will have just the knowledge about the theory, some just of the tools of the experiment, other just how to collect the data and, again, some other just how to analyse best the recorded data.

If there is a specialisation regarding every part of the experiment, what makes Data Scientist so special? It is impossible to validate a theory, deciding which market strategy is best without the work of the Data Scientist. It is the reason why one starts today recording data in the first place. Not only the size of the experiment has grown in the past centuries, but also the size of the data. Gauss manage to determine the orbit of Ceres with less than 20 measurements, whereas the new picture about the black hole took 5 petabytes of recorded data. To put this in perspective, 1.5 petabytes corresponds to 33 billion photos or 66.5 years of HD-TV videos. If one includes also the time to eat and sleep, than 5 petabytes would be enough for a life time.

For Faraday and Hertz, and all the other scientist of their time, the goal was to find some relationship in the scarce data they painstakingly recorded. Due to time limitations, no special skills could be developed regarding only the part of analysing data. Not only are Data Scientist better equipped as the scientist of the past in analysing data, but they managed to develop new methods like Deep Learning, which have no mathematical foundation yet in spate of their success. Data Scientist developed over the centuries to the seldom branch of science which bring together what the scientific specialisation was forced to split.

What was impossible to conceive in the 19 century, became more and more a reality at the end of the 20 century and developed to a stand alone discipline at the beginning of the 21 century. Such a development is not only natural, but also the ground for the development of A.I. in general. The mathematical tools needed for such an endeavour where already developed by the half of the 20 century in the period when computing power was scars. Although the mathematical methods were present for everyone, to understand them and learn how to apply them developed quite differently within every individual field in which Machine Learning/A.I. was applied. The way the same method would be applied by a physicist, a chemist, a biologist or an economist would differ so radical, that different words emerged which lead to different langues for similar algorithms. Even today, when Data Science has became a independent branch, two different Data Scientists from different application background could find it difficult to understand each other only from a language point of view. The moment they look at the methods and code the differences will slowly melt away.

Finding a universal language for Data Science is one of the next important steps in the development of A.I. Then it would be possible for a Data Scientist to successfully finish a project in industry, turn to a new one in physics, then biology and returning to industry without much need to learn special new languages in order to be able to perform each tasks. It would be possible to concentrate on that what a Data Scientist does best: find the best algorithm. In other words, a Data Scientist could resolve problems independent of the background the problem was stated.

This is the most important aspect that distinguish the Data Scientist. A mathematician is limited to solve problems in mathematics alone, a physicist is able to solve problems only in physics, a biologist problems only in biology. With a unique language regarding the methods and strategies to solve Machine Learning/A.I. problems, a Data Scientist can solve a problem independent of the field. Specialisation put different branches of science at drift from each other, but it is the evolution of the role of the Data Scientist to synthesize from all of them and find the quintessence in a language which transpire beyond all the field of science. The emerging language of Data Science is a new building block, a new mathematical language of nature.

Although such a perspective does not yet exists, the principal component of Machine Learning/A.I. already have such proprieties partially in form of data. Because predicting for example the numbers of eggs sold by a company or the numbers of patients which developed immune bacteria to a specific antibiotic in all hospital in a country can be performed by the same prediction method. The data do not carry any information about the entities which are being predicted. It does not matter anymore if the data are from Faraday’s experiment, CERN of Human Genome. The same data set and its corresponding prediction could stand literary for anything. Thus, the result of the prediction — what we would call for a human being intuition and/or estimation — would be independent of the domain, the area of knowledge it originated.

It also lies at the very heart of A.I., the dream of researcher to create self acting entities, that is machines with consciousness. This implies that the algorithms must be able to determine which task, model is relevant at a given moment. It would be to cumbersome to have a model for every task and and every field and then try to connect them all in one. The independence of scientific language, like of data, is thus a mandatory step. It also means that developing A.I. is not only connected to develop a new consciousness, but, and most important, to the development of our one.

