Posts

Process Analytics – Data Analysis for Process Audit & Improvement

Process Mining: Innovative data analysis for process optimization and audit

Step-by-Step: New ways to detect compliance violations with Process Analytics

In the course of the advancing digitization, an enormous upheaval of everyday work is currently taking place to ensure the complete recording of all steps in IT systems. In addition, companies are increasingly confronted with increasingly demanding regulatory requirements on their IT systems.


Read this article in German:
“Process Mining: Innovative Analyse von Datenspuren für Audit und Forensik “


The unstoppable trend towards a connected world will further increase the possibilities of process transparency, but many processes in the company area are already covered by one or more IT systems. Each employee, as well as any automated process, leaves many data traces in IT backend systems, from which processes can be replicated retroactively or in real time. These include both obvious processes, such as the entry of a recorded purchase order or invoice, as well as partially hidden processes, such as the modification of certain entries or deletion of these business objects.

1 Understanding Process Analytics

Process Analytics is a data-driven methodology of the actual process analysis, which originates in forensics. In the wake of the increasing importance of computer crime, it became necessary to identify and analyze the data traces that potential criminals left behind in IT systems in order to reconstruct the event as much as possible.

With the trend towards Big Data Analytics, Process Analytics has not only received new data bases, but has also been further developed as an analytical method. In addition, the visualization enables the analyst or the report recipient to have a deeper understanding of even more complex business processes.

While conventional process analysis primarily involves employee interviews and monitoring of the employees at the desk in order to determine actual processes, Process Analytics is a leading method, which is purely fact-based and thus objectively approaching the processes. It is not the employees who are asked, but the IT systems, which not only store all the business objects recorded in a table-oriented manner, but also all process activities. Every IT system for enterprise purposes log all relevant activities of the whole business process, in the background and invisible to the users, such as orders, invoices or customer orders, with a time stamp.

2 The right choice of the processes to analyze

Today almost every company works with at least one ERP system. As other systems are often used, it is clear which processes can not be analyzed: Those processes, which are still carried out exclusively on paper and in the minds of the employees, which are typical decision-making processes at the strategic level and not logged in IT systems.

Operational processes, however, are generally recorded almost seamlessly in IT systems. Furthermore, almost all operational decisions are recorded by status flags in datasets.

The operational processes, which can be reconstructed and analyzed with Process Mining very well and which are of equal interest from the point of view of compliance, include for example:

– Procurement

– Logistics / Transport

– Sales / Ordering

– Warranty / Claim Management

– Human Resource Management

Process Analytics enables the greatest possible transparency across all business processes, regardless of the sector and the department. Typical case IDs are, for example, sales order number, procurement order number, customer or material numbers.

3 Selection of relevant IT systems

In principle, every IT system used in the company should be examined with regard to the relevance for the process to be analyzed. As a rule, only the ERP system (SAP ERP or others) is relevant for the analysis of the purchasing processes. However, for other process areas there might be other IT systems interesting too, for example separate accounting systems, a CRM or a MES system, which must then also be included.

Occasionally, external data should also be integrated if they provide important process information from externally stored data sources – for example, data from logistics partners.

4 Data Preparation

Before the start of the data-driven process analysis, the data directly or indirectly indicating process activities must be identified, extracted and processed in the data sources. The data are stored in database tables and server logs and are collected via a data warehousing procedure and converted into a process protocol or – also called – event log.

The event log is usually a very large and wide table which, in addition to the actual process activities, also contains parameters which can be used to filter cases and activities. The benefit of this filter option is, for example, to show only process flows where special product groups, prices, quantities, volumes, departments or employee groups are involved.

5 Analysis Execution

The actual inspection is done visually and thus intuitively with an interactive process flow diagram, which represents the actual processes as they could be extracted from the IT systems. The event log generated by the data preparation is loaded into a data visualization software (e.g. Celonis PM Software), which displays this log by using the case IDs and time stamps and transforms this information in a graphical process network. The process flows are therefore not modeled by human “process thinkers”, as is the case with the target processes, but show the real process flows given by the IT systems. Process Mining means, that our enterprise databases “talk” about their view of the process.

The process flows are visualized and statistically evaluated so that concrete statements can be made about the process performance and risk estimations relevant to compliance.

6 Deviation from target processes

The possibility of intuitive filtering of the process presentation also enables an analysis of all deviation of our real process from the desired target process sequences.

