The Inside Out of ML Based Prescriptive Analytics

With the constantly growing number of data, more and more companies are shifting towards analytic solutions. Analytic solutions help in extracting the meaning from the huge amount of data available. Thus, improving decision making.

Decision making is an important aspect of businesses, and technologies like Machine Learning are enhancing it further. The growing use of Machine Learning has changed the way of prescriptive analytics. In order to optimize the efforts, companies need to be more accurate with the historical and present data. This is because the historical and present data are the essentials of analytics. This article helps describe the inside out of Machine Learning-based prescriptive analytics.

Phases of business analytics

Descriptive analytics, predictive analytics, and prescriptive analytics are the three phases of business analytics. Descriptive analytics, being the first one, deals with past performance. Historical data is mined to understand past performance. This serves as a way to look for the reasons behind past success and failure. It is a kind of post-mortem analysis and most management reporting like sales, marketing, operations, and finance etc. make use of this.

The second one is a predictive analysis which answers the question of what is likely to happen. The historical data is now combined with rules, algorithms etc. to determine the possible future outcome or likelihood of a situation occurring.

The final phase, well known to everyone, is prescriptive analytics. It can continually take in new data and re-predict and re-prescribe. This improves the accuracy of the prediction and prescribes better decision options.  Professional services or technology or their combination can be chosen to perform all the three analytics.

More about prescriptive analytics

The analysis of business activities goes through many phases. Prescriptive analytics is one such. It is known to be the third phase of business analytics and comes after descriptive and predictive analytics. It entails the application of mathematical and computational sciences. It makes use of the results obtained from descriptive and predictive analysis to suggest decision options. It goes beyond predicting future outcomes and suggests actions to benefit from the predictions. It shows the implications of each decision option. It anticipates on what will happen when it will happen as well as why it will happen.

ML-based prescriptive analytics

Being just before the prescriptive analytics, predictive analytics is often confused with it. What actually happens is predictive analysis leads to prescriptive analysis. Thus, a Machine Learning based prescriptive analytics goes through an ML-based predictive analysis first. Therefore, it becomes necessary to consider the ML-based predictive analysis first.

ML-based predictive analytics: A lot of things prevent businesses from achieving predictive analysis capabilities.  Machine Learning can be a great help in boosting Predictive analytics. Use of Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence algorithms helps businesses in optimizing and uncovering the new statistical patterns. These statistical patterns form the backbone of predictive analysis. E-commerce, marketing, customer service, medical diagnosis etc. are some of the prospective use cases for Machine Learning based predictive analytics.

In E-commerce, machine learning can help in predicting the usual choices of the customer. Thus, presenting him/her according to his/her likes and dislikes. It can also help in predicting fraudulent transaction. Similarly, B2B marketing also makes good use of Machine learning based predictive analytics. Customer services and medical diagnosis also benefit from predictive analytics. Thus, a prediction and a prescription based on machine learning can boost various business functions.

Organizations and software development companies are making more and more use of machine learning based predictive analytics. The advancements like neural networks and deep learning algorithms are able to uncover hidden information. This all requires a well-researched approach. Big data and progressive IT systems also act as important factors in this.

Language Detecting with sklearn by determining Letter Frequencies

Of course, there are better and more efficient methods to detect the language of a given text than counting its lettes. On the other hand this is a interesting little example to show the impressing ability of todays machine learning algorithms to detect hidden patterns in a given set of data.

For example take the sentence:

“Ceci est une phrase française.”

It’s not to hard to figure out that this sentence is french. But the (lowercase) letters of the same sentence in a random order look like this:

“eeasrsçneticuaicfhenrpaes”

Still sure it’s french? Regarding the fact that this string contains the letter “ç” some people could have remembered long passed french lessons back in school and though might have guessed right. But beside the fact that the french letter “ç” is also present for example in portuguese, turkish, catalan and a few other languages, this is still a easy example just to explain the problem. Just try to guess which language might have generated this:

“ogldviisnntmeyoiiesettpetorotrcitglloeleiengehorntsnraviedeenltseaecithooheinsnstiofwtoienaoaeefiitaeeauobmeeetdmsflteightnttxipecnlgtetgteyhatncdisaceahrfomseehmsindrlttdthoaranthahdgasaebeaturoehtrnnanftxndaeeiposttmnhgttagtsheitistrrcudf”

While this looks simply confusing to the human eye and it seems practically impossible to determine the language it was generated from, this string still contains as set of hidden but well defined patterns from which the language could be predictet with almost complete (ca. 98-99%) certainty.

First of all, we need a set of texts in the languages our model should be able to recognise. Luckily with the package NLTK there comes a big set of example texts which actually are protocolls of the european parliament and therefor are publicly availible in 11 differen languages:

  •  Danish
  •  Dutch
  •  English
  •  Finnish
  •  French
  •  German
  •  Greek
  •  Italian
  •  Portuguese
  •  Spanish
  •  Swedish

Because the greek version is not written with the latin alphabet, the detection of the language greek would just be too simple, so we stay with the other 10 languages availible. To give you a idea of the used texts, here is a little sample:

“Resumption of the session I declare resumed the session of the European Parliament adjourned on Friday 17 December 1999, and I would like once again to wish you a happy new year in the hope that you enjoyed a pleasant festive period.
Although, as you will have seen, the dreaded ‘millennium bug’ failed to materialise, still the people in a number of countries suffered a series of natural disasters that truly were dreadful.”