Mit Dashboards zur Prozessoptimierung

Geschäftlicher Erfolg ergibt sich oft aus den richtigen Fragen – zum Beispiel: „Wie kann ich sicherstellen, dass mein Produkt das beste ist?“, „Wie hebe ich mich von meinen Mitbewerbern ab?“ und „Wie baue ich mein Unternehmen weiter aus?“ Moderne Unternehmen gehen über derartige Fragen hinaus und stellen vielmehr die Funktionsweise ihrer Organisation in den Fokus. Fragen auf dieser Ebene lauten dann: „Wie kann ich meine Geschäftsprozesse so effizient wie möglich gestalten?“, „Wie kann ich Zusammenarbeit meiner Mitarbeiter verbessern?“ oder auch „Warum funktionieren die Prozesse meines Unternehmens nicht so, wie sie sollten?“


Read this article in English: 
“Process Paradise by the Dashboard Light”


Um die Antworten auf diese (und viele andere!) Fragen zu erhalten, setzen immer mehr Unternehmen auf Process Mining. Process Mining hilft Unternehmen dabei, den versteckten Mehrwert in ihren Prozessen aufzudecken, indem Informationen zu Prozessmodellen aus den verschiedenen IT-Systemen eines Unternehmens automatisch erfasst werden. Auf diese Weise kann die End-to-End-Prozesslandschaft eines Unternehmens kontinuierlich überwacht werden. Manager und Mitarbeiter profitieren so von operativen Erkenntnissen und können potenzielle Risiken ebenso erkennen wie Möglichkeiten zur Verbesserung.

Process Mining ist jedoch keine „Wunderwaffe“, die Daten auf Knopfdruck in Erkenntnisse umwandelt. Eine Process-Mining-Software ist vielmehr als Werkzeug zu betrachten, das Informationen erzeugt, die anschließend analysiert und in Maßnahmen umgesetzt werden. Hierfür müssen die generierten Informationen den Entscheidungsträgern jedoch auch in einem verständlichen Format zur Verfügung stehen.

Bei den meisten Process-Mining-Tools steht nach wie vor die Verbesserung der Analysefunktionen im Fokus und die generierten Daten müssen von Experten oder Spezialisten innerhalb einer Organisation bewertet werden. Dies führt zwangsläufig dazu, dass es zwischen den einzelnen Schritten zu Verzögerungen kommt und die Abläufe bis zur Ergreifung von Maßnahmen ins Stocken geraten.

Process-Mining-Software, die einen kooperativeren Ansatz verfolgt und dadurch das erforderliche spezifische Fachwissen verringert, kann diese Lücke schließen. Denn nur wenn Informationen, Hypothesen und Analysen mit einer Vielzahl von Personen geteilt und erörtert werden, können am Ende aussagekräftige Erkenntnisse gewonnen werden.

Aktuelle Process-Mining-Software kann natürlich standardisierte Berichte und Informationen generieren. In einem sich immer schneller ändernden Geschäftsumfeld reicht dies jedoch möglicherweise nicht mehr aus. Das Erfolgsgeheimnis eines wirklich effektiven Process Minings besteht darin, Herausforderungen und geschäftliche Möglichkeiten vorherzusehen und dann in Echtzeit auf sie zu reagieren.

Dashboards der Zukunft

Nehmen wir ein analoges Beispiel, um aufzuzeigen, wie sich das Process Mining verbessern lässt. Der technologische Fortschritt soll die Dinge einfacher machen: Denken Sie beispielsweise an den Unterschied zwischen der handschriftlichen Erfassung von Ausgaben und einem Tabellenkalkulator. Stellen Sie sich nun vor, die Tabelle könnte Ihnen genau sagen, wann Sie sie lesen und wo Sie beginnen müssen, und würde Sie auf Fehler und Auslassungen aufmerksam machen, bevor Sie überhaupt bemerkt haben, dass sie Ihnen passiert sind.