The deviation of the actual processes from the target processes is usually underestimated even by IT-affine managers – with Process Analytics all deviations and the general process complexity can now be investigated.

6 Detection of process control violations

The implementation of process controls is an integral part of a professional internal control system (ICS), but the actual observance of these controls is often not proven. Process Analytics allows circumventing the dual control principle or the detection of functional separation conflicts. In addition, the deliberate removal of internal control mechanisms by executives or the incorrect configuration of the IT systems are clearly visible.

7 Detection of previously unknown behavioral patterns

After checking compliance with existing controls, Process Analytics continues to be used to recognize previously unknown patterns in process networks, which point to risks or even concrete fraud cases and are not detected by any control due to their previously unknown nature. In particular, the complexity of everyday process interlacing, which is often underestimated as already mentioned, only reveals fraud scenarios that would previously not have been conceivable.

8 Reporting – also possible in real time

As a highly effective audit analysis, Process Analytics is already an iterative test at intervals of three to twelve months. After the initial implementation, compliance violations, weak or even ineffective controls, and even cases of fraud, are detected reliably. The findings can be used in the aftermath to stop the weaknesses. A further implementation of the analysis after a waiting period makes it possible to assess the effectiveness of the measures taken.

In some application scenarios, the seamless integration of the process analysis with the visual dashboard to the IT system landscape is recommended so that processes can be monitored in near real-time. This connection can also be supplemented by notification systems, so that decision makers and auditors are automatically informed about the latest process bottlenecks or violations via SMS or e-mail.

Fazit

Process Analytics is, in the course of the digitalization, the highly effective methodology from the area of ​​Big Data Analysis for detecting compliance-relevant events throughout the company and also providing visual support for forensic data analysis. Since this is a method, and not a software, an expansion of the IT system landscape, especially for entry, is not absolutely necessary, but can be carried out by internal or external employees at regular intervals.

Process Mining: Innovative Analyse von Datenspuren für Audit und Forensik

Step-by-Step:

Neue Möglichkeiten zur Aufdeckung von Compliance-Verstößen mit Process Analytics

Im Zuge der fortschreitenden Digitalisierung findet derzeit ein enormer Umbruch der alltäglichen Arbeit hin zur lückenlosen Erfassung aller Arbeitsschritte in IT-Systemen statt. Darüber hinaus sehen sich Unternehmen mit zunehmend verschärften Regulierungsanforderungen an ihre IT-Systeme konfrontiert.

Der unaufhaltsame Trend hin zur vernetzten Welt („Internet of Things“) wird die Möglichkeiten der Prozesstransparenz noch weiter vergrößern – jedoch werden bereits jetzt viele Prozesse im Unternehmensbereich über ein oder mehrere IT-Systeme erfasst. Jeder Mitarbeiter, aber auch jeder automatisiert ablaufende Prozess hinterlässt viele Datenspuren in IT-Backend-Systemen, aus denen Prozesse rückwirkend oder in Echtzeit nachgebildet werden können. Diese umfassen sowohl offensichtliche Prozesse, wie etwa den Eintrag einer erfassten Bestellung oder Rechnung, als auch teilweise verborgene Prozesse, wie beispielsweise die Änderung bestimmter Einträge oder Löschung dieser Geschäftsobjekte. 


english-flagRead this article in English:
“Process Analytics – Data Analysis for Process Audit & Improvement”


1 Das Verständnis von Process Analytics

Process Analytics ist eine datengetriebene Methodik der Ist-Prozessanalyse, die ihren Ursprung in der Forensik hat. Im Kern des dieser am Zweck orientierten Analyse steht das sogenannte Process Mining, eine auf die Rekonstruktion von Prozessen ausgerichtetes Data Mining. Im Zuge der steigenden Bedeutung der Computerkriminalität wurde es notwendig, die Datenspuren, die potenzielle Kriminelle in IT-Systemen hinterließen, zu identifizieren und zu analysieren, um das Geschehen so gut wie möglich zu rekonstruieren.

Mit dem Trend hin zu Big Data Analytics hat Process Analytics nicht nur neue Datengrundlagen erhalten, sondern ist als Analysemethode weiterentwickelt worden. Zudem ermöglicht die Visualisierung dem Analysten oder Berichtsempfänger ein tief gehendes Verständnis auch komplexerer Geschäftsprozesse.

