Geschriebene Artikel über Big Data Analytics

My elaborate study notes on reinforcement learning

I will not tell you why, but all of a sudden I was in need of writing an article series on Reinforcement Learning. Though I am also a beginner in reinforcement learning field. Everything I knew was what I learned from one online lecture conducted in a lazy tone in my college. However in the process of learning reinforcement learning, I found a line which could connect the two dots, one is reinforcement learning and the other is my studying field. That is why I made up my mind to make an article series on reinforcement learning seriously.

To be a bit more concrete, I imagine that technologies in our world could be enhanced by a combination of reinforcement learning and virtual reality. That means companies like Toyota or VW might come to invest on visual effect or video game companies more seriously in the future. And I have been actually struggling with how to train deep learning with cgi, which might bridge the virtual world and the real world.

As I am also a beginner in reinforcement learning, this article series would a kind of study note for me. But as I have been doing in my former articles, I prefer exhaustive but intuitive explanations on AI algorithms, thus I will do my best to make my series as instructive and effective as existing tutorial on reinforcement learning.

This article is going to be composed of the following contents.

  • Understanding the “simplicity” of reinforcement learning: comprehensive tips to take the trouble out of RL (coming soon!)
  • The ethereal beauty of future prediction: dynamic programming and the Bellman equation (coming soon!)
  • How computers “experience” things: model-free reinforcement learning and temporal difference (coming soon!)
  • Reality will become a simulation of virtual reality: algorithms of board game AI and transfer learning (coming soon!)
  • A thaw in another winter of artificial intelligence: uses of deep learning in reinforcement learning (coming soon!)

In this article I would like to share what I have learned about RL, and I hope you could get some hints of learning this fascinating field. In case you have any comments or advice on my “study note,” leaving a comment or contacting me via email would be appreciated.

How to Successfully Perform a Data Quality Assessment (DQA)

People generate 2.5 quintillion bytes of data every single day. That’s 1.7 megabytes generated every second for each of the 7.8 billion residents of Earth. A lot of that information is junk that somebody can easily discard, but just as much can prove to be vital. How do you tell the difference?

According to industry experts, poor quality information costs the U.S. economy upwards of $3.1 trillion annually. That is why data quality assessments (DQAs) are so important.

A Brief Explanation of Data Quality Assessments

With companies around the globe generating massive amounts of data every second of the day, it’s essential to have tools that help you sort through it all. Data quality assessments are usually carried out by software programmed with a predefined set of rules. They can compare the incoming information to those guidelines and provide reports.

This is a simplified explanation, but the goal of these DQA programs is to separate the wheat from the chaff. They eliminate any unnecessary or redundant data, leaving only the highest quality information.

The biggest challenge here is figuring who will determine what is considered quality. Data quality depends on three things: the individual or team that creates the requirements, how they complete that task, and how flexible the program meets those obligations.

How to Perform a DQA

Once you have your DQA program in place, performing an assessment is relatively simple. The challenge lies in establishing the program. The first step is to determine the scope of the data you’re trying to assess. The details of this step will depend on your system and the amount of information you have to sort through. You can set up a program to assess a single data point at a time, but if your system generates a lot of info, this isn’t effective from an efficiency standpoint.

Define your scope carefully to ensure the program does the job correctly without wasting time sorting through bytes one at a time.

Now that you have a framework to work from, you can move on to monitoring and cleansing data. Analyze your information against the scope and details you’ve established. Validate each point against your existing statistical measures, and determine its quality.

Next, ensure all the data requirements are available and correctly formatted. You may wish to provide training for any new team members entering information to ensure it’s in a format that the DQA system can understand.

Finally, make it a point to verify that your data is consistent with the rules you’ve established, as well as your business goals. DQAs aren’t a one-and-done kind of program. Monitoring needs to be an ongoing process to prevent things from falling through the cracks and keeping bad information from potentially costing you millions of dollars.

Benefits of DQA

A data quality assessment has various benefits, both on the commercial and consumer side of your business. Accuracy is essential. It’s valuable for marketers who purchase demographic data, with 84% stating it plays a large role in their purchase decisions. Targeted marketing is one of the most popular forms of advertisement, and while it’s not always practical, its efficacy drops even further if the demographic data is incorrect.

High-quality data should be accurate, complete, relevant, valid, timely and consistent. Maintaining frequent and comprehensive quality assessments can help you do that and more. The goal of collecting this information is to produce results. The higher quality your data is, the easier and faster your system will work, with better results than you might manage without DQAs.

Data Quality Assessment vs. Data Profiling

When talking about data quality, you’ll often see the terms assessment and profiling used interchangeably. While the concepts are similar, they are not the same. Data profiling is a valuable tool for setting up your quality assessment program, giving you the information you’ll need to build your program in the future. It isn’t a step you can perform independently and expect to get the same results.

If you don’t already have a DQA in place, start with profiling to create the foundation for a comprehensive data quality assessment program.

The Growing Importance of Data Quality

Data quality has always been important. However, as the population generates more information every year, learning how to separate value from junk is more critical than ever.

Coffee Shop Location Predictor

As part of this article, we will explore the main steps involved in predicting the best location for a coffee shop in Vancouver. We will also take into consideration that the coffee shop is near a transit station, and has no Starbucks near it. Well, while at it, let us also add an extra feature where we make sure the crime in the area is lower.

Introduction

In this article, we will highlight the main steps involved to predict a location for a coffee shop in Vancouver. We also want to make sure that the coffee shop is near a transit station, and has no Starbucks near it. As an added feature, we will make sure that the crime concentration in the area is low, and the entire program should be implemented in Python. So let’s walk through the steps.

Steps Required

  • Get crime history for the last two years
  • Get locations of all transit stations and Starbucks in Vancouver
  • Check all the transit stations that do not have any Starbucks near them
  • Get all the data regarding crimes near the filtered transit stations
  • Create a grid of all possible coordinates around the transit station
  • Check crime around each created coordinate and display the top 5 locations.

Gathering Data

This covers the first two steps required to get data from the internet, both manually and automatically.

Getting all Crime History

We can get crime history for the past 14 years in Vancouver from here. This data is in raw crime.csv format, so we have to process it and filter out useless data. We then write this processed information on the crime_processed.csv file.

Note: There are 530,653 records of crime in this file

In this program, we will just use the type and coordinate of the crime. There are many crime types, but we have classified them into three major categories namely;

Theft (red), Break and Enter (orange) and Mischief (green)

These all crimes can be plotted on Graph as displayed below.

This may seem very congested and full, so let’s see a closeup image for future references.

Getting Locations of all Rapid Transit Stations

We can get the coordinates of all Transit Stations in Vancouver from here. This dataset has all coordinates of rapid transit stations in three transit lines in Vancouver. There are a total of 23 of them in Vancouver, we can then use it for further processing.

Getting Locations of all Starbucks

The Starbucks data is present here, we can scrape it easily and get the locations of all the Starbucks in Vancouver. We just need the Starbucks that is near transit stations, so we’ll filter out the rest. There are a total 24 Starbucks in Vancouver, and 10 of them are near Transit Stations.

Note: Other than the coordinates of Transit Stations and Starbucks, we also need coordinates and type of the crime.

Transit Stations with no Starbucks

As we have all the data required, now moving to the next step. We need to get to the transit Station locations that have no Starbucks near them. For that we can create an area of particular radius around each Transit Station. Then check all Starbucks locations with respect to them, whether they are within that area or not.

If none of the Starbucks are within that particular Transit Station’s area, we can append it to a list. At the end, we have a list of all Transit locations with no Starbucks near them. There are a total of 6 Transit Stations with no Starbucks near them.

Crime near Transit Stations

Now lets filter out all crime records and get just what we are interested in, which means the crime near Transit stations. For that we will plot an area of specific radius around each of them to see the crimes. These are more than 110,000 crime records.

Crime near located Transit Stations

Now that we have all the Transit Stations that don’t have any Starbucks near them and also the crime near all Transit Stations. So, let’s use this information and get crime near the located Transit Stations. These are about 44,000 crime records.

This may seem correct at first glance, but the points are overlapping due to abundance, so we can create different lists of crimes based on their types.

Theft

Break and Enter

Mischief

Generating all possible coordinates

Now finally, we have all the prerequisites and let’s get to the main task at hand, predicting the best coordinate for the coffee shop.

There may be many approaches to solve this problem, but the one I used in this program is that I will create a grid of all possible locations (coordinates) in the area of 1 km radius around each located transit station.

Initially I generated 1 coordinate for every m, this resulted in 1000,000 coordinates in every km. This is a huge number, and for the 6 located Transit stations, it becomes 6 Million. It may not seem much at first glance because computers can handle such data in a few seconds.

But for location prediction we need to compare each coordinate with crime coordinates. As the algorithm has to check for ~7,000 Thefts, ~19,000 Break ins, and ~17,000 Mischiefs around each generated coordinate. Computing this would want the program to process an estimate of 432.4 Billion times. This sort of execution takes many hours on normal computers (sometimes days).

The solution to this is to create a coordinate for each 10 m area, this results about 10,000 coordinate per km. For the above mentioned number of crimes, the estimated processes will be several Billions. That would significantly reduce the time, but is still not less.

To control this, we can remove the duplicate values in crime coordinates and those which are too close to each other ~1m. Doing so, we are left with just 816 Thefts, 2,654 Break ins, and 8,234 Mischiefs around each generated coordinate.
The precision will not be affected much but the time and computational resources required will be reduced a lot.

 

Checking Crime near Generated coordinates

Now that we have all the locations, we will start some processing on it and check each coordinate against some constraints. That are respectively;

  1. Filter out Coordinates having Theft near 1 km
    We get 122,000 coordinates with no Thefts (Below merged 1000 to 1)
  2. Filter out Coordinates having Break Ins near 200m
    We get 8000 coordinates with no Thefts (Below merged 1000 to 1)
  3. Filter out Coordinates having Mischief near 200m
    We get 6000 coordinates with no Thefts (Below merged 1000 to 1)
    Now that we have 6 Coordinates of best locations that have passed through all the constraints, we will order them.To order them, we will check their distance from the nearest transit location. The nearest will be on top of the list as the best possible location, then the second and so on. The generated List is;

    1. -123.0419406741792, 49.24824259252004
    2. -123.05887151659479, 49.24327221040713
    3. -123.05287151659476, 49.24327221040713
    4. -123.04994067417924, 49.239242592520064
    5. -123.0419406741792, 49.239242592520064
    6. -123.0409406741792, 49.239242592520064

How can MindTrades help?

MindTrades Consulting Services, a leading marketing agency provides in-depth analysis and insights for the global IT sector including leading data integration brands such as Diyotta. From Cloud Migration, Big Data, Digital Transformation, Agile Deliver, Cyber Security, to Analytics- Mind trades provides published breakthrough ideas, and prompt content delivery. For more information, refer to mindtrades.com.

Code

https://github.com/Mindtrades-Consulting/Coffee-Shop-Location-Predictor

 

What Is Data Lake Architecture?

The volume of information produced by everyone in the world is growing exponentially. To put it in perspective, it’s estimated that by 2023 the big data analytics market will reach $103 billion.

Finding probable solutions for storing big data is a challenge. It’s no easy task to hold enormous amounts of information, clean it and transform it into understandable subsets — it’s best to take one step at a time.

Some reasons why companies access their big data is to:

  • Improve their consumer experience
  • Draw conclusions and make data-driven decisions
  • Identify potential problems
  • Create innovative products

There are ways to help define big data. Combining its characteristics with storage management methods help experts make their clients’ information digestible and understandable. Cue data lakes, which are repositories for big data in its native form.

Think of an actual lake with multiple water sources around the perimeter flowing into it. Picture these as three types of data: structured, semi-structured and unstructured. All this information can remain in a data lake and be accessed in its raw form at any time, making it an attractive storage method.

Here’s how data lakes are created, some of their components and how to avoid common pitfalls.

Creating a Data Lake

One benefit of creating and implementing a data lake is that structuring becomes much more manageable.  Pulling necessary information from a lake allows analysts to compare and contrast data and communicate any connections between datasets to their client.

