The 6 most in-demand AI jobs and how to get them

A press release issued in December 2017 by Gartner, Inc explicitly states, 2020 will be a pivotal year in Artificial Intelligence-related employment dynamics. It states AI will become “a positive job motivator”.

However, the Gartner report also sounds some alarm bells. “The number of jobs affected by AI will vary by industry-through 2019, healthcare, the public sector and education will see continuously growing job demand while manufacturing will be hit the hardest. Starting in 2020, AI-related job creation will cross into positive territory, reaching two million net-new jobs in 2025,” the press release adds.

This phenomenon is expected to strike worldwide, as a report carried by a leading Indian financial daily, The Hindu BusinessLine states. “The year 2018 will see a sharp increase in demand for professionals with skills in emerging technologies such as Artificial Intelligence (AI) and machine learning, even as people with capabilities in Big Data and Analytics will continue to be the most sought after by companies across sectors, say sources in the recruitment industry,” this news article says.

Before we proceed, let us understand what exactly does Artificial Intelligence or AI mean.

Understanding Artificial Intelligence

Encyclopedia Britannica explains AI as: “The ability of a digital computer or computer-controlled robot to perform tasks commonly associated with human beings.” Classic examples of AI are computer games that can be played solo on a computer. Of these, one can be a human while the other is the reasoning, analytical and other intellectual property a computer. Chess is one example of such a game. While playing Chess with a computer, AI will analyze your moves. It will predict and reason why you made them and respond accordingly.

Similarly, AI imitates functions of the human brain to a very great extent. Of course, AI can never match the prowess of humans but it can come fairly close.

What this means?

This means that AI technology will advance exponentially. The main objective for developing AI will not aim at reducing dependence on humans that can result in loss of jobs or mass retrenchment of employees. Having a large population of unemployed people is harmful to economy of any country. Secondly, people without money will not be able to utilize most functions that are performed through AI, which will render the technology useless.

The advent and growing popularity of AI can be summarized in words of Bill Gates. According to the founder of Microsoft, AI will have a positive impact on people’s lives. In an interview with Fox Business, he said, people would have more spare time that would eventually lead to happier life. However he cautions, it would be long before AI starts making any significant impact on our daily activities and jobs.

Career in AI

Since AI primarily aims at making human life better, several companies are testing the technology. Global online retailer Amazon is one amongst these. Banks and financial institutions, service providers and several other industries are expected to jump on the AI bandwagon in 2018 and coming years. Hence, this is the right time to aim for a career in AI. Currently, there exists a great demand for AI professionals. Here, we look at the top six employment opportunities in Artificial Intelligence.

Computer Vision Research Engineer

 A Computer Vision Research Engineer’s work includes research and analysis, developing software and tools, and computer vision technologies. The primary role of this job is to ensure customer experience that equals human interaction.

Business Intelligence Engineer

As the job designation implies, the role of a Business Intelligence Engineer is to gather data from multiple functions performed by AI such as marketing and collecting payments. It also involves studying consumer patterns and bridging gaps that AI leaves.

Data Scientist

A posting for Data Scientist on recruitment website Indeed describes Data Scientist in these words: “ A mixture between a statistician, scientist, machine learning expert and engineer: someone who has the passion for building and improving Internet-scale products informed by data. The ideal candidate understands human behavior and knows what to look for in the data.

Research and Development Engineer (AI)

Research & Development Engineers are needed to find ways and means to improve functions performed through Artificial Intelligence. They research voice and text chat conversations conducted by bots or robotic intelligence with real-life persons to ensure there are no glitches. They also develop better solutions to eliminate the gap between human and AI interactions.

Machine Learning Specialist

The job of a Machine Learning Specialist is rather complex. They are required to study patterns such as the large-scale use of data, uploads, common words used in any language and how it can be incorporated into AI functions as well as analyzing and improving existing techniques.

Researchers

Researchers in AI is perhaps the best-paid lot. They are required to research into various aspects of AI in any organization. Their role involves researching usage patterns, AI responses, data analysis, data mining and research, linguistic differences based on demographics and almost every human function that AI is expected to perform.