Während in der konventionellen Prozessanalyse vor allem Mitarbeiterinterviews und Beobachtung der Mitarbeiter am Schreibtisch durchgeführt werden, um tatsächlich gelebte Prozesse zu ermitteln, ist Process Analytics eine führende Methode, die rein faktenbasiert und damit objektiv an die Prozesse herangeht. Befragt werden nicht die Mitarbeiter, sondern die IT-Systeme, die nicht nur alle erfassten Geschäftsobjekte tabellenorientiert abspeichern, sondern auch im Hintergrund – unsichtbar für die Anwender – jegliche Änderungsvorgänge z. B. an Bestellungen, Rechnungen oder Kundenaufträgen lückenlos mit einem Zeitstempel (oft Sekunden- oder Millisekunden-genau) protokollieren.

2 Die richtige Auswahl der zu betrachtenden Prozesse

Heute arbeitet nahezu jedes Unternehmen mit mindestens einem ERP-System. Da häufig noch weitere Systeme eingesetzt werden, lässt sich klar herausstellen, welche Prozesse nicht analysiert werden können: Solche Prozesse, die noch ausschließlich auf Papier und im Kopf der Mitarbeiter ablaufen, also typische Entscheiderprozesse auf oberster, strategischer Ebene, die nicht in IT-Systemen erfasst und dementsprechend nicht ausgewertet werden können. Operative Prozesse werden hingegen in der Regel nahezu lückenlos in IT-Systemen erfasst und operative Entscheidungen protokolliert.

Zu den operativen Prozessen, die mit Process Analytics sehr gut rekonstruiert und analysiert werden können und gleichermaßen aus Compliance-Sicht von höchstem Interesse sind, gehören beispielsweise Prozesse der:

  • Beschaffung
  • Logistik / Transport
  • Vertriebs-/Auftragsvorgänge
  • Gewährleistungsabwicklung
  • Schadensregulierung
  • Kreditgewährung

Process Analytics bzw. Process Mining ermöglicht unabhängig von der Branche und dem Fachbereich die größtmögliche Transparenz über alle operativen Geschäftsprozesse. Für die Audit-Analyse ist dabei zu beachten, dass jeder Prozess separat betrachtet werden sollte, denn die Rekonstruktion erfolgt anhand von Vorgangsnummern, die je nach Prozess unterschiedlich sein können. Typische Vorgangsnummern sind beispielsweise Bestell-, Auftrags-, Kunden- oder Materialnummern.

3 Auswahl der relevanten IT-Systeme

Grundsätzlich sollte jedes im Unternehmen eingesetzte IT-System hinsichtlich der Relevanz für den zu analysierenden Prozess untersucht werden. Für die Analyse der Einkaufsprozesse ist in der Regel nur das ERP-System (z. B. SAP ERP) von Bedeutung. Einige Unternehmen verfügen jedoch über ein separates System der Buchhaltung (z.B. DATEV) oder ein CRM/SRM (z. B. von Microsoft), die dann ebenfalls einzubeziehen sind.

Bei anderen Prozessen können außer dem ERP-/CRM-System auch Daten aus anderen IT-Systemen eine entscheidende Rolle spielen. Gelegentlich sollten auch externe Daten integriert werden, wenn diese aus extern gelagerten Datenquellen wichtige Prozessinformationen liefern – beispielsweise Daten aus der Logistik.

4 Datenaufbereitung

Vor der datengetriebenen Prozessanalyse müssen die Daten, die auf Prozessaktivitäten direkt oder indirekt hindeuten, in den Datenquellen identifiziert, extrahiert und aufbereitet werden. Die Daten liegen in Datenbanktabellen und Server-Logs vor und werden über ein Data Warehousing Verfahren zusammengeführt und in ein Prozessprotokoll (unter den Process Minern i.d.R. als Event Log bezeichnet) umformuliert.

Das Prozessprotokoll ist in der Regel eine sehr große und breite Tabelle, die neben den eigentlichen Prozessaktivitäten auch Parameter enthält, über die sich Prozesse filtern lassen, beispielsweise Informationen über Produktgruppen, Preise, Mengen, Volumen, Fachbereiche oder Mitarbeitergruppen.

