How Tech Helps Keep You Safe Throughout the Day

Safety is always a primary concern for people no matter what is happening in the world, but there are certain times when it’s pushed firmly to the front of our minds. It’s in these times that we realise just how much we have come to rely on technology to help secure our safety.

From the moment we wake up, to the moment we go to bed, there’s always some sort of technology helping to keep us safe – protecting our health, loved ones and personal details.

Here are just some of the main ways in which tech helps keep you secure throughout the day.

At Home

We literally have everything at the push of a button these days. Whether you want to see who’s at your front door, or check for the latest safety announcements, you’ve got the power to do it with your phone.

Knowledge is power as they say, and having access to limitless information can help keep you safe. When problems do occur, your ability to communicate with people who can help you is also far superior to what has ever been in the past.

Through easy access to information, and clear communication channels, technology has made us more secure at home.

In Hospitals

If you do get sick, then technology is always there to help you get back on your feet. Everyday across the world, research is taking place that improves our medical procedures and makes our medicines more effective.

With novel medicines delivered by innovative drug discovery platform, each day brings us closer to curing previously uncurable diseases and improving the performances of our healthcare systems. Technology is constantly driving the healthcare system forward, helping to make you safer if you do end up in hospital.

On the Road

While you’re still very safe on the road, driving is one of the riskier activities you do on a daily basis. To help protect you, car manufacturers and regulatory bodies are constantly investing in new technology to help keep us safe.

We take amenities such as seatbelts and airbags for granted these days, but they’re part of a constant stream of technologies designed to keep us safer on the roads.

Today we talk about ideas such as lane assist, and even driverless cars to keep us safe, and technology will continue to drive safety forward.

At Work

Workplace accidents are another risk we face when we leave the house, but again, technology is helping to lower the risk and even prevent these from happening.

This can be anything from ergonomic chairs, to sophisticated personnel management systems, but all industries continue to make strides toward keeping you safer when you’re at work.

Online

It’s not so long ago that this wouldn’t have even featured on the list, but we spend so much of our lives online, and store so much of our information there that we have to make sure we’re using it safely.

As quickly as the internet develops, so too does the technology to help keep us safe online. The technology is there to help you, but you’ve got to be aware of the threat and be up to date with online security.

Data Science in Engineering Process - Product Lifecycle Management

How to develop digital products and solutions for industrial environments?

The Data Science and Engineering Process in PLM.

Huge opportunities for digital products are accompanied by huge risks

Digitalization is about to profoundly change the way we live and work. The increasing availability of data combined with growing storage capacities and computing power make it possible to create data-based products, services, and customer specific solutions to create insight with value for the business. Successful implementation requires systematic procedures for managing and analyzing data, but today such procedures are not covered in the PLM processes.

From our experience in industrial settings, organizations start processing the data that happens to be available. This data often does not fully cover the situation of interest, typically has poor quality, and in turn the results of data analysis are misleading. In industrial environments, the reliability and accuracy of results are crucial. Therefore, an enormous responsibility comes with the development of digital products and solutions. Unless there are systematic procedures in place to guide data management and data analysis in the development lifecycle, many promising digital products will not meet expectations.

Various methodologies exist but no comprehensive framework

Over the last decades, various methodologies focusing on specific aspects of how to deal with data were promoted across industries and academia. Examples are Six Sigma, CRISP-DM, JDM standard, DMM model, and KDD process. These methodologies aim at introducing principles for systematic data management and data analysis. Each methodology makes an important contribution to the overall picture of how to deal with data, but none provides a comprehensive framework covering all the necessary tasks and activities for the development of digital products. We should take these approaches as valuable input and integrate their strengths into a comprehensive Data Science and Engineering framework.

In fact, we believe it is time to establish an independent discipline to address the specific challenges of developing digital products, services and customer specific solutions. We need the same kind of professionalism in dealing with data that has been achieved in the established branches of engineering.

Data Science and Engineering as new discipline

Whereas the implementation of software algorithms is adequately guided by software engineering practices, there is currently no established engineering discipline covering the important tasks that focus on the data and how to develop causal models that capture the real world. We believe the development of industrial grade digital products and services requires an additional process area comprising best practices for data management and data analysis. This process area addresses the specific roles, skills, tasks, methods, tools, and management that are needed to succeed.

Figure: Data Science and Engineering as new engineering discipline

More than in other engineering disciplines, the outputs of Data Science and Engineering are created in repetitions of tasks in iterative cycles. The tasks are therefore organized into workflows with distinct objectives that clearly overlap along the phases of the PLM process.

Feasibility of Objectives
  Understand the business situation, confirm the feasibility of the product idea, clarify the data infrastructure needs, and create transparency on opportunities and risks related to the product idea from the data perspective.
Domain Understanding
  Establish an understanding of the causal context of the application domain, identify the influencing factors with impact on the outcomes in the operational scenarios where the digital product or service is going to be used.
Data Management
  Develop the data management strategy, define policies on data lifecycle management, design the specific solution architecture, and validate the technical solution after implementation.
Data Collection
  Define, implement and execute operational procedures for selecting, pre-processing, and transforming data as basis for further analysis. Ensure data quality by performing measurement system analysis and data integrity checks.
Modeling
  Select suitable modeling techniques and create a calibrated prediction model, which includes fitting the parameters or training the model and verifying the accuracy and precision of the prediction model.
Insight Provision
  Incorporate the prediction model into a digital product or solution, provide suitable visualizations to address the information needs, evaluate the accuracy of the prediction results, and establish feedback loops.

Real business value will be generated only if the prediction model at the core of the digital product reliably and accurately reflects the real world, and the results allow to derive not only correct but also helpful conclusions. Now is the time to embrace the unique chances by establishing professionalism in data science and engineering.

Authors

Peter Louis                               

Peter Louis is working at Siemens Advanta Consulting as Senior Key Expert. He has 25 years’ experience in Project Management, Quality Management, Software Engineering, Statistical Process Control, and various process frameworks (Lean, Agile, CMMI). He is an expert on SPC, KPI systems, data analytics, prediction modelling, and Six Sigma Black Belt.


Ralf Russ    

Ralf Russ works as a Principal Key Expert at Siemens Advanta Consulting. He has more than two decades experience rolling out frameworks for development of industrial-grade high quality products, services, and solutions. He is Six Sigma Master Black Belt and passionate about process transparency, optimization, anomaly detection, and prediction modelling using statistics and data analytics.4


Must-have Skills to Master Data Science

The need to process a massive amount of data sets is making Data Science the most-demanded job across diverse industry verticals. In today’s times, organizations are actively looking for Data Scientists.

But What does a Data Scientist do?

Data Scientist design data models, create various algorithms to extract the data the organization needs, and then they analyze the gathered data and communicate the data insights with the business stakeholders.

If you are looking forward to pursuing a career in Data Science, then this blog is for you 🙂

Data Scientists often come from many different educational and work experience backgrounds but few skills are common and essential.

Let’s have a look at all the essential skills required to become a Data Scientist:

  1. Multivariable Calculus & Linear Algebra
  2. Probability & Statistics
  3. Programming Skills (Python & R)
  4. Machine Learning Algorithms
  5. Data Visualization
  6. Data Wrangling
  7. Data Intuition

Let’s dive deeper into all these skills one by one.

 

Multivariable Calculus & Linear Algebra:

Having a solid understanding of math concepts is very helpful for a Data Scientist.

Key Concepts:

  • Matrices
  • Linear Algebra Functions
  • Derivatives and Gradient
  • Relational Algebra

Probability & Statistics:

Probability and Statistics play a major role in Data Science for estimation and prediction purposes.

Key concepts required:

  • Probability Distributions
  • Conditional Probability
  • Bayesian Thinking
  • Descriptive Statistics
  • Random Variables
  • Hypothesis Testing and Regression
  • Maximum Likelihood Estimation

Programming Skills (Python & R):

Python :

Start with Python Fundamentals using a jupyter notebook, which comes pre-packaged with Python libraries.

Important Python Libraries used:

  • NumPy (For Data Exploration)
  • Pandas (For Data Exploration)
  • Matplotlib (For Data Visualization)

R:

It is a programming language and software environment used for statistical computing and graphics. 

Key Concepts required:

  • R Languages fundamentals and basic syntax
  • Vectors, Matrices, Factors
  • Data frames
  • Basic Graphics

Machine Learning Algorithms

Machine Learning is an innovative and essential field in the industry. There are quite a few algorithms out there, major ones are as follows –

  • Linear Regression
  • Logistic Regression
  • Decision Trees
  • Random Forest
  • Naïve Bayes
  • Support Vector Machines
  • Dimensionality Reduction
  • K-means
  • Artificial Neural Networks

Data Visualization:

Data visualization is very essential when it comes to analyzing a massive amount of information and data. 

To make data-driven decisions, data visualization tools, and technologies are essential in the world of Data Science.

Data Visualization tools:

  • Tableau
  • Microsoft Power Bi
  • E Charts
  • Datawrapper
  • HighCharts

Data Wrangling:

Data wrangling, this term refers to the process of cleaning and refining the messy and complex data available into a more usable format. 

It is considered one of the most crucial parts of working with data.

Important Steps to Data Wrangling:

  1. Discovering
  2. Structuring
  3. Cleaning
  4. Enriching
  5. Validating
  6. Documenting

Tools used:

  • Tabula
  • Google DataPrep
  • Data Wrangler
  • CSVkit

Data Wrangling can be done using Python and R.