Fortschrittliche Process-Mining-Tools bieten Unternehmen, die ihre Arbeitsweise optimieren möchten, genau diese Art der Unterstützung. Denn mit der richtigen Process-Mining-Software können individuelle operative Cockpits erstellt werden, die geschäftliche Daten in Echtzeit mit dem Prozessmanagement verbinden. Der Vorteil: Es werden nicht nur einzelne Prozesse und Ergebnisse kontinuierlich überwacht, sondern auch klare Einblicke in den Gesamtzustand eines Unternehmens geboten.

Durch die richtige Kombination von Process Mining mit den vorhandenen Prozessmodellen eines Unternehmens werden statisch dargestellte Funktionsweisen eines bestimmten Prozesses in dynamische Dashboards umgewandelt. Manager und Mitarbeiter erhalten so Warnungen über potenzielle Probleme und Schwachstellen in Ihren Prozessen. Und denken Sie daran, dynamisch heißt nicht zwingend störend: Die richtige Process-Mining-Software setzt an der richtigen Stelle in Ihren Prozessen an und bietet ein völlig neues Maß an Prozesstransparenz und damit an Prozessverständnis.

Infolgedessen können Transformationsinitiativen und andere Verbesserungspläne jederzeit angepasst und umstrukturiert werden und Entscheidungsträger mittels automatisierter Nachrichten sofort über Probleme informiert werden, sodass sich Korrekturmaßnahmen schneller als je zuvor umsetzen lassen. Der Vorteil: Unternehmen sparen Zeit und Geld, da Zykluszeiten verkürzt, Engpässe lokalisiert und nicht konforme Prozesse in der Prozesslandschaft der Organisation aufgedeckt werden.

Dynamische Dashboards von Signavio

 Testen Sie Signavio Process Intelligence und erleben Sie selbst, wie die modernste und fortschrittlichste Process-Mining-Software Ihnen dabei hilft, umsetzbare Einblicke in die Funktionsweise Ihres Unternehmens zu erhalten. Mit Signavios Live Insights profitieren Sie von einer zentralen Ansicht Ihrer Prozesse und Informationen, die in Form eines Ampelsystems dargestellt werden. Entscheiden Sie einfach, welche Prozesse und Aktivitäten Sie innerhalb eines Prozesses überwachen möchten, platzieren Sie Indikatoren und wählen Sie Grenzwerte aus. Alles Weitere übernimmt Signavio Process Intelligence, das Ihre Prozessmodelle mit den Daten verbindet.

Lassen Sie veraltete Arbeitsweisen hinter sich. Setzen Sie stattdessen auf faktenbasierte Erkenntnisse, um Ihre Geschäftstransformation zu unterstützen und Ihre Prozessmanagementinitiativen schneller zum Erfolg zu führen. Erfahren Sie mehr über Signavio Process Intelligence oder registrieren Sie sich für eine kostenlose 30-Tage-Testversion über www.signavio.com/try.

Erfahren Sie in unserem kostenlosen Whitepaper mehr über erfolgreiches Process Mining mit Signavio Process Intelligence.

Why Retailers Are Making the Push for Stronger Data Science and AI

Retail relies on what the customer wants and needs at that moment, no matter the size of the company. Making judgments without consumer input would probably work for a little while but will fall flat as soon as the business model becomes outdated. In today’s technology-run world, things can become obsolete in a matter of days or even hours.

Retailers are the businesses most in need of capitalizing on what the customer wants in real-time. They have started to use data science and information from the Internet of Things (IoT) to not only stay in business, but also get ahead of other brands.

Artificial intelligence (AI) adds a new layer by using modern technology. The details of why retailers want to use these new practices are a bit more specific, though.

Data Targets Audiences

By using current customer data compared to information from the IoT, retailers can learn more about their audience and find better means of targeting them. Demographics like age, location and many other factors could affect advertising and even shopping, not to mention holidays throughout the year an audience celebrates.