There are four steps to follow when setting up a data lake:

  1. Choosing a software solution: Microsoft, Amazon and Google are cloud vendors that allow developers to create data lakes without using servers.
  2. Identifying where data is sourced: Where is your information coming from? Once sources are identified, determine how your data will be cleaned or transformed.
  3. Defining process and automation: It’s vital to outline how information should be processed once the data lake ingests it. This creates consistency for businesses.
  4. Establishing retrieval governance: Choosing who has access to what types of information is crucial for companies with multiple locations and departments. It helps with overall organization. Data scientists, for this reason, primarily access data lakes.

The next step would be to determine the extract, transform and load (ETL) process. ETL creates visual interpretations of data to provide context to businesses. When information from a data lake is sent to a warehouse, it can be analyzed.

Components of a Data Lake

Here is what happens to information once a data lake is created:

  • Collection: Data comes in from various sources.
  • Ingestion: Data is processed using management software.
  • Blending: Data is combined from multiple sources.
  • Transformation: Data is analyzed and made sense of.
  • Publication: Data can be used to drive business decisions.

There are other aspects of a data lake to keep in mind. These are the critical components that help provide business solutions:

  • Security: Data lakes require security to protect information — they do not have built-in safety measures.
  • Governance: Determine who can check on the quality of data and perform measurements.
  • Metadata: This provides information about other data to improve understanding.
  • Stewardship: Choose one or more employees to take on the responsibility of managing data.
  • Monitoring: Employ other software to perform the ETL process.

Big data lends itself to incorporating multiple processes to make it usable for companies. The volume of information one company produces is massive — to manage it, experts need to consider these components and steps when building a data lake.

What to Avoid When Using Data Lakes

The last thing people want for their data lake is to see it turn into a swamp. When big data is processed incorrectly, its value decreases, making it useless to the business sourcing it.

The first step in avoiding a common pitfall is to consider the sustainability of the data lake. Planning processes are necessary to ensure it’s secure, and governing and regulating incoming information will allow for long-term use.

A lack of security causes another problem that can arise in data lakes. Safety measures must be implemented. Because enterprises will build data lakes for different purposes, it’s easy for information to become unorganized and vulnerable to hacking. With security, the likelihood of data breaches decreases, and the quality of data remains high.

The most important thing to remember about data lakes is the planning stage. Without proper preparation, they tend to be overwhelming due to their size and complexity. Taking the time and care to establish the processes ahead of time is vital.

Using Data Lake Architecture for Business

Data lakes store massive amounts of information to be used later on to create subsets, analyze metadata and more. Their advantages allow businesses to be flexible, save money and have access to raw information at all times.

Artikelserie: BI Tools im Vergleich – Qlik Sense

Dies ist ein Artikel der Artikel-Serie “BI Tools im Vergleich – Einführung und Motivation“, zu der auch die vorab sehr lesenswerten einführenden Worte und die Ausführungen zur Datenbasis gehören. Auf Grundlage derselben Daten wurde analog zu diesem Artikel hier auch ein Artikel über Microsoft Power BI und einen zu Tableau.

Übrigens gibt es auch Erweiterungen für Qlik Sense, die Process Mining ermöglichen. Eine dieser Erweiterungen ist die von MEHRWERK Process Mining.

Lizenzmodell

Neben Qlik Sense gibt es auch das lang bewährte Qlik View, dass auf der gleichen In-Memory-Kerntechnologie basiert. Qlik Sense wurde im Jahr 2014 vom schwedischen Softwareunternehmen Qlik Tech herausgebracht und bei Qlik Sense liegt auch der Fokus der Weiterentwicklung. Es handelt sich um Self-Service-BI und eine Plattform für Visual Data Analysis. Dabei gibt es die Möglichkeit einer On Premise Server Version (interne Cloud) oder auf die Server von Qlik zu setzen und somit gänzlich auf die Qlik Sense Cloud zu setzen, also die Qlik Sense Cloud als SaaS-Lösung. Dazu gibt es noch Qlik Sense Desktop, das für kleinere Projekte ausreichen kann und ganz ohne die Cloud auskommt, jedoch Ergebnisse bei Bedarf in die Cloud publishen kann. Ähnlich wie bei Tableau und anders als derzeitig bei Power BI, wird für das Editieren von Apps/Dashboards jedoch kein Qlik Sense Desktop benötigt, denn das Erstellen, Bearbeiten und Verwalten von Qlik Sense Reports darf komplett in der Cloud (vom Browser aus) stattfinden.

Der Kunde hat die Wahl zwischen den Lizenzmodellen von Qlik Sense Business (SaaS) und Qlik Sense Enterprise (SaaS oder On Premise). Die Enterprise Variante ist dann noch mal in Enterprise Professional, Enterprise Analyzer und Enterprise Analyzer Capacity eingeteilt, es stehen also insgesamt drei Lizenzen zur Auswahl. Der Preis für Qlik Sense Business beträgt monatlich derzeitig $30 pro Anwender. Das offizielle Preismodell sieht für Enterprise Professionell $70 für einen Benutzer pro Monat vor und für Enterprise Analyzer $40 pro Benutzer pro Monat. Zum Kennenlernen der Business Version gibt eine kostenlose 30-Tage-Testversion.

Die Version Qlik Sense Desktop ist in der Funktionalität an der SaaS Lösung Qlik Sense Enterprise angepasst und steht ihr in nichts Essenziellem nach. Die Desktop Version kann nur auf Windows-Computern ausgeführt werden und die Verwendung mehrerer Bildschirme oder Tablets wird nicht unterstützt. Außerdem werden Sicherheitsfunktionen nicht unterstützt und es gibt keine Funktion zum automatischen Speichern. Mehr zu den Unterschieden hier.

Community & Features von anderen Entwicklern

Wie relevant die Community für Visualisierungstools ist, wurde bereits in den vorherigen Blogartikeln zu Power BI und Tableau beschrieben. Auch Qlik besitzt eine offizielle Community Seite, in der u. a. Diskussionen, Blogs und Support angeboten werden. Auch hier finden sich zu den meisten Problemstellungen eine Menge Lösungsansätze. Zudem bietet Qlik auf den offiziellen Webseiten auch sehr viele Lernvideos an, mit denen sich Neulinge einarbeiten und fortgeschrittene Anwender auch noch einiges erfahren können.

Neben den zahlreichen Visualisierungen können auch weitere Diagramme hinzugefügt werden. Im Qlik Sense Desktop werden bei Arbeitsblatt im Reiter Benutzerdefinierte Objekte zwei Bundles mitgeliefert. Hier können auch Erweiterungen importiert werden. Ein bekanntes Bundle ist die Vizlib, welches hier unterschiedliche Packages zur Verfügung stellt. Diese Erweiterungen können einfach importiert werden, indem die heruntergeladenen Verzeichnisse in den Qlik Sense Extensions Ordner eingefügt werden. Wem auch die Erweiterungen nicht ausreichen, der kann sogenannte Widgets erstellen. Diese werden in HTML und CSS geschrieben, daher ist ein gewisses Grundverständnis vorausgesetzt. Diese Widgets können auf Qlik Sense Funktionalitäten zugreifen und diese per Klick ausführen. So kann bspw. ein Button zum Entfernen aller gesetzten Filter erstellt werden.

Erstellung von Filtern in Qlik Sense

Daten laden & transformieren

Flexibler als die meisten Vergleichstools ist Qlik in der Verknüpfung von Datenquellen. Es werden Hunderte von Datenquellen angeboten, durch die der Anwender Zugriff auf seine Daten erhalten kann. Die von Qlik entwickelte Associate Engine beschleunig die Verarbeitung von verknüpften Daten. Die Anbindung von Cloudanwendungen steht hier im Vordergrund, aber es werden natürlich auch klassische Datenbanken, Textfiles usw. angeboten.

Nachdem die Daten geladen sind, befindet sich im Dateneditor unter dem Reiter auto generated selection eine automatisch generierte Query für den Ladevorgang. Dieses „Datenladeskript“ kann angelegt, bearbeitet und ausgeführt werden. Im Reiter „Main“ befinden sich hier vordefinierte Variableneinstellungen, wie z. B. SET ThousandSep=’.’; wobei auch diese angepasst und erweitert werden können. Zudem gibt es die Möglichkeit, das Datenmodell mit allen Tabellenverbindungen anzeigen zu lassen. Die große Qlik-Community und die Tutorials ermöglicht es jedem Nutzer, die vielen Möglichkeiten mit Qlik Script zügig aus dem Internet zu erlernen.

Daten laden & transformieren: AdventureWorks2017Dataset

Im Reiter Datenmanager werden die empfohlenen Verknüpfungen angezeigt. Diese sind für Einsteiger sehr nützlich. Im Verlauf der Analysen musste jedoch nachjustiert werden. Wenn die ID-Spalten zum Verknüpfen z. B. unterschiedliche Bezeichnungen haben, tut sich der Algorithmus schon mal schwer.

Abbildung eines Datenmodels in Qlik Sense. Zusehen sind die Verbindungen zwischen den Tabellen der Datenbank “AdventureWorks2016”.

Eine vom Tool vordefinierte Detailansicht in Form einer Visualisierung (siehe Screenshot) ermöglicht einen schnellen und einfachen Qualitätscheck der gerade erst geladenen Daten. Hier können die Verbindungen angepasst und neue erstellt werden. Hier können erste Datentransformation durchgeführt werden, z. B. die Ersetzung von Daten oder NULL-Werten.

Datentransformationen mit einfachen Eingabemasken – Hier: Ersetzen von Werten in Tabellen-Spalten.

Zudem können Felder hinzugefügt, also berechnet werden (ähnlich wie in Power BI und Tableau als neues Measure). Z. B. können Textwerte mit dem Operator „&“ verbunden und somit z. B. Vor- und Nachname ganz intuitiv in eine Spalte zusammengefügt werden. Außerdem gibt es mathematische Operatoren für Berechnungen und ein SQL-artiges „like“, um Zeichenfolgen mit Mustern zu vergleichen. Auch an dieser Stelle können Formeln eingegeben werden. Die Formeln umfassen hier: String-, Datums-, numerische, Bedingungs-, mathematische, Verteilungsfunktionen usw. Zu beachten ist hier, dass die Daten neu geladen werden müssen, um die berechneten Spalten zu updaten. Der Umgang mit den Formeln aber erscheint mir einfacher als z. B. mit DAX in Power BI.

Daten visualisieren

Dank einer benutzerfreundlichen Oberfläche sind auch Analysen ohne großes Vorwissen und per Drag and Drop möglich. Individuelle Dashboards sind in wenigen Schritten möglich und erfordern keine besonderen Tricks oder Kniffe um gleich zum Erfolg zu kommen. Die Datenvisualisierung erfolgt in sogenannten Apps, in denen die Dashboards (Seiten in der App) liegen. Diese können von Qlik Sense Desktop nach Qlik Cloud hochgeladen werden und von dort aus mit anderen Usern geteilt werden.

Qlik Sense enthält von Hause aus eine große Anzahl an Visualisierungsmöglichkeiten. „Entdecken Sie neue Einblicke in ihre Daten“ heißt es bei der Funktion namens Einblicke (Insights), denn hier wird der Zugriff auf die Qlik Cognitive Engine gewährt. Dabei kann der Anwender eine Frage an den sogenannten Insight Advisor in natürlicher Sprache formulieren, woraus dann AI-gestützte Dashboard-Vorschläge generiert werden. Auch wenn diese Funktion noch nicht vollkommen ausgereift erscheint, ist dies sicherlich ein Schritt in die Business Intelligence der Zukunft.

Qlik Sense Insights – Einblicke gewinnen mit Stichworten in menschlicher Sprache. Funktioniert mal besser, mal schlechter. Die Titel der Diagramme sind (in Qlik Sense stets per default) die Formeln der Darstellung. Diese lassen sich leicht umbenennen.

Diese Diagrammvorschläge können einen guten ersten Eindruck über verschiedene Dimensionen und Kennzahlen geben und die Diagramme können direkt zu den Arbeitsblättern hinzugefügt werden. Es können auch Fragen gestellt werden, die Berechnungen zur Grundlage haben. So wird im folgenden Beispiel die Korrelation zwischen zwei Kennzahlen ermittelt.