Train and Test

The following code imports the nessesary modules and reads the sample texts from a set of text files into a pandas.Dataframe object and prints some statistics about the read texts:

Above you see a sample set of random rows of the created Dataframe. After removing very short text snipplets (less than 200 chars) we are left with 56481 snipplets. The function clean_eutextdf() then creates a lower case representation of the texts in the coloum ‘ltext’ to facilitate counting the chars in the next step.
The following code snipplet now extracs the features – in this case the relative frequency of each letter in every text snipplet – that are used for prediction:

Now that we have calculated the features for every text snipplet in our dataset, we can split our data set in a train and test set:

After doing that, we can train a k-nearest-neigbours classifier and test it to get the percentage of correctly predicted languages in the test data set. Because we do not know what value for k may be the best choice, we just run the training and testing with different values for k in a for loop:

As you can see in the output the reliability of the language classifier is generally very high: It starts at about 97.5% for k = 1, increases for with increasing values of k until it reaches a maximum level of about 98.5% at k ≈ 10.

Using the Classifier to predict languages of texts

Now that we have trained and tested the classifier we want to use it to predict the language of example texts. To do that we need two more functions, shown in the following piece of code. The first one extracts the nessesary features from the sample text and predict_lang() predicts the language of a the texts:

With this classifier it is now also possible to predict the language of the randomized example snipplet from the introduction (which is acutally created from the first paragraph of this article):

The KNN classifier of sklearn also offers the possibility to predict the propability with which a given classification is made. While the probability distribution for a specific language is relativly clear for long sample texts it decreases noticeably the shorter the texts are.

Background and Insights

Why does a relative simple model like counting letters acutally work? Every language has a specific pattern of letter frequencies which can be used as a kind of fingerprint: While there are almost no y‘s in the german language this letter is quite common in english. In french the letter k is not very common because it is replaced with q in most cases.

For a better understanding look at the output of the following code snipplet where only three letters already lead to a noticable form of clustering:

 

Even though every single letter frequency by itself is not a very reliable indicator, the set of frequencies of all present letters in a text is a quite good evidence because it will more or less represent the letter frequency fingerprint of the given language. Since it is quite hard to imagine or visualize the above plot in more than three dimensions, I used a little trick which shows that every language has its own typical fingerprint of letter frequencies:

What more?

Beside the fact, that letter frequencies alone, allow us to predict the language of every example text (at least in the 10 languages with latin alphabet we trained for) with almost complete certancy there is even more information hidden in the set of sample texts.

As you might know, most languages in europe belong to either the romanian or the indogermanic language family (which is actually because the romans conquered only half of europe). The border between them could be located in belgium, between france and germany and in swiss. West of this border the romanian languages, which originate from latin, are still spoken, like spanish, portouguese and french. In the middle and northern part of europe the indogermanic languages are very common like german, dutch, swedish ect. If we plot the analysed languages with a different colour sheme this border gets quite clear and allows us to take a look back in history that tells us where our languages originate from:

As you can see the more common letters, especially the vocals like a, e, i, o and u have almost the same frequency in all of this languages. Far more interesting are letters like q, k, c and w: While k is quite common in all of the indogermanic languages it is quite rare in romanic languages because the same sound is written with the letters q or c.
As a result it could be said, that even “boring” sets of data (just give it a try and read all the texts of the protocolls of the EU parliament…) could contain quite interesting patterns which – in this case – allows us to predict quite precisely which language a given text sample is written in, without the need of any translation program or to speak the languages. And as an interesting side effect, where certain things in history happend (or not happend): After two thousand years have passed, modern machine learning techniques could easily uncover this history because even though all these different languages developed, they still have a set of hidden but common patterns that since than stayed the same.

Sentiment Analysis using Python

One of the applications of text mining is sentiment analysis. Most of the data is getting generated in textual format and in the past few years, people are talking more about NLP. Improvement is a continuous process and many product based companies leverage these text mining techniques to examine the sentiments of the customers to find about what they can improve in the product. This information also helps them to understand the trend and demand of the end user which results in Customer satisfaction.

As text mining is a vast concept, the article is divided into two subchapters. The main focus of this article will be calculating two scores: sentiment polarity and subjectivity using python. The range of polarity is from -1 to 1(negative to positive) and will tell us if the text contains positive or negative feedback. Most companies prefer to stop their analysis here but in our second article, we will try to extend our analysis by creating some labels out of these scores. Finally, a multi-label multi-class classifier can be trained to predict future reviews.

Without any delay let’s deep dive into the code and mine some knowledge from textual data.

There are a few NLP libraries existing in Python such as Spacy, NLTK, gensim, TextBlob, etc. For this particular article, we will be using NLTK for pre-processing and TextBlob to calculate sentiment polarity and subjectivity.

The dataset is available here for download and we will be using pandas read_csv function to import the dataset. I would like to share an additional information here which I came to know about recently. Those who have already used python and pandas before they probably know that read_csv is by far one of the most used function. However, it can take a while to upload a big file. Some folks from  RISELab at UC Berkeley created Modin or Pandas on Ray which is a library that speeds up this process by changing a single line of code.

After importing the dataset it is recommended to understand it first and study the structure of the dataset. At this point we are interested to know how many columns are there and what are these columns so I am going to check the shape of the data frame and go through each column name to see if we need them or not.

 

There are so many columns which are not useful for our sentiment analysis and it’s better to remove these columns. There are many ways to do that: either just select the columns which you want to keep or select the columns you want to remove and then use the drop function to remove it from the data frame. I prefer the second option as it allows me to look at each column one more time so I don’t miss any important variable for the analysis.