As with any other field, there are several other designations available in AI. However, these will depend upon your geographic location. The best way to find the demand for any AI job is to look for good recruitment or job posting sites, especially those specific to your region.

In conclusion

Since AI is a technology that is gathering momentum, it will be some years before there is a flood of people who can be hired as fresher or expert in this field. Consequently, the demand for AI professionals is rather high. Median salaries these jobs mentioned above range between US$ 100,000 to US$ 150,000 per year.

However, before leaping into AI, it is advisable to find out what other qualifications are required by employers. As with any job, some companies need AI experts that hold specific engineering degrees combined with additional qualifications in IT and a certificate that states you hold the required AI training. Despite, this is the best time to make a career in the AI sector.

New Sponsor: Snowflake

Dear readers,

we have good news again: Now we welcome snowflake as our new Data Science Blog Sponsor! So we are booked out for the moment regarding sponsoring. Snowflake provides data warehousing for the cloud and has an unique data, access and feature model, the snowflake. Now we are looking forward to editorial contributions by snowflake.

Snowflake is the only data warehouse built for the cloud. Snowflake delivers the performance, concurrency and simplicity needed to store and analyze all data available to an organization in one location. Snowflake’s technology combines the power of data warehousing, the flexibility of big data platforms, the elasticity of the cloud, and live data sharing at a fraction of the cost of traditional solutions. Snowflake: Your data, no limits. Find out more at snowflake.net.

Furthermore, snowflake will also sponsor our Data Leader Days 2018 in November in Berlin!

Applying Data Science Techniques in Python to Evaluate Ionospheric Perturbations from Earthquakes

Multi-GNSS (Galileo, GPS, and GLONASS) Vertical Total Electron Content Estimates: Applying Data Science techniques in Python to Evaluate Ionospheric Perturbations from Earthquakes

1 Introduction

Today, Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) observations are routinely used to study the physical processes that occur within the Earth’s upper atmosphere. Due to the experienced satellite signal propagation effects the total electron content (TEC) in the ionosphere can be estimated and the derived Global Ionosphere Maps (GIMs) provide an important contribution to monitoring space weather. While large TEC variations are mainly associated with solar activity, small ionospheric perturbations can also be induced by physical processes such as acoustic, gravity and Rayleigh waves, often generated by large earthquakes.

In this study Ionospheric perturbations caused by four earthquake events have been observed and are subsequently used as case studies in order to validate an in-house software developed using the Python programming language. The Python libraries primarily utlised are Pandas, Scikit-Learn, Matplotlib, SciPy, NumPy, Basemap, and ObsPy. A combination of Machine Learning and Data Analysis techniques have been applied. This in-house software can parse both receiver independent exchange format (RINEX) versions 2 and 3 raw data, with particular emphasis on multi-GNSS observables from GPS, GLONASS and Galileo. BDS (BeiDou) compatibility is to be added in the near future.

Several case studies focus on four recent earthquakes measuring above a moment magnitude (MW) of 7.0 and include: the 11 March 2011 MW 9.1 Tohoku, Japan, earthquake that also generated a tsunami; the 17 November 2013 MW 7.8 South Scotia Ridge Transform (SSRT), Scotia Sea earthquake; the 19 August 2016 MW 7.4 North Scotia Ridge Transform (NSRT) earthquake; and the 13 November 2016 MW 7.8 Kaikoura, New Zealand, earthquake.

Ionospheric disturbances generated by all four earthquakes have been observed by looking at the estimated vertical TEC (VTEC) and residual VTEC values. The results generated from these case studies are similar to those of published studies and validate the integrity of the in-house software.

2 Data Cleaning and Data Processing Methodology

Determining the absolute VTEC values are useful in order to understand the background ionospheric conditions when looking at the TEC perturbations, however small-scale variations in electron density are of primary interest. Quality checking processed GNSS data, applying carrier phase leveling to the measurements, and comparing the TEC perturbations with a polynomial fit creating residual plots are discussed in this section.

Time delay and phase advance observables can be measured from dual-frequency GNSS receivers to produce TEC data. Using data retrieved from the Center of Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) site (ftp://ftp.unibe.ch/aiub/CODE), the differential code biases are subtracted from the ionospheric observables.