Qlik Sense Insights – Korrelation erstellt mit Anweisung auf Englisch

Den ersten Auftritt hatte die Cognitive Engine im April 2018 und der Insight Advisor im Juni 2018. Über den Insight Adviser werden auch die empfohlenen Verknüpfungen im Datenmanager generiert, diese sollten jedoch vom Anwender (z. B. BI-Developer, Data Analyst oder Data Engineer) jedoch nochmal überblickt werden, da diese nicht unbedingt fehlerfrei abläuft. Gerade in vielen Geschäftsdaten verstecken sich viele “falsche Freunde” unter den ID-Spalten-Benennungen, die einen Zusammenhang herzustellen scheinen – aber es nicht immer tun.

Diagramme können ansonsten auf übliche Weise über eine Paletten ausgewählt werden, um sie dann mit Kennzahlen und Dimensionen zu befüllen. Die Charts können mit vordefinierten Optionen in den Kategorien Daten, Sortieren, Darstellung usw. bearbeitet werden. Unter Darstellung können ggf. verschiedene Designs ausgewählt werden und Beschriftungen, Titel etc. angepasst werden. Die Felder zur Auswahl der Kennzahlen und Dimensionen können nach Tabelle ausgewählt werden, sie sind ansonsten alle in einer Liste und können über eine Suchfunktion schnell gefunden werden, vorausgesetzt die genaue Bezeichnung ist bekannt. Diese Suchfunktion wird auch an anderen Stellen angewandt, immer dann, wenn Felder ausgewählt werden.

Es gibt außerdem die Option „Master-Elemente“, um wieder verwendbare Dimensionen oder Kennzahlen (Measures) zu erstellen.

Hier können Berechnungen für Kennzahlen und Dimensionen hinterlegt und in jedem Arbeitsblatt wiederverwendet werden. Dies gilt auch für Visualisierungen und die damit verbundenen Dateninputs und Einstellungen.

Mit Drag and Drop stößt der Anwender hier schon mal an seine Grenzen, aber dann helfen die Formeln von Qlik Sense Script weiter. Wenn bspw. das Diagramm namens KPI eine Kennzahl mit Filterung nach einer Dimension anzeigen soll, hilft die Formel: Sum({<DimensionName={‘Value’}>} MeasureName. Eine Qlik Sense Formelsammlung ist hier zu finden. Jede Kennzahl und Dimension kann als Formel eingegeben werden. Im Formel bearbeiten – Editor werden auch schon gebräuchliche Berechnungen wie Aggregierungsfunktionen (Sum, Avg, Max usw.) und Distinct, vorgegeben und können auf Knopfdruck und ohne Coding generiert werden, ähnliche wie ein Quick Measure in Power BI.

Fazit

Das Finanzmodell ist auf jede Unternehmensgröße ausgerichtet. Wenn die Datenbereinigung im Vorfeld stattgefunden hat, sind Visualisierungen in wenigen Schritten möglich. Es gibt dabei die Möglichkeit, die Daten in gewissem Rahmen zu transformieren. Für die gewünschte Darstellung der Kennzahlen ist die Verwendung von Qlik Sense Script oftmals erforderlich, jedoch kommen Anfänger auch lange ohne Coding aus. Insgesamt bewerte ich die Nutzerfreundlichkeit auf Grund der intuitiveren Bedienung subjektiv höher als bei Tableau oder Power BI.

Es können Erweiterungen und Widgets zur tiefgründigen Dashboard Erstellung und Analyse genutzt werden. Es gibt viele Drag and Drop Funktionen, um die Dashboards zusammen zu ziehen. Die Erstellung einfacher Berichte erfordert keinen Entwickler oder einen gut ausgebildeten Data Analyst, dennoch werden Unternehmen bei größeren Vorhaben auf Grund der Komplexität von Unternehmensprozessen, die in der Business Intelligence darzustellen versucht werden, nicht um geschultes Personal herum kommen, wofür es viele Angebote an Trainings auch von Qlik-Partnern gibt. Die Schnelligkeit der Datenverarbeitung liegt dank der Associative Engine im Vergleich zu den anderen beiden Tools vorne. AI-gestützte Vorschläge können bei der Dashboard-Erstellung zusätzliche Unterstützung leisten. Die Kombination beider Komponenten, Schnelligkeit und Ai-gestützte Vorschläge des Insight Advisors, grenzt das Qlik Sense Tool zwar nicht so sehr von den anderen Anbietern ab, wie Qlik gerne hätte…. Dennoch ist Qlik Sense auch heute noch ein Tool, dass für Ad-Hoc-Analytics wie Business Intelligence mit Standard Reporting in Erwägung gezogen werden sollte.

How Microsoft Azure Is Impacting Financial Companies

Microsoft Azure has taken a large chunk of the cloud marketplace, transforming companies with the speed and security of the cloud. Microsoft has over the years used Azure to cushion companies against risk, deal with fraud and differentiate their customer experience. 

With Microsoft Cloud App Security, customers experience 75% automatic threat elimination because of increased visibility and automated threat protection. With all these and more amazing benefits of using Azure, its market share is bound to increase even more over the coming years.

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Financial companies have not been left behind by the Azure bandwagon. The financial industry is using Microsoft Azure to enhance its core functionsinvest money by making informed decisions, and minimize risk while maximizing returns. 

Azure facilitates these core functions by helping with the storage of huge amounts of data—  some dating back to decades ago—, data retrieval and data security. 

It also helps financial companies to keep up with regulatory compliance.

Microsoft Azure is not the only cloud services provider. But here’s why it is the most outstanding when it comes to helping financial companies achieve their business goals.

Azure Offers Hybrid and Multi-Cloud Computing for Financial Companies

The financial services industry is extremely dynamic. Organizations offering financial services have to constantly test the market and come up with new and innovative products and services. 

They are also often under pressure to extend their services across borders. Remember they have to do all of this while at the same time managing their existing customers, containing their risk, and dealing with fraud.

Financial regulations also keep changing. As financial companies increasingly embrace new technology for their services— including intelligent cloud computing— and they have to comply with industry regulations. They cannot afford to leave loopholes as they take on their journey with the cloud.

The financial services industry is highly competitive and keeps up with modernity. These companies have had to resort to the dynamic hybrid, multi-cloud computing, and public cloud strategies to keep up with the trend.

This is how a hybrid cloud model worksit enables existing on-premises applications to be extended through a connection to the public cloud. 

This allows financial companies to enjoy the speed, elasticity, and scale of the public cloud without necessarily having to remodel their entire applications. These organizations are afforded the flexibility of deciding what parts of their application remains in an existing data center and which one resides in the cloud.

Cloud computing with Azure allows financial organizations to operate more efficiently by providing end-to-end protection to information, allowing the digitization of financial services, and providing data security. 

Data security is particularly important to financial firms because they are often targeted by fraudsters and cyber threats. They, therefore, need to protect crucial information which they achieve by authenticating their data centers using Azure.

Here’s why financial companies cannot think of doing without Azure’s hybrid cloud computing even for just a day.

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  • The ability to expand their geographic reach

Azure enables financial companies to establish data centers in new locations to meet globally growing demand. This allows them to open and explore new markets. They can then use Azure DevOps pipelines to maintain their data factories and keep everything consistent.

  • Consistent Infrastructure management

The hybrid cloud model promotes a consistent approach to infrastructure management across all locations, whether it is on-premises, public cloud, or the edge.

  • Increased Elasticity

Financial firms and banks utilizing Azure services can respond with great agility to transactional changes or changes in demand by provisioning or de-provisioning as the situation at hand demands. 

In cases where the organization requires high computation such as complex risk modeling, a hybrid strategy allows it to expand its capacity beyond its data center without overwhelming its servers.

  • Flexibility

A hybrid strategy allows financial organizations to choose cloud services that fall within their budget, match their needs, and suit their features.

  • Data security and enhanced regulatory compliance

Hybrid and multi-cloud strategies are a superb alternative for strictly on-premises strategies when one considers resiliency, data portability, and data security.

  • Reduces CapEx Expenses

Managing on-premises infrastructure is expensive. Financial companies utilizing Azure do not need to spend large amounts of money setting them up and managing them. 

With the increased elasticity of the hybrid system, financial organizations only pay for the resources they actually use, at a relatively lower cost.

Financial Organizations Have Access to an Analytics Platform

As we mentioned earlier, financial companies have the core function of making financial decisions in order to invest money and gain maximum returns at the least possible risk. 

Having been entrusted with their customers’ assets, the best way to ensure success in making profits is by using an analytics system.

Getting the form of analytics that helps with solving this investment problem is the kind of headache that does not go away by taking a tablet of ibuprofen and a glass of waterintegrating data is not an easy task. Besides, building a custom analytics solution from scratch is quite expensive.

Luckily for financial companies, Azure has a dedicated analytics platform for the financial services industry. It is custom-made just for these types of organizations. 

Their system is quite intuitive and easy to use. Companies not only get to save the resources they would have otherwise used to build a custom solution, but they get to learn about their investment risks and get instant results at cloud speed. 

They can mitigate against negatively impactful market occurrences and gain profits even when operating in adverse market conditions.

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Financial Companies Get Advanced Data Management

Good analytics goes hand-in-hand with a great data management system. Financial companies need to have good data, create an organized data warehouse, and have a secure data storage system.

In addition to storing your data, Microsoft Azure ensures your storage can be optimized to support advanced applications, for example, machine learning and forecasting. 

Azure even allows you to compress and store documents for long periods of time when you write the data to Microsoft Azure Blob Storage. These documents can be retrieved anytime when the need arises for auditors’, regulators’, and lawyers’ perusal. 

Conclusion

Microsoft has over time managed to gain the trust of many industries, the financial services industry inclusive. Using its cloud computing giant, Azure, it has empowered these companies to carry out their functions efficiently and at the lowest cost and risk possible.

Azure’s hybrid cloud computing strategy has made financial operations flexible, opened doors for financial companies to establish their services in multiple locations, and provided them with consistent infrastructure management, among many other benefits.

With their futuristic model and commitment to growth, it’s only prudent to assume that Microsoft Azure will continue carrying the mantle as the best cloud services provider in the financial services industry.

Rethinking linear algebra part two: ellipsoids in data science

*This is the fourth article of my article series “Illustrative introductions on dimension reduction.”

1 Our expedition of eigenvectors still continues

This article is still going to be about eigenvectors and PCA, and this article still will not cover LDA (linear discriminant analysis). Hereby I would like you to have more organic links of the data science ideas with eigenvectors.

In the second article, we have covered the following points:

  • You can visualize linear transformations with matrices by calculating displacement vectors, and they usually look like vectors swirling.
  • Diagonalization is finding a direction in which the displacement vectors do not swirl, and that is equal to finding new axis/basis where you can describe its linear transformations more straightforwardly. But we have to consider diagonalizability of the matrices.
  • In linear dimension reduction such as PCA or LDA, we mainly use types of matrices called positive definite or positive semidefinite matrices.

In the last article we have seen the following points:

  • PCA is an algorithm of calculating orthogonal axes along which data “swell” the most.
  • PCA is equivalent to calculating a new orthonormal basis for the data where the covariance between components is zero.
  • You can reduced the dimension of the data in the new coordinate system by ignoring the axes corresponding to small eigenvalues.
  • Covariance matrices enable linear transformation of rotation and expansion and contraction of vectors.

I emphasized that the axes are more important than the surface of the high dimensional ellipsoids, but in this article let’s focus more on the surface of ellipsoids, or I would rather say general quadratic curves. After also seeing how to draw ellipsoids on data, you would see the following points about PCA or eigenvectors.

  • Covariance matrices are real symmetric matrices, and also they are positive semidefinite. That means you can always diagonalize covariance matrices, and their eigenvalues are all equal or greater than 0.
  • PCA is equivalent to finding axes of quadratic curves in which gradients are biggest. The values of quadratic curves increases the most in those directions, and that means the directions describe great deal of information of data distribution.
  • Intuitively dimension reduction by PCA is equal to fitting a high dimensional ellipsoid on data and cutting off the axes corresponding to small eigenvalues.

Even if you already understand PCA to some extent, I hope this article provides you with deeper insight into PCA, and at least after reading this article, I think you would be more or less able to visually control eigenvectors and ellipsoids with the Numpy and Maplotlib libraries.