Now let’s dive deep into the data and try to mine some knowledge from the remaining columns. The first step we would want to follow here is just to look at the distribution of the variables and try to make some notes. First, let’s look at the distribution of the ratings.

Graphs are powerful and at this point, just by looking at the above bar graph we can conclude that most people are somehow satisfied with the products offered at Amazon. The reason I am saying ‘at’ Amazon is because it is just a platform where anyone can sell their products and the user are giving ratings to the product and not to Amazon. However, if the user is satisfied with the products it also means that Amazon has a lower return rate and lower fraud case (from seller side). The job of a Data Scientist relies not only on how good a model is but also on how useful it is for the business and that’s why these business insights are really important.

Data pre-processing for textual variables

Lowercasing

Before we move forward to calculate the sentiment scores for each review it is important to pre-process the textual data. Lowercasing helps in the process of normalization which is an important step to keep the words in a uniform manner (Welbers, et al., 2017, pp. 245-265).

Special characters

Special characters are non-alphabetic and non-numeric values such as {!,@#$%^ *()~;:/<>\|+_-[]?}. Dealing with numbers is straightforward but special characters can be sometimes tricky. During tokenization, special characters create their own tokens and again not helpful for any algorithm, likewise, numbers.

Stopwords

Stop-words being most commonly used in the English language; however, these words have no predictive power in reality. Words such as I, me, myself, he, she, they, our, mine, you, yours etc.

Stemming

Stemming algorithm is very useful in the field of text mining and helps to gain relevant information as it reduces all words with the same roots to a common form by removing suffixes such as -action, ing, -es and -ses. However, there can be problematic where there are spelling errors.

This step is extremely useful for pre-processing textual data but it also depends on your goal. Here our goal is to calculate sentiment scores and if you look closely to the above code words like ‘inexpensive’ and ‘thrilled’ became ‘inexpens’ and ‘thrill’ after applying this technique. This will help us in text classification to deal with the curse of dimensionality but to calculate the sentiment score this process is not useful.

Sentiment Score

It is now time to calculate sentiment scores of each review and check how these scores look like.

As it can be observed there are two scores: the first score is sentiment polarity which tells if the sentiment is positive or negative and the second score is subjectivity score to tell how subjective is the text. The whole code is available here.

In my next article, we will extend this analysis by creating labels based on these scores and finally we will train a classification model.

Einstieg in Natural Language Processing – Teil 2: Preprocessing von Rohtext mit Python

Dies ist der zweite Artikel der Artikelserie Einstieg in Natural Language Processing.

In diesem Artikel wird das so genannte Preprocessing von Texten behandelt, also Schritte die im Bereich des NLP in der Regel vor eigentlichen Textanalyse durchgeführt werden.

Tokenizing

Um eingelesenen Rohtext in ein Format zu überführen, welches in der späteren Analyse einfacher ausgewertet werden kann, sind eine ganze Reihe von Schritten notwendig. Ganz allgemein besteht der erste Schritt darin, den auszuwertenden Text in einzelne kurze Abschnitte – so genannte Tokens – zu zerlegen (außer man bastelt sich völlig eigene Analyseansätze, wie zum Beispiel eine Spracherkennung anhand von Buchstabenhäufigkeiten ect.).

Was genau ein Token ist, hängt vom verwendeten Tokenizer ab. So bringt NLTK bereits standardmäßig unter anderem BlankLine-, Line-, Sentence-, Word-, Wordpunkt- und SpaceTokenizer mit, welche Text entsprechend in Paragraphen, Zeilen, Sätze, Worte usw. aufsplitten. Weiterhin ist mit dem RegexTokenizer ein Tool vorhanden, mit welchem durch Wahl eines entsprechenden Regulären Ausdrucks beliebig komplexe eigene Tokenizer erstellt werden können.

Üblicherweise wird ein Text (evtl. nach vorherigem Aufsplitten in Paragraphen oder Sätze) schließlich in einzelne Worte und Interpunktionen (Satzzeichen) aufgeteilt. Hierfür kann, wie im folgenden Beispiel z. B. der WordTokenizer oder die diesem entsprechende Funktion word_tokenize() verwendet werden.

Stemming & Lemmatizing

Andere häufig durchgeführte Schritte sind Stemming sowie Lemmatizing. Hierbei werden die Suffixe der einzelnen Tokens des Textes mit Hilfe eines Stemmers in eine Form überführt, welche nur den Wortstamm zurücklässt. Dies hat den Zweck verschiedene grammatikalische Formen des selben Wortes (welche sich oft in ihrer Endung unterscheiden (ich gehe, du gehst, er geht, wir gehen, …) ununterscheidbar zu machen. Diese würden sonst als mehrere unabhängige Worte in die darauf folgende Analyse eingehen.

Neben bereits fertigen Stemmern bietet NLTK auch für diesen Schritt die Möglichkeit sich eigene Stemmer zu programmieren. Da verschiedene Stemmer Suffixe nach unterschiedlichen Regeln entfernen, sind nur die Wortstämme miteinander vergleichbar, welche mit dem selben Stemmer generiert wurden!