Data Intuition:

Data Intuition in Data Science is an intuitive understanding of concepts. It’s one of the most significant skills required to become a Data Scientist.

It’s about recognizing patterns where none are observable on the surface.

This is something that you need to develop. It is a skill that will only come with experience.

A Data Scientist should know which Data Science methods to apply to the problem at hand.

Conclusion:

 As you can see, all these skills – from programming to algorithmic methods, work with one another to build on top of each other for gathering deeper data insights.

There are a wide number of courses available online for developing these skills and to help you become a true talent in this data industry.

Sure, this journey isn’t an easy one to follow but it’s not impossible. With sheer determination and consistency, you will be able to cross all the hurdles in your Data Science career path.

Process Mining mit Celonis – Artikelserie

Der erste Artikel dieser Artikelserie Process Mining Tools beschäftigt sich mit dem Anbieter Celonis. Das 2011 in Deutschland gegründete Unternehmen ist trotz wachsender Anzahl an Wettbewerbern zum Zeitpunkt der Veröffentlichung dieses Artikels der eindeutige Marktführer im Bereich Process Mining.

Celonis Process Mining – Teil 1 der Artikelserie

Celonis Process Mining ist 2011 als reine On-Premise-Lösung gestartet und seit 2018 auch als Cloud-Lösuung zu haben. Übersicht zu den vier verschiedenen Produktversionen der Celonis Process Mining Lösungen:

Celonis Snap Celonis Enterprise Celonis Academic Celonis Consulting
Lizenz:  Kostenfrei Kostenpflichtige Lösungspakete Kostenfrei Consulting Lizenz on Demand
Zielgruppe:  Für kleine Unternehmen und Einzelanwender Für mittel- und große Unternehmen Für akademische Einrichtungen und Studenten Für Berater
Datenquellen: ServiceNow, CSV/XLS -Datei Beliebig (On-Premise- und Cloud – Anbindungen) ServiceNow, CSV/XLS/XES –Datei oder Demosysteme Beliebig (On-Premise- und Cloud – Anbindungen)
Datenvolumen: Limitiert auf 500 MB Event-Log-Daten Unlimitierte Datenmengen (Größte Installation 50 TB) Unlimitierte Datenmengen Unlimitierte Datenmengen (Größte Installation 30 TB
Architektur: Cloud & On-Premise Cloud & On-Premise Cloud & On-Premise Cloud & On-Premise

Dieser Artikel bezieht sich im weiteren Verlauf auf die Celonis Enterprise Version, wenn nicht anders gekennzeichnet. Spezifische Unterschiede unter den einzelnen Produkten und weitere Informationen können auf der Website von Celonis entnommen werden.

Bedienbarkeit und Anpassungsfähigkeit der Analysen

In Sachen Bedienbarkeit punktet Celonis mit einem sehr übersichtlichen und einsteigerfreundlichem Userinterface. Jeder der mit BI-Tools wir z.B. „Power-BI“ oder „Tableau“ gearbeitet hat, wird sich wahrscheinlich schnell zurechtfinden.

Userinterface Celonis

Abbildung 1: Userinterface von Celonis. Über die Reiter kann direkt von der Analyse (Process Analytics) zu den ETL-Prozessen (Event Collection) gewechselt werden.

Das Erstellen von Analysen funktioniert intuitiv und schnell, auch weil die einzelnen Komponentenbausteine lediglich per drag & drop platziert und mit den gewünschten Dimensionen und KPI’s bestückt werden müssen.

Process Analytics im Process Explorer

Abbildung 2: Typische Analyse im Edit Modus. Neue Komponenten können aus dem Reiter (rechts im Bild) mittels drag & drop auf der Dashboard Bearbeitungsfläche platziert werden.

Darüber hinaus bietet Celonis mit seinem kostenlosen Programm „Celonis Acadamy“ einen umfangreichen und leicht verständlichen Pool an Trainingseinheiten für die verschiedenen User-Rollen: „Snap“, „Executive“, „Business User“, „Analyst“ und „Data Engineer“. Einsteiger finden sich nach der Absolvierung der Grundkurse etwa nach vier Stunden in dem Tool zurecht.

Conformance Analyse In Celonis

Abbildung 3: Conformance Analyse In Celonis. Es kann direkt analysiert werden, welche Art von Verstößen welche Auswirkungen haben und mit welcher Häufigkeit diese auftreten.

Die Definition von eigenen KPIs erfolgt mittels übersichtlichem Code Editor. Die verwendete proprietäre und patentierte Programmiersprache lautet PQL (Process Query Language) , dessen Syntax stark an SQL angelehnt ist und alle prozessrelevanten Berechnungen ermöglicht. Noch einsteigerfreundlicher ist der Visual Editor, in welchem KPIs alternativ mit zahlreicher visueller Unterstützung und über 130 mathematischen Operatoren erstellt werden können – ganz ohne Coding Erfahrung.
Mit Hilfe von über 30 Komponenten lassen sich alle üblichen Charts und Grafiken erstellen. Ich hatte das Gefühl, dass die Auswahl grundsätzlich ausreicht und dem Erkenntnisgewinn nicht im Weg steht. Dieses Gefühl rührt nicht zuletzt daher, dass die vorgefertigten Features, wie zum Beispiel „Conformance“ direkt und ohne Aufwand implementiert werden können und bemerkenswerte Erkenntnisse liefern. Kurzum: Ja es ist vieles vorgefertigt, aber hier wurde mit hohen Qualitätsansprüchen vorgefertigt!

Celonis Code Editor vs Visual Editor

Abbildung 4: Coder Editor (links) und Visual Editor (rechts). Während im Code Editor mit PQL geschrieben werden muss, können Einsteiger im Visual Editor visuelle Hilfestellungen nehmen, um KPIs zu definieren.

Diese Flexibilität erscheint groß und bedient mehrere Zielgruppen, beginnend bei den Einsteigern. Insbesondere da das Verständnis für den Code Editor und somit für PQL durch die Arbeit mit dem Visual Code Editor gefördert wird. Wer SQL-Kenntnisse mitbringt, wird sehr schnell ohne Probleme KPIs im Code Editor definieren können. Erfahrenen Data Engineers stünde es dennoch frei, die Entwicklungsarbeit auf die Datenbankebene zu verschieben.

Celonis Visual Editor

Abbildung 5: Mit Hilfe zahlreicher Möglichkeiten können Einsteiger im Visual Editor visuelle Hilfestellungen nehmen, um individuelle KPIs zu definieren.

Nachdem die ersten Analysen erstellt wurden, steht der Prozessanalyse nichts mehr im Wege. Während sich per Knopfdruck auf alle visualisierten Datenpunkte filtern lässt, unterstützt auch hier Celonis zusätzlich mit zahlreichen sogenannten ‘Auswahlansichten’, um die Entdeckung unerwünschter oder betrügerischer Prozesse so einfach wie das Googeln zu machen.

Predefined dashboard apps

Abbildung 6: Die anwenderfreundlichen Auswahlarten ermöglichen es dem Benutzer, einfach mit wenigen Klicks nach Unregelmäßigkeiten oder Mustern in Transaktionen zu suchen und diese eingehend zu analysieren.

Integrationsfähigkeit

Die Celonis Enterprise Version ist sowohl als Cloud- und On-Premise-Lösung verfügbar. Die Cloud-Lösung bietet die folgenden Vorteile: Zum einen zusätzliche Leistungen wieCloud Connectoren, einer sogenannten Action Engine die jeden einzelnen Mitarbeiter in einem Unternehmen mit datengetriebenen nächstbesten Handlungen unterstützt, intelligenter Process Automation, Machine Learning und AI, einen App Store sowie verschiedene Boards. Diese Erweiterungen zeigen deutlich den Anspruch des Münchner Process Mining Vendors auf, neben der reinen Prozessanalyse Unternehmen beim heben der identifizierten Potentiale tatkräftig zu unterstützen. Darüber hinaus kann die Cloud-Lösung punkten mit, einer schnellen Amortisierung, bedarfsgerechter Skalierbarkeit der Kapazitäten sowie einen noch stärkeren Fokus auf Security & Compliance. Darüber hinaus  erfolgen regelmäßig Updates.

Celonis Process Automation

Abbildung 7: Celonis Process Automation ermöglicht Unternehmen ihre Prozesse auf intelligente Art und Weise so zu automatisieren, dass die Zielerreichung der jeweiligen Fachabteilung im Fokus stehen. Auch hier trumpft Celonis mit über 30+ vorgefertigten Möglichkeiten von der Automatisierung von Kommunikation, über Backend Automatisierung in Quellsystemen bis hin zu Einbindung von RPA Bots und vielem mehr.

Der Schwenk von Celonis scheint in Richtung Cloud zu sein und es bleibt abzuwarten, wie die On-Premise-Lösung zukünftig aussehen wird und ob sie noch angeboten wird. Je nach Ausgangssituation gilt es hier abzuwägen, welche der beiden Lösungen die meisten Vorteile bietet. In jedem Fall wird Celonis als browserbasierte Webanwendung für den Endanwender zur Verfügung gestellt. Die folgende Abbildung zeigt eine beispielhafte Celonis on-Premise-Architektur, bei welcher der User über den Webbrowser Zugang erhält.