2.1 Determining VTEC: Thin Shell Mapping Function

The ionospheric shell height, H, used in ionosphere modeling has been open to debate for many years and typically ranges from 300 – 400 km, which corresponds to the maximum electron density within the ionosphere. The mapping function compensates for the increased path length traversed by the signal within the ionosphere. Figure 1 demonstrates the impact of varying the IPP height on the TEC values.

Figure 1 Impact on TEC values from varying IPP heights. The height of the thin shell, H, is increased in 50km increments from 300 to 500 km.

2.2 Phase Smoothing

For dual-frequency GNSS users TEC values can be retrieved with the use of dual-frequency measurements by applying calculations. Calculation of TEC for pseudorange measurements in practice produces a noisy outcome and so the relative phase delay between two carrier frequencies – which produces a more precise representation of TEC fluctuations – is preferred. To circumvent the effect of pseudorange noise on TEC data, GNSS pseudorange measurements can be smoothed by carrier phase measurements, with the use of the carrier phase smoothing technique, which is often referred to as carrier phase leveling.

Figure 2 Phase smoothed code differential delay

2.3 Residual Determination

For the purpose of this study the monitoring of small-scale variations in ionospheric electron density from the ionospheric observables are of particular interest. Longer period variations can be associated with diurnal alterations, and changes in the receiver- satellite elevation angles. In order to remove these longer period variations in the TEC time series as well as to monitor more closely the small-scale variations in ionospheric electron density, a higher-order polynomial is fitted to the TEC time series. This higher-order polynomial fit is then subtracted from the observed TEC values resulting in the residuals. The variation of TEC due to the TID perturbation are thus represented by the residuals. For this report the polynomial order applied was typically greater than 4, and was chosen to emulate the nature of the arc for that particular time series. The order number selected is dependent on the nature of arcs displayed upon calculating the VTEC values after an initial inspection of the VTEC plots.

3 Results

3.1 Tohoku Earthquake

For this particular report, the sampled data focused on what was retrieved from the IGS station, MIZU, located at Mizusawa, Japan. The MIZU site is 39N 08′ 06.61″ and 141E 07′ 58.18″. The location of the data collection site, MIZU, and the earthquake epicenter can be seen in Figure 3.

Figure 3 MIZU IGS station and Tohoku earthquake epicenter [generated using the Python library, Basemap]

Figure 4 displays the ionospheric delay in terms of vertical TEC (VTEC), in units of TECU (1 TECU = 1016 el m-2). The plot is split into two smaller subplots, the upper section displaying the ionospheric delay (VTEC) in units of TECU, the lower displaying the residuals. The vertical grey-dashed lined corresponds to the epoch of the earthquake at 05:46:23 UT (2:46:23 PM local time) on March 11 2011. In the upper section of the plot, the blue line corresponds to the absolute VTEC value calculated from the observations, in this case L1 and L2 on GPS, whereby the carrier phase leveling technique was applied to the data set. The VTEC values are mapped from the STEC values which are calculated from the LOS between MIZU and the GPS satellite PRN18 (on Figure 4 denoted G18). For this particular data set as seen in Figure 4, a polynomial fit of  five degrees was applied, which corresponds to the red-dashed line. As an alternative to polynomial fitting, band-pass filtering can be employed when TEC perturbations are desired. However for the scope of this report polynomial fitting to the time series of TEC data was the only method used. In the lower section of Figure 4 the residuals are plotted. The residuals are simply the phase smoothed delay values (the blue line) minus the polynomial fit line (the red-dashed line). All ionosphere delay plots follow the same layout pattern and all time data is represented in UT (UT = GPS – 15 leap seconds, whereby 15 leap seconds correspond to the amount of leap seconds at the time of the seismic event). The time series shown for the ionosphere delay plots are given in terms of decimal of the hour, so that the format follows hh.hh.

Figure 4 VTEC and residual plot for G18 at MIZU on March 11 2011

3.2 South Georgia Earthquake

In the South Georgia Island region located in the North Scotia Ridge Transform (NSRT) plate boundary between the South American and Scotia plates on 19 August 2016, a magnitude of 7.4 MW earthquake struck at 7:32:22 UT. This subsection analyses the data retrieved from KEPA and KRSA. As well as computing the GPS and GLONASS TEC values, four Galileo satellites (E08, E14, E26, E28) are also analysed. Figure 5 demonstrates the TEC perturbations as computed for the Galileo L1 and L5 carrier frequencies.