*Let me first introduce some mathematical facts and how I denote them throughout this article in advance. If you are allergic to mathematics, take it easy or please go back to my former articles.

  • Any quadratic curves can be denoted as \boldsymbol{x}^T A\boldsymbol{x} + 2\boldsymbol{b}^T\boldsymbol{x} + s = 0, where \boldsymbol{x}\in \mathbb{R}^D , A \in \mathbb{R}^{D\times D} \boldsymbol{b}\in \mathbb{R}^D s\in \mathbb{R}.
  • When I want to clarify dimensions of variables of quadratic curves, I denote parameters as A_D, b_D.
  • If a matrix A is a real symmetric matrix, there exist a rotation matrix U such that U^T A U = \Lambda, where \Lambda = diag(\lambda_1, \dots, \lambda_D) and U = (\boldsymbol{u}_1, \dots , \boldsymbol{u}_D). \boldsymbol{u}_1, \dots , \boldsymbol{u}_D are eigenvectors corresponding to \lambda_1, \dots, \lambda_D respectively.
  • PCA corresponds to a case of diagonalizing A where A is a covariance matrix of certain data. When I want to clarify that A is a covariance matrix, I denote it as A=\Sigma.
  • Importantly covariance matrices \Sigma are positive semidefinite and real symmetric, which means you can always diagonalize \Sigma and any of their engenvalues cannot be lower than 0.

*In the last article, I denoted the covariance of data as S, based on Pattern Recognition and Machine Learning by C. M. Bishop.

*Sooner or later you are going to see that I am explaining basically the same ideas from different points of view, using the topic of PCA. However I believe they are all important when you learn linear algebra for data science of machine learning. Even you have not learnt linear algebra or if you have to teach linear algebra, I recommend you to first take a review on the idea of diagonalization, like the second article. And you should be conscious that, in the context of machine learning or data science, only a very limited type of matrices are important, which I have been explaining throughout this article.

2 Rotation or projection?

In this section I am going to talk about basic stuff found in most textbooks on linear algebra. In the last article, I mentioned that if A is a real symmetric matrix, you can diagonalize A with a rotation matrix U = (\boldsymbol{u}_1 \: \cdots \: \boldsymbol{u}_D), such that U^{-1}AU = U^{T}AU =\Lambda, where \Lambda = diag(\lambda_{1}, \dots , \lambda_{D}). I also explained that PCA is a case where A=\Sigma, that is, A is the covariance matrix of certain data. \Sigma is known to be positive semidefinite and real symmetric. Thus you can always diagonalize \Sigma and any of their engenvalues cannot be lower than 0.

I think we first need to clarify the difference of rotation and projection. In order to visualize the ideas, let’s consider a case of D=3. Assume that you have got an orthonormal rotation matrix U = (\boldsymbol{u}_1 \: \boldsymbol{u}_2 \: \boldsymbol{u}_3) which diagonalizes A. In the last article I said diagonalization is equivalent to finding new orthogonal axes formed by eigenvectors, and in the case of this section you got new orthonoramal basis (\boldsymbol{u}_1, \boldsymbol{u}_2, \boldsymbol{u}_3) which are in red in the figure below. Projecting a point \boldsymbol{x} = (x, y, z) on the new orthonormal basis is simple: you just have to multiply \boldsymbol{x} with U^T. Let U^T \boldsymbol{x} be (x', y', z')^T, and then \left( \begin{array}{c} x' \\ y' \\ z' \end{array} \right) = U^T\boldsymbol{x} = \left( \begin{array}{c} \boldsymbol{u}_1^{T}\boldsymbol{x} \\ \boldsymbol{u}_2^{T}\boldsymbol{x} \\ \boldsymbol{u}_3^{T}\boldsymbol{x} \end{array} \right). You can see x', y', z' are \boldsymbol{x} projected on \boldsymbol{u}_1, \boldsymbol{u}_2, \boldsymbol{u}_3 respectively, and the left side of the figure below shows the idea. When you replace the orginal orthonormal basis (\boldsymbol{e}_1, \boldsymbol{e}_2, \boldsymbol{e}_3) with (\boldsymbol{u}_1, \boldsymbol{u}_2, \boldsymbol{u}_3) as in the right side of the figure below, you can comprehend the projection as a rotation from (x, y, z) to (x', y', z') by a rotation matrix U^T.

Next, let’s see what rotation is. In case of rotation, you should imagine that you rotate the point \boldsymbol{x} in the same coordinate system, rather than projecting to other coordinate system. You can rotate \boldsymbol{x} by multiplying it with U. This rotation looks like the figure below.

In the initial position, the edges of the cube are aligned with the three orthogonal black axes (\boldsymbol{e}_1,  \boldsymbol{e}_2 , \boldsymbol{e}_3), with one corner of the cube located at the origin point of those axes. The purple dot denotes the corner of the cube directly opposite the origin corner. The cube is rotated in three dimensions, with the origin corner staying fixed in place. After the rotation with a pivot at the origin, the edges of the cube are now aligned with a new set of orthogonal axes (\boldsymbol{u}_1,  \boldsymbol{u}_2 , \boldsymbol{u}_3), shown in red. You might understand that more clearly with an equation: U\boldsymbol{x} = (\boldsymbol{u}_1 \: \boldsymbol{u}_2 \: \boldsymbol{u}_3) \left( \begin{array}{c} x \\ y \\ z \end{array} \right) = x\boldsymbol{u}_1 + y\boldsymbol{u}_2 + z\boldsymbol{u}_3. In short this rotation means you keep relative position of \boldsymbol{x}, I mean its coordinates (x, y, z), in the new orthonormal basis. In this article, let me call this a “cube rotation.”

The discussion above can be generalized to spaces with dimensions higher than 3. When U \in \mathbb{R}^{D \times D} is an orthonormal matrix and a vector \boldsymbol{x} \in \mathbb{R}^D, you can project \boldsymbol{x} to \boldsymbol{x}' = U^T \boldsymbol{x}or rotate it to \boldsymbol{x}'' = U \boldsymbol{x}, where \boldsymbol{x}' = (x_{1}', \dots, x_{D}')^T and \boldsymbol{x}'' = (x_{1}'', \dots, x_{D}'')^T. In other words \boldsymbol{x} = U \boldsymbol{x}', which means you can rotate back \boldsymbol{x}' to the original point \boldsymbol{x} with the rotation matrix U.

I think you at least saw that rotation and projection are basically the same, and that is only a matter of how you look at the coordinate systems. But I would say the idea of projection is more important through out this article.

Let’s consider a function f(\boldsymbol{x}; A) = \boldsymbol{x}^T A \boldsymbol{x} = (\boldsymbol{x}, A \boldsymbol{x}), where A\in \mathbb{R}^{D\times D} is a real symmetric matrix. The distribution of f(\boldsymbol{x}; A) is quadratic curves whose center point covers the origin, and it is known that you can express this distribution in a much simpler way using eigenvectors. When you project this function on eigenvectors of A, that is when you substitute U \boldsymbol{x}' for \boldsymbol{x}, you get f = (\boldsymbol{x}, A \boldsymbol{x}) =(U \boldsymbol{x}', AU \boldsymbol{x}') = (\boldsymbol{x}')^T U^TAU \boldsymbol{x}' = (\boldsymbol{x}')^T \Lambda \boldsymbol{x}' = \lambda_1 ({x'}_1)^2 + \cdots + \lambda_D ({x'}_D)^2. You can always diagonalize real symmetric matrices, so the formula implies that the shapes of quadratic curves largely depend on eigenvectors. We are going to see this in detail in the next section.

*(\boldsymbol{x}, \boldsymbol{y}) denotes an inner product of \boldsymbol{x} and \boldsymbol{y}.

*We are going to see details of the shapes of quadratic “curves” or “functions” in the next section.

To be exact, you cannot naively multiply U or U^T for rotation. Let’s take a part of data I showed in the last article as an example. In the figure below, I projected data on the basis (\boldsymbol{u}_1,  \boldsymbol{u}_2 , \boldsymbol{u}_3).

You might have noticed that you cannot do a “cube rotation” in this case. If you make the coordinate system (\boldsymbol{u}_1, \boldsymbol{u}_2, \boldsymbol{u}_3) with your left hand, like you might have done in science classes in school to learn Fleming’s rule, you would soon realize that the coordinate systems in the figure above do not match. You need to flip the direction of one axis to match them.

Mathematically, you have to consider the determinant of the rotation matrix U. You can do a “cube rotation” when det(U)=1, and in the case above det(U) was -1, and you needed to flip one axis to make the determinant 1. In the example in the figure below, you can match the basis. This also can be generalized to higher dimensions, but that is also beyond the scope of this article series. If you are really interested, you should prepare some coffee and snacks and textbooks on linear algebra, and some weekends.

When you want to make general ellipsoids in a 3d space on Matplotlib, you can take advantage of rotation matrices. You first make a simple ellipsoid symmetric about xyz axis using polar coordinates, and you can rotate the whole ellipsoid with rotation matrices. I made some simple modules for drawing ellipsoid. If you put in a rotation matrix which diagonalize the covariance matrix of data and a list of three radiuses \sqrt{\lambda_1}, \sqrt{\lambda_2}, \sqrt{\lambda_3}, you can rotate the original ellipsoid so that it fits the data well.

3 Types of quadratic curves.

*This article might look like a mathematical writing, but I would say this is more about computer science. Please tolerate some inaccuracy in terms of mathematics. I gave priority to visualizing necessary mathematical ideas in my article series. If you are not sure about details, please let me know.

In linear dimension reduction, or at least in this article series you mainly have to consider ellipsoids. However ellipsoids are just one type of quadratic curves. In the last article, I mentioned that when the center of a D dimensional ellipsoid is the origin point of a normal coordinate system, the formula of the surface of the ellipsoid is as follows: (\boldsymbol{x}, A\boldsymbol{x})=1, where A satisfies certain conditions. To be concrete, when (\boldsymbol{x}, A\boldsymbol{x})=1 is the surface of a ellipsoid, A has to be diagonalizable and positive definite.

*Real symmetric matrices are diagonalizable, and positive definite matrices have only positive eigenvalues. Covariance matrices \Sigma, whose displacement vectors I visualized in the last two articles, are known to be symmetric real matrices and positive semi-defintie. However, the surface of an ellipsoid which fit the data is \boldsymbol{x}^T \Sigma ^{-1} \boldsymbol{x} = const., not \boldsymbol{x}^T \Sigma \boldsymbol{x} = const..

*You have to keep it in mind that \boldsymbol{x} are all deviations.

*You do not have to think too much about what the “semi” of the term “positive semi-definite” means fow now.

As you could imagine, this is just one simple case of richer variety of graphs. Let’s consider a 3-dimensional space. Any quadratic curves in this space can be denoted as ax^2 + by^2 + cz^2 + dxy + eyz + fxz + px + qy + rz + s = 0, where at least one of a, b, c, d, e, f, p, q, r, s is not 0.  Let \boldsymbol{x} be (x, y, z)^T, then the quadratic curves can be simply denoted with a 3\times 3 matrix A and a 3-dimensional vector \boldsymbol{b} as follows: \boldsymbol{x}^T A\boldsymbol{x} + 2\boldsymbol{b}^T\boldsymbol{x} + s = 0, where A = \left( \begin{array}{ccc} a & \frac{d}{2} & \frac{f}{2} \\ \frac{d}{2} & b & \frac{e}{2} \\ \frac{f}{2} & \frac{e}{2} & c \end{array} \right), \boldsymbol{b} = \left( \begin{array}{c} \frac{p}{2} \\ \frac{q}{2} \\ \frac{r}{2} \end{array} \right). General quadratic curves are roughly classified into the 9 types below.

You can shift these quadratic curves so that their center points come to the origin, without rotation, and the resulting curves are as follows. The curves can be all denoted as \boldsymbol{x}^T A\boldsymbol{x}.