Celonis bringt eine ausreichende Anzahl an vordefinierten Datenschnittstellen mit, wodurch sowohl gängige on-Premise Datenbanken / ERP-Systeme als auch Cloud-Dienste, wie z. B. „ServiceNow“ oder „Salesforce“ verbunden werden können. Im „App Store“ können zusätzlich sogenannte „prebuild Process-Connectors“ kostenlos erworben werden. Diese erstellen die Verbindung und erzeugen das Datenmodell (Extract and Transform) für einen Standard Prozess automatisch, so dass mit der Analyse direkt begonnen werden kann. Über 500 vordefinierte Analysen für Standard Prozesse gibt es zusätzlich im App Store. Dadurch kann die Bearbeitungszeit für ein Process-Mining Projekt erheblich verkürzt werden, vorausgesetzt das benötigte Datenmodel weicht im Kern nicht zu sehr von dem vordefinierten Model ab. Sollten Schnittstellen mal nicht vorhanden sein, können Daten auch als CSV oder XLS Format importiert werden.

Celonis App Store

Abbildung 8: Der Celonis App Store beinhaltet über 100 Prozesskonnektoren, über 500 vorgefertigte Analysen und über 80 Action Engine Fähigkeiten die kostenlos mit der Cloud Lizenz zur Verfügung stehen

Auch wenn von einer 100%-Cloud gesprochen wird, muss für die Anbindung von unternehmensinternen on-premise Datenquellen (z. B. lokale Instanzen von SAP ERP, Oracle ERP, MS Dynamics ERP) ein sogenannter Extractor on-premise installiert werden.

Celonis Extractors

Abbildung 9: Celonis Extractor muss für die Anbindung von On-Premise Datenquellen ebenfalls On-Premise installiert werden. Dieser arbeitet wie ein Gateway zur Celonis Intelligent Business Cloud (IBC). Die IBC enthält zudem einen eigenen Extratctor für die Anbindung von Daten aus anderen Cloud-Systemen.

Celonis bietet in der Enterprise-Ausführung zudem ein umfassendes Benutzer-Berechtigungsmanagement, so dass beispielsweise für Analysen im Einkauf die Berechtigungen zwischen dem Einkaufsleiter, Einkäufern und Praktikanten im Einkauf unterschieden werden können. Auch dieser Punkt ist für viele Unternehmen eine Grundvoraussetzung für einen eventuellen unternehmensweiten Roll-Out.

Skalierbarkeit

In Punkto großen Datenmengen kann Celonis sich sehen lassen. Allein für „Uber“ verarbeitet die Cloud rund 50 Millionen Datensätze, wobei ein einzelner mehrere Terabyte (TB) groß sein kann. Der größte einzelne Datenblock, den Celonis analysiert, beträgt wohl etwas über 50 TB. Celonis bietet somit Process Mining, zeitgerecht im Bereich Big Data an und kann daher auch viele große renommierten Unternehmen zu seinen Kunden zählen, wie zum Beispiel Siemens, ABB oder BMW. Doch wie erweiterbar und flexibel sind die erstellten Datenmodelle? An diesem Punkt konnte ich keine Schwierigkeiten feststellen. Celonis bietet ein übersichtlich gestaltetes Userinterface, welches das Datenmodell mit seinen Tabellen und Beziehungen sauber darstellt. Modelliert wird mit SQL-Befehlen, wodurch eine zusätzliche Abfragesprache entfällt. Der von Celonis gewählte SQL-Dialekt ist Vertica. Dieser ist keineswegs begrenzt und bietet die ausreichende Tiefe, welche an dieser Stelle benötigt wird. Die Erweiterbarkeit sowie die Flexibilität der Datenmodelle wird somit ausschließlich von der Arbeit des Data Engineer bestimmt und in keiner Weise durch Celonis selbst eingeschränkt. Durch das Zurückgreifen auf die Abfragesprache SQL, kann bei der Modellierung auf eine sehr breite Community zurückgegriffen werden. Darüber hinaus können bestehende SQL-Skripte eingefügt und leicht angepasst werden. Und auch die Suche nach einem geeigneten Data Engineer gestaltet sich dadurch praktisch, da SQL eine der meistbeherrschten Abfragesprachen ist.

Zukunftsfähigkeit

Machine Learning umfasst Data Mining und Predictive Analytics und findet vermehrt den Einzug ins Process Mining. Auch ist es längst ein wesentlicher Bestandteil von Celonis. So basiert z. B. das Feature „Conformance“ auf Machine Learning Algorithmen, welche zu den identifizierten Prozessabweichungen den Einfluss auf das Geschäft berechnen. Aber auch Lösungen zu den Identifizierten Problemen werden von Verfahren des maschinellen Lernens dem Benutzer vorgeschlagen. Was zusätzlich in Sachen Machine Learning von Celonis noch bereitgestellt wird, ist die sogenannte Machine-Learning-Workbench, welche in die Intelligent Business Cloud integriert ist. Hier können eigene Anwendungen mit Machine Learning auf Basis der Event-Log Daten entwickelt und eingesetzt werden, um z. B. Vorhersagen zu Lieferzeiten treffen zu können.

Task Mining ist einer der nächsten Schritte im Bereich Process Mining, der den Detailgrad für Analysen von Prozessen bis hin zu einzelnen Aufgaben auf Mausklick-Ebene erhöht. Im Oktober 2019 hatte Celonis bereits angekündigt, dass die Intelligent Business Cloud um eben diese neue Technik der Datenerhebung und -analyse erweitert wird. Die beiden Methoden Prozess Analyse und Task Mining ergänzen sich ausgezeichnet. Stelle ich in der Prozess Analyse fest, dass sich eine bestimmte Aktivität besonders negativ auf meine gewünschte Performance auswirkt (z. B. Zeit), können mit Task Mining diese Aktivität genauer untersuchen und die möglichen Gründe sehr granular betrachten. So kann ich evtl. feststellen das Mitarbeiter bei einer bestimmten Art von Anfrage sehr viel Zeit in Salesforce verbringen, um Informationen zu sammeln. Hier liegt also viel Potential versteckt, um den gesamten Prozess zu verbessern. In dem z.B. die Informationsbeschaffung erleichtert wird oder evtl. der Anfragetyp optimiert wird, kann dieses Potential genutzt werden. Auch ist Task Mining die ideale Grundlage zur Formulierung von RPA-Lösungen.

Ebenfalls entscheidend für die Zukunftsfähigkeit von Process Mining ist die Möglichkeit, Verknüpfungen zwischen unterschiedlichen Geschäftsprozesse zu erkennen. Häufig sind diese untrennbar miteinander verbunden und der Output eines Prozesses bildet den Input für einen anderen. Mit prozessübergreifenden Multi-Event Logs bietet Celonis die Möglichkeit, genau diese Verbindungen aufzuzeigen. So entsteht ein einheitliches Prozessmodell für das gesamte Unternehmen. Und das unter bestimmten Voraussetzungen auch in nahezu Echtzeit.

Werden die ersten Entwicklungen im Bereich Machine Learning und Task Mining von Celonis weiter ausgebaut, ist Celonis weiterhin auf einem zukunftssicheren Weg. Unternehmen, die vor allem viel Wert auf Enterprise-Readiness und eine intensive Weiterentwicklung legen, dürften mit Celonis auf der sicheren Seite sein.

Preisgestaltung

Die Preisgestaltung der Enterprise Version wird von Celonis nicht transparent kommuniziert. Angeboten werden verschiedene kostenpflichtige Lösungspakete, welche sich aus den Anforderungen eines Projektes ergeben.  Generell stufe ich die Celonis Enterprise Version als Premium Produkt ein. Dies liegt auch daran, weil die Basisausführung der Celonis Enterprise Version bereits sehr umfänglich ist und neben der Software Subscription standardmäßig auch mit Wartung und Support kommt. Zusätzlich steckt mittlerweile sehr viel Entwicklungsarbeit in der Celonis Process Mining Plattform, welche weit über klassische Process Discovery Solutions hinausgeht.  Für kleinere Unternehmen mit begrenztem Budget gibt es daher zwischen der kostenfreien Snap Version und den Basis Paketen der Enterprise Version oft keine Interimslösung.

Fazit

Insgesamt stellt Celonis ein unabhängiges und leistungsstarkes Process Mining Tool in der Cloud bereit. Gehört die Cloud zur Unternehmensstrategie, ist man bei Celonis an der richtigen Adresse. Die „prebuild Process-Connectors“ und die vordefinierten Analysen können ein Process Mining Projekt signifikant beschleunigen und somit die Time-to-Value lukrativ verkürzen. Die Analyse Tools sind leicht bedienbar und schaffen dank integrierter Machine Learning Algorithmen Optimierungspotentiale. Positiv ist auch zu bewerten, dass Celonis ohne speziellen Syntax auskommt und mittelmäßige SQL-Fähigkeiten somit völlig ausreichend sind, um Prozessanalysen vollumfänglich durchzuführen. Diesen vielen positiven Aspekten steht eigentlich nur die hohe Preisgestaltung für die Enterprise Version gegenüber. Ob diese im Einzelfall gerechtfertigt ist, sollte situationsabhängig evaluiert werden. Sicherlich richtet sich Celonis Enterprise in erster Linie an größere Unternehmen, welche komplexe Prozesse mit hohen Datenvolumina analysieren möchte.  Mit Celonis-Snap können jedoch auch kleine Unternehmen und Start-ups einen begrenzten Einblick in dieses gut gelungene Process Mining Tool erhalten.

