Neues Weiterbildungsangebot zu Programmiersprache R an der TU Dortmund

Anzeige: Neues Weiterbildungsangebot zu Programmiersprache R an der TU Dortmund

In der Tagesseminarreihe Dortmunder R-Kursean der Technischen Universität Dortmund vermitteln erfahrene Experten die praktische Anwendung der Open-Source Statistiksoftware R. Die Teilnehmenden erwerben dadurch Schlüsselkompetenzen im Umgang mit Big Data.

Das Seminar R-Basiskurs für Anfänger findet am 22.02. & 23.02.18 statt. Den Teilnehmern wird der praxisrelevante Part der Programmiersprache näher gebracht, um so die Grundlagen zur ersten Datenanalyse — vom Datensatz zu statistischen Kennzahlen und ersten Datenvisualisierungen — zu schaffen. Anmeldeschluss ist der 01.02.2018.

Das Seminar R-Vertiefungskurs für Fortgeschrittene findet am 06.03. & 07.03.18 statt. Die Veranstaltung ist ideal für Teilnehmende mit ersten Vorkenntnissen, die ihre Analysen effizient mit R durchführen möchten. Anmeldeschluss ist der 13.02.2018.

Weitere inhaltliche Informationen zu den R-Kursen finden Sie unter:
http://dortmunder-r-kurse.de/

My Desk for Data Science

In my last post I anounced a blog parade about what a data scientist’s workplace might look like.

Here are some photos of my desk and my answers to the questions:

How many monitors do you use (or wish to have)?

I am mostly working at my desk in my office with a tower PC and three monitors.
I definitely need at least three monitors to work productively as a data scientist. Who does not know this: On the left monitor the data model is displayed, on the right monitor the data mapping and in the middle I do my work: programming the analysis scripts.

What hardware do you use? Apple? Dell? Lenovo? Others?

I am note an Apple guy. When I need to work mobile, I like to use ThinkPad notebooks. The ThinkPads are (in my experience) very robust and are therefore particularly good for mobile work. Besides, those notebooks look conservative and so I’m not sad if there comes a scratch on the notebook. However, I do not solve particularly challenging analysis tasks on a notebook, because I need my monitors for that.

Which OS do you use (or prefer)? MacOS, Linux, Windows? Virtual Machines?

As a data scientist, I have to be able to communicate well with my clients and they usually use Microsoft Windows as their operating system. I also use Windows as my main operating system. Of course, all our servers run on Linux Debian, but most of my tasks are done directly on Windows.
For some notebooks, I have set up a dual boot, because sometimes I need to start native Linux, for all other cases I work with virtual machines (Linux Ubuntu or Linux Mint).

What are your favorite databases, programming languages and tools?

I prefer the Microsoft SQL Server (T-SQL), C# and Python (pandas, numpy, scikit-learn). This is my world. But my customers are kings, therefore I am working with Postgre SQL, MongoDB, Neo4J, Tableau, Qlik Sense, Celonis and a lot more. I like to get used to new tools and technologies again and again. This is one of the benefits of being a data scientist.

Which data dou you analyze on your local hardware? Which in server clusters or clouds?

There have been few cases yet, where I analyzed really big data. In cases of analyzing big data we use horizontally scalable systems like Hadoop and Spark. But we also have customers analyzing middle-sized data (more than 10 TB but less than 100 TB) on one big server which is vertically scalable. Most of my customers just want to gather data to answer questions on not so big amounts of data. Everything less than 10TB we can do on a highend workstation.

If you use clouds, do you prefer Azure, AWS, Google oder others?

Microsoft Azure! I am used to tools provided by Microsoft and I think Azure is a well preconfigured cloud solution.

Where do you make your notes/memos/sketches. On paper or digital?

My calender is managed digital, because I just need to know everywhere what appointments I have. But my I prefer to wirte down my thoughts on paper and that´s why I have several paper-notebooks.

Now it is your turn: Join our Blog Parade!

So what does your workplace look like? Show your desk on your blog until 31/12/2017 and we will show a short introduction of your post here on the Data Science Blog!

 

Show your Data Science Workplace!

The job of a data scientist is often a mystery to outsiders. Of course, you do not really need much more than a medium-sized notebook to use data science methods for finding value in data. Nevertheless, data science workplaces can look so different and, let’s say, interesting. And that’s why I want to launch a blog parade – which I want to start with this article – where you as a Data Scientist or Data Engineer can show your workplace and explain what tools a data scientist in your opinion really needs.

I am very curious how many monitors you prefer, whether you use Apple, Dell, HP or Lenovo, MacOS, Linux or Windows, etc., etc. And of course, do you like a clean or messy desk?

What is a Blog Parade?

A blog parade is a call to blog owners to report on a specific topic. Everyone who participates in the blog parade, write on their blog a contribution to the topic. The organizer of the blog parade collects all the articles and will recap those articles in a short form together, of course with links to the articles.

How can I participate?

Write an article on your blog! Mention this blog parade here, show and explain your workplace (your desk with your technical equipment) in an article. If you’re missing your own blog, articles can also be posted directly to LinkedIn (LinkedIn has its own blogging feature that every LinkedIn member can use). Alternative – as a last resort – it would also be possible to send me your article with a photo about your workplace directly to: redaktion@data-science-blog.com.
Please make me aware of an article, via e-mail or with a comment (below) on this article.

Who can participate?

Any data scientist or anyone close to Data Science: Everyone concerned with topics such as data analytics, data engineering or data security. Please do not over-define data science here, but keep it in a nutshell, so that all professionals who manage and analyze data can join in with a clear conscience.

And yes, I will participate too. I will propably be the first who write an article about my workplace (I just need a new photo of my desk).

When does the article have to be finished?

By 31/12/2017, the article must have been published on your blog (or LinkedIn or wherever) and the release has to be reported to me.
But beware: Anyone who has previously written an article will also be linked earlier. After all, reporting on your article will take place immediately after I hear about it.
If you publish an artcile tomorrow, it will be shown the day after tomorrow here on the Data Science Blog.

What is in it for me to join?

Nothing! Except perhaps the fun factor of sharing your idea of ​​a nice desk for a data expert with others, so as to share creativity or a certain belief in what a data scientist needs.
Well and for bloggers: There is a great backlink from this data science blog for you 🙂

What should I write? What are the minimum requirements of content?

The article does not have to (but may be) particularly long. Anyway, here on this data science blog only a shortened version of your article will appear (with a link, of course).

Minimum requirments:

  • Show a photo (at least one!) of your workplace desk!
  • And tell us something about:
    • How many monitors do you use (or wish to have)?
    • What hardware do you use? Apple? Dell? Lenovo? Others?
    • Which OS do you use (or prefer)? MacOS, Linux, Windows? Virtual Machines?
    • What are your favorite databases, programming languages and tools? (e.g. Python, R, SAS, Postgre, Neo4J,…)
    • Which data dou you analyze on your local hardware? Which in server clusters or clouds?
    • If you use clouds, do you prefer Azure, AWS, Google oder others?
    • Where do you make your notes/memos/sketches. On paper or digital?

