Posts

Establish a Collaborative Culture – Process Mining Rule 4 of 4

This is article no. 4 of the four-part article series Privacy, Security and Ethics in Process Mining.

Read this article in German:
Datenschutz, Sicherheit und Ethik beim Process Mining – Regel 4 von 4

Perhaps the most important ingredient in creating a responsible process mining environment is to establish a collaborative culture within your organization. Process mining can make the flaws in your processes very transparent, much more transparent than some people may be comfortable with. Therefore, you should include change management professionals, for example, Lean practitioners who know how to encourage people to tell each other “the truth”, in your team.

Furthermore, be careful how you communicate the goals of your process mining project and involve relevant stakeholders in a way that ensures their perspective is heard. The goal is to create an atmosphere, where people are not blamed for their mistakes (which only leads to them hiding what they do and working against you) but where everyone is on board with the goals of the project and where the analysis and process improvement is a joint effort.

Do:

  • Make sure that you verify the data quality before going into the data analysis, ideally by involving a domain expert already in the data validation step. This way, you can build trust among the process managers that the data reflects what is actually happening and ensure that you have the right understanding of what the data represents.
  • Work in an iterative way and present your findings as a starting point for discussion in each iteration. Give people the chance to explain why certain things are happening and let them ask additional questions (to be picked up in the next iteration). This will help to improve the quality and relevance of your analysis as well as increase the buy-in of the process stakeholders in the final results of the project.

Don’t:

  • Jump to conclusions. You can never assume that you know everything about the process. For example, slower teams may be handling the difficult cases, people may deviate from the process for good reasons, and you may not see everything in the data (for example, there might be steps that are performed outside of the system). By consistently using your observations as a starting point for discussion, and by allowing people to join in the interpretation, you can start building trust and the collaborative culture that process mining needs to thrive.
  • Force any conclusions that you expect, or would like to have, by misrepresenting the data (or by stating things that are not actually supported by the data). Instead, keep track of the steps that you have taken in the data preparation and in your process mining analysis. If there are any doubts about the validity or questions about the basis of your analysis, you can always go back and show, for example, which filters have been applied to the data to come to the particular process view that you are presenting.

Privacy, Security and Ethics in Process Mining – Article Series

When I moved to the Netherlands 12 years ago and started grocery shopping at one of the local supermarket chains, Albert Heijn, I initially resisted getting their Bonus card (a loyalty card for discounts), because I did not want the company to track my purchases. I felt that using this information would help them to manipulate me by arranging or advertising products in a way that would make me buy more than I wanted to. It simply felt wrong.

Read this article in German:
Datenschutz, Sicherheit und Ethik beim Process Mining – Artikelserie

The truth is that no data analysis technique is intrinsically good or bad. It is always in the hands of the people using the technology to make it productive and constructive. For example, while supermarkets could use the information tracked through the loyalty cards of their customers to make sure that we have to take the longest route through the store to get our typical items (passing by as many other products as possible), they can also use this information to make the shopping experience more pleasant, and to offer more products that we like.

Most companies have started to use data analysis techniques to analyze their data in one way or the other. These data analyses can bring enormous opportunities for the companies and for their customers, but with the increased use of data science the question of ethics and responsible use also grows more dominant. Initiatives like the Responsible Data Science seminar series [1] take on this topic by raising awareness and encouraging researchers to develop algorithms that have concepts like fairness, accuracy, confidentiality, and transparency built in (see Wil van der Aalst’s presentation on Responsible Data Science at Process Mining Camp 2016).

Process Mining can provide you with amazing insights about your processes, and fuel your improvement initiatives with inspiration and enthusiasm, if you approach it in the right way. But how can you ensure that you use process mining responsibly? What should you pay attention to when you introduce process mining in your own organization?

In this article series, we provide you four guidelines that you can follow to prepare your process mining analysis in a responsible way:

Part 1 of 4: Clarify the Goal of the Analysis

Part 2 of 4: Responsible Handling of Data

Part 3 of 4: Consider Anonymization

Part 4 of 4: Establish a collaborative Culture

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank Frank van Geffen and Léonard Studer, who initiated the first discussions in the workgroup around responsible process mining in 2015. Furthermore, we would like to thank Moe Wynn, Felix Mannhardt and Wil van der Aalst for their feedback on earlier versions of this article.