Interview: Data Science in der Finanzbranche

Interview mit Torsten Nahm von der DKB (Deutsche Kreditbank AG) über Data Science in der Finanzbranche

Torsten Nahm ist Head of Data Science bei der DKB (Deutsche Kreditbank AG) in Berlin. Er hat Mathematik in Bonn mit einem Schwerpunkt auf Statistik und numerischen Methoden studiert. Er war zuvor u.a. als Berater bei KPMG und OliverWyman tätig sowie bei dem FinTech Funding Circle, wo er das Risikomanagement für die kontinentaleuropäischen Märkte geleitet hat.

Hallo Torsten, wie bist du zu deinem aktuellen Job bei der DKB gekommen?

Die Themen Künstliche Intelligenz und maschinelles Lernen haben mich schon immer fasziniert. Den Begriff „Data Science“ gibt es ja noch gar nicht so lange. In meinem Studium hieß das „statistisches Lernen“, aber im Grunde ging es um das gleiche Thema: dass ein Algorithmus Muster in den Daten erkennt und dann selbstständig Entscheidungen treffen kann.

Im Rahmen meiner Tätigkeit als Berater für verschiedene Unternehmen und Banken ist mir klargeworden, an wie vielen Stellen man mit smarten Algorithmen ansetzen kann, um Prozesse und Produkte zu verbessern, Risiken zu reduzieren und das Kundenerlebnis zu verbessern. Als die DKB jemanden gesucht hat, um dort den Bereich Data Science weiterzuentwickeln, fand ich das eine äußerst spannende Gelegenheit. Die DKB bietet mit über 4 Millionen Kunden und einem auf Nachhaltigkeit fokussierten Geschäftsmodell m.E. ideale Möglichkeiten für anspruchsvolle aber auch verantwortungsvolle Data Science.

Du hast viel Erfahrung in Data Science und im Risk Management sowohl in der Banken- als auch in der Versicherungsbranche. Welche Rolle siehst du für Big Data Analytics in der Finanz- und Versicherungsbranche?

Banken und Versicherungen waren mit die ersten Branchen, die im großen Stil Computer eingesetzt haben. Das ist einfach ein unglaublich datengetriebenes Geschäft. Entsprechend haben komplexe Analysemethoden und auch Big Data von Anfang an eine große Rolle gespielt – und die Bedeutung nimmt immer weiter zu. Technologie hilft aber vor allem dabei Prozesse und Produkte für die Kundinnen und Kunden zu vereinfachen und Banking als ein intuitives, smartes Erlebnis zu gestalten – Stichwort „Die Bank in der Hosentasche“. Hier setzen wir auf einen starken Kundenfokus und wollen die kommenden Jahre als Bank deutlich wachsen.

Kommen die Bestrebungen hin zur Digitalisierung und Nutzung von Big Data gerade eher von oben aus dem Vorstand oder aus der Unternehmensmitte, also aus den Fachbereichen, heraus?

Das ergänzt sich idealerweise. Unser Vorstand hat sich einer starken Wachstumsstrategie verschrieben, die auf Automatisierung und datengetriebenen Prozessen beruht. Gleichzeitig sind wir in Dialog mit vielen Bereichen der Bank, die uns fragen, wie sie ihre Produkte und Prozesse intelligenter und persönlicher gestalten können.

Was ist organisatorische Best Practice? Finden die Analysen nur in deiner Abteilung statt oder auch in den Fachbereichen?

Ich bin ein starker Verfechter eines „Hub-and-Spoke“-Modells, d.h. eines starken zentralen Bereichs zusammen mit dezentralen Data-Science-Teams in den einzelnen Fachbereichen. Wir als zentraler Bereich erschließen dabei neue Technologien (wie z.B. die Cloud-Nutzung oder NLP-Modelle) und arbeiten dabei eng mit den dezentralen Teams zusammen. Diese wiederum haben den Vorteil, dass sie direkt an den jeweiligen Kollegen, Daten und Anwendern dran sind.

Wie kann man sich die Arbeit bei euch in den Projekten vorstellen? Was für Profile – neben dem Data Scientist – sind beteiligt?

Inzwischen hat im Bereich der Data Science eine deutliche Spezialisierung stattgefunden. Wir unterscheiden grob zwischen Machine Learning Scientists, Data Engineers und Data Analysts. Die ML Scientists bauen die eigentlichen Modelle, die Date Engineers führen die Daten zusammen und bereiten diese auf und die Data Analysts untersuchen z.B. Trends, Auffälligkeiten oder gehen Fehlern in den Modellen auf den Grund. Dazu kommen noch unsere DevOps Engineers, die die Modelle in die Produktion überführen und dort betreuen. Und natürlich haben wir in jedem Projekt noch die fachlichen Stakeholder, die mit uns die Projektziele festlegen und von fachlicher Seite unterstützen.

Und zur technischen Organisation, setzt ihr auf On-Premise oder auf Cloud-Lösungen?

Unsere komplette Data-Science-Arbeitsumgebung liegt in der Cloud. Das vereinfacht die gemeinsame Arbeit enorm, da wir auch sehr große Datenmengen z.B. direkt über S3 gemeinsam bearbeiten können. Und natürlich profitieren wir auch von der großen Flexibilität der Cloud. Wir müssen also z.B. kein Spark-Cluster oder leistungsfähige Multi-GPU-Instanzen on premise vorhalten, sondern nutzen und zahlen sie nur, wenn wir sie brauchen.

Gibt es Stand heute bereits Big Data Projekte, die die Prototypenphase hinter sich gelassen haben und nun produktiv umgesetzt werden?

Ja, wir haben bereits mehrere Produkte, die die Proof-of-Concept-Phase erfolgreich hinter sich gelassen haben und nun in die Produktion umgesetzt werden. U.a. geht es dabei um die Automatisierung von Backend-Prozessen auf Basis einer automatischen Dokumentenerfassung und -interpretation, die Erkennung von Kundenanliegen und die Vorhersage von Prozesszeiten.

In wie weit werden unstrukturierte Daten in die Analysen einbezogen?

Das hängt ganz vom jeweiligen Produkt ab. Tatsächlich spielen in den meisten unserer Projekte unstrukturierte Daten eine große Rolle. Das macht die Themen natürlich anspruchsvoll aber auch besonders spannend. Hier ist dann oft Deep Learning die Methode der Wahl.

Wie stark setzt ihr auf externe Vendors? Und wie viel baut ihr selbst?

Wenn wir ein neues Projekt starten, schauen wir uns immer an, was für Lösungen dafür schon existieren. Bei vielen Themen gibt es gute etablierte Lösungen und Standardtechnologien – man muss nur an OCR denken. Kommerzielle Tools haben wir aber im Ergebnis noch fast gar nicht eingesetzt. In vielen Bereichen ist das Open-Source-Ökosystem am weitesten fortgeschritten. Gerade bei NLP zum Beispiel entwickelt sich der Forschungsstand rasend. Die besten Modelle werden dann von Facebook, Google etc. kostenlos veröffentlicht (z.B. BERT und Konsorten), und die Vendors von kommerziellen Lösungen sind da Jahre hinter dem Stand der Technik.

Letzte Frage: Wie hat sich die Coronakrise auf deine Tätigkeit ausgewirkt?

In der täglichen Arbeit eigentlich fast gar nicht. Alle unsere Daten sind ja per Voraussetzung digital verfügbar und unsere Cloudumgebung genauso gut aus dem Home-Office nutzbar. Aber das Brainstorming, gerade bei komplexen Fragestellungen des Feature Engineering und Modellarchitekturen, finde ich per Videocall dann doch deutlich zäher als vor Ort am Whiteboard. Insofern sind wir froh, dass wir uns inzwischen auch wieder selektiv in unseren Büros treffen können. Insgesamt hat die DKB aber schon vor Corona auf unternehmensweites Flexwork gesetzt und bietet dadurch per se flexible Arbeitsumgebungen über die IT-Bereiche hinaus.

Sechs Eigenschaften einer modernen Business Intelligence

Völlig unabhängig von der Branche, in der Sie tätig sind, benötigen Sie Informationssysteme, die Ihre geschäftlichen Daten auswerten, um Ihnen Entscheidungsgrundlagen zu liefern. Diese Systeme werden gemeinläufig als sogenannte Business Intelligence (BI) bezeichnet. Tatsächlich leiden die meisten BI-Systeme an Mängeln, die abstellbar sind. Darüber hinaus kann moderne BI Entscheidungen teilweise automatisieren und umfassende Analysen bei hoher Flexibilität in der Nutzung ermöglichen.


english-flagRead this article in English:
“Six properties of modern Business Intelligence”


Lassen Sie uns die sechs Eigenschaften besprechen, die moderne Business Intelligence auszeichnet, die Berücksichtigungen von technischen Kniffen im Detail bedeuten, jedoch immer im Kontext einer großen Vision für die eigene Unternehmen-BI stehen:

1.      Einheitliche Datenbasis von hoher Qualität (Single Source of Truth)

Sicherlich kennt jeder Geschäftsführer die Situation, dass sich seine Manager nicht einig sind, wie viele Kosten und Umsätze tatsächlich im Detail entstehen und wie die Margen pro Kategorie genau aussehen. Und wenn doch, stehen diese Information oft erst Monate zu spät zur Verfügung.