As you can see, A is a real symmetric matrix. As I have mentioned repeatedly, when all the elements of a D \times D symmetric matrix A are real values and its eigen values are \lambda_{i} (i=1, \dots , D), there exist orthogonal/orthonormal matrices U such that U^{-1}AU = \Lambda, where \Lambda = diag(\lambda_{1}, \dots , \lambda_{D}). Hence, you can diagonalize the A = \left( \begin{array}{ccc} a & \frac{d}{2} & \frac{f}{2} \\ \frac{d}{2} & b & \frac{e}{2} \\ \frac{f}{2} & \frac{e}{2} & c \end{array} \right) with an orthogonal matrix U. Let U be an orthogonal matrix such that U^T A U = \left( \begin{array}{ccc} \alpha  & 0 & 0 \\ 0 & \beta & 0 \\ 0 & 0 & \gamma \end{array} \right) =\left( \begin{array}{ccc} \lambda_1  & 0 & 0 \\ 0 & \lambda_2 & 0 \\ 0 & 0 & \lambda_3 \end{array} \right). After you apply rotation by U to the curves (a)” ~ (i)”, those curves are symmetrically placed about the xyz axes, and their center points still cross the origin. The resulting curves look like below. Or rather I should say you projected (a)’ ~ (i)’ on their eigenvectors.

In this article mainly (a)” , (g)”, (h)”, and (i)” are important. General equations for the curves is as follows

  • (a)”: \frac{x^2}{l^2} + \frac{y^2}{m^2} + \frac{z^2}{n^2} = 1
  • (g)”: z = \frac{x^2}{l^2} + \frac{y^2}{m^2}
  • (h)”: z = \frac{x^2}{l^2} - \frac{y^2}{m^2}
  • (i)”: z = \frac{x^2}{l^2}

, where l, m, n \in \mathbb{R}^+.

Even if this section has been puzzling to you, you just have to keep one point in your mind: we have been discussing general quadratic curves, but in PCA, you only need to consider a case where A is a covariance matrix, that is A=\Sigma. PCA corresponds to the case where you shift and rotate the curve (a) into (a)”. Subtracting the mean of data from each point of data corresponds to shifting quadratic curve (a) to (a)’. Calculating eigenvectors of A corresponds to calculating a rotation matrix U such that the curve (a)’ comes to (a)” after applying the rotation, or projecting curves on eigenvectors of \Sigma. Importantly we are only discussing the covariance of certain data, not the distribution of the data itself.

*Just in case you are interested in a little more mathematical sides: it is known that if you rotate all the points \boldsymbol{x} on the curve \boldsymbol{x}^T A\boldsymbol{x} + 2\boldsymbol{b}^T\boldsymbol{x} + s = 0 with the rotation matrix P, those points \boldsymbol{x} are mapped into a new quadratic curve \alpha x^2 + \beta y^2 + \gamma z^2 + \lambda x + \mu y + \nu z + \rho = 0. That means the rotation of the original quadratic curve with P (or rather rotating axes) enables getting rid of the terms xy, yz, zx. Also it is known that when \alpha ' \neq 0, with proper translations and rotations, the quadratic curve \alpha x^2 + \beta y^2 + \gamma z^2 + \lambda x + \mu y + \nu z + \rho = 0 can be mapped into one of the types of quadratic curves in the figure below, depending on coefficients of the original quadratic curve. And the discussion so far can be generalized to higher dimensional spaces, but that is beyond the scope of this article series. Please consult decent textbooks on linear algebra around you for further details.

4 Eigenvectors are gradients and sometimes variances.

In the second section I explained that you can express quadratic functions f(\boldsymbol{x}; A) = \boldsymbol{x}^T A \boldsymbol{x} in a very simple way by projecting \boldsymbol{x} on eigenvectors of A.

You can comprehend what I have explained in another way: eigenvectors, to be exact eigenvectors of real symmetric matrices A, are gradients. And in case of PCA, I mean when A=\Sigma eigenvalues are also variances. Before explaining what that means, let me explain a little of the totally common facts on mathematics. If you have variables \boldsymbol{x}\in \mathbb{R}^D, I think you can comprehend functions f(\boldysmbol{x}) in two ways. One is a normal “functions” f(\boldsymbol{x}), and the others are “curves” f(\boldsymbol{x}) = const.. “Functions” get an input \boldsymbol{x} and gives out an output f(\boldsymbol{x}), just as well as normal functions you would imagine. “Curves” are rather sets of \boldsymbol{x} \in \mathbb{R}^D such that f(\boldsymbol{x}) = const..

*Please assume that the terms “functions” and “curves” are my original words. I use them just in case I fail to use functions and curves properly.

The quadratic curves in the figure above are all “curves” in my term, which can be denoted as f(\boldsymbol{x}; A_3, \boldsymbol{b}_3)=const or f(\boldsymbol{x}; A_3)=const. However if you replace z of (g)”, (h)”, and (i)” with f, you can interpret the “curves” as “functions” which are denoted as f(\boldsymbol{x}; A_2). This might sounds too obvious to you, and my point is you can visualize how values of “functions” change only when the inputs are 2 dimensional.

When a symmetric 2\times 2 real matrices A_2 have two eigenvalues \lambda_1, \lambda_2, the distribution of quadratic curves can be roughly classified to the following three types.

  • (g): Both \lambda_1 and \lambda_2 are positive or negative.
  • (h): Either of \lambda_1 or \lambda_2 is positive and the other is negative.
  • (i): Either of \lambda_1 or \lambda_2 is 0 and the other is not.

The equations of (g)” , (h)”, and (i)” correspond to each type of f=(\boldsymbol{x}; A_2), and thier curves look like the three graphs below.

And in fact, when start from the origin and go in the direction of an eigenvector \boldsymbol{u}_i, \lambda_i is the gradient of the direction. You can see that more clearly when you restrict the distribution of f=(\boldsymbol{x}; A_2) to a unit circle. Like in the figure below, in case \lambda_1 = 7, \lambda_2 = 3, which is classified to (g), the distribution looks like the left side, and if you restrict the distribution in the unit circle, the distribution looks like a bowl like the middle and the right side. When you move in the direction of \boldsymbol{u}_1, you can climb the bowl as as high as \lambda_1, in \boldsymbol{u}_2 as high as \lambda_2.

Also in case of (h), the same facts hold. But in this case, you can also descend the curve.

*You might have seen the curve above in the context of optimization with stochastic gradient descent. The origin of the curve above is a notorious saddle point, where gradients are all 0 in any directions but not a local maximum or minimum. Points can be stuck in this point during optimization.

Especially in case of PCA, A is a covariance matrix, thus A=\Sigma. Eigenvalues of \Sigma are all equal to or greater than 0. And it is known that in this case \lambda_i is the variance of data projected on its corresponding eigenvector \boldsymbol{u}_i (i=0, \dots , D). Hence, if you project f(\boldsymbol{x}; \Sigma), quadratic curves formed by a covariance matrix \Sigma, on eigenvectors of \Sigma, you get f(\boldsymbol{x}; \Sigma) = ({x'}_1 \: \dots \: {x'}_D) (\lambda_1 {x'}_1 \: \dots \: \lambda_D {x'}_D)^t =\lambda_1 ({x'}_1)^2 + \cdots + \lambda_D ({x'}_D)^2.  This shows that you can re-weight ({x'}_1 \: \dots \: {x'}_D), the coordinates of data projected projected on eigenvectors of A, with \lambda_1, \dots, \lambda_D, which are variances ({x'}_1 \: \dots \: {x'}_D). As I mentioned in an example of data of exam scores in the last article, the bigger a variance \lambda_i is, the more the feature described by \boldsymbol{u}_i vary from sample to sample. In other words, you can ignore eigenvectors corresponding to small eigenvalues.

That is a great hint why principal components corresponding to large eigenvectors contain much information of the data distribution. And you can also interpret PCA as a “climbing” a bowl of f(\boldsymbol{x}; A_D), as I have visualized in the case of (g) type curve in the figure above.

*But as I have repeatedly mentioned, ellipsoid which fit data well isf(\boldsymbol{x}; \Sigma ^{-1}) =(\boldsymbol{x}')^T diag(\frac{1}{\lambda_1}, \dots, \frac{1}{\lambda_D})\boldsymbol{x}' = \frac{({x'}_{1})^2}{\lambda_1} + \cdots + \frac{({x'}_{D})^2}{\lambda_D} = const..

*You have to be careful that even if you slice a type (h) curve f(\boldsymbol{x}; A_D) with a place z=const. the resulting cross section does not fit the original data well because the equation of the cross section is \lambda_1 ({x'}_1)^2 + \cdots + \lambda_D ({x'}_D)^2 = const. The figure below is an example of slicing the same f(\boldsymbol{x}; A_2) as the one above with z=1, and the resulting cross section.

As we have seen, \lambda_i, the eigenvalues of the covariance matrix of data are variances or data when projected on it eigenvectors. At the same time, when you fit an ellipsoid on the data, \sqrt{\lambda_i} is the radius of the ellipsoid corresponding to \boldsymbol{u}_i. Thus ignoring data projected on eigenvectors corresponding to small eigenvalues is equivalent to cutting of the axes of the ellipsoid with small radiusses.

I have explained PCA in three different ways over three articles.

  • The second article: I focused on what kind of linear transformations convariance matrices \Sigma enable, by visualizing displacement vectors. And those vectors look like swirling and extending into directions of eigenvectors of \Sigma.
  • The third article: We directly found directions where certain data distribution “swell” the most, to find that data swell the most in directions of eigenvectors.
  • In this article, we have seen PCA corresponds to only one case of quadratic functions, where the matrix A is a covariance matrix. When you go in the directions of eigenvectors corresponding to big eigenvalues, the quadratic function increases the most. Also that means data samples have bigger variances when projected on the eigenvectors. Thus you can cut off eigenvectors corresponding to small eigenvectors because they retain little information about data, and that is equivalent to fitting an ellipsoid on data and cutting off axes with small radiuses.

*Let A be a covariance matrix, and you can diagonalize it with an orthogonal matrix U as follow: U^{T}AU = \Lambda, where \Lambda = diag(\lambda_1, \dots, \lambda_D). Thus A = U \Lambda U^{T}. U is a rotation, and multiplying a \boldsymbol{x} with \Lambda means you multiply each eigenvalue to each element of \boldsymbol{x}. At the end U^T enables the reverse rotation.

If you get data like the left side of the figure below, most explanation on PCA would just fit an oval on this data distribution. However after reading this articles series so far, you would have learned to see PCA from different viewpoints like at the right side of the figure below.

 

5 Ellipsoids in Gaussian distributions.

I have explained that if the covariance of a data distribution is \boldsymbol{\Sigma}, the ellipsoid which fits the distribution the best is \bigl((\boldsymbol{x} - \boldsymbol{\mu}), \boldsymbol{\Sigma}^{-1}(\boldsymbol{x} - \boldsymbol{\mu})\bigr) = 1. You might have seen the part \bigl((\boldsymbol{x} - \boldsymbol{\mu}), \boldsymbol{\Sigma}^{-1}(\boldsymbol{x} - \boldsymbol{\mu})\bigr) = (\boldsymbol{x} - \boldsymbol{\mu}) \boldsymbol{\Sigma}^{-1}(\boldsymbol{x} - \boldsymbol{\mu}) somewhere else. It is the exponent of general Gaussian distributions: \mathcal{N}(\boldsymbol{x} | \boldsymbol{\mu}, \boldsymbol{\Sigma}) = \frac{1}{(2\pi)^{D/2}} \frac{1}{|\boldsymbol{\Sigma}|} exp\{ -\frac{1}{2}(\boldsymbol{x} - \boldsymbol{\mu}) \boldsymbol{\Sigma}^{-1}(\boldsymbol{x} - \boldsymbol{\mu}) \}.  It is known that the eigenvalues of \Sigma ^{-1} are \frac{1}{\lambda_1}, \dots, \frac{1}{\lambda_D}, and eigenvectors corresponding to each eigenvalue are also \boldsymbol{u}_1, \dots, \boldsymbol{u}_D respectively. Hence just as well as what we have seen, if you project (\boldsymbol{x} - \boldsymbol{\mu}) on each eigenvector of \Sigma ^{-1}, we can convert the exponent of the Gaussian distribution.