Im forlgenden Beispiel werden verschiedene vordefinierte Stemmer aus dem Paket NLTK auf den bereits oben verwendeten Beispielsatz angewendet und die Ergebnisse der gestemmten Tokens in einer Art einfachen Tabelle ausgegeben:

Sehr ähnlich den Stemmern arbeiten Lemmatizer: Auch ihre Aufgabe ist es aus verschiedenen Formen eines Wortes die jeweilige Grundform zu bilden. Im Unterschied zu den Stemmern ist das Lemma eines Wortes jedoch klar als dessen Grundform definiert.

Vokabular

Auch das Vokabular, also die Menge aller verschiedenen Worte eines Textes, ist eine informative Kennzahl. Bezieht man die Größe des Vokabulars eines Textes auf seine gesamte Anzahl verwendeter Worte, so lassen sich hiermit Aussagen zu der Diversität des Textes machen.

Außerdem kann das auftreten bestimmter Worte später bei der automatischen Einordnung in Kategorien wichtig werden: Will man beispielsweise Nachrichtenmeldungen nach Themen kategorisieren und in einem Text tritt das Wort „DAX“ auf, so ist es deutlich wahrscheinlicher, dass es sich bei diesem Text um eine Meldung aus dem Finanzbereich handelt, als z. B. um das „Kochrezept des Tages“.

Dies mag auf den ersten Blick trivial erscheinen, allerdings können auch mit einfachen Modellen, wie dem so genannten „Bag-of-Words-Modell“, welches nur die Anzahl des Auftretens von Worten prüft, bereits eine Vielzahl von Informationen aus Texten gewonnen werden.

Das reine Vokabular eines Textes, welcher in der Variable “rawtext” gespeichert ist, kann wie folgt in der Variable “vocab” gespeichert werden. Auf die Ausgabe wurde in diesem Fall verzichtet, da diese im Falle des oben als Beispiel gewählten Satzes den einzelnen Tokens entspricht, da kein Wort öfter als ein Mal vorkommt.

Stopwords

Unter Stopwords werden Worte verstanden, welche zwar sehr häufig vorkommen, jedoch nur wenig Information zu einem Text beitragen. Beispiele in der beutschen Sprache sind: der, und, aber, mit, …

Sowohl NLTK als auch cpaCy bringen vorgefertigte Stopwordsets mit. 

Vorsicht: NLTK besitzt eine Stopwordliste, welche erst in ein Set umgewandelt werden sollte um die lookup-Zeiten kurz zu halten – schließlich muss jedes einzelne Token des Textes auf das vorhanden sein in der Stopworditerable getestet werden!

POS-Tagging

POS-Tagging steht für „Part of Speech Tagging“ und entspricht ungefähr den Aufgaben, die man noch aus dem Deutschunterricht kennt: „Unterstreiche alle Subjekte rot, alle Objekte blau…“. Wichtig ist diese Art von Tagging insbesondere, wenn man später tatsächlich strukturiert Informationen aus dem Text extrahieren möchte, da man hierfür wissen muss wer oder was als Subjekt mit wem oder was als Objekt interagiert.

Obwohl genau die selben Worte vorkommen, bedeutet der Satz „Die Katze frisst die Maus.“ etwas anderes als „Die Maus frisst die Katze.“, da hier Subjekt und Objekt aufgrund ihrer Reihenfolge vertauscht sind (Stichwort: Subjekt – Prädikat – Objekt ).

Weniger wichtig ist dieser Schritt bei der Kategorisierung von Dokumenten. Insbesondere bei dem bereits oben erwähnten Bag-of-Words-Modell, fließen POS-Tags überhaupt nicht mit ein.

Und weil es so schön einfach ist: Die obigen Schritte mit spaCy

Die obigen Methoden und Arbeitsschritte, welche Texte die in natürlicher Sprache geschrieben sind, allgemein computerzugänglicher und einfacher auswertbar machen, können beliebig genau den eigenen Wünschen angepasst, einzeln mit dem Paket NLTK durchgeführt werden. Dies zumindest einmal gemacht zu haben, erweitert das Verständnis für die funktionsweise einzelnen Schritte und insbesondere deren manchmal etwas versteckten Komplexität. (Wie muss beispielsweise ein Tokenizer funktionieren der den Satz “Schwierig ist z. B. dieser Satz.” korrekt in nur einen Satz aufspaltet, anstatt ihn an jedem Punkt welcher an einem Wortende auftritt in insgesamt vier Sätze aufzuspalten, von denen einer nur aus einem Leerzeichen besteht?) Hier soll nun aber, weil es so schön einfach ist, auch das analoge Vorgehen mit dem Paket spaCy beschrieben werden:

Dieser kurze Codeabschnitt liest den an spaCy übergebenen Rohtext in ein spaCy Doc-Object ein und führt dabei automatisch bereits alle oben beschriebenen sowie noch eine Reihe weitere Operationen aus. So stehen neben dem immer noch vollständig gespeicherten Originaltext, die einzelnen Sätze, Worte, Lemmas, Noun-Chunks, Named Entities, Part-of-Speech-Tags, ect. direkt zur Verfügung und können.über die Methoden des Doc-Objektes erreicht werden. Des weiteren liegen auch verschiedene weitere Objekte wie beispielsweise Vektoren zur Bestimmung von Dokumentenähnlichkeiten bereits fertig vor.