5 Prüfungsdurchführung

Die eigentliche Prüfung erfolgt visuell und somit intuitiv vor einem Prozessflussdiagramm, das die tatsächlichen Prozesse so darstellt, wie sie aus den IT-Systemen extrahiert werden konnten.

Process Mining – Beispielhafter Process Flow mit Fluxicon Disco (www.fluxicon.com)

Das durch die Datenaufbereitung erstellte Prozessprotokoll wird in eine Datenvisualisierungssoftware geladen, die dieses Protokoll über die Vorgangsnummern und Zeitstempel in einem grafischen Prozessnetzwerk darstellt. Die Prozessflüsse werden also nicht modelliert, wie es bei den Soll-Prozessen der Fall ist, sondern es „sprechen“ die IT-Systeme.

Die Prozessflüsse werden visuell dargestellt und statistisch ausgewertet, so dass konkrete Aussagen über die im Hinblick auf Compliance relevante Prozess-Performance und -Risiken getroffen werden können.

6 Abweichung von Soll-Prozessen

Die Möglichkeit des intuitiven Filterns der Prozessdarstellung ermöglicht auch die gezielte Analyse von Ist-Prozessen, die von den Soll-Prozessverläufen abweichen.

Die Abweichung der Ist-Prozesse von den Soll-Prozessen wird in der Regel selbst von IT-affinen Führungskräften unterschätzt – mit Process Analytics lassen sich nun alle Abweichungen und die generelle Prozesskomplexität auf ihren Daten basierend untersuchen.

6 Erkennung von Prozesskontrollverletzungen

Die Implementierung von Prozesskontrollen sind Bestandteil eines professionellen Internen Kontrollsystems (IKS), die tatsächliche Einhaltung dieser Kontrollen in der Praxis ist jedoch häufig nicht untersucht oder belegt. Process Analytics ermöglicht hier die Umgehung des Vier-Augen-Prinzips bzw. die Aufdeckung von Funktionstrennungskonflikten. Zudem werden auch die bewusste Außerkraftsetzung von internen Kontrollmechanismen durch leitende Mitarbeiter oder die falsche Konfiguration der IT-Systeme deutlich sichtbar.

7 Erkennung von bisher unbekannten Verhaltensmustern

Nach der Prüfung der Einhaltung bestehender Kontrollen, also bekannter Muster, wird Process Analytics weiterhin zur Neuerkennung von bislang unbekannten Mustern in Prozessnetzwerken, die auf Risiken oder gar konkrete Betrugsfälle hindeuten und aufgrund ihrer bisherigen Unbekanntheit von keiner Kontrolle erfasst werden, genutzt. Insbesondere durch die – wie bereits erwähnt – häufig unterschätzte Komplexität der alltäglichen Prozessverflechtung fallen erst durch diese Analyse Fraud-Szenarien auf, die vorher nicht denkbar gewesen wären. An dieser Stelle erweitert sich die Vorgehensweise des Process Mining um die Methoden des maschinellen Lernens (Machine Learning), typischerweise unter Einsatz von Clustering, Klassifikation und Regression.

8 Berichterstattung – auch in Echtzeit möglich

Als hocheffektive Audit-Analyse ist Process Analytics bereits als iterative Prüfung in Abständen von drei bis zwölf Monaten ausreichend. Nach der erstmaligen Durchführung werden bereits Compliance-Verstöße, schwache oder gar unwirksame Kontrollen und gegebenenfalls sogar Betrugsfälle zuverlässig erkannt. Die Erkenntnisse können im Nachgang dazu genutzt werden, um die Schwachstellen abzustellen. Eine weitere Durchführung der Analyse nach einer Karenzzeit ermöglicht dann die Beurteilung der Wirksamkeit getroffener Maßnahmen.

In einigen Anwendungsszenarien ist auch die nahtlose Anbindung der Prozessanalyse mit visuellem Dashboard an die IT-Systemlandschaft zu empfehlen, so dass Prozesse in nahezu Echtzeit abgebildet werden können. Diese Anbindung kann zudem um Benachrichtigungssysteme ergänzt werden, so dass Entscheider und Revisoren via SMS oder E-Mail automatisiert über aktuellste Prozessverstöße informiert werden. Process Analytics wird somit zum Realtime Analytics.