Datenschutz, Sicherheit und Ethik beim Process Mining – Regel 4 von 4:

Dieser Artikel ist Teil 4 von 4 aus der Reihe Datenschutz, Sicherheit und Ethik beim Process Mining.

english-flagRead this article in English:
Privacy, Security and Ethics in Process Mining – Rule 4 of 4


Schaffung einer Kooperationskultur

Möglicherweise ist der wichtigste Bestandteil bei der Schaffung eines verantwortungsbewussten Process Mining-Umfeldes der Aufbau einer Kooperationskultur innerhalb Ihrer Organisation. Process Mining kann die Fehler Ihrer Prozesse viel eindeutiger aufzeigen, als das manchen Menschen lieb ist. Daher sollten Sie Change Management-Experten miteinbeziehen wie beispielsweise Lean-Coaches, die es verstehen, Menschen dazu zu bewegen, sich gegenseitig “die Wahrheit“ zu sagen (siehe auch: Erfolgskriterien beim Process Mining).

Darüber hinaus sollten Sie vorsichtig sein, wie Sie die Ziele Ihres Process Mining-Projektes vermitteln und relevante Stakeholder so einbeziehen, dass ihre Meinung gehört wird. Ziel ist es, eine Atmosphäre zu schaffen, in der die Menschen nicht für ihre Fehler verantwortlich gemacht werden (was nur dazu führt, dass sie verbergen, was sie tun und gegen Sie arbeiten), sondern ein Umfeld zu schaffen, in dem jeder mitgenommen wird und wo die Analyse und Prozessverbesserung ein gemeinsames Ziel darstellt, für das man sich engagiert.

Was man tun sollte:

  • Vergewissern Sie sich, dass Sie die Datenqualität überprüfen, bevor Sie mit der Datenanalyse beginnen, bestenfalls durch die Einbeziehung eines Fachexperten bereits in der Datenvalidierungsphase. Auf diese Weise können Sie das Vertrauen der Prozessmanager stärken, dass die Daten widerspiegeln, was tatsächlich passiert und sicherstellen, dass Sie verstanden haben, was die Daten darstellen.
  • Arbeiten Sie auf iterative Weise und präsentieren Sie Ihre Ergebnisse als Ausgangspunkt einer Diskussion bei jeder Iteration. Geben Sie allen Beteiligten die Möglichkeit zu erklären, warum bestimmte Dinge geschehen und seien Sie offen für zusätzliche Fragen (die in der nächsten Iteration aufgegriffen werden). Dies wird dazu beitragen, die Qualität und Relevanz Ihrer Analyse zu verbessern, als auch das Vertrauen der Prozessverantwortlichen in die endgültigen Projektergebnisse zu erhöhen.

Was man nicht tun sollte:

  • Voreilige Schlüsse ziehen. Sie können nie davon ausgehen, dass Sie alles über den Prozess wissen. Zum Beispiel können langsamere Teams die schwierigen Fälle behandeln, es kann gute Gründe geben, von dem Standardprozess abzuweichen und Sie sehen möglicherweise nicht alles in den Daten (beispielsweise Vorgänge, die außerhalb des Systems durchgeführt werden). Indem Sie konstant Ihre Beobachtungen als Ausgangspunkt für Diskussionen anbringen und den Menschen die Möglichkeit einräumen, Ihre Erfahrung und Interpretationen mitzugeben, beginnen Sie, Vertrauen und die Kooperationskultur aufzubauen, die Process Mining braucht.
  • Schlussfolgerungen erzwingen, die ihren Erwartungen entsprechen oder die sie haben möchten, indem Sie die Daten falsch darstellen (oder Dinge darstellen, die nicht wirklich durch die Daten unterstützt werden). Führen Sie stattdessen ganz genau Buch über die Schritte, die Sie bei der Datenaufbereitung und in Ihrer Process-Mining-Analyse ausgeführt haben. Wenn Zweifel an der Gültigkeit bestehen oder es Fragen zu Ihrer Analysebasis gibt, dann können Sie stets zurückkehren und beispielsweise zeigen, welche Filter bei den Daten angewendet wurden, um zu der bestimmten Prozesssicht zu gelangen, die Sie vorstellen.