Not allowed:
Of course, please do not provide any information, which could endanger your company`s IT security.

Absolutly allowed:
Bringing some joke into the matter 🙂 We are happy to vote in the comments on the best or funniest desk for election, there may be also a winner later!


The resulting Blog Posts: https://data-science-blog.com/data-science-insights/show-your-desk/


 

Big Data Essentials – Intro

1. Big Data Definition

Data umfasst Nummern, Text, Bilder, Audio, Video und jede Art von Informationen die in Ihrem Computer gespeichert werden können. Big Data umfasst Datenmengen, die eine oder mehrere der folgenden Eigenschaften aufweisen: Hohes Volumen (High Volume), hohe Vielfalt (High Variety) und / oder eine notwendige hohe Geschwindigkeit (High Velocity) zur Auswertung. Diese drei Eigenschaften werden oft auch als die 3V’s von Big Data bezeichnet.

1.1. Volumen: Menge der erzeugten Daten

Volumen bezieht sich auf die Menge der generierten Daten. Traditionelle Datenanalysemodelle erfordern typischerweise Server mit großen Speicherkapazitäten, bei massiver Rechenleistung sind diese Modelle nicht gut skalierbar. Um die Rechenleistung zu erhöhen, müssen Sie weiter investieren, möglicherweise auch in teurere proprietäre Hardware. Die NASA ist eines von vielen Unternehmen, die enorme Mengen an Daten sammeln. Ende 2014 sammelte die NASA alle paar Sekunden etwa 1,73 GB an Daten. Und auch dieser Betrag der Datenansammlung steigt an, so dass die Datenerfassung entsprechend exponentiell mitwachsen muss. Es resultieren sehr hohe Datenvolumen und es kann schwierig sein, diese zu speichern.

1.2. Vielfalt: Unterschiedliche Arten von Daten

Das  traditionelle  Datenmodell (ERM)  erfordert  die  Entwicklung  eines  Schemas,  das  die  Daten in ein Korsett zwingt. Um das Schema zu erstellen, muss man das Format der Daten kennen, die gesammelt werden. Daten  können  wie  XML-Dateien  strukturiert  sein,  halb  strukturiert  wie  E-Mails oder unstrukturiert wie Videodateien.

Wikipedia – als Beispiel – enthält mehr als nur Textdaten, es enthält Hyperlinks, Bilder, Sound-Dateien und viele andere Datentypen mit mehreren verschiedenen Arten von Daten. Insbesondere unstrukturierte   Daten haben   eine   große   Vielfalt.  Es   kann   sehr   schwierig   sein, diese Vielfalt in einem Datenmodell zu beschreiben.

1.3. Geschwindigkeit: Geschwindigkeit, mit der Daten genutzt werden

Traditionelle Datenanalysemodelle wurden für die Stapelverarbeitung (batch processing) entwickelt. Sie sammeln die gesamte Datenmenge und verarbeiten sie, um sie in die Datenbank zu speichern. Erst mit einer Echtzeitanalyse der Daten kann schnell auf Informationen reagiert werden. Beispielsweise können Netzwerksensoren, die mit dem Internet der Dinge (IoT) verbunden sind, tausende von Datenpunkten pro Sekunde erzeugen. Im Gegensatz zu Wikipedia, deren Daten später verarbeitet werden können, müssen Daten von Smartphones und anderen Netzwerkteilnehmern mit entsprechender Sensorik in  Echtzeit  verarbeitet  werden.

2. Geschichte von Big Data

2.1. Google Solution

  • Google File System speichert die Daten, Bigtable organisiert die Daten und MapReduce verarbeitet es.
  • Diese Komponenten arbeiten zusammen auf einer Sammlung von Computern, die als Cluster bezeichnet werden.
  • Jeder einzelne Computer in einem Cluster wird als Knoten bezeichnet.

2.2 Google File System

Das Google File System (GFS) teilt Daten in Stücke ‚Chunks’ auf. Diese ‚Chunks’ werden verteilt und auf verschiedene Knoten in einem Cluster nachgebildet. Der Vorteil ist nicht nur die mögliche parallele Verarbeitung bei der späteren Analysen, sondern auch die Datensicherheit. Denn die Verteilung und die Nachbildung schützen vor Datenverlust.

2.3. Bigtable

Bigtable ist ein Datenbanksystem, das GFS zum Speichern und Abrufen von Daten verwendet. Trotz seines Namens ist Bigtable nicht nur eine sehr große Tabelle. Bigtable ordnet die Datenspeicher mit einem Zeilenschlüssel, einem Spaltenschlüssel und einem Zeitstempel zu. Auf diese Weise können dieselben Informationen über einen längeren Zeitraum hinweg erfasst werden, ohne dass bereits vorhandene Einträge überschrieben werden. Die Zeilen sind dann in den Untertabellen partitioniert, die über einem Cluster verteilt sind. Bigtable wurde entwickelt, um riesige Datenmengen zu bewältigen, mit der Möglichkeit, neue Einträge zum Cluster hinzuzufügen, ohne dass eine der vorhandenen Dateien neu konfiguriert werden muss.

2.4. MapReduce

Als dritter Teil des Puzzles wurde ein Parallelverarbeitungsparadigma namens MapReduce genutzt, um die bei GFS gespeicherten Daten zu verarbeiten. Der Name MapReduce wird aus den Namen von zwei Schritten im Prozess übernommen. Obwohl der Mapreduce-Prozess durch Apache Hadoop berühmt geworden ist, ist das kaum eine neue Idee. In der Tat können viele gängige Aufgaben wie Sortieren und Falten von Wäsche als Beispiele für den MapReduce- Prozess betrachtet werden.

Quadratische Funktion:

  • wendet die gleiche Logik auf jeden Wert an, jeweils einen Wert
  • gibt das Ergebnis für jeden Wert aus
    (map square'(1 2 3 4)) = (1 4 9 16)

Additionsfunktion

  • wendet die gleiche Logik auf alle Werte an, die zusammen genommen werden.
    (reduce + ‘(1 4 9 16)) = 30

Die Namen Map und Reduce können bei der Programmierung mindestens bis in die 70er-Jahre zurückverfolgt werden. In diesem Beispiel sieht man, wie die Liste das MapReduce-Modell verwendet. Zuerst benutzt man Map der Quadratfunktion auf einer Eingangsliste für die Quadratfunktion, da sie abgebildet ist, alle angelegten Eingaben und erzeugt eine einzige Ausgabe pro Eingabe, in diesem Fall (1, 4, 9 und 16). Additionsfunktion reduziert die Liste und erzeugt eine einzelne Ausgabe von 30, der die Summe aller Eingänge ist.