In jedem Unternehmen sind täglich hunderte oder gar tausende Entscheidungen auf operative Ebene zu treffen, die bei guter Informationslage in der Masse sehr viel fundierter getroffen werden können und somit Umsätze steigern und Kosten sparen. Demgegenüber stehen jedoch viele Quellsysteme aus der unternehmensinternen IT-Systemlandschaft sowie weitere externe Datenquellen. Die Informationsbeschaffung und -konsolidierung nimmt oft ganze Mitarbeitergruppen in Anspruch und bietet viel Raum für menschliche Fehler.

Ein System, das zumindest die relevantesten Daten zur Geschäftssteuerung zur richtigen Zeit in guter Qualität in einer Trusted Data Zone als Single Source of Truth (SPOT) zur Verfügung stellt. SPOT ist das Kernstück moderner Business Intelligence.

Darüber hinaus dürfen auch weitere Daten über die BI verfügbar gemacht werden, die z. B. für qualifizierte Analysen und Data Scientists nützlich sein können. Die besonders vertrauenswürdige Zone ist jedoch für alle Entscheider diejenige, über die sich alle Entscheider unternehmensweit synchronisieren können.

2.      Flexible Nutzung durch unterschiedliche Stakeholder

Auch wenn alle Mitarbeiter unternehmensweit auf zentrale, vertrauenswürdige Daten zugreifen können sollen, schließt das bei einer cleveren Architektur nicht aus, dass sowohl jede Abteilung ihre eigenen Sichten auf diese Daten erhält, als auch, dass sogar jeder einzelne, hierfür qualifizierte Mitarbeiter seine eigene Sicht auf Daten erhalten und sich diese sogar selbst erstellen kann.

Viele BI-Systeme scheitern an der unternehmensweiten Akzeptanz, da bestimmte Abteilungen oder fachlich-definierte Mitarbeitergruppen aus der BI weitgehend ausgeschlossen werden.

Moderne BI-Systeme ermöglichen Sichten und die dafür notwendige Datenintegration für alle Stakeholder im Unternehmen, die auf Informationen angewiesen sind und profitieren gleichermaßen von dem SPOT-Ansatz.

3.      Effiziente Möglichkeiten zur Erweiterung (Time to Market)

Bei den Kernbenutzern eines BI-Systems stellt sich die Unzufriedenheit vor allem dann ein, wenn der Ausbau oder auch die teilweise Neugestaltung des Informationssystems einen langen Atem voraussetzt. Historisch gewachsene, falsch ausgelegte und nicht besonders wandlungsfähige BI-Systeme beschäftigen nicht selten eine ganze Mannschaft an IT-Mitarbeitern und Tickets mit Anfragen zu Änderungswünschen.

Gute BI versteht sich als Service für die Stakeholder mit kurzer Time to Market. Die richtige Ausgestaltung, Auswahl von Software und der Implementierung von Datenflüssen/-modellen sorgt für wesentlich kürzere Entwicklungs- und Implementierungszeiten für Verbesserungen und neue Features.

Des Weiteren ist nicht nur die Technik, sondern auch die Wahl der Organisationsform entscheidend, inklusive der Ausgestaltung der Rollen und Verantwortlichkeiten – von der technischen Systemanbindung über die Datenbereitstellung und -aufbereitung bis zur Analyse und dem Support für die Endbenutzer.

4.      Integrierte Fähigkeiten für Data Science und AI

Business Intelligence und Data Science werden oftmals als getrennt voneinander betrachtet und geführt. Zum einen, weil Data Scientists vielfach nur ungern mit – aus ihrer Sicht – langweiligen Datenmodellen und vorbereiteten Daten arbeiten möchten. Und zum anderen, weil die BI in der Regel bereits als traditionelles System im Unternehmen etabliert ist, trotz der vielen Kinderkrankheiten, die BI noch heute hat.

Data Science, häufig auch als Advanced Analytics bezeichnet, befasst sich mit dem tiefen Eintauchen in Daten über explorative Statistik und Methoden des Data Mining (unüberwachtes maschinelles Lernen) sowie mit Predictive Analytics (überwachtes maschinelles Lernen). Deep Learning ist ein Teilbereich des maschinellen Lernens (Machine Learning) und wird ebenfalls für Data Mining oder Predictvie Analytics angewendet. Bei Machine Learning handelt es sich um einen Teilbereich der Artificial Intelligence (AI).

In der Zukunft werden BI und Data Science bzw. AI weiter zusammenwachsen, denn spätestens nach der Inbetriebnahme fließen die Prädiktionsergebnisse und auch deren Modelle wieder in die Business Intelligence zurück. Vermutlich wird sich die BI zur ABI (Artificial Business Intelligence) weiterentwickeln. Jedoch schon heute setzen viele Unternehmen Data Mining und Predictive Analytics im Unternehmen ein und setzen dabei auf einheitliche oder unterschiedliche Plattformen mit oder ohne Integration zur BI.

Moderne BI-Systeme bieten dabei auch Data Scientists eine Plattform, um auf qualitativ hochwertige sowie auf granularere Rohdaten zugreifen zu können.

5.      Ausreichend hohe Performance

Vermutlich werden die meisten Leser dieser sechs Punkte schon einmal Erfahrung mit langsamer BI gemacht haben. So dauert das Laden eines täglich zu nutzenden Reports in vielen klassischen BI-Systemen mehrere Minuten. Wenn sich das Laden eines Dashboards mit einer kleinen Kaffee-Pause kombinieren lässt, mag das hin und wieder für bestimmte Berichte noch hinnehmbar sein. Spätestens jedoch bei der häufigen Nutzung sind lange Ladezeiten und unzuverlässige Reports nicht mehr hinnehmbar.

Ein Grund für mangelhafte Performance ist die Hardware, die sich unter Einsatz von Cloud-Systemen bereits beinahe linear skalierbar an höhere Datenmengen und mehr Analysekomplexität anpassen lässt. Der Einsatz von Cloud ermöglicht auch die modulartige Trennung von Speicher und Rechenleistung von den Daten und Applikationen und ist damit grundsätzlich zu empfehlen, jedoch nicht für alle Unternehmen unbedingt die richtige Wahl und muss zur Unternehmensphilosophie passen.

Tatsächlich ist die Performance nicht nur von der Hardware abhängig, auch die richtige Auswahl an Software und die richtige Wahl der Gestaltung von Datenmodellen und Datenflüssen spielt eine noch viel entscheidender Rolle. Denn während sich Hardware relativ einfach wechseln oder aufrüsten lässt, ist ein Wechsel der Architektur mit sehr viel mehr Aufwand und BI-Kompetenz verbunden. Dabei zwingen unpassende Datenmodelle oder Datenflüsse ganz sicher auch die neueste Hardware in maximaler Konfiguration in die Knie.

6.      Kosteneffizienter Einsatz und Fazit

Professionelle Cloud-Systeme, die für BI-Systeme eingesetzt werden können, bieten Gesamtkostenrechner an, beispielsweise Microsoft Azure, Amazon Web Services und Google Cloud. Mit diesen Rechnern – unter Einweisung eines erfahrenen BI-Experten – können nicht nur Kosten für die Nutzung von Hardware abgeschätzt, sondern auch Ideen zur Kostenoptimierung kalkuliert werden. Dennoch ist die Cloud immer noch nicht für jedes Unternehmen die richtige Lösung und klassische Kalkulationen für On-Premise-Lösungen sind notwendig und zudem besser planbar als Kosten für die Cloud.

Kosteneffizienz lässt sich übrigens auch mit einer guten Auswahl der passenden Software steigern. Denn proprietäre Lösungen sind an unterschiedliche Lizenzmodelle gebunden und können nur über Anwendungsszenarien miteinander verglichen werden. Davon abgesehen gibt es jedoch auch gute Open Source Lösungen, die weitgehend kostenfrei genutzt werden dürfen und für viele Anwendungsfälle ohne Abstriche einsetzbar sind.

Die Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) gehören zum BI-Management mit dazu und sollten stets im Fokus sein. Falsch wäre es jedoch, die Kosten einer BI nur nach der Kosten für Hardware und Software zu bewerten. Ein wesentlicher Teil der Kosteneffizienz ist komplementär mit den Aspekten für die Performance des BI-Systems, denn suboptimale Architekturen arbeiten verschwenderisch und benötigen mehr und teurere Hardware als sauber abgestimmte Architekturen. Die Herstellung der zentralen Datenbereitstellung in adäquater Qualität kann viele unnötige Prozesse der Datenaufbereitung ersparen und viele flexible Analysemöglichkeiten auch redundante Systeme direkt unnötig machen und somit zu Einsparungen führen.

In jedem Fall ist ein BI für Unternehmen mit vielen operativen Prozessen grundsätzlich immer günstiger als kein BI zu haben. Heutzutage könnte für ein Unternehmen nichts teurer sein, als nur nach Bauchgefühl gesteuert zu werden, denn der Markt tut es nicht und bietet sehr viel Transparenz.

Dennoch sind bestehende BI-Architekturen hin und wieder zu hinterfragen. Bei genauerem Hinsehen mit BI-Expertise ist die Kosteneffizienz und Datentransparenz häufig möglich.

Data Science für Smart Home im familiengeführten Unternehmen Miele

Dr. Florian Nielsen ist Principal for AI und Data Science bei Miele im Bereich Smart Home und zuständig für die Entwicklung daten-getriebener digitaler Produkte und Produkterweiterungen. Der studierte Informatiker promovierte an der Universität Ulm zum Thema multimodale kognitive technische Systeme.