Fazit

Process Analytics ist im Zuge der Digitalisieurng die hocheffektive Methodik aus dem Bereich der Big Data Analyse zur Aufdeckung Compliance-relevanter Tatbestände im gesamten Unternehmensbereich und auch eine visuelle Unterstützung bei der forensischen Datenanalyse.

 

Establish a Collaborative Culture – Process Mining Rule 4 of 4

This is article no. 4 of the four-part article series Privacy, Security and Ethics in Process Mining.

Read this article in German:
Datenschutz, Sicherheit und Ethik beim Process Mining – Regel 4 von 4

Perhaps the most important ingredient in creating a responsible process mining environment is to establish a collaborative culture within your organization. Process mining can make the flaws in your processes very transparent, much more transparent than some people may be comfortable with. Therefore, you should include change management professionals, for example, Lean practitioners who know how to encourage people to tell each other “the truth”, in your team.

Furthermore, be careful how you communicate the goals of your process mining project and involve relevant stakeholders in a way that ensures their perspective is heard. The goal is to create an atmosphere, where people are not blamed for their mistakes (which only leads to them hiding what they do and working against you) but where everyone is on board with the goals of the project and where the analysis and process improvement is a joint effort.

Do:

  • Make sure that you verify the data quality before going into the data analysis, ideally by involving a domain expert already in the data validation step. This way, you can build trust among the process managers that the data reflects what is actually happening and ensure that you have the right understanding of what the data represents.
  • Work in an iterative way and present your findings as a starting point for discussion in each iteration. Give people the chance to explain why certain things are happening and let them ask additional questions (to be picked up in the next iteration). This will help to improve the quality and relevance of your analysis as well as increase the buy-in of the process stakeholders in the final results of the project.

Don’t:

  • Jump to conclusions. You can never assume that you know everything about the process. For example, slower teams may be handling the difficult cases, people may deviate from the process for good reasons, and you may not see everything in the data (for example, there might be steps that are performed outside of the system). By consistently using your observations as a starting point for discussion, and by allowing people to join in the interpretation, you can start building trust and the collaborative culture that process mining needs to thrive.
  • Force any conclusions that you expect, or would like to have, by misrepresenting the data (or by stating things that are not actually supported by the data). Instead, keep track of the steps that you have taken in the data preparation and in your process mining analysis. If there are any doubts about the validity or questions about the basis of your analysis, you can always go back and show, for example, which filters have been applied to the data to come to the particular process view that you are presenting.

Privacy, Security and Ethics in Process Mining – Article Series

When I moved to the Netherlands 12 years ago and started grocery shopping at one of the local supermarket chains, Albert Heijn, I initially resisted getting their Bonus card (a loyalty card for discounts), because I did not want the company to track my purchases. I felt that using this information would help them to manipulate me by arranging or advertising products in a way that would make me buy more than I wanted to. It simply felt wrong.

Read this article in German:
Datenschutz, Sicherheit und Ethik beim Process Mining – Artikelserie

The truth is that no data analysis technique is intrinsically good or bad. It is always in the hands of the people using the technology to make it productive and constructive. For example, while supermarkets could use the information tracked through the loyalty cards of their customers to make sure that we have to take the longest route through the store to get our typical items (passing by as many other products as possible), they can also use this information to make the shopping experience more pleasant, and to offer more products that we like.

Most companies have started to use data analysis techniques to analyze their data in one way or the other. These data analyses can bring enormous opportunities for the companies and for their customers, but with the increased use of data science the question of ethics and responsible use also grows more dominant. Initiatives like the Responsible Data Science seminar series [1] take on this topic by raising awareness and encouraging researchers to develop algorithms that have concepts like fairness, accuracy, confidentiality, and transparency built in (see Wil van der Aalst’s presentation on Responsible Data Science at Process Mining Camp 2016).

Process Mining can provide you with amazing insights about your processes, and fuel your improvement initiatives with inspiration and enthusiasm, if you approach it in the right way. But how can you ensure that you use process mining responsibly? What should you pay attention to when you introduce process mining in your own organization?

In this article series, we provide you four guidelines that you can follow to prepare your process mining analysis in a responsible way:

Part 1 of 4: Clarify the Goal of the Analysis

Part 2 of 4: Responsible Handling of Data

Part 3 of 4: Consider Anonymization

Part 4 of 4: Establish a collaborative Culture

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank Frank van Geffen and Léonard Studer, who initiated the first discussions in the workgroup around responsible process mining in 2015. Furthermore, we would like to thank Moe Wynn, Felix Mannhardt and Wil van der Aalst for their feedback on earlier versions of this article.