Google nutzte die Leistung von MapReduce, um einen Suchmaschinen-Markt zu dominieren. Das Paradigma kam in der 19. Websearch-Engine zum Einsatz und etablierte sich innerhalb weniger Jahre und ist bis heute noch relevant. Google verwendete MapReduce auf verschiedene Weise, um die Websuche zu verbessern. Es wurde verwendet, um den Seiteninhalt zu indexieren und ein Ranking über die Relevant einer Webseite zu berechnen.

Dieses  Beispiel  zeigt  uns  den MapReduce-Algorithmus, mit dem Google Wordcount auf Webseiten ausführte. Die Map-Methode verwendet als Eingabe einen Schlüssel (key) und einen Wert, wobei der Schlüssel den Namen des Dokuments darstellt  und  der  Wert  der  Kontext  dieses Dokuments ist. Die Map-Methode durchläuft jedes Wort im Dokument und gibt es als Tuple zurück, die aus dem Wort und dem Zähler 1 besteht.

Die   Reduce-Methode   nimmt   als   Eingabe auch  einen  Schlüssel  und  eine  Liste  von  Werten an, in der der Schlüssel ein Wort darstellt. Die  Liste  von  Werten  ist  die  Liste  von  Zählungen dieses Worts. In diesem Beispiel ist der Wert 1. Die Methode “Reduce” durchläuft alle Zählungen. Wenn die Schleife beendet ist, um die Methode zu reduzieren, wird sie als Tuple zurückgegeben, die aus dem Wort und seiner Gesamtanzahl besteht.

 

The importance of domain knowledge – A healthcare data science perspective

Data scientists have (and need) many skills. They are frequently either former academic researchers or software engineers, with knowledge and skills in statistics, programming, machine learning, and many other domains of mathematics and computer science. These skills are general and allow data scientists to offer valuable services to almost any field. However, data scientists in some cases find themselves in industries they have relatively little knowledge of.

This is especially true in the healthcare field. In healthcare, there is an enormous amount of important clinical knowledge that might be relevant to a data scientist. It is unreasonable to expect a data scientist to not only have all of the skills typically required of a data scientist, but to also have all of the knowledge a medical professional may have.

Why is domain knowledge necessary?

This lack of domain knowledge, while perfectly understandable, can be a major barrier to healthcare data scientists. For one thing, it’s difficult to come up with project ideas in a domain that you don’t know much about. It can also be difficult to determine the type of data that may be helpful for a project – if you want to build a model to predict a health outcome (for example, whether a patient has or is likely to develop a gastrointestinal bleed), you need to know what types of variables might be related to this outcome so you can make sure to gather the right data.

Knowing the domain is useful not only for figuring out projects and how to approach them, but also for having rules of thumb for sanity checks on the data. Knowing how data is captured (is it hand-entered? Is it from machines that can give false readings for any number of reasons?) can help a data scientist with data cleaning and from going too far down the wrong path. It can also inform what true outliers are and which values might just be due to measurement error.

Often the most challenging part of building a machine learning model is feature engineering. Understanding clinical variables and how they relate to a health outcome is extremely important for this. Is a long history of high blood pressure important for predicting heart problems, or is only very recent history? How long a time horizon is considered ‘long’ or ‘short’ in this context? What other variables might be related to this health outcome? Knowing the domain can help direct the data exploration and greatly speed (and enhance) the feature engineering process.

Once features are generated, knowing what relationships between variables are plausible helps for basic sanity checks. If you’re finding the best predictor of hospitalization is the patient’s eye color, this might indicate an issue with your code. Being able to glance at the outcome of a model and determine if they make sense goes a long way for quality assurance of any analytical work.

Finally, one of the biggest reasons a strong understanding of the data is important is because you have to interpret the results of analyses and modeling work. Knowing what results are important and which are trivial is important for the presentation and communication of results. An analysis that determines there is a strong relationship between age and mortality is probably well-known to clinicians, while weaker but more surprising associations may be of more use. It’s also important to know what results are actionable. An analysis that finds that patients who are elderly are likely to end up hospitalized is less useful for trying to determine the best way to reduce hospitalizations (at least, without further context).

How do you get domain knowledge?

In some industries, such as tech, it’s fairly easy and straightforward to see an end-user’s prospective. By simply viewing a website or piece of software from the user’s point of view, a data scientist can gain a lot of the needed context and background knowledge needed to understand where their data is coming from and how their model output is being used. In the healthcare industry, it’s more difficult. A data scientist can’t easily choose to go through med school or the experience of being treated for a chronic illness. This means there is no easy single answer to where to gain domain knowledge. However, there are many avenues available.

Reading literature and attending presentations can boost one’s domain knowledge. However, it’s often difficult to find resources that are penetrable for someone who is not already a clinician. To gain deep knowledge, one needs to be steeped in the topic. One important avenue to doing this is through the establishment of good relationships with clinicians. Clinicians can be powerful allies that can help point you in the right direction for understanding your data, and simply by chatting with them you can gain important insights. They can also help you visit the clinics or practices to interact with the people that perform the procedures or even watch the procedures being done. At Fresenius Medical Care, where I work, members of my team regularly visit clinics. I have in the last year visited one of our dialysis clinics, a nephrology practice, and a vascular care unit. These experiences have been invaluable to me in developing my knowledge of the treatment of chronic illnesses.

In conclusion, it is crucial for data scientists to acquire basic familiarity in the field they are working in and in being part of collaborative teams that include people who are technically knowledgeable in the field they work in. This said, acquiring even an essential understanding (such as “Medicine 101”) may go a long way for the data scientists in being able to become self-sufficient in essential feature selection and design.

 

Data Science vs Data Engineering

The job of the Data Scientist is actually a fairly new trend, and yet other job titles are coming to us. “Is this really necessary?”, Some will ask. But the answer is clear: yes!

There are situations, every Data Scientist know: a recruiter calls, speaks about a great new challenge for a Data Scientist as you obviously claim on your LinkedIn profile, but in the discussion of the vacancy it quickly becomes clear that you have almost none of the required skills. This mismatch is mainly due to the fact that under the job of the Data Scientist all possible activity profiles, method and tool knowledge are summarized, which a single person can hardly learn in his life. Many open jobs, which are to be called under the name Data Science, describe rather the professional image of the Data Engineer.


Read this article in German:
“Data Science vs Data Engineering – Wo liegen die Unterschiede?“


What is a Data Engineer?