Data Science Blog: Herr Dr. Nielsen, viele Unternehmen und Anwender reden heute schon von Smart Home, haben jedoch eher ein Remote Home. Wie machen Sie daraus tatsächlich ein Smart Home?

Tatsächlich entspricht das auch meiner Wahrnehmung. Die bloße Steuerung vernetzter Produkte über digitale Endgeräte macht aus einem vernetzten Produkt nicht gleich ein „smartes“. Allerdings ist diese Remotefunktion ein notwendiges Puzzlestück in der Entwicklung von einem nicht vernetzten Produkt, über ein intelligentes, vernetztes Produkt hin zu einem Ökosystem von sich ergänzenden smarten Produkten und Services. Vernetzte Produkte, selbst wenn sie nur aus der Ferne gesteuert werden können, erzeugen Daten und ermöglichen uns die Personalisierung, Optimierung oder gar Automatisierung von Produktfunktionen basierend auf diesen Daten voran zu treiben. „Smart“ wird für mich ein Produkt, wenn es sich beispielsweise besser den Bedürfnissen des Nutzers anpasst oder über Assistenzfunktionen eine Arbeitserleichterung im Alltag bietet.

Data Science Blog: Smart Home wiederum ist ein großer Begriff, der weit mehr als Geräte für Küchen und Badezimmer betrifft. Wie weit werden Sie hier ins Smart Home vordringen können?

Smart Home ist für mich schon fast ein verbrannter Begriff. Der Nutzer assoziiert hiermit doch vor allem die Steuerung von Heizung und Rollladen. Im Prinzip geht es doch um eine Vision in der sich smarte, vernetzte Produkt in ein kontextbasiertes Ökosystem einbetten um den jeweiligen Nutzer in seinem Alltag, nicht nur in seinem Zuhause, Mehrwert mit intelligenten Produkten und Services zu bieten. Für uns fängt das beispielsweise nicht erst beim Starten des Kochprozesses mit Miele-Geräten an, sondern deckt potenziell die komplette „User Journey“ rund um Ernährung (z. B. Inspiration, Einkaufen, Vorratshaltung) und Kochen ab. Natürlich überlegen wir verstärkt, wie Produkte und Services unser existierendes Produktportfolio ergänzen bzw. dem Nutzer zugänglicher machen könnten, beschränken uns aber hierauf nicht. Ein zusätzlicher für uns als Miele essenzieller Aspekt ist allerdings auch die Privatsphäre des Kunden. Bei der Bewertung potenzieller Use-Cases spielt die Privatsphäre unserer Kunden immer eine wichtige Rolle.

Data Science Blog: Die meisten Data-Science-Abteilungen befassen sich eher mit Prozessen, z. B. der Qualitätsüberwachung oder Prozessoptimierung in der Produktion. Sie jedoch nutzen Data Science als Komponente für Produkte. Was gibt es dabei zu beachten?

Kundenbedürfnisse. Wir glauben an nutzerorientierte Produktentwicklung und dementsprechend fängt alles bei uns bei der Identifikation von Bedürfnissen und potenziellen Lösungen hierfür an. Meist starten wir mit „Design Thinking“ um die Themen zu identifizieren, die für den Kunden einen echten Mehrwert bieten. Wenn dann noch Data Science Teil der abgeleiteten Lösung ist, kommen wir verstärkt ins Spiel. Eine wesentliche Herausforderung ist, dass wir oft nicht auf der grünen Wiese starten können. Zumindest wenn es um ein zusätzliches Produktfeature geht, das mit bestehender Gerätehardware, Vernetzungsarchitektur und der daraus resultierenden Datengrundlage zurechtkommen muss. Zwar sind unsere neuen Produktgenerationen „Remote Update“-fähig, aber auch das hilft uns manchmal nur bedingt. Dementsprechend ist die Antizipation von Geräteanforderungen essenziell. Etwas besser sieht es natürlich bei Umsetzungen von cloud-basierten Use-Cases aus.

Data Science Blog: Es heißt häufig, dass Data Scientists kaum zu finden sind. Ist Recruiting für Sie tatsächlich noch ein Thema?

Data Scientists, hier mal nicht interpretiert als Mythos „Unicorn“ oder „Full-Stack“ sind natürlich wichtig, und auch nicht leicht zu bekommen in einer Region wie Gütersloh. Aber Engineers, egal ob Data, ML, Cloud oder Software generell, sind der viel wesentlichere Baustein für uns. Für die Umsetzung von Ideen braucht es nun mal viel Engineering. Es ist mittlerweile hinlänglich bekannt, dass Data Science einen zwar sehr wichtigen, aber auch kleineren Teil des daten-getriebenen Produkts ausmacht. Mal abgesehen davon habe ich den Eindruck, dass immer mehr „Data Science“- Studiengänge aufgesetzt werden, die uns einerseits die Suche nach Personal erleichtern und andererseits ermöglichen Fachkräfte einzustellen die nicht, wie früher einen PhD haben (müssen).

Data Science Blog: Sie haben bereits einige Analysen erfolgreich in Ihre Produkte integriert. Welche Herausforderungen mussten dabei überwunden werden? Und welche haben Sie heute noch vor sich?

Wir sind, wie viele Data-Science-Abteilungen, noch ein relativ junger Bereich. Bei den meisten unserer smarten Produkte und Services stecken wir momentan in der MVP-Entwicklung, deshalb gibt es einige Herausforderungen, die wir aktuell hautnah erfahren. Dies fängt, wie oben erwähnt, bei der Berücksichtigung von bereits vorhandenen Gerätevoraussetzungen an, geht über mitunter heterogene, inkonsistente Datengrundlagen, bis hin zur Etablierung von Data-Science- Infrastruktur und Deploymentprozessen. Aus meiner Sicht stehen zudem viele Unternehmen vor der Herausforderung die Weiterentwicklung und den Betrieb von AI bzw. Data- Science- Produkten sicherzustellen. Verglichen mit einem „fire-and-forget“ Mindset nach Start der Serienproduktion früherer Zeiten muss ein Umdenken stattfinden. Daten-getriebene Produkte und Services „leben“ und müssen dementsprechend anders behandelt und umsorgt werden – mit mehr Aufwand aber auch mit der Chance „immer besser“ zu werden. Deshalb werden wir Buzzwords wie „MLOps“ vermehrt in den üblichen Beraterlektüren finden, wenn es um die nachhaltige Generierung von Mehrwert von AI und Data Science für Unternehmen geht. Und das zu Recht.

Data Science Blog: Data Driven Thinking wird heute sowohl von Mitarbeitern in den Fachbereichen als auch vom Management verlangt. Gerade für ein Traditionsunternehmen wie Miele sicherlich eine Herausforderung. Wie könnten Sie diese Denkweise im Unternehmen fördern?

Data Driven Thinking kann nur etabliert werden, wenn überhaupt der Zugriff auf Daten und darauf aufbauende Analysen gegeben ist. Deshalb ist Daten-Demokratisierung der wichtigste erste Schritt. Aus meiner Perspektive geht es darum initial die Potenziale aufzuzeigen, um dann mithilfe von Daten Unsicherheiten zu reduzieren. Wir haben die Erfahrung gemacht, dass viele Fachbereiche echtes Interesse an einer daten-getriebenen Analyse ihrer Hypothesen haben und dankbar für eine daten-getriebene Unterstützung sind. Miele war und ist ein sehr innovatives Unternehmen, dass „immer besser“ werden will. Deshalb erfahren wir momentan große Unterstützung von ganz oben und sind sehr positiv gestimmt. Wir denken, dass ein Schritt in die richtige Richtung bereits getan ist und mit zunehmender Zahl an Multiplikatoren ein „Data Driven Thinking“ sich im gesamten Unternehmen etablieren kann.

Process Mining Tools – Artikelserie

Process Mining ist nicht länger nur ein Buzzword, sondern ein relevanter Teil der Business Intelligence. Process Mining umfasst die Analyse von Prozessen und lässt sich auf alle Branchen und Fachbereiche anwenden, die operative Prozesse haben, die wiederum über operative IT-Systeme erfasst werden. Um die zunehmende Bedeutung dieser Data-Disziplin zu verstehen, reicht ein Blick auf die Entwicklung der weltweiten Datengenerierung an. Waren es 2010 noch 2 Zettabytes (ZB), sind laut Statista für das Jahr 2020 mehr als 50 ZB an Daten zu erwarten. Für 2025 wird gar mit einem Bestand von 175 ZB gerechnet.

Hier wird das Datenvolumen nach Jahren angezeit

Abbildung 1 zeigt die Entwicklung des weltweiten Datenvolumen (Stand 2018). Quelle: https://www.statista.com/statistics/871513/worldwide-data-created/

Warum jetzt eigentlich Process Mining?

Warum aber profitiert insbesondere Process Mining von dieser Entwicklung? Der Grund liegt in der Unordnung dieser Datenmenge. Die Herausforderung der sich viele Unternehmen gegenübersehen, liegt eben genau in der Analyse dieser unstrukturierten Daten. Hinzu kommt, dass nahezu jeder Prozess Datenspuren in Informationssystemen hinterlässt. Die Betrachtung von Prozessen auf Datenebene birgt somit ein enormes Potential, welches in Anbetracht der Entwicklung zunehmend an Bedeutung gewinnt.

Was war nochmal Process Mining?