Websites also need to be customized to suit the target audience. Those that are mobile-friendly and focused on what shoppers want can increase revenue, but the wrong approach can drive away new and existing customers. AI can help companies understand that data and present it back to the customer seamlessly, providing different options for various audiences.

Customer Base Expansion

Customer success should mean business success, as well. Growing a client base is something data science can assist with. However, helping customers grow is another type of service few companies provide but all people appreciate. A business can expand by offering new products and services that are relevant to their audience through the use of data.

Once a company learns what current customers want and begin to fit their needs, it can expand to more audiences. With data science, a business can ensure it does so slowly to give more of what current customers want while also finding new ones. The data can tell what sort of interests they all share so companies can capitalize on the venture.

AI Helps Customer Service

AI helps out customer service on both ends. Employees don’t have to focus on common problems that could easily be resolved, and clients often walk away happier than if they were to speak to a real person. This doesn’t work for every problem, especially ones that are specific in nature, but they can assist with more common issues. This is where chatbots enter the stage.

An AI-supported chatbot can give immediate support, provide suggestions, answer direct questions and offer almost any other form of help needed. Customers get personalized attention, and businesses can work faster toward customer loyalty.

Again, speaking to a real person when they have problems is a big plus for customers, but not for issues they know could be resolved in the time it takes to wait on the line for a representative.

Supply and Demand

Price optimization has taken on a bigger role than it has in the past. Mostly, data science is looking at supply and demand in real-time rather than having price fluctuations occur months after the business loses money. Having the right price can also help create more promotions for products and services, rewarding loyal customers for their shopping.

The data has to be gained from multiple channels by using price optimization tools, which focus on using data correctly in a company’s favor. The information doesn’t just look at supply and demand, but also examines locations, times, customer attitudes, competitor pricing and many other factors. All these pieces of information can be delivered in real-time so prices can be changed accordingly.

Taking the Competition

The thing about data science is that businesses are already utilizing it to their full potential and getting more customers than ever. The only way to get ahead of the competition is to at least start using the tools they’ve had at their disposal for years.

Target was one such company that took up the data helm. During 2012 and 2013, it saw a pretty sizeable dip in sales, but its online sales went up by almost 30% during the same time.

Data and Retail

When running a retail business, especially one that’s branching off into a franchise, using data is imperative. Data science and AI have become extremely important to companies both big and small.

Applying it correctly can help enterprises of any size and in every industry take things to the next level.

Even if a company is just starting out, sticking the first landing with a target audience is a fantastic way to begin the adventure and find success.

Interview: Data Science im Einzelhandel

Interview mit Dr. Andreas Warntjen über den Weg zum daten-getriebenen Unternehmen – Data Science im Einzelhandel

Zur Einführung der Person:

Dr. Andreas Warntjen arbeitet seit Juli 2016 bei der Thalia Bücher GmbH, aktuell als Senior Manager Advanced and Predictive Analytics. Davor hat Herr Dr. Warntjen viele Jahre als Sozialwissenschaftler an ausländischen Universitäten geforscht. Er hat selbst langjährige Erfahrung in der statistischen Datenanalyse mit Stata, SPSS und R und arbeitet im Moment mit der in-memory Datenbank SAP HANA sowie Python und SAP’s Automated Predictive Library (APL).


Data Science Blog: Herr Dr. Warntjen, welche Bedeutung hat die Data Science für Sie und Ihren Bereich bei Thalia? Und wie ordnen Sie die verwandten Begriffe wie Predictive Analytics und Advanced Analytics im Kontext der geschäftlichen Entscheidungsfindung ein?

Data Science spielt bei Thalia in unterschiedlichsten Bereichen eine zunehmend größer werdende Rolle. Neben den klassischen Themen wie Betrugserkennung und Absatzprognosen ist für Thalia als Buchhändler Text Mining von zentraler Bedeutung. Das größte Potential liegt aus meiner Sicht darin, besser auf die Wünsche unserer  Kunden eingehen zu können.