Data engineering is primarily about collecting or generating data, storing, historicalizing, processing, adapting and submitting data to subsequent instances. A Data Engineer, often also named as Big Data Engineer or Big Data Architect, models scalable database and data flow architectures, develops and improves the IT infrastructure on the hardware and software side, deals with topics such as IT Security , Data Security and Data Protection. A Data Engineer is, as required, a partial administrator of the IT systems and also a software developer, since he or she extends the software landscape with his own components. In addition to the tasks in the field of ETL / Data Warehousing, he also carries out analyzes, for example, to investigate data quality or user access. A Data Engineer mainly works with databases and data warehousing tools.

A Data Engineer is talented as an educated engineer or computer scientist and rather far away from the actual core business of the company. The Data Engineer’s career stages are usually something like:

  1. (Big) Data Architect
  2. BI Architect
  3. Senior Data Engineer
  4. Data Engineer

What makes a Data Scientist?

Although there may be many intersections with the Data Engineer’s field of activity, the Data Scientist can be distinguished by using his working time as much as possible to analyze the available data in an exploratory and targeted manner, to visualize the analysis results and to convert them into a red thread (storytelling). Unlike the Data Engineer, a data scientist rarely sees into a data center, because he picks up data via interfaces provided by the Data Engineer or provides by other resources.

A Data Scientist deals with mathematical models, works mainly with statistical procedures, and applies them to the data to generate knowledge. Common methods of Data Mining, Machine Learning and Predictive Modeling should be known to a Data Scientist. Data Scientists basically work close to the department and need appropriate expertise. Data Scientists use proprietary tools (e.g. Tools by IBM, SAS or Qlik) and program their own analyzes, for example, in Scala, Java, Python, Julia, or R. Using such programming languages and data science libraries (e.g. Mahout, MLlib, Scikit-Learn or TensorFlow) is often considered as advanced data science.

Data Scientists can have diverse academic backgrounds, some are computer scientists or engineers for electrical engineering, others are physicists or mathematicians, not a few have economical backgrounds. Common career levels could be:

  1. Chief Data Scientist
  2. Senior Data Scientist
  3. Data Scientist
  4. Data Analyst oder Junior Data Scientist

Data Scientist vs Data Analyst

I am often asked what the difference between a Data Scientist and a Data Analyst would be, or whether there would be a distinction criterion at all:

In my experience, the term Data Scientist stands for the new challenges for the classical concept of Data Analysts. A Data Analyst performs data analysis like a Data Scientist. More complex topics such as predictive analytics, machine learning or artificial intelligence are topics for a Data Scientist. In other words, a Data Scientist is a Data Analyst++ (one step above the Data Analyst).

And how about being a Business Analyst?

Business Analysts can (but need not) be Data Analysts. In any case, they have a very strong relationship with the core business of the company. Business Analytics is about analyzing business models and business successes. The analysis of business success is usually carried out by IT, and many business analysts are starting a career as Data Analyst now. Dashboards, KPIs and SQL are the tools of a good business analyst, but there might be a lot business analysts, who are just analysing business models by reading the newspaper…

Data Science Knowledge Stack – Abstraction of the Data Science Skillset

What must a Data Scientist be able to do? Which skills does as Data Scientist need to have? This question has often been asked and frequently answered by several Data Science Experts. In fact, it is now quite clear what kind of problems a Data Scientist should be able to solve and which skills are necessary for that. I would like to try to bring this consensus into a visual graph: a layer model, similar to the OSI layer model (which any data scientist should know too, by the way).
I’m giving introductory seminars in Data Science for merchants and engineers and in those seminars I always start explaining what we need to work out together in theory and practice-oriented exercises. Against this background, I came up with the idea for this layer model. Because with my seminars the problem already starts: I am giving seminars for Data Science for Business Analytics with Python. So not for medical analyzes and not with R or Julia. So I do not give a general knowledge of Data Science, but a very specific direction.

A Data Scientist must deal with problems at different levels in any Data Science project, for example, the data access does not work as planned or the data has a different structure than expected. A Data Scientist can spend hours debating its own source code or learning the ropes of new DataScience packages for its chosen programming language. Also, the right algorithms for data evaluation must be selected, properly parameterized and tested, sometimes it turns out that the selected methods were not the optimal ones. Ultimately, we are not doing Data Science all day for fun, but for generating value for a department and a data scientist is also faced with special challenges at this level, at least a basic knowledge of the expertise of that department is a must have.


Read this article in German:
“Data Science Knowledge Stack – Was ein Data Scientist können muss“


Data Science Knowledge Stack

With the Data Science Knowledge Stack, I would like to provide a structured insight into the tasks and challenges a Data Scientist has to face. The layers of the stack also represent a bidirectional flow from top to bottom and from bottom to top, because Data Science as a discipline is also bidirectional: we try to answer questions with data, or we look at the potentials in the data to answer previously unsolicited questions.

The DataScience Knowledge Stack consists of six layers:

Database Technology Knowledge

A Data Scientist works with data which is rarely directly structured in a CSV file, but usually in one or more databases that are subject to their own rules. In particular, business data, for example from the ERP or CRM system, are available in relational databases, often from Microsoft, Oracle, SAP or an open source alternative. A good Data Scientist is not only familiar with Structured Query Language (SQL), but is also aware of the importance of relational linked data models, so he also knows the principle of data table normalization.

Other types of databases, so-called NoSQL databases (Not only SQL) are based on file formats, column or graph orientation, such as MongoDB, Cassandra or GraphDB. Some of these databases use their own programming languages ​​(for example JavaScript at MongoDB or the graph-oriented database Neo4J has its own language called Cypher). Some of these databases provide alternative access via SQL (such as Hive for Hadoop).

A data scientist has to cope with different database systems and has to master at least SQL – the quasi-standard for data processing.

Data Access & Transformation Knowledge

If data are given in a database, Data Scientists can perform simple (and not so simple) analyzes directly on the database. But how do we get the data into our special analysis tools? To do this, a Data Scientist must know how to export data from the database. For one-time actions, an export can be a CSV file, but which separators and text qualifiers should be used? Possibly, the export is too large, so the file must be split.
If there is a direct and synchronous data connection between the analysis tool and the database, interfaces like REST, ODBC or JDBC come into play. Sometimes a socket connection must also be established and the principle of a client-server architecture should be known. Synchronous and asynchronous encryption methods should also be familiar to a Data Scientist, as confidential data are often used, and a minimum level of security is most important for business applications.

Many datasets are not structured in a database but are so-called unstructured or semi-structured data from documents or from Internet sources. And again we have interfaces, a frequent entry point for Data Scientists is, for example, the Twitter API. Sometimes we want to stream data in near real-time, let it be machine data or social media messages. This can be quite demanding, so the data streaming is almost a discipline with which a Data Scientist can come into contact quickly.

Programming Language Knowledge

Programming languages ​​are tools for Data Scientists to process data and automate processing. Data Scientists are usually no real software developers and they do not have to worry about software security or economy. However, a certain basic knowledge about software architectures often helps because some Data Science programs can be going to be integrated into an IT landscape of the company. The understanding of object-oriented programming and the good knowledge of the syntax of the selected programming languages ​​are essential, especially since not every programming language is the most useful for all projects.