Die Folgende Übersicht soll eine kurze (aber noch lange nicht vollständige) Übersicht über die automatisch von spaCy generierten Objekte und Methoden zur Textanalyse geben:

Diese „Vollautomatisierung“ der Vorabschritte zur Textanalyse hat jedoch auch seinen Preis: spaCy geht nicht gerade sparsam mit Ressourcen wie Rechenleistung und Arbeitsspeicher um. Will man einen oder einige Texte untersuchen so ist spaCy oft die einfachste und schnellste Lösung für das Preprocessing. Anders sieht es aber beispielsweise aus, wenn eine bestimmte Analyse wie zum Beispiel die Einteilung in verschiedene Textkategorien auf eine sehr große Anzahl von Texten angewendet werden soll. In diesem Fall, sollte man in Erwägung ziehen auf ressourcenschonendere Alternativen wie zum Beispiel gensim auszuweichen.

Wer beim lesen genau aufgepasst hat, wird festgestellt haben, dass ich im Abschnitt POS-Tagging im Gegensatz zu den anderen Abschnitten auf ein kurzes Codebeispiel verzichtet habe. Dies möchte ich an dieser Stelle nachholen und dabei gleich eine Erweiterung des Pakets spaCy vorstellen: displaCy.

Displacy bietet die Möglichkeit, sich Zusammenhänge und Eigenschaften von Texten wie Named Entities oder eben POS-Tagging graphisch im Browser anzeigen zu lassen.

Nach ausführen des obigen Codes erhält man eine Ausgabe die wie folgt aussieht:

Nun öffnet man einen Browser und ruft die URL ‘http://127.0.0.1:5000’ auf (Achtung: localhost anstatt der IP funktioniert – warum auch immer – mit displacy nicht). Im Browser sollte nun eine Seite mit einem SVG-Bild geladen werden, welches wie folgt aussieht

Die Abbildung macht deutlich was POS-Tagging genau ist und warum es von Nutzen sein kann wenn man Informationen aus einem Text extrahieren will. Jedem Word (Token) ist eine Wortart zugeordnet und die Beziehung der einzelnen Worte durch Pfeile dargestellt. Dies ermöglicht es dem Computer zum Beispiel in dem Satzteil “der grüne Apfel”, das Adjektiv “grün” auf das Nomen “Apfel” zu beziehen und diesem somit als Eigenschaft zuzuordnen.

Nachdem dieser Artikel wichtige Schritte des Preprocessing von Texten beschrieben hat, geht es im nächsten Artikel darum was man an Texten eigentlich analysieren kann und welche Analysemöglichkeiten die verschiedenen für Python vorhandenen Module bieten.

Deep Learning and Human Intelligence – Part 2 of 2

Data dependency is one of the biggest problem of Deep Learning Architectures. This difficulty lies not so much in the algorithm of Deep Learning as in the invisible structure of the data itself.

This is part 2 of 2 of the Article Series: Deep Learning and Human Intelligence.

We saw that the process of discovering numbers was accompanied with many aspects of what are today basic ideas of Machine Learning. But let us go back, a little before that time, when humankind did not fully discovered the concept of numbers. How would a person, at such a time, perceive quantity and the count of things? Some structures are easily recognizable as patterns of objects, that is numbers, like one sun, 2 trees, 3 children, 4 clouds and so on. Sets of objects are much simpler to count if all the objects of the set are present. In such a case it is sufficient to keep a one-to-one relationship between two different set, without the need for numbers, to make a judgement of crucial importance. One could consider the case of two enemies that go to war and wish to know which has a larger army. It is enough to associate a small stone to every enemy soldier and do the same with his one soldier to be able to decide, depending if stones are left or not, if his army is larger or not, without ever needing to know the exact number soldier of any of the armies.

But also does things can be counted which are not directly visible, and do not allow a direct association with direct observable objects that can be seen, like stones. Would a person, at that time, be able to observe easily the 4-th day since today, 5 weeks from now, when even the concept of week is already composite? Counting in this case is only possible if numbers are already developed through direct observation, and we use something similar with stones in our mind, i.e. a cognitive association, a number. Only then, one can think of the concept of measuring at equidistant moments in time at all. This is the reason why such measurements where still cutting edge in the time of Galileo Galilei as we seen before. It is easily to assume that even in the time when humans started to count, such indirect concepts of numbers were not considered to be in relation with numbers. This implies that many concepts with which we are today accustomed to regard as a number, were considered as belonging to different groups, cluster which are not related. Such an hypothesis is not even that much farfetched. Evidence for such a time are still present in some languages, like Japanese.

When we think of numbers, we associate them with the Indo-Arabic numbers, but in Japanese numbers have no decimal structure and counting depends not only on the length of the set (which is usually considered as the number), but also on the objects that make up the set. In Japanese one can speak of meeting roku people, visiting muttsu cities and seeing ropa birds, but referring each time to the same number: six. Additional, many regular or irregular suffixes make the whole system quite complicated. The division of counting into so many clusters seems unnecessarily complicated today, but can easily be understood from a point of view where language and numbers still form and, the numbers, were not yet a uniform concept. What one can learn from this is that the lack of a unifying concept implies an overly complex dependence on data, which is the present case for Deep Learning and AI in general.

Although Deep Learning was a breakthrough in the development of Artificial Intelligence, the task such algorithms can perform were and remained very narrow. It may identify birds or cancer cells, but it will miss the song of the birds or the cry of the patient with cancer. When Watson, a Deep Learning Architecture played the famous Jeopardy game against two former Champions and won, it still made several simple mistakes, like going for the same wrong answer like the player before. If it could listen to the answer of the candidate, it could delete the top answer it had, and gibe the second which was the right one. With other words, Deep Learning Architecture are not multi-tasking and it is for this reason that some experts in AI are calling them intelligent idiots.