Datenschutz, Sicherheit und Ethik beim Process Mining – Regel 4 von 4:

Dieser Artikel ist Teil 4 von 4 aus der Reihe Datenschutz, Sicherheit und Ethik beim Process Mining.

english-flagRead this article in English:
Privacy, Security and Ethics in Process Mining – Rule 4 of 4


Schaffung einer Kooperationskultur

Möglicherweise ist der wichtigste Bestandteil bei der Schaffung eines verantwortungsbewussten Process Mining-Umfeldes der Aufbau einer Kooperationskultur innerhalb Ihrer Organisation. Process Mining kann die Fehler Ihrer Prozesse viel eindeutiger aufzeigen, als das manchen Menschen lieb ist. Daher sollten Sie Change Management-Experten miteinbeziehen wie beispielsweise Lean-Coaches, die es verstehen, Menschen dazu zu bewegen, sich gegenseitig “die Wahrheit“ zu sagen (siehe auch: Erfolgskriterien beim Process Mining).

Darüber hinaus sollten Sie vorsichtig sein, wie Sie die Ziele Ihres Process Mining-Projektes vermitteln und relevante Stakeholder so einbeziehen, dass ihre Meinung gehört wird. Ziel ist es, eine Atmosphäre zu schaffen, in der die Menschen nicht für ihre Fehler verantwortlich gemacht werden (was nur dazu führt, dass sie verbergen, was sie tun und gegen Sie arbeiten), sondern ein Umfeld zu schaffen, in dem jeder mitgenommen wird und wo die Analyse und Prozessverbesserung ein gemeinsames Ziel darstellt, für das man sich engagiert.

Was man tun sollte:

  • Vergewissern Sie sich, dass Sie die Datenqualität überprüfen, bevor Sie mit der Datenanalyse beginnen, bestenfalls durch die Einbeziehung eines Fachexperten bereits in der Datenvalidierungsphase. Auf diese Weise können Sie das Vertrauen der Prozessmanager stärken, dass die Daten widerspiegeln, was tatsächlich passiert und sicherstellen, dass Sie verstanden haben, was die Daten darstellen.
  • Arbeiten Sie auf iterative Weise und präsentieren Sie Ihre Ergebnisse als Ausgangspunkt einer Diskussion bei jeder Iteration. Geben Sie allen Beteiligten die Möglichkeit zu erklären, warum bestimmte Dinge geschehen und seien Sie offen für zusätzliche Fragen (die in der nächsten Iteration aufgegriffen werden). Dies wird dazu beitragen, die Qualität und Relevanz Ihrer Analyse zu verbessern, als auch das Vertrauen der Prozessverantwortlichen in die endgültigen Projektergebnisse zu erhöhen.

Was man nicht tun sollte:

  • Voreilige Schlüsse ziehen. Sie können nie davon ausgehen, dass Sie alles über den Prozess wissen. Zum Beispiel können langsamere Teams die schwierigen Fälle behandeln, es kann gute Gründe geben, von dem Standardprozess abzuweichen und Sie sehen möglicherweise nicht alles in den Daten (beispielsweise Vorgänge, die außerhalb des Systems durchgeführt werden). Indem Sie konstant Ihre Beobachtungen als Ausgangspunkt für Diskussionen anbringen und den Menschen die Möglichkeit einräumen, Ihre Erfahrung und Interpretationen mitzugeben, beginnen Sie, Vertrauen und die Kooperationskultur aufzubauen, die Process Mining braucht.
  • Schlussfolgerungen erzwingen, die ihren Erwartungen entsprechen oder die sie haben möchten, indem Sie die Daten falsch darstellen (oder Dinge darstellen, die nicht wirklich durch die Daten unterstützt werden). Führen Sie stattdessen ganz genau Buch über die Schritte, die Sie bei der Datenaufbereitung und in Ihrer Process-Mining-Analyse ausgeführt haben. Wenn Zweifel an der Gültigkeit bestehen oder es Fragen zu Ihrer Analysebasis gibt, dann können Sie stets zurückkehren und beispielsweise zeigen, welche Filter bei den Daten angewendet wurden, um zu der bestimmten Prozesssicht zu gelangen, die Sie vorstellen.