Figure 5 VTEC and residual plots at KRSA on 19 August 2016. The plots are from the perspective of the GNSS receiver at KRSA, for four Galileo satellites (a) E08; (b) E14; (c) E24; (d) E26. The y-axes and x-axes in all plots do not conform with one another but are adjusted to fit the data. The y-axes for the residual section of each plot is consistent with one another.

Figure 6 Geometry of the Galileo (E08, E14, E24 and E26) satellites’ projected ground track whereby the IPP is set to 300km altitude. The orange lines correspond to tectonic plate boundaries.

4 Conclusion

The proximity of the MIZU site and magnitude of the Tohoku event has provided a remarkable – albeit a poignant – opportunity to analyse the ocean-ionospheric coupling aftermath of a deep submarine seismic event. The Tohoku event has also enabled the observation of the origin and nature of the TIDs generated by both a major earthquake and tsunami in close proximity to the epicenter. Further, the Python software developed is more than capable of providing this functionality, by drawing on its mathematical packages, such as NumPy, Pandas, SciPy, and Matplotlib, as well as employing the cartographic toolkit provided from the Basemap package, and finally by utilizing the focal mechanism generation library, Obspy.

Pre-seismic cursors have been investigated in the past and strongly advocated in particular by Kosuke Heki. The topic of pre-seismic ionospheric disturbances remains somewhat controversial. A potential future study area could be the utilization of the Python program – along with algorithmic amendments – to verify the existence of this phenomenon. Such work would heavily involve the use of Scikit-Learn in order to ascertain the existence of any pre-cursors.

Finally, the code developed is still retained privately and as of yet not launched to any particular platform, such as GitHub. More detailed information on this report can be obtained here:

Download as PDF

Data Science Survey by lexoro.ai

Ergebnisse unserer ersten Data Science Survey

Wie denken Data Scientists über ihre Skills, ihre Karriere und ihre Arbeitgeber? Data Science, Machine Learning, Künstliche Intelligenz – mehr als bloße Hype-Begriffe und entfernte Zukunftsmusik! Wir stecken mitten in massiven strukturellen Veränderungen. Die Digitalisierungswelle der vergangenen Jahre war nur der Anfang. Jede Branche ist betroffen. Schnell kann ein Gefühl von Bedrohung und Angst vor dem Unbekannten aufkommen. Tatsächlich liegen aber nie zuvor dagewesene Chancen und Potentiale vor unseren Füßen. Die Herausforderung ist es diese zu erkennen und dann die notwendigen Veränderungen umzusetzen.
Diese Survey möchte deshalb die Begriffe Data Science und Machine Learning einmal genauer beleuchten. Was steckt überhaupt hinter diesen Begriffen? Was muss ein Data Scientist können? Welche Gedanken macht sich ein Data Scientist über seine Karriere? Und sind Unternehmen hinsichtlich des Themas Machine Learning gut aufgestellt? Nun möchten wir die Ergebnisse dieser Umfrage vorstellen:



Link zu den Ergebnissen der ersten Data Science Survey by lexoro.ai

Interesse an einem Austausch zu verschiedenen Karriereperspektiven im Bereich Data Science/ Machine Learning? Dann registrieren Sie sich direkt auf dem lexoro Talent Check-In und ein lexoro-Berater wird sich bei Ihnen melden.

Pentaho User Meeting: Warum das CERN und die Bundespolizei auf Open Source setzen

Anzeige

Was bewegt die größte Forschungsorganisation der Welt dazu, Open Source-Technologien einzusetzen? Wieso nutzt die Bundespolizei das offene Tool Pentaho Data Integration, um ihr Data Warehouse zu befüllen? Die Antworten geben die Anwender selbst auf dem Pentaho User Meeting am 6. März in Frankfurt.