Bei Thalia werden in schneller Taktung Innovationen eingeführt. Sei es die Filialabholung, bei der online bestellte Bücher innerhalb von 2 Stunden in einer Buchhandlung abgeholt werden können. Oder das Beratungs- und Bezahl-Tablet für die Mitarbeiter vor Ort. Oder Innovationen im Webshop. Bei der Beurteilung, ob diese Neuerungen tatsächlich Kundenwünsche effektiv und effizient erfüllen, kann Advanced Analytics helfen. Im Gegensatz zur klassischen Business Intelligence – die weiterhin eine wichtige Rolle bei der Entscheidungsfindung im Unternehmen spielen wird – berücksichtigt Advanced Analytics stärker die Vielfalt des Kundenverhaltens und der unterschiedlichen Situationen in den Filialen. Verfahren wie etwa multivariate Regressionsanalyse, Entscheidungsbäume und statistische Hypothesentest können die in Unternehmen etablierte Analyse von deskriptiven Statistiken – etwa der Vergleich von Umsatzzahlen zwischen Pilot- und Vergleichsfilialen mit Pivot-Tabellen – ergänzen.

Predictive Analytics kann helfen verschiedenste Geschäftsprozesse individuell für Kunden zu gestalten. Generell können auf Grundlage von automatischen, in Echtzeit erstellten Vorhersagen Prozesse im Unternehmen optimiert werden. Außerdem kann Predictive Analytics Mitarbeiter bei wiederkehrenden Tätigkeiten unterstützen, beispielsweise in der Disposition.

Data Science Blog: Welche Fähigkeiten benötigen gute Data Scientists denn wirklich zur Geschäftsoptimierung? Wie wichtig ist das Domänenwissen?

Die wichtigsten Eigenschaften eines Data Scientist sind große Neugierde, eine sehr analytische Denkweise und eine exzellente Kommunikationsfähigkeit. Um mit Data Science erfolgreich Geschäftsprozesse zu optimieren, benötigt man ein breites Wissensspektrum: vom Geschäftsprozess über das IT-Datenmodell und das Know-how zur Entwicklung von Vorhersagemodellen bis hin zur Prozessintegration. Das ist nur im Team machbar. Domänenwissen spielt dabei eine wichtige Rolle, weshalb es für den Data Scientist essentiell ist sich mit den Prozessverantwortlichen und Business Analysten auszutauschen.

Data Science Blog: Sie bearbeiten Anwendungsfälle für den Handel. Können sich Branchen die Anwendungsfälle gegenseitig abschauen oder sollte jede Branche auf sich selbst fokussiert bleiben?

Es gibt sowohl Anwendungsfälle, die für den Einzelhandel und andere Branchen gleichermaßen relevant sind, als auch Themen, die für Thalia als Buchhändler besonders wichtig sind.

Die Individualisierung im eCommerce ist ein branchenübergreifendes Thema. Analytisches CRM, etwa das zielsichere Ausspielen von Kampagnen oder eine passgenaue Kundensegmentierung, ist für eine Versicherung oder Bank genauso wichtig wie für den Baumarkt oder den Buchhändler. Die Warenkorbanalyse mit statistischen Algorithmen ist ein klassisches Data Mining-Thema, das für den Einzelhandel generell interessant ist.

Natürlich muss man sich vorab über die Besonderheiten des jeweiligen Geschäftsumfeldes Gedanken machen, aber prinzipiell kann man von Unternehmen oder Branchen lernen, die Advanced und Predictive Analytics schon seit Jahren oder Jahrzehnten nutzen. Die passende IT-Infrastruktur und das entsprechende Interesse vom Fachbereich vorausgesetzt, eignen sich diese Anwendungsfälle damit besonders für den Einstieg in Advanced und Predictive Analytics – auch für Mittelständler.