At the level of the programming language, there is already a lot of snares in the programming language that are based on the programming language itself, as each has its own faults and details determine whether an analysis is done correctly or incorrectly: for example, whether data objects are copied or linked as reference, or how NULL/NaN values ​​are treated.

Data Science Tool & Library Knowledge

Once a data scientist has loaded the data into his favorite tool, for example, one of IBM, SAS or an open source alternative such as Octave, the core work just began. However, these tools are not self-explanatory and therefore there is a wide range of certification options for various Data Science tools. Many (if not most) Data Scientists work mostly directly with a programming language, but this alone is not enough to effectively perform statistical data analysis or machine learning: We use Data Science libraries (packages) that provide data structures and methods as a groundwork and thus extend the programming language to a real Data Science toolset. Such a library, for example Scikit-Learn for Python, is a collection of methods implemented in the programming language. The use of such libraries, however, is intended to be learned and therefore requires familiarization and practical experience for reliable application.

When it comes to Big Data Analytics, the analysis of particularly large data, we enter the field of Distributed Computing. Tools (frameworks) such as Apache Hadoop, Apache Spark or Apache Flink allows us to process and analyze data in parallel on multiple servers. These tools also provide their own libraries for machine learning, such as Mahout, MLlib and FlinkML.

Data Science Method Knowledge

A Data Scientist is not simply an operator of tools, he uses the tools to apply his analysis methods to data he has selected for to reach the project targets. These analysis methods are, for example, descriptive statistics, estimation methods or hypothesis tests. Somewhat more mathematical are methods of machine learning for data mining, such as clustering or dimensional reduction, or more toward automated decision making through classification or regression.

Machine learning methods generally do not work immediately, they have to be improved using optimization methods like the gradient method. A Data Scientist must be able to detect under- and overfitting, and he must prove that the prediction results for the planned deployment are accurate enough.

Special applications require special knowledge, which applies, for example, to the fields of image recognition (Visual Computing) or the processing of human language (Natural Language Processiong). At this point, we open the door to deep learning.

Expertise

Data Science is not an end in itself, but a discipline that would like to answer questions from other expertise fields with data. For this reason, Data Science is very diverse. Business economists need data scientists to analyze financial transactions, for example, to identify fraud scenarios or to better understand customer needs, or to optimize supply chains. Natural scientists such as geologists, biologists or experimental physicists also use Data Science to make their observations with the aim of gaining knowledge. Engineers want to better understand the situation and relationships between machinery or vehicles, and medical professionals are interested in better diagnostics and medication for their patients.

In order to support a specific department with his / her knowledge of data, tools and analysis methods, every data scientist needs a minimum of the appropriate skills. Anyone who wants to make analyzes for buyers, engineers, natural scientists, physicians, lawyers or other interested parties must also be able to understand the people’s profession.

Engere Data Science Definition

While the Data Science pioneers have long established and highly specialized teams, smaller companies are still looking for the Data Science Allrounder, which can take over the full range of tasks from the access to the database to the implementation of the analytical application. However, companies with specialized data experts have long since distinguished Data Scientists, Data Engineers and Business Analysts. Therefore, the definition of Data Science and the delineation of the abilities that a data scientist should have, varies between a broader and a more narrow demarcation.


A closer look at the more narrow definition shows, that a Data Engineer takes over the data allocation, the Data Scientist loads it into his tools and runs the data analysis together with the colleagues from the department. According to this, a Data Scientist would need no knowledge of databases or APIs, neither an expertise would be necessary …

In my experience, DataScience is not that narrow, the task spectrum covers more than just the core area. This misunderstanding comes from Data Science courses and – for me – I should point to the overall picture of Data Science again and again. In courses and seminars, which want to teach Data Science as a discipline, the focus will of course be on the core area: programming, tools and methods from mathematics & statistics.

Data Leader Day 2017 – Die Benefits für Data Scientists & Data Engineers

In eigener Sache…

Der Data Leader Day (www.dataleaderday.com) am 09.11.2017 im Spreespeicher in Berlin ist das Event für praktische Umsetzungsempfehlungen für die Big Data und Data Science von führenden Anwendern aus der Industrie – unsere Data Leader. Vor allem die hochrangigen Referenten ziehen dabei Teilnehmer aus der ganzen DACH-Region an, um neue Kontakte zu knüpfen und wichtige Impulse für die eigene digitale Weiterentwicklung zu erhalten. Es handelt sich dabei jedoch nicht um eine anonyme Veranstaltung, sondern um ein Event mit der richtigen Konfiguration zum Fachsimpeln und Netzwerken in einer persönlichen Atmosphäre.


Firmenkontaktgespräche auf dem Data Leader Day

Der Data Leader Day 2017 bringt Nachwuchskräfte aus der Big Data Welt und Unternehmen zusammen. Dafür richten wir einen Young Professional Roundtable ein, an dem wir das Zusammentreffen organisieren.

Für Studenten, Absolventen und Young Professionals

Sie haben bereits erste Erfahrung als Data Scientist gesammelt und möchten sich weiterentwickeln? Neben dem umfangreichen Vortragsprogramm präsentieren sich Firmenvertreter und Recruiter auf dem Data Leader Day in Berlin. Dort haben Sie die Möglichkeit, mehr über die Aufgaben, Arbeitsweise und Karrierewege als Data Scientist in Gesprächen mit Entscheidern zu erfahren.

Nachwuchskräfte, die an Praktika, Werksstudentenstellen und Direkteinstiege im Bereich Data Science interessiert sind, können sich vorab für Einzelgespräche bewerben.

Connected Industry, der Hauptorganisator der Veranstaltung, vergibt für Young Professionals 30 Tickets zum Preis von 50 € (inkl. Verpflegung, Event-Teilnahme und -unterlagen) für Nachwuchskräfte. Bewerben Sie sich jetzt mit einer kurzen Vorstellung zu Ihrer Person und einem Lebenslauf als PDF-Datei via E-Mail an info@dataleaderday.com.

Für Personaler und Führungskräfte

Der Data Leader Day am 09.11.2017 im Berliner Spreespeicher ist das Premium-Event, das sich mit den Möglichkeiten und Lösungen rund um die Digitalisierung, Big Data und Industrie 4.0 beschäftigt. Mit dabei sind u.a. Dr. Eberhard Kurz (CIO, Deutsche Bahn), Dr. Andreas Braun (Head of Global Data & Analytics, Allianz), Steffen Winkler (Vice President, Bosch Rexroth), Dr. Michael Müller-Wünsch (CIO, Otto Group), Helen Arnold (President SAP Data Network) und Peter Krause (Geschäftsführer, First Sensor).