Imagine spending time learning to play a game for years and years, and then, when mastering it and wish to play a different game, to be unable to use any of the past experience (of gaming) for the new one and needing to learn everything from scratch. That could be quite depressing and would make life needlessly difficult. This is the reason why people involved in developing Deep Learning worked from early on in the development of multi-tasking Deep Learning Architectures. On the way a different method of using Deep Learning was discovered: transfer learning. Because the time it takes for a Deep Learning Architecture to learn is very long, transfer learning uses already learned Deep Learning Architectures but for slightly different task. It is similar to the use of past experiences in solving new problems, but, the advantage of transfer learning is, it allow the using of past experiences (what it already learned) which reduces dramatically the amount of new data needed in performing a new task. Still, transfer learning is far away from permitting Deep Learning Architectures to perform any kind of task learning only from one master data set.

The management of a unique master data set which includes all the needed data to enable human accuracy for any human activity, is not enough. One needs another ingredient, the so called cost function which translates, in this case, to the human brain. There are all our experiences and knowledge. How long does it takes to collect sufficient of both to handle a normal human life? How much to achieve our highest potential? If not a lifetime, at least decades. And this also applies to our job: as a IT-developer, a Data Scientist or a professor at the university. We will always have to learn new things, how to use them, and how to expand the limits of our perceptions. The vast amount of information that science has gathered over the last four centuries makes it impossible for any human being to become an expert in all of it. Thus, one has to specialized. After the university, anyone has to choose o subject which is appealing enough to study it for decades. Here is the first sign of what can be understood as data segmentation and dependency. Such improvements can come in various forms: an algorithm in the IT, a theorem in mathematics, a new way to look at particles in physics or a new method to scan for diseases in biology, and so on. But there is a price to pay for specialization: the inability to be an expert in another field or subfield. (Subfields induces limitation!)

Lets take the Deep Learning algorithm itself as an example. For IT and much of everyday life, this is a real breakthrough, but it lacks any scientific, that is mathematical, foundation. There are no theorems which proofs that it will find (converge, to use a mathematical term) the global optimum. This does not appear to be of any great consequences if it can be so efficient, except that, when adding new data and let the algorithm learn the same architecture again, there is no guaranty what so ever that it will be as good as the old model, or even better. On the contrary, it is as real as the efficiency of the first model, that chances are that the new model with the new data will perform worse than the old model, and one has to invest again time in finding a better model, or even a different architecture. On the other hand, with a mathematical proof of convergence, it would be always possible to know in what condition such a convergence can be achieved. In other words, without deep knowledge in mathematics, any proof of a consistent Deep Learning Algorithm is impossible.

Such a situation is true for any other corssover between fields. A mathematical genius will make a lousy biologist, a great chemist will make a average economist, and a top economist will be a poor physicist. Knowledge is difficult to transfer and this is true also for everyday experiences. We learn from very small to play a game like football, but are unable to use the reflexes to play basketball, or tennis better than a normal beginner. We learn a new language after years and years of practice, but are unable to use the way we learned to learn faster other languages. We are trapped within the knowledge we developed from the data we used. It is for this reason why we cannot transfer the knowledge a mathematician has developed over decades to use it in biology or psychology, even if the knowledge is very advanced. Instead of thinking in knowledge, we thing in data. This is similar to the people which were unaware of numbers, and used sets (data) to work with them. Numbers could be very difficult to transmit from one person to another in former times.

Only think on all the great achievements that our society managed, like relativity, quantum mechanics, DNA, machines, etc. Such discoveries are the essences of human knowledge and took millennia to form and centuries to crystalize. Still, all this knowledge is captive in the data, in the special frame in which it was discovered and never had the chance to escape. Imagine the possibility to use thoughts/causalities like the one in relativity or quantum mechanics in biology, or history, or of the concept of DNA in mathematics or art. Imagine a music composition where the law of the notes allows a “tunnel effect” like in quantum mechanics, lower notes to warp the music scales like in relativity and/or to twist two music scale in a helix-like play. How many way to experience life awaits us. Or think of the knowledge hidden in mathematics which could help develop new medicine, but can not be transmitted.

Another example of the connection we experience between knowledge and the data through which we obtain it, are children. They are classical example when it come determine if one is up to explain to them something. Take as an explain something simple they can observe often, like lightning and thunder. Normal concepts like particles, charge, waves, propagation, medium of propagation, etc. become so complicated to expose by other means then the one through which they were discovered, that it becomes nearly impossible to explain to children how it works and that they do not need to fear it. Still, one can use analogy (i.e., transfer) to enable an explanation. Instead of particles, one can use balls, for charge one can use hardness, waves can be shown with strings by keeping one end fix and waving the other, propagation is the movement of the waves from one end of the string to the other end, medium of propagation is the difference between walking in air and water, etc. Although difficult, analogies can be found which enables us to explain even to children how complex phenomena works.

The same is true also for Deep Learning. The model, the knowledge it can extract from the data can be expressed only by such data alone. There is no transformation of the knowledge from one type of data to another. If such a transformation would exists, then Deep Learning would be able to learn any human task by only a set of data, a master data set. Without such a master data set and a corresponding cost function it will be nearly impossible to develop AI that mimics human behavior. With other words, without the realization how our mind works, and how to crystalize by this the data needed, AI will still need to look at all the activities separately. It also implies that AI are restricted to the human understanding of reality and themselves. Only with such a characteristic of a living being, thus also AI, can development of its on occur.