Das CERN und die Bundespolizei sind nur zwei der Referenten, die auf dem Anwendertreffen ihre Datenprojekte vorstellen. Auf dem Pentaho User Meeting treffen sich seit Jahren alle Pentaho-Anwender aus dem deutschsprachigen Raum. Da spielt es keine Rolle, ob das Datenprojekt schon seit Jahren läuft oder noch nicht mal begonnen hat. Ob Newbie oder Professional – wer sich täglich mit Unternehmensdaten beschäftigt, ist auf dem User Meeting willkommen.

Das Pentaho User Meeting findet am 6. März von 10.00 bis 18.00 Uhr statt. Die Teilnahme ist kostenlos, aus Organisationsgründen (Raum, Catering) wird um eine Anmeldung gebeten. Anmelden können Sie sich hier.

Alles dreht sich um die Aufbereitung und Analyse von Daten

Das Pentaho User Meeting findet seit 2014 statt und dient dem Erfahrungs- und Wissensaustausch beim Einsatz mit der Data Analytics- und Big Data-Plattform Pentaho. Jeder Anwender ist herzlich eingeladen, sein Projekt oder Eigenentwicklung vorzustellen. In den letzten Jahren nahmen ca. 100 Anwender am Treffen teil, unter den Referenten waren u.a. Bosch, Swissport, Deutsche See und Wiener Wohnen Kundenservice.

Am 6. März wird es unter anderem um diese Themen gehen:

  • Realtime Analytics bei der Bundespolizei
  • Pentaho in einer Kubernetes-Verwaltung beim Fondsverwalter Netfonds
  • Migration von Reports von Business Objects auf Pentaho im CERN
  • Datei-Handling mit Pentaho Data Integration bei der Kapitalgesellschaft Hansainvest
  • Vorhersagemodelle für Predictive Analytics
  • IoT Analytics Use Case: das Smart Trains-Projekt von Virgin und Hitachi
  • SAP-Daten mit Pentaho integrieren und analysieren
  • Service Management Analytics: 360 Grad-Blick auf IT Services

Interviews mit den Referenten finden Sie hier.

Für Networking und Gespräche mit den Referenten und Anwendern bleibt in den Pausen genügend Zeit. Nach Abschluss der Veranstaltung laden wir alle Teilnehmer herzlich zu einem Get together bei Pizza und Bier ein! Alle Informationen zum Event, die Agenda und Anmeldung finden Sie hier.

Ps.: Aktuelle Updates zum Event gibt es auf Twitter unter #PUM18

New Sponsor: Cloudera

Dear readers,

we have good news: We welcome Cloudera as our new Data Science Blog Sponsor! Cloudera is one of the most famous platform and solution provider for big data analytics and machine learning. This also means editorial contributions by Cloudera for at least one year.

At Cloudera, we believe that data can make what is impossible today, possible tomorrow. We empower people to transform complex data into clear and actionable insights. We deliver the modern platform for machine learning and analytics optimized for the cloud. The world’s largest enterprises trust Cloudera to help solve their most challenging business problems.

Learn more about our new sponsor at cloudera.com.

Process Mining – Der Trend für 2018

Etwa seit dem Jahr 2010 erlebt Process Mining einerseits als Technologie und Methode einen Boom, andererseits fristet Process Mining noch ein gewisses Nischendasein. Wie wird sich dieser Trend 2018 und 2019 entwickeln?

Was ist Process Mining?

Process Mining (siehe auch: Artikel über Process Mining) ist ein Verfahren der Datenanalyse mit dem Ziel der Visualisierung und Analyse von Prozessflüssen. Es ist ein Data Mining im Sinne der Gewinnung von Informationen aus Daten heraus, nicht jedoch Data Mining im Sinne des unüberwachten maschinellen Lernens. Konkret formuliert, ist Process Mining eine Methode, um Prozess datenbasiert zur Rekonstruieren und zu analysieren. Im Mittelpunkt stehen dabei Zeitstempel (TimeStamps), die auf eine Aktivität (Event) in einem IT-System hinweisen und sich über Vorgangnummern (CaseID) verknüpfen lassen.