Der Data Leader Day ist darüber hinaus die Plattform für neue Kontakte zu Young Professionals aus dem Bereich Data Science. Als Besucher erhalten Sie die Möglichkeit, sich als attraktiver Arbeitgeber zu präsentieren und den Data Science Nachwuchs auf sich aufmerksam zu machen. Gerne stehen wir Ihnen vorab für die Organisation von persönlichen Einzelgesprächen mit Nachwuchskräften zur Verfügung.


25% Ticket-Rabatt über den Buchungscode “DATASCIENCEBLOG”

Alle diejenigen, die es mit dem aufmerksamen Lesen bis an diese Stelle geschafft haben, dürfen sich über einen 25%igen Rabatt auf alle Tickets für den Data Leader Day 2017 freuen. Das funktioniert so: Rufen Sie sich die Ticket-Sektion auf www.dataleaderday.com auf oder klicken Sie auf diesen Direktlink zum Ticketverkauf.


Sponsoren

harnham-logo datanomiq-logo
netdescribe-logo celonis-logo

Volunteers für den Data Leader Day gesucht!

Wir suchen motivierte Studierende und Promovierende, die uns bei der Durchführung der Konferenz als Volunteer unterstützen. Dabei erhaltet ihr einen Überblick über aktuelle Praxis- und Forschungsthemen, persönliche Kontakte zu den Entscheidern der deutschen Digitalwirtschaft sowie einen Einblick in den Ablauf hinter den Kulissen einer Konferenz.

Holen Sie sich Anregungen aus unterschiedlichen Branchen und treffen Sie führende Persönlichkeiten der deutschen Digitalwirtschaft sowie aus den Digital bzw. Data Labs der traditionellen Industrie.

Was muss ich als Volunteer machen?

  • Unterstützung am Empfang der Konferenz
  • Allgemeine organisatorische Tätigkeiten
  • Moderation des Young Professional Networkings
  • Beantwortung von organisatorischen Fragen von Vortragenden und Konferenzteilnehmern Unterstützung des Organisationsteams
Was bekomme ich dafür?

  • Kostenfreie Teilnahme an der Konferenz im Rahmen der betreuten Kurse, inkl. Unterlagen
  • Kostenfreier Teilnahme am
  • Kostenfreie Verpflegung (Pausen, Mittagessen, etc.)
  • Provision für Einladung von Teilnehmern
Wann?

  1. November 2017 (07.30 Uhr – 18.30 Uhr)
Wo?

Spreespeicher (Stralauer Allee 2, 10245 Berlin)

Wie kann ich mich bewerben?

Um als Volunteer am Data Leader Day 2017 teilzunehmen, bewerbt Euch bis zum 15.10.2017 unter info@dataleaderday.com. Wir geben euch zeitnah Bescheid, ob ihr dabei seid. Wir freuen uns auf euch!

Rückblick: Data Leader Day 2016

Rückblick: Agenda, Sponsoren und Fotos vom Data Leader Day 2016

 

Data Science Knowledge Stack – Was ein Data Scientist können muss

Was muss ein Data Scientist können? Diese Frage wurde bereits häufig gestellt und auch häufig beantwortet. In der Tat ist man sich mittlerweile recht einig darüber, welche Aufgaben ein Data Scientist für Aufgaben übernehmen kann und welche Fähigkeiten dafür notwendig sind. Ich möchte versuchen, diesen Konsens in eine Grafik zu bringen: Ein Schichten-Modell, ähnlich des OSI-Layer-Modells (welches übrigens auch jeder Data Scientist kennen sollte).
Ich gebe Einführungs-Seminare in Data Science für Kaufleute und Ingenieure und bei der Erläuterung, was wir in den Seminaren gemeinsam theoretisch und mit praxisnahen Übungen erarbeiten müssen, bin ich auf die Idee für dieses Schichten-Modell gekommen. Denn bei meinen Seminaren fängt es mit der Problemstellung bereits an, ich gebe nämlich Seminare für Data Science für Business Analytics mit Python. Also nicht beispielsweise für medizinische Analysen und auch nicht mit R oder Julia. Ich vermittle also nicht irgendein Data Science, sondern eine ganz bestimmte Richtung.

Ein Data Scientist muss bei jedem Data Science Vorhaben Probleme auf unterschiedlichsten Ebenen bewältigen, beispielsweise klappt der Datenzugriff nicht wie geplant oder die Daten haben eine andere Struktur als erwartet. Ein Data Scientist kann Stunden damit verbringen, seinen eigenen Quellcode zu debuggen oder sich in neue Data Science Pakete für seine ausgewählte Programmiersprache einzuarbeiten. Auch müssen die richtigen Algorithmen zur Datenauswertung ausgewählt, richtig parametrisiert und getestet werden, manchmal stellt sich dabei heraus, dass die ausgewählten Methoden nicht die optimalen waren. Letztendlich soll ein Mehrwert für den Fachbereich generiert werden und auch auf dieser Ebene wird ein Data Scientist vor besondere Herausforderungen gestellt.


english-flagRead this article in English:
“Data Science Knowledge Stack – Abstraction of the Data Scientist Skillset”


Data Science Knowledge Stack

Mit dem Data Science Knowledge Stack möchte ich einen strukturierten Einblick in die Aufgaben und Herausforderungen eines Data Scientists geben. Die Schichten des Stapels stellen zudem einen bidirektionalen Fluss dar, der von oben nach unten und von unten nach oben verläuft, denn Data Science als Disziplin ist ebenfalls bidirektional: Wir versuchen gestellte Fragen mit Daten zu beantworten oder wir schauen, welche Potenziale in den Daten liegen, um bisher nicht gestellte Fragen zu beantworten.

Der Data Science Knowledge Stack besteht aus sechs Schichten:

Database Technology Knowledge

Ein Data Scientist arbeitet im Schwerpunkt mit Daten und die liegen selten direkt in einer CSV-Datei strukturiert vor, sondern in der Regel in einer oder in mehreren Datenbanken, die ihren eigenen Regeln unterliegen. Insbesondere Geschäftsdaten, beispielsweise aus dem ERP- oder CRM-System, liegen in relationalen Datenbanken vor, oftmals von Microsoft, Oracle, SAP oder eine Open-Source-Alternative. Ein guter Data Scientist beherrscht nicht nur die Structured Query Language (SQL), sondern ist sich auch der Bedeutung relationaler Beziehungen bewusst, kennt also auch das Prinzip der Normalisierung.

Andere Arten von Datenbanken, sogenannte NoSQL-Datenbanken (Not only SQL)  beruhen auf Dateiformaten, einer Spalten- oder einer Graphenorientiertheit, wie beispielsweise MongoDB, Cassandra oder GraphDB. Einige dieser Datenbanken verwenden zum Datenzugriff eigene Programmiersprachen (z. B. JavaScript bei MongoDB oder die graphenorientierte Datenbank Neo4J hat eine eigene Sprache namens Cypher). Manche dieser Datenbanken bieten einen alternativen Zugriff über SQL (z. B. Hive für Hadoop).