Das Kerngeschäft des Buchhändlers  Thalia ist es, Kunden mit für sie interessanten Geschichten zusammen zu bringen. Die Geschichten selber bestehen aus Text. Die Produktbeschreibungen („Klappentexte“) und -besprechungen liegen in Textform vor. Und Kundenfeedback – sei es auf Thalia.de oder in sozialen Medien – erreicht uns als Text. Erkenntnisse aus Texten abzuleiten (Text Mining) ist deshalb für Thalia wichtiger als für andere Einzelhändler.

Data Science Blog: Welche Algorithmen und Tools verwenden Sie für Ihre Anwendungsfälle? Womit machen Sie eher gute, womit eher schlechte Erfahrungen?

Die Palette bei Thalia reicht von A wie Automated Machine Learning bis Z wie Zeitreihenanalyse. Ich selber arbeite aktuell mit verschiedenen Klassifikationsalgorithmen (z.B., regularisierte logistische Regression,  Random Forest, XGB, Naive Bayes, SAP’s Automated Predictive Library). Im Bereich Text Mining beschäftigen wir uns im Moment unter anderem mit Topic Models und Word2Vec.

Sowohl Algorithmus als auch die Software muss zum Verwendungszweck passen. Bei der Auswahl des Algorithmus gibt es häufig einen Trade-off zwischen Interpretierbarkeit und Prognosegüte. Das muss zusammen mit der Fachabteilung je nach Anwendungsfall abgewogen werden.

Mit flexibler Open Source-Software wie etwa R oder Python lassen sich schnell Proof-of-Concept-Projekte verwirklichen. Für die Integration in bestehende Prozesse sind manchmal kommerzielle Software-Lösungen besser.

Data Science Blog: Soviel zum kurz- und mittelfristigen Start in die Datennutzung. Wie sieht es für die langfristige Verankerung von Advanced/Predictive Analytics im Unternehmen aus? Was muss hier im Rahmen der IT-Infrastruktur bedacht und verankert werden?

Ohne Daten keine Datenanalyse. Je flexibler man auf unterschiedliche Daten im Unternehmen zugreifen kann, desto höher die Innovationsgeschwindigkeit durch Advanced/Predictive Analytics. „Datensilos“ abzubauen bzw. zu vermeiden ist also ein sehr wichtiges Thema. Hohe Datenqualität und die umfassende Dokumentation von Daten sind auch essentiell. Das gilt natürlich nicht nur für Advanced und Predictive Analytics sondern auch für Business Intelligence.

Die langfristige Verankerung von Advanced und Predictive Analytics im Unternehmen verlangt den Aufbau und die kontinuierliche Weiterentwicklung von Infrastruktur in Form von Hardware, Software, Kompetenzen und Wissen, sowie Organisationsformen und Prozessen. Wertschöpfung durch Advanced bzw. Predictive Analytics erfordert das konstruktive Zusammenspiel von Domänenexpertise aus der Fachabteilung, Wissen über Datenstrukturen und -modellen  aus der IT-Abteilung bzw. BI/BW-Systemen und tiefem statistischem Know-how. Nur durch die Zusammenarbeit verschiedener Unternehmensbereiche entstehen Erfolge für das gesamte Unternehmen.

Data Science Blog: Auch organisatorisch sollte langfristig sicherlich einiges bedacht werden. Wann sollten Projekte in den jeweiligen Fachbereichen direkt umgesetzt werden? Wann vielleicht besser in einer zentralen Daten-Abteilung?

Das hängt von einer Reihe von Faktoren ab. Bei hochgradig spezialisiertem Know-how, von dem unterschiedliche Fachbereiche profitieren können, kann es Synergie-Effekte geben, wenn dies zentral organisiert ist. Eine zentrale Einheit kann vielleicht auch Innovationen breiter in ein Unternehmen tragen. Wenn bestimmte Anwendungsszenarien von Advanced/Predictive Analytics für eine Fachabteilung hingegen eine zentrale Rolle spielen oder sie sich ein einem sehr schnelllebigen Umfeld bewegt, dann wäre eine fachliche und organisatorische Verankerung im Fachbereich wichtig.