Process Mining als Analyseverfahren ist zweiteilig: Als erstes muss über eine Programmiersprache (i.d.R. PL/SQL oder T-SQL, seltener auch R oder Python) ein Skript entwickelt werden, dass auf die Daten eines IT-Systems (meistens Datenbank-Tabellen eines ERP-Systems, manchmal auch LogFiles z. B. von Webservern) zugreift und die darin enthaltenden (und oftmals verteilten) Datenspuren in ein Protokoll (ein sogenanntes EventLog) überführt.

Ist das EventLog erstellt, wird diese in ein Process Mining Tool geladen, dass das EventLog visuell als Flow-Chart darstellt, Filter- und Analysemöglichkeiten anbietet. Auch Alertings, Dashboards mit Diagrammen oder Implementierungen von Machine Learning Algorithmen (z. B. zur Fraud-Detection) können zum Funktionsumfang dieser Tools gehören. Die angebotenen Tools unterscheiden sich von Anbieter zu Anbieter teilweise erheblich.

Welche Branchen setzen bislang auf Process Mining?

Diese Analysemethodik hat sicherlich bereits in allen Branchen ihren Einzug gefunden, jedoch arbeiten gegenwärtig insbesondere größere Industrieunternehmen, Energieversorger, Handelsunternehmen und Finanzdienstleister mit Process Mining. Process Mining hat sich bisher nur bei einigen wenigen Mittelständlern etabliert, andere denken noch über die Einführung nach oder haben noch nie etwas von Process Mining gehört.

Auch Beratungsunternehmen (Prozess-Consulting) und Wirtschaftsprüfungen (Audit) setzen Process Mining seit Jahren ein und bieten es direkt oder indirekt als Leistung für ihre Kunden an.

Welche IT-Systeme und Prozesse werden analysiert?

Und auch hier gilt: Alle möglichen operativen Prozesse werden analysiert, beispielsweise der Gewährleistungsabwicklung (Handel/Hersteller), Kreditgenehmigung (Banken) oder der Vertragsänderungen (Kundenübergabe zwischen Energie- oder Telekommunikationsanbietern). Entsprechend werden alle IT-Systeme analysiert, u. a. ERP-, CRM-, PLM-, DMS- und ITS-Systeme.

Allen voran werden Procure-to-Pay- und Order-to-Cash-Prozesse analysiert, die für viele Unternehmen typische Einstiegspunkte in Process Mining darstellen, auch weil einige Anbieter von Process Mining Tools die nötigen Skripte (ggf. als automatisierte Connectoren) der EventLog-Generierung aus gängigen ERP-Systemen für diese Prozesse bereits mitliefern.

Welche Erfolge wurden mit Process Mining bereits erreicht?

Die Erfolge von Process Mining sind in erster Linie mit der gewonnenen Prozesstransparenz zu verbinden. Process Mining ist eine starke Analysemethode, um Potenziale der Durchlaufzeiten-Optimierung aufzudecken. So lassen sich recht gut unnötige Wartezeiten und störende Prozesschleifen erkennen. Ebenfalls eignet sich Process Mining wunderbar für die datengetriebene Prozessanalyse mit Blick auf den Compliance-Check bis hin zur Fraud-Detection.

Process Mining ist als Methode demnach sehr erfolgreich darin, die Prozessqualität zu erhöhen. Das ist natürlich an einen gewissen Personaleinsatz gebunden und funktioniert nicht ohne Schulungen, bedingt jedoch i.d.R. weniger eingebundene Mitarbeiter als bei klassischen Methoden der Ist-Prozessanalyse.

Ferner sollten einige positive Nebeneffekte Erwähnung finden. Durch den Einsatz von Process Mining, gerade wenn dieser erst nach einigen Herausforderungen zum Erfolg wurde, konnte häufig beobachtet werden, dass involvierte Mitarbeiter ein höheres Prozessbewustsein entwickelt haben, was sich auch indirekt bemerkbar machte (z. B. dadurch, dass Soll-Prozessdokumentationen realitätsnäher gestaltet wurden). Ein großer Nebeneffekt ist ganz häufig eine verbesserte Datenqualität und das Bewusstsein der Mitarbeiter über Datenquellen, deren Inhalte und Wissenspotenziale.

Wo haperte es bisher?