Ein Data Scientist muss mit unterschiedlichen Datenbanksystemen zurechtkommen und mindestens SQL – den Quasi-Standard für Datenverarbeitung – sehr gut beherrschen.

Data Access & Transformation Knowledge

Liegen Daten in einer Datenbank vor, können Data Scientists einfache (und auch nicht so einfache) Analysen bereits direkt auf der Datenbank ausführen. Doch wie bekommen wir die Daten in unsere speziellen Analyse-Tools? Hierfür muss ein Data Scientist wissen, wie Daten aus der Datenbank exportiert werden können. Für einmalige Aktionen kann ein Export als CSV-Datei reichen, doch welche Trennzeichen und Textqualifier können verwendet werden? Eventuell ist der Export zu groß, so dass die Datei gesplittet werden muss.
Soll eine direkte und synchrone Datenanbindung zwischen dem Analyse-Tool und der Datenbank bestehen, kommen Schnittstellen wie REST, ODBC oder JDBC ins Spiel. Manchmal muss auch eine Socket-Verbindung hergestellt werden und das Prinzip einer Client-Server-Architektur sollte bekannt sein. Auch mit synchronen und asynchronen Verschlüsselungsverfahren sollte ein Data Scientist vertraut sein, denn nicht selten wird mit vertraulichen Daten gearbeitet und ein Mindeststandard an Sicherheit ist zumindest bei geschäftlichen Anwendungen stets einzuhalten.

Viele Daten liegen nicht strukturiert in einer Datenbank vor, sondern sind sogenannte unstrukturierte oder semi-strukturierte Daten aus Dokumenten oder aus Internetquellen. Auch hier haben wir es mit Schnittstellen zutun, ein häufiger Einstieg für Data Scientists stellt beispielsweise die Twitter-API dar. Manchmal wollen wir Daten in nahezu Echtzeit streamen, beispielsweise Maschinendaten. Dies kann recht anspruchsvoll sein, so das Data Streaming beinahe eine eigene Disziplin darstellt, mit der ein Data Scientist schnell in Berührung kommen kann.

Programming Language Knowledge

Programmiersprachen sind für Data Scientists Werkzeuge, um Daten zu verarbeiten und die Verarbeitung zu automatisieren. Data Scientists sind in der Regel keine richtigen Software-Entwickler, sie müssen sich nicht um Software-Sicherheit oder -Ergonomie kümmern. Ein gewisses Basiswissen über Software-Architekturen hilft jedoch oftmals, denn immerhin sollen manche Data Science Programme in eine IT-Landschaft integriert werden. Unverzichtbar ist hingegen das Verständnis für objektorientierte Programmierung und die gute Kenntnis der Syntax der ausgewählten Programmiersprachen, zumal nicht jede Programmiersprache für alle Vorhaben die sinnvollste ist.

Auf dem Level der Programmiersprache gibt es beim Arbeitsalltag eines Data Scientists bereits viele Fallstricke, die in der Programmiersprache selbst begründet sind, denn jede hat ihre eigenen Tücken und Details entscheiden darüber, ob eine Analyse richtig oder falsch abläuft: Beispielsweise ob Datenobjekte als Kopie oder als Referenz übergeben oder wie NULL-Werte behandelt werden.

Data Science Tool & Library Knowledge

Hat ein Data Scientist seine Daten erstmal in sein favorisiertes Tool geladen, beispielsweise in eines von IBM, SAS oder in eine Open-Source-Alternative wie Octave, fängt seine Kernarbeit gerade erst an. Diese Tools sind allerdings eher nicht selbsterklärend und auch deshalb gibt es ein vielfältiges Zertifizierungsangebot für diverse Data Science Tools. Viele (wenn nicht die meisten) Data Scientists arbeiten überwiegend direkt mit einer Programmiersprache, doch reicht diese alleine nicht aus, um effektiv statistische Datenanalysen oder Machine Learning zu betreiben: Wir verwenden Data Science Bibliotheken, also Pakete (Packages), die uns Datenstrukturen und Methoden als Vorgabe bereitstellen und die Programmiersprache somit erweitern, damit allerdings oftmals auch neue Tücken erzeugen. Eine solche Bibliothek, beispielsweise Scikit-Learn für Python, ist eine in der Programmiersprache umgesetzte Methodensammlung und somit ein Data Science Tool. Die Verwendung derartiger Bibliotheken will jedoch gelernt sein und erfordert für die zuverlässige Anwendung daher Einarbeitung und Praxiserfahrung.

Geht es um Big Data Analytics, also die Analyse von besonders großen Daten, betreten wir das Feld von Distributed Computing (Verteiltes Rechnen). Tools (bzw. Frameworks) wie Apache Hadoop, Apache Spark oder Apache Flink ermöglichen es, Daten zeitlich parallel auf mehren Servern zu verarbeiten und auszuwerten. Auch stellen diese Tools wiederum eigene Bibliotheken bereit, für Machine Learning z. B. Mahout, MLlib und FlinkML.

Data Science Method Knowledge

Ein Data Scientist ist nicht einfach nur ein Bediener von Tools, sondern er nutzt die Tools, um seine Analyse-Methoden auf Daten anzuwenden, die er für die festgelegten Ziele ausgewählt hat. Diese Analyse-Methoden sind beispielweise Auswertungen der beschreibenden Statistik, Schätzverfahren oder Hypothesen-Tests. Etwas mathematischer sind Verfahren des maschinellen Lernens zum Data Mining, beispielsweise Clusterung oder Dimensionsreduktion oder mehr in Richtung automatisierter Entscheidungsfindung durch Klassifikation oder Regression.

Maschinelle Lernverfahren funktionieren in der Regel nicht auf Anhieb, sie müssen unter Einsatz von Optimierungsverfahren, wie der Gradientenmethode, verbessert werden. Ein Data Scientist muss Unter- und Überanpassung erkennen können und er muss beweisen, dass die Vorhersageergebnisse für den geplanten Einsatz akkurat genug sind.

Spezielle Anwendungen bedingen spezielles Wissen, was beispielsweise für die Themengebiete der Bilderkennung (Visual Computing) oder der Verarbeitung von menschlicher Sprache (Natural Language Processiong) zutrifft. Spätestens an dieser Stelle öffnen wir die Tür zum Deep Learning.