Let -\frac{1}{2}(\boldsymbol{x} - \boldsymbol{\mu}) \boldsymbol{\Sigma}^{-1}(\boldsymbol{x} - \boldsymbol{\mu}) be \boldsymbol{y} and U ^{-1} \boldsymbol{y}= U^{T} \boldsymbol{y} be \boldsymbol{y}', where U=(\boldsymbol{u}_1 \: \dots \: \boldsymbol{u}_D). Just as we have seen, (\boldsymbol{x} - \boldsymbol{\mu}) \boldsymbol{\Sigma}^{-1}(\boldsymbol{x} - \boldsymbol{\mu}) =\boldsymbol{y}^T\Sigma^{-1} \boldsymbol{y} =(U\boldsymbol{y}')^T \Sigma^{-1} U\boldsymbol{y}' =((\boldsymbol{y}')^T U^T \Sigma^{-1} U\boldsymbol{y}' = (\boldsymbol{y}')^T diag(\frac{1}{\lambda_1}, \dots, \frac{1}{\lambda_D}) \boldsymbol{y}' = \frac{({y'}_{1})^2}{\lambda_1} + \cdots + \frac{({y'}_{D})^2}{\lambda_D}. Hence \mathcal{N}(\boldsymbol{x} | \boldsymbol{\mu}, \boldsymbol{\Sigma}) = \frac{1}{(2\pi)^{D/2}} \frac{1}{|\boldsymbol{\Sigma}|} exp\{ -\frac{1}{2}(\boldsymbol{y}) \boldsymbol{\Sigma}^{-1}(\boldsymbol{y}) \} =  \frac{1}{(2\pi)^{D/2}} \frac{1}{|\boldsymbol{\Sigma}|} exp\{ -\frac{1}{2}(\frac{({y'}_{1})^2}{\lambda_1} + \cdots + \frac{({y'}_{D})^2}{\lambda_D} ) \} =\frac{1}{(2\pi)^{1/2}} \frac{1}{|\boldsymbol{\Sigma}|} exp\biggl( -\frac{1}{2} \frac{({y'}_{1})^2}{\lambda_1} \biggl) \cdots \frac{1}{(2\pi)^{1/2}} \frac{1}{|\boldsymbol{\Sigma}|} exp\biggl( -\frac{1}{2}\frac{({y'}_{D})^2}{\lambda_D} \biggl).

*To be mathematically exact about changing variants of normal distributions, you have to consider for example Jacobian matrices.

This results above demonstrate that, by projecting data on the eigenvectors of its covariance matrix, you can factorize the original multi-dimensional Gaussian distribution into a product of Gaussian distributions which are irrelevant to each other. However, at the same time, that is the potential limit of approximating data with PCA. This idea is going to be more important when you think about more probabilistic ways to handle PCA, which is more robust to lack of data.

I have explained PCA over 3 articles from various viewpoints. If you have been patient enough to read my article series, I think you have gained some deeper insight into not only PCA, but also linear algebra, and that should be helpful when you learn or teach data science. I hope my codes also help you. In fact these are not the only topics about PCA. There are a lot of important PCA-like algorithms.

In fact our expedition of ellipsoids, or PCA still continues, just as Star Wars series still continues. Especially if I have to explain an algorithm named probabilistic PCA, I need to explain the “Bayesian world” of machine learning. Most machine learning algorithms covered by major introductory textbooks tend to be too deterministic and dependent on the size of data. Many of those algorithms have another “parallel world,” where you can handle inaccuracy in better ways. I hope I can also write about them, and I might prepare another trilogy for such PCA. But I will not disappoint you, like “The Phantom Menace.”

Appendix: making a model of a bunch of grape with ellipsoid berries.

If you can control quadratic curves, reshaping and rotating them, you can make a model of a grape of olive bunch on Matplotlib. I made a program of making a model of a bunch of berries on Matplotlib using the module to draw ellipsoids which I introduced earlier. You can check the codes in this page.

*I have no idea how many people on this earth are in need of making such models.

I made some modules so that you can see the grape bunch from several angles. This might look very simple to you, but the locations of berries are organized carefully so that it looks like they are placed around a stem and that the berries are not too close to each other.

 

The programming code I created for this article is completly available here.

[Refereces]

[1]C. M. Bishop, “Pattern Recognition and Machine Learning,” (2006), Springer, pp. 78-83, 559-577

[2]「理工系新課程 線形代数 基礎から応用まで」, 培風館、(2017)

[3]「これなら分かる 最適化数学 基礎原理から計算手法まで」, 金谷健一著、共立出版, (2019), pp. 17-49

[4]「これなら分かる 応用数学教室 最小二乗法からウェーブレットまで」, 金谷健一著、共立出版, (2019), pp.165-208

[5] 「サボテンパイソン 」
https://sabopy.com/

 

Moderne Business Intelligence in der Microsoft Azure Cloud

Google, Amazon und Microsoft sind die drei großen Player im Bereich Cloud Computing. Die Cloud kommt für nahezu alle möglichen Anwendungsszenarien infrage, beispielsweise dem Hosting von Unternehmenssoftware, Web-Anwendungen sowie Applikationen für mobile Endgeräte. Neben diesen Klassikern spielt die Cloud jedoch auch für Internet of Things, Blockchain oder Künstliche Intelligenz eine wichtige Rolle als Enabler. In diesem Artikel beleuchten wir den Cloud-Anbieter Microsoft Azure mit Blick auf die Möglichkeiten des Aufbaues eines modernen Business Intelligence oder Data Platform für Unternehmen.

Eine Frage der Architektur

Bei der Konzeptionierung der Architektur stellen sich viele Fragen:

  • Welche Datenbank wird für das Data Warehouse genutzt?
  • Wie sollten ETL-Pipelines erstellt und orchestriert werden?
  • Welches BI-Reporting-Tool soll zum Einsatz kommen?
  • Müssen Daten in nahezu Echtzeit bereitgestellt werden?
  • Soll Self-Service-BI zum Einsatz kommen?
  • … und viele weitere Fragen.

1 Die Referenzmodelle für Business Intelligence Architekturen von Microsoft Azure

Die vielen Dienste von Microsoft Azure erlauben unzählige Einsatzmöglichkeiten und sind selbst für Cloud-Experten nur schwer in aller Vollständigkeit zu überblicken.  Microsoft schlägt daher verschiedene Referenzmodelle für Datenplattformen oder Business Intelligence Systeme mit unterschiedlichen Ausrichtungen vor. Einige davon wollen wir in diesem Artikel kurz besprechen und diskutieren.

1a Automatisierte Enterprise BI-Instanz

Diese Referenzarchitektur für automatisierte und eher klassische BI veranschaulicht die Vorgehensweise für inkrementelles Laden in einer ELT-Pipeline mit dem Tool Data Factory. Data Factory ist der Cloud-Nachfolger des on-premise ETL-Tools SSIS (SQL Server Integration Services) und dient nicht nur zur Erstellung der Pipelines, sondern auch zur Orchestrierung (Trigger-/Zeitplan der automatisierten Ausführung und Fehler-Behandlung). Über Pipelines in Data Factory werden die jeweils neuesten OLTP-Daten inkrementell aus einer lokalen SQL Server-Datenbank (on-premise) in Azure Synapse geladen, die Transaktionsdaten dann in ein tabellarisches Modell für die Analyse transformiert, dazu wird MS Azure Analysis Services (früher SSAS on-premis) verwendet. Als Tool für die Visualisierung der Daten wird von Microsoft hier und in allen anderen Referenzmodellen MS PowerBI vorgeschlagen. MS Azure Active Directory verbindet die Tools on Azure über einheitliche User im Active Directory Verzeichnis in der Azure-Cloud.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/architecture/reference-architectures/data/enterprise-bi-adfQuelle:

Einige Diskussionspunkte zur BI-Referenzarchitektur von MS Azure

Der von Microsoft vorgeschlagenen Referenzarchitektur zu folgen kann eine gute Idee sein, ist jedoch tatsächlich nur als Vorschlag – eher noch als Kaufvorschlag – zu betrachten. Denn Unternehmens-BI ist hochgradig individuell und Bedarf einiger Diskussion vor der Festlegung der Architektur.

Azure Data Factory als ETL-Tool

Azure Data Factory wird in dieser Referenzarchitektur als ETL-Tool vorgeschlagen. In der Tat ist dieses sehr mächtig und rein über Mausklicks bedienbar. Darüber hinaus bietet es die Möglichkeit z. B. über Python oder Powershell orchestriert und pipeline-modelliert zu werden. Der Clue für diese Referenzarchitektur ist der Hinweis auf die On-Premise-Datenquellen. Sollte zuvor SSIS eingesetzt werden sollen, können die SSIS-Packages zu Data Factory migriert werden.

Die Auswahl der Datenbanken

Der Vorteil dieser Referenzarchitektur ist ohne Zweifel die gute Aufstellung der Architektur im Hinblick auf vielseitige Einsatzmöglichkeiten, so werden externe Daten (in der Annahme, dass diese un- oder semi-strukturiert vorliegen) zuerst in den Azure Blob Storage oder in den auf dem Blob Storage beruhenden Azure Data Lake zwischen gespeichert, bevor sie via Data Factory in eine für Azure Synapse taugliche Struktur transformiert werden können. Möglicherweise könnte auf den Blob Storage jedoch auch gut verzichtet werden, solange nur Daten aus bekannten, strukturierten Datenbanken der Vorsysteme verarbeitet werden. Als Staging-Layer und für Datenhistorisierung sind der Azure Blob Storage oder der Azure Data Lake jedoch gute Möglichkeiten, da pro Dateneinheit besonders preisgünstig.

Azure Synapse ist eine mächtige Datenbank mindestens auf Augenhöhe mit zeilen- und spaltenorientierten, verteilten In-Memory-Datenbanken wie Amazon Redshift, Google BigQuery oder SAP Hana. Azure Synapse bietet viele etablierte Funktionen eines modernen Data Warehouses und jährlich neue Funktionen, die zuerst als Preview veröffentlicht werden, beispielsweise der Einsatz von Machine Learning direkt auf der Datenbank.

Zur Diskussion steht jedoch, ob diese Funktionen und die hohe Geschwindigkeit (bei richtiger Nutzung) von Azure Synapse die vergleichsweise hohen Kosten rechtfertigen. Alternativ können MySQL-/MariaDB oder auch PostgreSQL-Datenbanken bei MS Azure eingesetzt werden. Diese sind jedoch mit Vorsicht zu nutzen bzw. erst unter genauer Abwägung einzusetzen, da sie nicht vollständig von Azure Data Factory in der Pipeline-Gestaltung unterstützt werden. Ein guter Kompromiss kann der Einsatz von Azure SQL Database sein, der eigentliche Nachfolger der on-premise Lösung MS SQL Server. MS Azure Snypase bleibt dabei jedoch tatsächlich die Referenz, denn diese Datenbank wurde speziell für den Einsatz als Data Warehouse entwickelt.

Zentrale Cube-Generierung durch Azure Analysis Services

Zur weiteren Diskussion stehen könnte MS Azure Analysis Sevice als Cube-Engine. Diese Cube-Engine, die ursprünglich on-premise als SQL Server Analysis Service (SSAS) bekannt war, nun als Analysis Service in der Azure Cloud verfügbar ist, beruhte früher noch als SSAS auf der Sprache MDX (Multi-Dimensional Expressions), eine stark an SQL angelehnte Sprache zum Anlegen von schnellen Berechnungsformeln für Kennzahlen im Cube-Datenmodellen, die grundlegendes Verständnis für multidimensionale Abfragen mit Tupeln und Sets voraussetzt. Heute wird statt MDX die Sprache DAX (Data Analysis Expression) verwendet, die eher an Excel-Formeln erinnert (diesen aber keinesfalls entspricht), sie ist umfangreicher als MDX, jedoch für den abitionierten Anwender leichter verständlich und daher für Self-Service-BI geeignet.

Punkt der Diskussion ist, dass der Cube über den Analysis-Service selbst keine Möglichkeiten eine Self-Service-BI nicht ermöglicht, da die Bearbeitung des Cubes mit DAX nur über spezielle Entwicklungsumgebungen möglich ist (z. B. Visual Studio). MS Power BI selbst ist ebenfalls eine Instanz des Analysis Service, denn im Kern von Power BI steckt dieselbe Engine auf Basis von DAX. Power BI bietet dazu eine nutzerfreundliche UI und direkt mit mausklickbaren Elementen Daten zu analysieren und Kennzahlen mit DAX anzulegen oder zu bearbeiten. Wird im Unternehmen absehbar mit Power BI als alleiniges Analyse-Werkzeug gearbeitet, ist eine separate vorgeschaltete Instanz des Azure Analysis Services nicht notwendig. Der zur Abwägung stehende Vorteil des Analysis Service ist die Nutzung des Cubes in Microsoft Excel durch die User über Power Pivot. Dies wiederum ist eine eigene Form des sehr flexiblen Self-Service-BIs.