Ins Stottern kam Process Mining bisher insbesondere an der häufig mangelhaften Datenverfügbarkeit und Datenqualität in vielen IT-Systemen, insbesondere bei mittelständischen Unternehmen. Auch die Eigenständigkeit der Process Mining Tools (Integration in die BI, Anbindung an die IT, Lizenzkosten) und das fehlen von geschulten Mitarbeiter-Kapazitäten für die Analyse sorgen bei einigen Unternehmen für Frustration und Zweifel am langfristigen Erfolg.

Als Methode schwächelt Process Mining bei der Aufdeckung von Möglichkeiten der Reduzierung von Prozesskosten. Es mag hier einige gute Beispiele für die Prozesskostenreduzierung geben, jedoch haben insbesondere Mittelständische Unternehmen Schwierigkeiten darin, mit Process Mining direkt Kosten zu senken. Dieser Aspekt lässt insbesondere kostenfokussierte Unternehmer an Process Mining zweifeln, insbesondere wenn die Durchführung der Analyse mit hohen Lizenz- und Berater-Kosten verbunden ist.

Was wird sich an Process Mining ändern müssen?

Bisher wurde Process Mining recht losgelöst von anderen Themen des Prozessmanagements betrachtet, woran die Tool-Anbieter nicht ganz unschuldig sind. Process Mining wird sich zukünftig mehr von der Stabstelle mit Initiativ-Engagement hin zur Integration in den Fachbereichen entwickeln und Teil des täglichen Workflows werden. Auch Tool-seitig werden aktuelle Anbieter für Process Mining Software einem verstärkten Wettbewerb stellen müssen. Process Mining wird toolseitig enger Teil der Unternehmens-BI und somit ein Teil einer gesamtheitlichen Business Intelligence werden.

Um sich von etablierten BI-Anbietern abzusetzen, implementieren und bewerben einige Anbieter für Process Mining Software bereits Machine Learning oder Deep Learning Algorithmen, die selbstständig Prozessmuster auf Anomalien hin untersuchen, die ein Mensch (vermutlich) nicht erkennen würde. Process Mining mit KI wird zu Process Analytics, und somit ein Trend für die Jahre 2018 und 2019.

Für wen wird Process Mining 2018 interessant?

Während größere Industrieunternehmen, Großhändler, Banken und Versicherungen längst über Process Mining Piloten hinaus und zum produktiven Einsatz übergegangen sind (jedoch von einer optimalen Nutzung auch heute noch lange entfernt sind!), wird Process Mining zunehmend auch für mittelständische Unternehmen interessant – und das für alle geschäftskritischen Prozesse.

Während Process Mining mit ERP-Daten bereits recht verbreitet ist, wurden andere IT-Systeme bisher seltener analysiert. Mit der höheren Datenverfügbarkeit, die dank Industrie 4.0 und mit ihr verbundene Konzepte wie M2M, CPS und IoT, ganz neue Dimensionen erlangt, wird Process Mining auch Teil der Smart Factory und somit der verstärkte Einsatz in der Produktion und Logistik absehbar.

Lesetipp: Process Mining 2018 – If you can’t measure it, you can’t improve it: Process Mining bleibt auch im neuen Jahr mit hoher Wahrscheinlichkeit ein bestimmendes Thema in der Datenanalytik. Sechs Experten teilen ihre Einschätzungen zur weiteren Entwicklung 2018 und zeigen auf, warum das Thema von so hoher Relevanz ist. (www.internet-of-things.de – 10. Januar 2018)

New Sponsor: lexoro.ai

We wish our readers a happy new year and have good news: We welcome lexoro as our new Data Science Blog Sponsor for 2018!

lexoro GmbH is a Talent Management and Consulting company in the cosmos of the broad topic of Artificial Intelligence. Our focus lies on the relevant technologies and trends in the fields of data science, machine learning and big data. We identify and connect the best talents and experts behind the buzzwords, and help technology-focused industrial and consulting firms in finding the right people with the right skills to build and grow their analytics teams. In addition, we advise companies in identifying their individual challenges, hurdles and opportunities that go along with the great hype of Artificial Intelligence. We develop A.I. Prototypes and make the market transparent with industry-typical use cases.