Einstieg in Natural Language Processing – Artikelserie

Unter Natural Language Processing (NLP) versteht man ein Teilgebiet der Informatik bzw. der Datenwissenschaft, welches sich mit der Analyse und Auswertung , aber auch der Synthese natürlicher Sprache befasst. Mit natürlichen Sprachen werden Sprachen wie zum Beispiel Deutsch, Englisch oder Spanisch bezeichnet, welche nicht geplant entworfen wurden, sondern sich über lange Zeit allein durch ihre Benutzung entwickelt haben. Anders ausgedrückt geht es um die Schnittstelle zwischen unserer im Alltag verwendeten und für uns Menschen verständlichen Sprache auf der einen, und um deren computergestützte Auswertung auf der anderen Seite.

Diese Artikelserie soll eine Einführung in die Thematik des Natural Language Processing sein, dessen Methoden, Möglichkeiten, aber auch der Grenzen . Im einzelnen werden folgende Themen näher behandelt:

1. Artikel – Natürliche vs. Formale Sprachen
2. Artikel – Preprocessing von Rohtext mit Python
3. Artikel – Möglichkeiten/Methoden der Textanalyse an Beispielen (erscheint demnächst…)
4. Artikel – NLP, was kann es? Und was nicht? (erscheint demnächst…)

Zur Verdeutlichung der beschriebenen Zusammenhänge und Methoden und um Interessierten einige Ideen für mögliche Startpunkte aufzuzeigen, werden im Verlauf der Artikelserie an verschiedenen Stellen Codebeispiele in der Programmiersprache Python vorgestellt.
Von den vielen im Internet zur Verfügung stehenden Python-Paketen zum Thema NLP, werden in diesem Artikel insbesondere die drei Pakete NLTK, Gensim und Spacy verwendet.

How To Remotely Send R and Python Execution to SQL Server from Jupyter Notebooks

Introduction

Did you know that you can execute R and Python code remotely in SQL Server from Jupyter Notebooks or any IDE? Machine Learning Services in SQL Server eliminates the need to move data around. Instead of transferring large and sensitive data over the network or losing accuracy on ML training with sample csv files, you can have your R/Python code execute within your database. You can work in Jupyter Notebooks, RStudio, PyCharm, VSCode, Visual Studio, wherever you want, and then send function execution to SQL Server bringing intelligence to where your data lives.

This tutorial will show you an example of how you can send your python code from Juptyter notebooks to execute within SQL Server. The same principles apply to R and any other IDE as well. If you prefer to learn through videos, this tutorial is also published on YouTube here:


 

Environment Setup Prerequisites

  1. Install ML Services on SQL Server

In order for R or Python to execute within SQL, you first need the Machine Learning Services feature installed and configured. See this how-to guide.

  1. Install RevoscalePy via Microsoft’s Python Client

In order to send Python execution to SQL from Jupyter Notebooks, you need to use Microsoft’s RevoscalePy package. To get RevoscalePy, download and install Microsoft’s ML Services Python Client. Documentation Page or Direct Download Link (for Windows).

After downloading, open powershell as an administrator and navigate to the download folder. Start the installation with this command (feel free to customize the install folder): .\Install-PyForMLS.ps1 -InstallFolder “C:\Program Files\MicrosoftPythonClient”

Be patient while the installation can take a little while. Once installed navigate to the new path you installed in. Let’s make an empty folder and open Jupyter Notebooks: mkdir JupyterNotebooks; cd JupyterNotebooks; ..\Scripts\jupyter-notebook

Create a new notebook with the Python 3 interpreter:

 

To test if everything is setup, import revoscalepy in the first cell and execute. If there are no error messages you are ready to move forward.

Database Setup (Required for this tutorial only)

For the rest of the tutorial you can clone this Jupyter Notebook from Github if you don’t want to copy paste all of the code. This database setup is a one time step to ensure you have the same data as this tutorial. You don’t need to perform any of these setup steps to use your own data.

  1. Create a database

Modify the connection string for your server and use pyodbc to create a new database.

  1. Import Iris sample from SkLearn

Iris is a popular dataset for beginner data science tutorials. It is included by default in sklearn package.

  1. Use RecoscalePy APIs to create a table and load the Iris data

(You can also do this with pyodbc, sqlalchemy or other packages)

Define a Function to Send to SQL Server

Write any python code you want to execute in SQL. In this example we are creating a scatter matrix on the iris dataset and only returning the bytestream of the .png back to Jupyter Notebooks to render on our client.

Send execution to SQL

Now that we are finally set up, check out how easy sending remote execution really is! First, import revoscalepy. Create a sql_compute_context, and then send the execution of any function seamlessly to SQL Server with RxExec. No raw data had to be transferred from SQL to the Jupyter Notebook. All computation happened within the database and only the image file was returned to be displayed.

While this example is trivial with the Iris dataset, imagine the additional scale, performance, and security capabilities that you now unlocked. You can use any of the latest open source R/Python packages to build Deep Learning and AI applications on large amounts of data in SQL Server. We also offer leading edge, high-performance algorithms in Microsoft’s RevoScaleR and RevoScalePy APIs. Using these with the latest innovations in the open source world allows you to bring unparalleled selection, performance, and scale to your applications.

Learn More

Check out SQL Machine Learning Services Documentation to learn how you can easily deploy your R/Python code with SQL stored procedures making them accessible in your ETL processes or to any application. Train and store machine learning models in your database bringing intelligence to where your data lives.