1b Enterprise Data Warehouse-Architektur

Eine weitere Referenz-Architektur von Microsoft auf Azure ist jene für den Einsatz als Data Warehouse, bei der Microsoft Azure Synapse den dominanten Part von der Datenintegration über die Datenspeicherung und Vor-Analyse übernimmt.https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/architecture/solution-ideas/articles/enterprise-data-warehouseQuelle: 

Diskussionspunkte zum Referenzmodell der Enterprise Data Warehouse Architecture

Auch diese Referenzarchitektur ist nur für bestimmte Einsatzzwecke in dieser Form sinnvoll.

Azure Synapse als ETL-Tool

Im Unterschied zum vorherigen Referenzmodell wird hier statt auf Azure Data Factory auf Azure Synapse als ETL-Tool gesetzt. Azure Synapse hat die Datenintegrationsfunktionalitäten teilweise von Azure Data Factory geerbt, wenn gleich Data Factory heute noch als das mächtigere ETL-Tool gilt. Azure Synapse entfernt sich weiter von der alten SSIS-Logik und bietet auch keine Integration von SSIS-Paketen an, zudem sind einige Anbindungen zwischen Data Factory und Synapse unterschiedlich.

Auswahl der Datenbanken

Auch in dieser Referenzarchitektur kommt der Azure Blob Storage als Zwischenspeicher bzw. Staging-Layer zum Einsatz, jedoch im Mantel des Azure Data Lakes, der den reinen Speicher um eine Benutzerebene erweitert und die Verwaltung des Speichers vereinfacht. Als Staging-Layer oder zur Datenhistorisierung ist der Blob Storage eine kosteneffiziente Methode, darf dennoch über individuelle Betrachtung in der Notwendigkeit diskutiert werden.

Azure Synapse erscheint in dieser Referenzarchitektur als die sinnvolle Lösung, da nicht nur die Pipelines von Synapse, sondern auch die SQL-Engine sowie die Spark-Engine (über Python-Notebooks) für die Anwendung von Machine Learning (z. B. für Recommender-Systeme) eingesetzt werden können. Hier spielt Azure Synpase die Möglichkeiten als Kern einer modernen, intelligentisierbaren Data Warehouse Architektur voll aus.

Azure Analysis Service

Auch hier wird der Azure Analysis Service als Cube-generierende Maschinerie von Microsoft vorgeschlagen. Hier gilt das zuvor gesagte: Für den reinen Einsatz mit Power BI ist der Analysis Service unnötig, sollen Nutzer jedoch in MS Excel komplexe, vorgerechnete Analysen durchführen können, dann zahlt sich der Analysis Service aus.

Azure Cosmos DB

Die Azure Cosmos DB ist am nächsten vergleichbar mit der MongoDB Atlas (die Cloud-Version der eigentlich on-premise zu hostenden MongoDB). Es ist eine NoSQL-Datenbank, die über Datendokumente im JSON-File-Format auch besonders große Datenmengen in sehr hoher Geschwindigkeit abfragen kann. Sie gilt als die zurzeit schnellste Datenbank in Sachen Lesezugriff und spielt dabei alle Vorteile aus, wenn es um die massenweise Bereitstellung von Daten in andere Applikationen geht. Unternehmen, die ihren Kunden mobile Anwendungen bereitstellen, die Millionen parallele Datenzugriffe benötigen, setzen auf Cosmos DB.

1c Referenzarchitektur für Realtime-Analytics

Die Referenzarchitektur von Microsoft Azure für Realtime-Analytics wird die Referenzarchitektur für Enterprise Data Warehousing ergänzt um die Aufnahme von Data Streaming.

Diskussionspunkte zum Referenzmodell für Realtime-Analytics

Diese Referenzarchitektur ist nur für Einsatzszenarios sinnvoll, in denen Data Streaming eine zentrale Rolle spielt. Bei Data Streaming handelt es sich, vereinfacht gesagt, um viele kleine, ereignis-getriggerte inkrementelle Datenlade-Vorgänge bzw. -Bedarfe (Events), die dadurch nahezu in Echtzeit ausgeführt werden können. Dies kann über Webshops und mobile Anwendungen von hoher Bedeutung sein, wenn z. B. Angebote für Kunden hochgrade-individualisiert angezeigt werden sollen oder wenn Marktdaten angezeigt und mit ihnen interagiert werden sollen (z. B. Trading von Wertpapieren). Streaming-Tools bündeln eben solche Events (bzw. deren Datenhäppchen) in Data-Streaming-Kanäle (Partitionen), die dann von vielen Diensten (Consumergruppen / Receiver) aufgegriffen werden können. Data Streaming ist insbesondere auch dann ein notwendiges Setup, wenn ein Unternehmen über eine Microservices-Architektur verfügt, in der viele kleine Dienste (meistens als Docker-Container) als dezentrale Gesamtstruktur dienen. Jeder Dienst kann über Apache Kafka als Sender- und/oder Empfänger in Erscheinung treten. Der Azure Event-Hub dient dazu, die Zwischenspeicherung und Verwaltung der Datenströme von den Event-Sendern in den Azure Blob Storage bzw. Data Lake oder in Azure Synapse zu laden und dort weiter zu reichen oder für tiefere Analysen zu speichern.

Azure Eventhub ArchitectureQuelle: https://docs.microsoft.com/de-de/azure/event-hubs/event-hubs-about

Für die Datenverarbeitung in nahezu Realtime sind der Azure Data Lake und Azure Synapse derzeitig relativ alternativlos. Günstigere Datenbank-Instanzen von MariaDB/MySQL, PostgreSQL oder auch die Azure SQL Database wären hier ein Bottleneck.

2 Fazit zu den Referenzarchitekturen

Die Referenzarchitekturen sind exakt als das zu verstehen: Als Referenz. Keinesfalls sollte diese Architektur unreflektiert für ein Unternehmen übernommen werden, sondern vorher in Einklang mit der Datenstrategie gebracht werden, dabei sollten mindestens diese Fragen geklärt werden:

  • Welche Datenquellen sind vorhanden und werden zukünftig absehbar vorhanden sein?
  • Welche Anwendungsfälle (Use Cases) habe ich für die Business Intelligence bzw. Datenplattform?
  • Über welche finanziellen und fachlichen Ressourcen darf verfügt werden?

Darüber hinaus sollten sich die Architekten bewusst sein, dass, anders als noch in der trägeren On-Premise-Welt, die Could-Dienste schnelllebig sind. So sah die Referenzarchitektur 2019/2020 noch etwas anders aus, in der Databricks on Azure als System für Advanced Analytics inkludiert wurde, heute scheint diese Position im Referenzmodell komplett durch Azure Synapse ersetzt worden zu sein.

Azure Reference Architecture BI Databrikcs 2019

Azure Reference Architecture – with Databricks, old image source: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/architecture/solution-ideas/articles/modern-data-warehouse

Hinweis zu den Kosten und der Administration

Die Kosten für Cloud Computing statt für IT-Infrastruktur On-Premise sind ein zweischneidiges Schwert. Der günstige Einstieg in de Azure Cloud ist möglich, jedoch bedingt ein kosteneffizienter Betrieb viel Know-How im Umgang mit den Diensten und Konfigurationsmöglichkeiten der Azure Cloud oder des jeweiligen alternativen Anbieters. Beispielsweise können über Azure Data Factory Datenbanken über Pipelines automatisiert hochskaliert und nach nur Minuten wieder runterskaliert werden. Nur wer diese dynamischen Skaliermöglichkeiten nutzt, arbeitet effizient in der Cloud.

Ferner sind Kosten nur schwer einschätzbar, da diese mehr noch von der Nutzung (Datenmenge, CPU, RAM) als von der zeitlichen Nutzung (Lifetime) abhängig sind. Preisrechner ermöglichen zumindest eine Kosteneinschätzung: https://azure.com/e/96162a623bda4911bb8f631e317affc6

How to make a toy English-German translator with multi-head attention heat maps: the overall architecture of Transformer

If you have been patient enough to read the former articles of this article series Instructions on Transformer for people outside NLP field, but with examples of NLP, you should have already learned a great deal of Transformer model, and I hope you gained a solid foundation of learning theoretical sides on this algorithm.

This article is going to focus more on practical implementation of a transformer model. We use codes in the Tensorflow official tutorial. They are maintained well by Google, and I think it is the best practice to use widely known codes.

The figure below shows what I have explained in the articles so far. Depending on your level of understanding, you can go back to my former articles. If you are familiar with NLP with deep learning, you can start with the third article.

1 The datasets

I think this article series appears to be on NLP, and I do believe that learning Transformer through NLP examples is very effective. But I cannot delve into effective techniques of processing corpus in each language. Thus we are going to use a library named BPEmb. This library enables you to encode any sentences in various languages into lists of integers. And conversely you can decode lists of integers to the language. Thanks to this library, we do not have to do simplification of alphabets, such as getting rid of Umlaut.

*Actually, I am studying in computer vision field, so my codes would look elementary to those in NLP fields.

The official Tensorflow tutorial makes a Portuguese-English translator, but in article we are going to make an English-German translator. Basically, only the codes below are my original. As I said, this is not an article on NLP, so all you have to know is that at every iteration you get a batch of (64, 41) sized tensor as the source sentences, and a batch of (64, 42) tensor as corresponding target sentences. 41, 42 are respectively the maximum lengths of the input or target sentences, and when input sentences are shorter than them, the rest positions are zero padded, as you can see in the codes below.

*If you just replace datasets and modules for encoding, you can make translators of other pairs of languages.

We are going to train a seq2seq-like Transformer model of converting those list of integers, thus a mapping from a vector to another vector. But each word, or integer is encoded as an embedding vector, so virtually the Transformer model is going to learn a mapping from sequence data to another sequence data. Let’s formulate this into a bit more mathematics-like way: when we get a pair of sequence data \boldsymbol{X} = (\boldsymbol{x}^{(1)}, \dots, \boldsymbol{x}^{(\tau _x)}) and \boldsymbol{Y} = (\boldsymbol{y}^{(1)}, \dots, \boldsymbol{y}^{(\tau _y)}), where \boldsymbol{x}^{(t)} \in \mathbb{R}^{|\mathcal{V}_{\mathcal{X}}|}, \boldsymbol{x}^{(t)} \in \mathbb{R}^{|\mathcal{V}_{\mathcal{Y}}|}, respectively from English and German corpus, then we learn a mapping f: \boldsymbol{X} \to \boldsymbol{Y}.

*In this implementation the vocabulary sizes are both 10002. Thus |\mathcal{V}_{\mathcal{X}}|=|\mathcal{V}_{\mathcal{Y}}|=10002

2 The whole architecture

This article series has covered most of components of Transformer model, but you might not understand how seq2seq-like models can be constructed with them. It is very effective to understand how transformer is constructed by actually reading or writing codes, and in this article we are finally going to construct the whole architecture of a Transforme translator, following the Tensorflow official tutorial. At the end of this article, you would be able to make a toy English-German translator.

The implementation is mainly composed of 4 classes, EncoderLayer(), Encoder(), DecoderLayer(), and Decoder() class. The inclusion relations of the classes are displayed in the figure below.

To be more exact in a seq2seq-like model with Transformer, the encoder and the decoder are connected like in the figure below. The encoder part keeps converting input sentences in the original language through N layers. The decoder part also keeps converting the inputs in the target languages, also through N layers, but it receives the output of the final layer of the Encoder at every layer.

You can see how the Encoder() class and the Decoder() class are combined in Transformer in the codes below. If you have used Tensorflow or Pytorch to some extent, the codes below should not be that hard to read.

3 The encoder

*From now on “sentences” do not mean only the input tokens in natural language, but also the reweighted and concatenated “values,” which I repeatedly explained in explained in the former articles. By the end of this section, you will see that Transformer repeatedly converts sentences layer by layer, remaining the shape of the original sentence.