Do you want to know more about lexoro? Visit them on lexoro.ai!

Neues Weiterbildungsangebot zu Programmiersprache R an der TU Dortmund

Anzeige: Neues Weiterbildungsangebot zu Programmiersprache R an der TU Dortmund

In der Tagesseminarreihe Dortmunder R-Kursean der Technischen Universität Dortmund vermitteln erfahrene Experten die praktische Anwendung der Open-Source Statistiksoftware R. Die Teilnehmenden erwerben dadurch Schlüsselkompetenzen im Umgang mit Big Data.

Das Seminar R-Basiskurs für Anfänger findet am 22.02. & 23.02.18 statt. Den Teilnehmern wird der praxisrelevante Part der Programmiersprache näher gebracht, um so die Grundlagen zur ersten Datenanalyse — vom Datensatz zu statistischen Kennzahlen und ersten Datenvisualisierungen — zu schaffen. Anmeldeschluss ist der 01.02.2018.

Das Seminar R-Vertiefungskurs für Fortgeschrittene findet am 06.03. & 07.03.18 statt. Die Veranstaltung ist ideal für Teilnehmende mit ersten Vorkenntnissen, die ihre Analysen effizient mit R durchführen möchten. Anmeldeschluss ist der 13.02.2018.

Weitere inhaltliche Informationen zu den R-Kursen finden Sie unter:
http://dortmunder-r-kurse.de/

My Desk for Data Science

In my last post I anounced a blog parade about what a data scientist’s workplace might look like.

Here are some photos of my desk and my answers to the questions:

How many monitors do you use (or wish to have)?

I am mostly working at my desk in my office with a tower PC and three monitors.
I definitely need at least three monitors to work productively as a data scientist. Who does not know this: On the left monitor the data model is displayed, on the right monitor the data mapping and in the middle I do my work: programming the analysis scripts.

What hardware do you use? Apple? Dell? Lenovo? Others?

I am note an Apple guy. When I need to work mobile, I like to use ThinkPad notebooks. The ThinkPads are (in my experience) very robust and are therefore particularly good for mobile work. Besides, those notebooks look conservative and so I’m not sad if there comes a scratch on the notebook. However, I do not solve particularly challenging analysis tasks on a notebook, because I need my monitors for that.

Which OS do you use (or prefer)? MacOS, Linux, Windows? Virtual Machines?

As a data scientist, I have to be able to communicate well with my clients and they usually use Microsoft Windows as their operating system. I also use Windows as my main operating system. Of course, all our servers run on Linux Debian, but most of my tasks are done directly on Windows.
For some notebooks, I have set up a dual boot, because sometimes I need to start native Linux, for all other cases I work with virtual machines (Linux Ubuntu or Linux Mint).

What are your favorite databases, programming languages and tools?

I prefer the Microsoft SQL Server (T-SQL), C# and Python (pandas, numpy, scikit-learn). This is my world. But my customers are kings, therefore I am working with Postgre SQL, MongoDB, Neo4J, Tableau, Qlik Sense, Celonis and a lot more. I like to get used to new tools and technologies again and again. This is one of the benefits of being a data scientist.

Which data dou you analyze on your local hardware? Which in server clusters or clouds?

There have been few cases yet, where I analyzed really big data. In cases of analyzing big data we use horizontally scalable systems like Hadoop and Spark. But we also have customers analyzing middle-sized data (more than 10 TB but less than 100 TB) on one big server which is vertically scalable. Most of my customers just want to gather data to answer questions on not so big amounts of data. Everything less than 10TB we can do on a highend workstation.

If you use clouds, do you prefer Azure, AWS, Google oder others?

Microsoft Azure! I am used to tools provided by Microsoft and I think Azure is a well preconfigured cloud solution.

Where do you make your notes/memos/sketches. On paper or digital?

My calender is managed digital, because I just need to know everywhere what appointments I have. But my I prefer to wirte down my thoughts on paper and that´s why I have several paper-notebooks.

Now it is your turn: Join our Blog Parade!

So what does your workplace look like? Show your desk on your blog until 31/12/2017 and we will show a short introduction of your post here on the Data Science Blog!