Process Mining ist eine Analysemethodik, welche dazu befähigt, aus den abgespeicherten Datenspuren der Informationssysteme eine Rekonstruktion der realen Prozesse zu schaffen. Diese Prozesse können anschließend als Prozessflussdiagramm dargestellt und ausgewertet werden. Die klassischen Anwendungsfälle reichen von dem Aufspüren (Discovery) unbekannter Prozesse, über einen Soll-Ist-Vergleich (Conformance) bis hin zur Anpassung/Verbesserung (Enhancement) bestehender Prozesse. Mittlerweile setzen viele Firmen darüber hinaus auf eine Integration von RPA und Data Science im Process Mining. Und die Analyse-Tiefe wird zunehmen und bis zur Analyse einzelner Klicks reichen, was gegenwärtig als sogenanntes „Task Mining“ bezeichnet wird.

Hier wird ein typischer Process Mining Workflow dargestellt

Abbildung 2 zeigt den typischen Workflow eines Process Mining Projektes. Oftmals dient das ERP-System als zentrale Datenquelle. Die herausgearbeiteten Event-Logs werden anschließend mittels Process Mining Tool visualisiert.

In jedem Fall liegt meistens das Gros der Arbeit auf die Bereitstellung und Vorbereitung der Daten und der Transformation dieser in sogenannte „Event-Logs“, die den Input für die Process Mining Tools darstellen. Deshalb arbeiten viele Anbieter von Process Mining Tools schon länger an Lösungen, um die mit der Datenvorbereitung verbundenen zeit -und arbeitsaufwendigen Schritte zu erleichtern. Während fast alle Tool-Anbieter vorgefertigte Protokolle für Standardprozesse anbieten, gehen manche noch weiter und bieten vollumfängliche Plattform Lösungen an, welche eine effiziente Integration der aufwendigen ETL-Prozesse versprechen. Der Funktionsumfang der Process Mining Tools geht daher mittlerweile deutlich über eine reine Darstellungsfunktion hinaus und deckt ggf. neue Trends sowie optimierte Einsteigerbarrieren mit ab.

Motivation dieser Artikelserie

Die Motivation diesen Artikel zu schreiben liegt nicht in der Erläuterung der Methode des Process Mining. Hierzu gibt es mittlerweile zahlreiche Informationsquellen. Eine besonders empfehlenswerte ist das Buch „Process Mining“ von Will van der Aalst, einem der Urväter des Process Mining. Die Motivation dieses Artikels liegt viel mehr in der Betrachtung der zahlreichen Process Mining Tools am Markt. Sehr oft erlebe ich als Data-Consultant, dass Process Mining Projekte im Vorfeld von der Frage nach dem „besten“ Tool dominiert werden. Diese Fragestellung ist in Ihrer Natur sicherlich immer individuell zu beantworten. Da individuelle Projekte auch einen individuellen Tool-Einsatz bedingen, beschäftige ich mich meist mit einem großen Spektrum von Process Mining Tools. Daher ist es mir in dieser Artikelserie ein Anliegen einen allgemeingültigen Überblick zu den üblichen Process Mining Tools zu erarbeiten. Dabei möchte ich mich nicht auf persönliche Erfahrungen stützen, sondern die Tools anhand von Testdaten einem praktischen Vergleich unterziehen, der für den Leser nachvollziehbar ist.

Um den Umfang der Artikelserie zu begrenzen, werden die verschiedenen Tools nur in Ihren Kernfunktionen angewendet und verglichen. Herausragende Funktionen oder Eigenschaften der jeweiligen Tools werden jedoch angemerkt und ggf. in anderen Artikeln vertieft. Das Ziel dieser Artikelserie soll sein, dem Leser einen ersten Einblick über die am Markt erhältlichen Tools zu geben. Daher spricht dieser Artikel insbesondere Einsteiger aber auch Fortgeschrittene im Process Mining an, welche einen Überblick über die Tools zu schätzen wissen und möglicherweise auch mal über den Tellerand hinweg schauen mögen.

Die Tools

Die Gruppe der zu betrachteten Tools besteht aus den folgenden namenhaften Anwendungen:

Die Auswahl der Tools orientiert sich an den „Market Guide for Process Mining 2019“ von Gartner. Aussortiert habe ich jene Tools, mit welchen ich bisher wenig bis gar keine Berührung hatte. Diese Auswahl an Tools verspricht meiner Meinung nach einen spannenden Einblick von verschiedene Process Mining Tools am Markt zu bekommen.

Die Anwendung in der Praxis

Um die Tools realistisch miteinander vergleichen zu können, werden alle Tools die gleichen Datengrundlage benutzen. Die Datenbasis wird folglich über die gesamte Artikelserie hinweg für die Darstellungen mit den Tools genutzt. Ich werde im nächsten Artikel explizit diese Datenbasis kurz erläutern.

Das Ziel der praktischen Untersuchung soll sein, die Beispieldaten in die verschiedenen Tools zu laden, um den enthaltenen Prozess zu visualisieren. Dabei möchte ich insbesondere darauf achten wie bedienbar und anpassungsfähig/flexibel die Tools mir erscheinen. An dieser Stelle möchte ich eindeutig darauf hinweisen, dass dieser Vergleich und seine Bewertung meine Meinung ist und keineswegs Anspruch auf Vollständigkeit beansprucht. Da der Markt in Bewegung ist, behalte ich mir ferner vor, diese Artikelserie regelmäßig anzupassen.

Die Kriterien

Neben der Bedienbarkeit und der Anpassungsfähigkeit der Tools möchte ich folgende zusätzliche Gesichtspunkte betrachten:

  • Bedienbarkeit: Wie leicht gehen die Analysen von der Hand? Wie einfach ist der Einstieg?
  • Anpassungsfähigkeit: Wie flexibel reagiert das Tool auf meine Daten und Analyse-Wünsche?
  • Integrationsfähigkeit: Welche Schnittstellen bringt das Tool mit? Läuft es auch oder nur in der Cloud?
  • Skalierbarkeit: Ist das Tool dazu in der Lage, auch große und heterogene Daten zu verarbeiten?
  • Zukunftsfähigkeit: Wie steht es um Machine Learning, ETL-Modeller oder Task Mining?
  • Preisgestaltung: Nach welchem Modell bestimmt sich der Preis?

Die Datengrundlage

Die Datenbasis bildet ein Demo-Datensatz der von Celonis für die gesamte Artikelserie netter Weise zur Verfügung gestellt wurde. Dieser Datensatz bildet einen Versand Prozess vom Zeitpunkt des Kaufes bis zur Auslieferung an den Kunden ab. In der folgenden Abbildung ist der Soll Prozess abgebildet.

Hier wird die Variante 1 der Demo Daten von Celonis als Grafik dargestellt

Abbildung 4 zeigt den gewünschten Versand Prozess der Datengrundlage von dem Kauf des Produktes bis zur Auslieferung.

Die Datengrundlage besteht aus einem 60 GB großen Event-Log, welcher lokal in einer Microsoft SQL Datenbank vorgehalten wird. Da diese Tabelle über 600 Mio. Events beinhaltet, wird die Datengrundlage für die Analyse der einzelnen Tools auf einen Ausschnitt von 60 Mio. Events begrenzt. Um die Performance der einzelnen Tools zu testen, wird jedoch auf die gesamte Datengrundlage zurückgegriffen. Der Ausschnitt der Event-Log Tabelle enthält 919 verschiedene Varianten und weisst somit eine ausreichende Komplexität auf, welche es mit den verschiednene Tools zu analysieren gilt.

Folgender Veröffentlichungsplan gilt für diese Artikelserie und wird mit jeder Veröffentlichung verlinkt:

  1. Celonis
  2. PAFnow
  3. MEHRWERK (erscheint demnächst)
  4. Lana Labs (erscheint demnächst)
  5. Signavio (erscheint demnächst)
  6. Process Gold (erscheint demnächst)
  7. Fluxicon Disco (erscheint demnächst)
  8. Aris Process Mining der Software AG (erscheint demnächst)

Severity of lockdowns and how they are reflected in mobility data

The global spread of the SARS-CoV-2 at the beginning of March 2020 forced majority of countries to introduce measures to contain the virus. The governments found themselves facing a very difficult tradeoff between limiting the spread of the virus and bearing potentially catastrophic economical costs of a lockdown. Notably, considering the level of globalization today, the response of countries varied a lot in severity and response latency. In the overwhelming amount of media and social media information feed a lot of misinformation and anecdotal evidence surfaced and remained in people’s mind. In this article, I try to have a more systematic view on the topics of severity of response from governments and change in people’s mobility due to the pandemic.

I want to look at several countries with different approach to restraining the spread of the virus. I will look at governmental regulations, when, and how they were introduced. For that I am referring to an index called Oxford COVID-19 Government Response Tracker (OxCGRT)[1]. The OxCGRT follows, records, and rates the actions taken by governments, that are available publicly. However, looking just at the regulations and taking them for granted does not provide that we have the whole picture. Therefore, equally interesting is the investigation of how the recommended levels of self-isolation and social distancing is reflected in the mobility data and we will look at it first.