Fachexpertise

Data Science ist kein Selbstzweck, sondern eine Disziplin, die Fragen aus anderen Fachgebieten mit Daten beantworten möchte. Aus diesem Grund ist Data Science so vielfältig. Betriebswirtschaftler brauchen Data Scientists, um Finanztransaktionen zu analysieren, beispielsweise um Betrugsszenarien zu erkennen oder um die Kundenbedürfnisse besser zu verstehen oder aber, um Lieferketten zu optimieren. Naturwissenschaftler wie Geologen, Biologen oder Experimental-Physiker nutzen ebenfalls Data Science, um ihre Beobachtungen mit dem Ziel der Erkenntnisgewinnung zu machen. Ingenieure möchten die Situation und Zusammenhänge von Maschinenanlagen oder Fahrzeugen besser verstehen und Mediziner interessieren sich für die bessere Diagnostik und Medikation bei ihren Patienten.

Damit ein Data Scientist einen bestimmten Fachbereich mit seinem Wissen über Daten, Tools und Analyse-Methoden ergebnisorientiert unterstützen kann, benötigt er selbst ein Mindestmaß an der entsprechenden Fachexpertise. Wer Analysen für Kaufleute, Ingenieure, Naturwissenschaftler, Mediziner, Juristen oder andere Interessenten machen möchte, muss eben jene Leute auch fachlich verstehen können.

Engere Data Science Definition

Während die Data Science Pioniere längst hochgradig spezialisierte Teams aufgebaut haben, suchen beispielsweise kleinere Unternehmen eher den Data Science Allrounder, der vom Zugriff auf die Datenbank bis hin zur Implementierung der analytischen Anwendung das volle Aufgabenspektrum unter Abstrichen beim Spezialwissen übernehmen kann. Unternehmen mit spezialisierten Daten-Experten unterscheiden jedoch längst in Data Scientists, Data Engineers und Business Analysts. Die Definition für Data Science und die Abgrenzung der Fähigkeiten, die ein Data Scientist haben sollte, schwankt daher zwischen der breiteren und einer engeren Abgrenzung.

Die engere Betrachtung sieht vor, dass ein Data Engineer die Datenbereitstellung übernimmt, der Data Scientist diese in seine Tools lädt und gemeinsam mit den Kollegen aus dem Fachbereich die Datenanalyse betreibt. Demnach bräuchte ein Data Scientist kein Wissen über Datenbanken oder APIs und auch die Fachexpertise wäre nicht notwendig…

In der beruflichen Praxis sieht Data Science meiner Erfahrung nach so nicht aus, das Aufgabenspektrum umfasst mehr als nur den Kernbereich. Dieser Irrtum entsteht in Data Science Kursen und auch in Seminaren – würde ich nicht oft genug auf das Gesamtbild hinweisen. In Kursen und Seminaren, die Data Science als Disziplin vermitteln wollen, wird sich selbstverständlich auf den Kernbereich fokussiert: Programmierung, Tools und Methoden aus der Mathematik & Statistik.

Data Science and Predictive Analytics in Healthcare

Doing data science in a healthcare company can save lives. Whether it’s by predicting which patients have a tumor on an MRI, are at risk of re-admission, or have misclassified diagnoses in electronic medical records are all examples of how predictive models can lead to better health outcomes and improve the quality of life of patients.  Nevertheless, the healthcare industry presents many unique challenges and opportunities for data scientists.

The impact of data science in healthcare

Healthcare providers have a plethora of important but sensitive data. Medical records include a diverse set of data such as basic demographics, diagnosed illnesses, and a wealth of clinical information such as lab test results. For patients with chronic diseases, there could be a long and detailed history of data available on a number of health indicators due to the frequency of visits to a healthcare provider. Information from medical records can often be combined with outside data as well. For example, a patient’s address can be combined with other publicly available information to determine the number of surgeons that practice near a patient or other relevant information about the type of area that patients reside in.

With this rich data about a patient as well as their surroundings, models can be built and trained to predict many outcomes of interest. One important area of interest is models predicting disease progression, which can be used for disease management and planning. For example, at Fresenius Medical Care (where we primarily care for patients with chronic conditions such as kidney disease), we use a Chronic Kidney Disease progression model that can predict the trajectory of a patient’s condition to help clinicians decide whether and when to proceed to the next stage in their medical care. Predictive models can also notify clinicians about patients who may require interventions to reduce risk of negative outcomes. For instance, we use models to predict which patients are at risk for hospitalization or missing a dialysis treatment. These predictions, along with the key factors driving the prediction, are presented to clinicians who can decide if certain interventions might help reduce the patient’s risk.

Challenges of data science in healthcare

One challenge is that the healthcare industry is far behind other sectors in terms of adopting the latest technology and analytics tools. This does present some challenges, and data scientists should be aware that the data infrastructure and development environment at many healthcare companies will not be at the bleeding edge of the field. However it also means there are a lot of opportunities for improvement, and even small simple models can yield vast improvements over current methods.

Another challenge in the healthcare sector arises from the sensitive nature of medical information. Due to concerns over data privacy, it can often be difficult to obtain access to data that the company has. For this reason, data scientists considering a position at a healthcare company should be aware of whether there is already an established protocol for data professionals to get access to the data. If there isn’t, be aware that simply getting access to the data may be a major effort in itself.

Finally, it is important to keep in mind the end-use of any predictive model. In many cases, there are very different costs to false-negatives and false-positives. A false-negative may be detrimental to a patient’s health, while too many false-positives may lead to many costly and unnecessary treatments (also to the detriment of patients’ health for certain treatments as well as economy overall). Education about the proper use of predictive models and their limitations is essential for end-users. Finally, making sure the output of a predictive model is actionable is important. Predicting that a patient is at high-risk is only useful if the model outputs is interpretable enough to explain what factors are putting that patient at risk. Furthermore, if the model is being used to plan interventions, the factors that can be changed need to be highlighted in some way – telling a clinician that a patient is at risk because of their age is not useful if the point of the prediction is to lower risk through intervention.

The future of data science in the healthcare sector

The future holds a lot of promise for data science in healthcare. Wearable devices that track all kinds of activity and biometric data are becoming more sophisticated and more common. Streaming data coming from either wearables or devices providing treatment (such as dialysis machines) could eventually be used to provide real-time alerts to patients or clinicians about health events outside of the hospital.

Currently, a major issue facing medical providers is that patients’ data tends to exist in silos. There is little integration across electronic medical record systems (both between and within medical providers), which can lead to fragmented care. This can lead to clinicians receiving out of date or incomplete information about a patient, or to duplication of treatments. Through a major data engineering effort, these systems could (and should) be integrated. This would vastly increase the potential of data scientists and data engineers, who could then provide analytics services that took into account the whole patients’ history to provide a level of consistency across care providers. Data workers could use such an integrated record to alert clinicians to duplications of procedures or dangerous prescription drug combinations.

Data scientists have a lot to offer in the healthcare industry. The advances of machine learning and data science can and should be adopted in a space where the health of individuals can be improved. The opportunities for data scientists in this sector are nearly endless, and the potential for good is enormous.