I have explained multi-head attention mechanism in the third article, precisely, and I explained positional encoding and masked multi-head attention in the last article. Thus if you have read them and have ever written some codes in Tensorflow or Pytorch, I think the codes of Transformer in the official Tensorflow tutorial is not so hard to read. What is more, you do not use CNNs or RNNs in this implementation. Basically all you need is linear transformations. First of all let’s see how the EncoderLayer() and the Encoder() classes are implemented in the codes below.

You might be confused what “Feed Forward” means in  this article or the original paper on Transformer. The original paper says this layer is calculated as FFN(x) = max(0, xW_1 + b_1)W_2 +b_2. In short you stack two fully connected layers and activate it with a ReLU function. Let’s see how point_wise_feed_forward_network() function works in the implementation with some simple codes. As you can see from the number of parameters in each layer of the position wise feed forward neural network, the network does not depend on the length of the sentences.

From the number of parameters of the position-wise feed forward neural networks, you can see that you share the same parameters over all the positions of the sentences. That means in the figure above, you use the same densely connected layers at all the positions, in single layer. But you also have to keep it in mind that parameters for position-wise feed-forward networks change from layer to layer. That is also true of “Layer” parts in Transformer model, including the output part of the decoder: there are no learnable parameters which cover over different positions of tokens. These facts lead to one very important feature of Transformer: the number of parameters does not depend on the length of input or target sentences. You can offset the influences of the length of sentences with multi-head attention mechanisms. Also in the decoder part, you can keep the shape of sentences, or reweighted values, layer by layer, which is expected to enhance calculation efficiency of Transformer models.

4, The decoder

The structures of DecoderLayer() and the Decoder() classes are quite similar to those of EncoderLayer() and the Encoder() classes, so if you understand the last section, you would not find it hard to understand the codes below. What you have to care additionally in this section is inter-language multi-head attention mechanism. In the third article I was repeatedly explaining multi-head self attention mechanism, taking the input sentence “Anthony Hopkins admired Michael Bay as a great director.” as an example. However, as I explained in the second article, usually in attention mechanism, you compare sentences with the same meaning in two languages. Thus the decoder part of Transformer model has not only self-attention multi-head attention mechanism of the target sentence, but also an inter-language multi-head attention mechanism. That means, In case of translating from English to German, you compare the sentence “Anthony Hopkins hat Michael Bay als einen großartigen Regisseur bewundert.” with the sentence itself in masked multi-head attention mechanism (, just as I repeatedly explained in the third article). On the other hand, you compare “Anthony Hopkins hat Michael Bay als einen großartigen Regisseur bewundert.” with “Anthony Hopkins admired Michael Bay as a great director.” in the inter-language multi-head attention mechanism (, just as you can see in the figure above).

*The “inter-language multi-head attention mechanism” is my original way to call it.

I briefly mentioned how you calculate the inter-language multi-head attention mechanism in the end of the third article, with some simple codes, but let’s see that again, with more straightforward figures. If you understand my explanation on multi-head attention mechanism in the third article, the inter-language multi-head attention mechanism is nothing difficult to understand. In the multi-head attention mechanism in encoder layers, “queries”, “keys”, and “values” come from the same sentence in English, but in case of inter-language one, only “keys” and “values” come from the original sentence, and “queries” come from the target sentence. You compare “queries” in German with the “keys” in the original sentence in English, and you re-weight the sentence in English. You use the re-weighted English sentence in the decoder part, and you do not need look-ahead mask in this inter-language multi-head attention mechanism.

Just as well as multi-head self-attention, you can calculate inter-language multi-head attention mechanism as follows: softmax(\frac{\boldsymbol{Q} \boldsymbol{K} ^T}{\sqrt{d}_k}). In the example above, the resulting multi-head attention map is a 10 \times 9 matrix like in the figure below.

Once you keep the points above in you mind, the implementation of the decoder part should not be that hard.

5 Masking tokens in practice

I explained masked-multi-head attention mechanism in the last article, and the ideas itself is not so difficult. However in practice this is implemented in a little tricky way. You might have realized that the size of input matrices is fixed so that it fits the longest sentence. That means, when the maximum length of the input sentences is 41, even if the sentences in a batch have less than 41 tokens, you sample (64, 41) sized tensor as a batch every time (The 64 is a batch size). Let “Anthony Hopkins admired Michael Bay as a great director.”, which has 9 tokens in total, be an input. We have been considering calculating (9, 9) sized attention maps or (10, 9) sized attention maps, but in practice you use (41, 41) or (42, 41) sized ones. When it comes to calculating self attentions in the encoder part, you zero pad self attention maps with encoder padding masks, like in the figure below. The black dots denote the zero valued elements.

As you can see in the codes below, encode padding masks are quite simple. You just multiply the padding masks with -1e9 and add them to attention maps and apply a softmax function. Thereby you can zero-pad the columns in the positions/columns where you added -1e9 to.

I explained look ahead mask in the last article, and in practice you combine normal padding masks and look ahead masks like in the figure below. You can see that you can compare each token with only its previous tokens. For example you can compare “als” only with “Anthony”, “Hopkins”, “hat”, “Michael”, “Bay”, “als”, not with “einen”, “großartigen”, “Regisseur” or “bewundert.”

Decoder padding masks are almost the same as encoder one. You have to keep it in mind that you zero pad positions which surpassed the length of the source input sentence.

6 Decoding process

In the last section we have seen that we can zero-pad columns, but still the rows are redundant. However I guess that is not a big problem because you decode the final output in the direction of the rows of attention maps. Once you decode <end> token, you stop decoding. The redundant rows would not affect the decoding anymore.

This decoding process is similar to that of seq2seq models with RNNs, and that is why you need to hide future tokens in the self-multi-head attention mechanism in the decoder. You share the same densely connected layers followed by a softmax function, at all the time steps of decoding. Transformer has to learn how to decode only based on the words which have appeared so far.

According to the original paper, “We also modify the self-attention sub-layer in the decoder stack to prevent positions from attending to subsequent positions. This masking, combined with fact that the output embeddings are offset by one position, ensures that the predictions for position i can depend only on the known outputs at positions less than i.” After these explanations, I think you understand the part more clearly.

The codes blow is for the decoding part. You can see that you first start decoding an output sentence with a sentence composed of only <start>, and you decide which word to decoded, step by step.

*It easy to imagine that this decoding procedure is not the best. In reality you have to consider some possibilities of decoding, and you can do that with beam search decoding.

After training this English-German translator for 30 epochs you can translate relatively simple English sentences into German. I displayed some results below, with heat maps of multi-head attention. Each colored attention maps corresponds to each head of multi-head attention. The examples below are all from the fourth (last) layer, but you can visualize maps in any layers. When it comes to look ahead attention, naturally only the lower triangular part of the maps is activated.

This article series has not covered some important topics machine translation, for example how to calculate translation errors. Actually there are many other fascinating topics related to machine translation. For example beam search decoding, which consider some decoding possibilities, or other topics like how to handle proper nouns such as “Anthony” or “Hopkins.” But this article series is not on NLP. I hope you could effectively learn the architecture of Transformer model with examples of languages so far. And also I have not explained some details of training the network, but I will not cover that because I think that depends on tasks. The next article is going to be the last one of this series, and I hope you can see how Transformer is applied in computer vision fields, in a more “linguistic” manner.

But anyway we have finally made it. In this article series we have seen that one of the earliest computers was invented to break Enigma. And today we can quickly make a more or less accurate translator on our desk. With Transformer models, you can even translate deadly funny jokes into German.

*You can train a translator with this code.

*After training a translator, you can translate English sentences into German with this code.

[References]

[1] Ashish Vaswani, Noam Shazeer, Niki Parmar, Jakob Uszkoreit, Llion Jones, Aidan N. Gomez, Lukasz Kaiser, Illia Polosukhin, “Attention Is All You Need” (2017)

[2] “Transformer model for language understanding,” Tensorflow Core
https://www.tensorflow.org/overview

[3] Jay Alammar, “The Illustrated Transformer,”
http://jalammar.github.io/illustrated-transformer/

[4] “Stanford CS224N: NLP with Deep Learning | Winter 2019 | Lecture 14 – Transformers and Self-Attention,” stanfordonline, (2019)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5vcj8kSwBCY

[5]Tsuboi Yuuta, Unno Yuuya, Suzuki Jun, “Machine Learning Professional Series: Natural Language Processing with Deep Learning,” (2017), pp. 91-94
坪井祐太、海野裕也、鈴木潤 著, 「機械学習プロフェッショナルシリーズ 深層学習による自然言語処理」, (2017), pp. 191-193

* I make study materials on machine learning, sponsored by DATANOMIQ. I do my best to make my content as straightforward but as precise as possible. I include all of my reference sources. If you notice any mistakes in my materials, including grammatical errors, please let me know (email: yasuto.tamura@datanomiq.de). And if you have any advice for making my materials more understandable to learners, I would appreciate hearing it.

Leveraging Data Science for Vaccine Access and Administration

As people across the world become eligible for receiving their doses, governments and pharmaceutical companies must act efficiently to provide those vaccines. Alongside distribution, people need more information about these newer vaccines. As a solution for both of these obstacles, data science is a useful tool for vaccine development, distribution, and access throughout the COVID-19 pandemic.

From the initial stages of social distancing and vaccine development to broadening access to the vaccines, data science uses information from countless resources to provide evidence-based, actionable recommendations. Governments and health care providers then act upon this data to help the public and move towards the global goal of eliminating the virus.

Vaccine Development

Since the pandemic began, vaccines have been a sign of hope and a return to a new normalcy. However, getting to effective vaccine distribution first required using data science to develop the doses themselves.

The COVID-19 vaccines have been some of the fastest-developed inoculations in history, which is partly because of the efforts of data scientists. Using machine learning, researchers were able to analyze the sequences of strains of the virus and establish what parts a vaccine would best respond to. Specifically, the sequences had to be those that would be less likely to mutate in the future and less likely to cause an adverse reaction in humans with an injection.

Machine learning helped scientists predict and theorize about which proteins would be the best to work within the SARS-CoV-2 strains. From there, they proceeded with creating vaccines that are now in use all over the world, like Pfizer’s or Moderna’s.

Then, as vaccines become more available, governments again rely on data science to dictate eligibility. Data analytics systems take into account exposure risk, demographics, jobs, and health conditions, which have helped countries break up eligibility into phases.

Supply and Demand

Vaccine supply chains had rocky beginnings throughout the world. In Germany, residents faced shortages of doses, where demand far outweighed the available vials. This type of shortage is especially dangerous, as it can lead to an increase in cases or a full-on spike.

To avoid these uneven dynamics, data science can provide more accurate projections of how many vaccines regions will need on a weekly basis. Data science systems that use machine learning can account for the population that’s eligible and historical COVID-19 vaccination numbers. Then, as eligibility opens up, these systems predict how many vaccines a facility or county will need in the future.

Vaccine administrative organizations can then communicate better with the government to request the doses they will properly handle and use weekly.

In the United States, West Virginia is working with data science dashboards to identify who is most at risk of contracting the virus. Then, they can request the right amount of vials each week and give them to the people who need them the most.

Information Access

As new vaccines and government mandates come into play, residents all over the world need more information to feel safe and to know what they should do. Vaccine scams, for example, have increased with distribution. These scams will ask for personal information like a Social Security number or a form of payment.

To avoid these scams and learn about the vaccine options available, the public needs more access to information. Data science is again helpful to distribute this information.

Google has become a leader in information access with its Intelligence Vaccine Impact initiative. With this program, Google uses machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) to process data regarding government policy changes, vaccine availability, eligibility, and demographics. That way, people know when they can receive a vaccine, the research and information that supports the vaccines, and what scams to avoid along the way.

Then, based on the vaccine information Google gathers, data scientists can provide a clearer trajectory of the pandemic globally and locally as vaccines help cases go down.

A Data-Driven Path Forward

Data science provides solutions for vaccine access, distribution, and administration. With these powerful dynamics in place, it’s clear that data will lead the world towards a healthier future. Based on evidence from the pandemic, data helps governments and health care providers offer the best solutions for eliminating the virus and protecting people everywhere.