The mobility dataset

The mobility data used in this article was collected by Google and made freely accessible[2]. The data reflects how the number of visits and their length changed as compared to a baseline from before the pandemic. The baseline is the median value for the corresponding day of the week in the period from 3.01.2020 – 6.02.2020. The dataset contains data in six categories. Here we look at only 4 of them: public transport stations, places of residence, workplaces, and retail/recreation (including shopping centers, libraries, gastronomy, culture). The analysis intentionally omits parks (public beaches, gardens etc.) and grocery/pharmacy category. Mobility in parks is excluded due to huge weather change confound. The baseline was created in winter and increased/decreased (depending on the hemisphere) activity in parks is expected as the weather changes. It would be difficult to detangle tis change from the change caused by the pandemic without referring to a different baseline. The grocery shops and pharmacies are excluded because the measures regarding the shopping were very similar across the countries.

Amid the Covid-19 pandemic a lot of anecdotal information surfaced, that some countries, like Sweden, acted completely against the current by not introducing a lockdown. It was reported that there were absolutely no restrictions and Sweden can be basically treated as a control group for comparing the different approaches to lockdown on the spread of the coronavirus. Looking at the mobility data (below), we can see however, that there was a change in the mobility of Swedish citizens in comparison to the baseline.

Fig. 1 Moving average (+/- 6 days) of the mobility data in Sweden in four categories.

Fig. 1 Moving average (+/- 6 days) of the mobility data in Sweden in four categories.

Looking at the change in mobility in Sweden, we can see that the change in the residential areas is small, but it is indicating some change in behavior. A change in the retail and recreational sector is more noticeable. Most interestingly it is approaching the baseline levels at the beginning of June. The most substantial changes, however, are in the workplaces and transit categories. They are also much slower to come back to the baseline, although a trend in that direction starts to be visible.

Next, let us have a look at the change in mobility in selected countries, separately for each category. Here, I compare Germany, Sweden, Italy, and New Zealand. (To see the mobility data for other countries visit https://covid19.datanomiq.de/#section-mobility).

Fig. 2 Moving average (+/- 6 days) of the mobility data.

Fig. 2 Moving average (+/- 6 days) of the mobility data.

Looking at the data, we can see that the change in mobility in Germany and Sweden was somewhat similar in orders of magnitude, in comparison to changes in mobility in countries like Italy and New Zealand. Without a doubt, the behavior in Sweden changed the least from the baseline in all the categories. Nevertheless, claiming that people’s reaction to the pandemic in Sweden in Germany were polar opposites is not necessarily correct. The biggest discrepancy between Sweden and Germany is in the retail and recreation sector out of all categories presented. The changes in Italy and New Zealand reached very comparable levels, but in New Zealand they seem to be much more dynamic, especially in approaching the baseline levels again.

The government response dataset

Oxford COVID-19 Government Response Tracker records regulations from number of countries, rates them and categorizes into a few indices. The number between 1 and 100 reflects the level of the action taken by a government. Here, I focus on the Containment and Health sub-index that includes 11 indicators from categories: containment and closure policies and health system policies[3]. The actions included in the index are for example: school and workplace closing, restrictions on public events, travel restrictions, public information campaigns, testing policy and contact tracing.

Below, we look at a plot with the Containment and Health sub-index value for the four aforementioned countries. Data and documentation is available here[4]

Fig. 3 Oxford COVID-19 Government Response Tracker, the Containment and Health sub-index.

Fig. 3 Oxford COVID-19 Government Response Tracker, the Containment and Health sub-index.

Here the difference between Sweden and the other countries that we are looking at becomes more apparent. Nevertheless, the Swedish government did take some measures in order to condemn the spread of the SARS-CoV-2. At the highest, the index reached value 45 points in Sweden, 73 in Germany, 92 in Italy and 94 in New Zealand. In all these countries except for Sweden the index started dropping again, while the drop is the most dynamic in New Zealand and the index has basically reached the level of Sweden.

Conclusions

As we have hopefully seen, the response to the COVID-19 pandemic from governments differed substantially, as well as the resulting change in mobility behavior of the inhabitants did. However, the discrepancies were probably not as big as reported in the media.

The overwhelming presence of the social media could have blown some of the mentioned differences out of proportion. For example, the discrepancy in the mobility behavior between Sweden and Germany was biggest in recreation sector, that involves cafes, restaurants, cultural resorts, and shopping centers. It is possible, that those activities were the ones that people in lockdown missed the most. Looking at Swedes, who were participating in them it was easy to extrapolate on the overall landscape of the response to the virus in the country.

It is very hard to say which of the world country’s approach will bring the best effects for the people’s well-being and the economies. The ongoing pandemic will remain a topic of extensive research for many years to come. We will (most probably) eventually find out which approach to the lockdown was the most optimal (or at least come close to finding out). For the time being, it is however important to remember that there are many factors in play and looking into one type of data might be misleading. Comparing countries with different history, weather, political and economic climate, or population density might be misleading as well. But it is still more insightful than not looking into the data at all.

[1] Hale, Thomas, Sam Webster, Anna Petherick, Toby Phillips, and Beatriz Kira (2020). Oxford COVID-19 Government Response Tracker, Blavatnik School of Government. Data use policy: Creative Commons Attribution CC BY standard.

[2] Google LLC “Google COVID-19 Community Mobility Reports”. https://www.google.com/covid19/mobility/ retrived: 04.06.2020

[3] See documentation https://github.com/OxCGRT/covid-policy-tracker/tree/master/documentation

[4] https://github.com/OxCGRT/covid-policy-tracker  retrieved on 04.06.2020

Capturing COVID: How and Why Data Mining is Being Used to Combat Coronavirus

Image Source: Pixabay (https://pixabay.com/illustrations/artificial-intelligence-brain-think-3382507/)

In just a few short months, the coronavirus pandemic has infiltrated pretty much every aspect of daily life. It has virtually decimated the global economy. It has taken our children out of their schools. It’s wrought havoc on an already overburdened healthcare system.

That, however, is changing. And technology is the reason why. Data mining is nothing new, of course, and its use in the field of healthcare is well-established.

But the importance of data mining has never been more apparent than right now, as scientists, researchers, and healthcare providers race to develop a clear and effective profile of this unseen adversary.

What is Data Mining and Why Does It Matter?

Put simply, data mining uses automated technology to scour other technologies for relevant information collected from the tech’s users. Data scientists then analyze these enormous — and we do mean enormous — quantities of data for some actionable purpose.

Big data can be used for anything from developing a targeted market plan for a large multinational based on customer research to formulating emergency preparedness plans based on community risk assessments to investigating crime scenes.

Data Mining, Healthcare, and Corona

In the face of rising healthcare costs, surging demand, and shrinking resources, data mining has proved an invaluable tool for evidence-based healthcare. For years now, anonymized patient data has been mined to identify public health concerns, individual patient risks, and customized treatment protocols. All of these are derived from the nearly instantaneous automated analysis of literally billions of gigabytes of data.

When it comes to combating coronavirus, data mining is turning out to be one of the most powerful weapons in the public health arsenal. Through healthcare data, researchers and policymakers can better describe the virus, its impacts, and its behaviors.

For example, COVID patients’ electronic health records (EHR) are being anonymized and mined for data on how the virus presented, what course it took, and what pre-existing factors, from age and gender to prior health status, the patient had. Likewise, hospital and clinical data are collected to determine how many patients, and in what demographics, were presenting with symptoms of the disease at any given time.

Once a more comprehensive description of the virus has been developed, researchers can use this information to predict who will be affected, how, and where. Armed with this knowledge, public health officials can make informed decisions on policies to help prevent or slow the spread.

Likewise, healthcare providers can devise more effective treatment plans based on success rates drawn from data accumulated from across the globe. They can even use the information drawn from mined healthcare data to determine who is at great risk for a poor outcome or severe complications, such as blood clots.

For example, these data can help determine who might be the best candidate for convalescent plasma or antivirals like Remdesivir. Scientists and healthcare providers are also increasingly cognizant of the risk of a severe autoimmune syndrome that children who have been exposed to the virus might experience, even if they had never become symptomatic for COVID.

The Really Smartphone

It’s not just patient records and other medical data that are being mined in the fight against coronavirus. As it turns out, your friendly, unassuming little smartphone is proving to be a treasure trove of essential public health data.

Your cell phone data plan allows you to live your digital life via your smartphone. When you’re streaming videos or surfing the web on your phone, you’re almost certainly using data, and that data can be mined — both for malicious (or at least questionable) purposes and for good ones.

When you link your smartphone to the network, your movements can be tracked using your phone’s geolocation capabilities. To be sure, that capability hasn’t gone without significant opposition from privacy advocates. Significant fears over the security of that data and how it might be used has fueled a long and often heated debate, both in courts of law and in the court of public opinion.

But now, in the face of a global pandemic, with the virus continuing to menace nearly every corner of the globe, the capacity to track the movements of those who have been in active hot zones, and especially of travelers coming from them, isn’t just helpful. It’s lifesaving. Through the use of cellphone data, for instance, not only can scientists track the spread of the virus, but they can also engage in more effective contract tracing. This includes the ability to warn individuals who have been in close proximity to an infected person.

The Takeaway

The coronavirus pandemic is like nothing many of us have ever seen before. This previously unknown pathogen has changed the world as we once knew it. It has not only altered the way we live, but it has threatened our own lives and the lives of those we love. But the virus will not be able to exploit its novelty for much longer. Every day, scientists and researchers are mining essential data to better understand the virus, what it does, and how it moves. Every moment, new treatment and containment strategies are emerging based on the power of big data. Every second, we are mining for the data for the weapon that will kill the enemy once and for all.