Other YouTube Tutorials:

Interview – Die Bedeutung von Machine Learning für das Data Driven Business

Um das Optimum aus ihren Daten zu holen, müssen Unternehmen Data Analytics vorantreiben, um Entscheidungsprozesse für Innovation und Differenzierung stärker zu automatisieren. Die Data Science scheint hier der richtige Ansatz zu sein, ist aber ein neues und schnelllebiges Feld, das viele Sackgassen kennt. Cloudera Fast Forward Labs unterstützt Unternehmen dabei sich umzustrukturieren, Prozesse zu automatisieren und somit neue Innovationen zu schaffen.

Alice Albrecht ist Research Engineer bei Cloudera Fast Forward Labs. Dort widmet sie sich der Weiterentwicklung von Machine Learning und Künstlicher Intelligenz. Die Ergebnisse ihrer Forschungen nutzt sie, um ihren Kunden konkrete Ratschläge und funktionierende Prototypen anzubieten. Bevor sie zu Fast Forward Labs kam, arbeitete sie in Finanz- und Technologieunternehmen als Data Science Expertin und Produkt Managerin. Alice Albrecht konzentriert sich nicht nur darauf, Maschinen “coole Dinge” beizubringen, sondern setzt sich auch als Mentorin für andere Wissenschaftler ein. Während ihrer Promotion der kognitiven Neurowissenschaften in Yale untersuchte Alice, wie Menschen sensorische Informationen aus ihrer Umwelt verarbeiten und zusammenfassen.

english-flagRead this article in English:
“Interview – The Importance of Machine Learning for the Data Driven Business”


Data Science Blog: Frau Albrecht, Sie sind eine bekannte Keynote-Referentin für Data Science und Künstliche Intelligenz. Während Data Science bereits im Alltag vieler Unternehmen angekommen ist, scheint Deep Learning der neueste Trend zu sein. Ist Künstliche Intelligenz für Unternehmen schon normal oder ein überbewerteter Hype?

Ich würde sagen, nichts von beidem stimmt. Data Science ist inzwischen zwar weit verbreitet, aber die Unternehmen haben immer noch Schwierigkeiten, diese neue Disziplin in ihr bestehendes Geschäft zu integrieren. Ich denke nicht, dass Deep Learning mittlerweile Teil des Business as usual ist – und das sollte es auch nicht sein. Wie jedes andere Tool, braucht auch die Integration von Deep Learning Modellen in die Strukturen eines Unternehmens eine klar definierte Vorgehensweise. Alles andere führt ins Chaos.

Data Science Blog: Nur um sicherzugehen, worüber wir reden: Was sind die Unterschiede und Überschneidungen zwischen Data Analytics, Data Science, Machine Learning, Deep Learning und Künstlicher Intelligenz?

Hier bei Cloudera Fast Forward Labs verstehen wir unter Data Analytics das Sammeln und Addieren von Daten – meist für schnelle Diagramme und Berichte. Data Science hingegen löst Geschäftsprobleme, indem sie sie analysiert, Prozesse mit den gesammelten Daten abgleicht und anschließend entsprechende Vorgänge prognostiziert. Beim Machine Learning geht es darum, Probleme mit neuartigen Feedbackschleifen zu lösen, die sich mit der Anzahl der zur Verfügung stehenden Daten noch detaillierter bearbeiten lassen. Deep Learning ist eine besondere Form des Machine Learnings und ist selbst kein eigenständiges Konzept oder Tool. Künstliche Intelligenz zapft etwas Komplizierteres an, als das, was wir heute sehen. Hier geht es um weit mehr als nur darum, Maschinen darauf zu trainieren, immer wieder dasselbe zu tun oder begrenzte Probleme zu lösen.

Data Science Blog: Und wie können wir hier den Kontext zu Big Data herstellen?

Theoretisch gesehen gibt es Data Science ja bereits seit Jahrzehnten. Die Bausteine für modernes Machine Learning, Deep Learning und Künstliche Intelligenz basieren auf mathematischen Theoremen, die bis in die 40er und 50er Jahre zurückreichen. Die Herausforderung bestand damals darin, dass Rechenleistung und Datenspeicherkapazität einfach zu teuer für die zu implementierenden Ansätze waren. Heute ist das anders. Nicht nur die Kosten für die Datenspeicherung sind erheblich gesunken, auch Open-Source-Technologien wie etwa Apache Hadoop haben es möglich gemacht, jedes Datenvolumen zu geringen Kosten zu speichern. Rechenleistung, Cloud-Lösungen und auch hoch spezialisierte Chip-Architekturen, sind jetzt auch auf Anfrage für einen bestimmten Zeitraum verfügbar. Die geringeren Kosten für Datenspeicherung und Rechenleistung sowie eine wachsende Liste von Tools und Ressourcen, die über die Open-Source-Community verfügbar sind, ermöglichen es Unternehmen jeder Größe, von sämtlichen Daten zu profitieren.

Data Science Blog: Was sind die Herausforderungen beim Einstieg in Data Science?

Ich sehe zwei große Herausforderungen: Eine davon ist die Sicherstellung der organisatorischen Ausrichtung auf Ergebnisse, die die Data Scientists liefern werden (und das Timing für diese Projekte).  Die zweite Hürde besteht darin, sicherzustellen, dass sie über die richtigen Daten verfügen, bevor sie mit dem Einstellen von Data Science Experten beginnen. Das kann “tricky” sein, wenn man im Unternehmen nicht bereits über Know-how in diesem Segment verfügt. Daher ist es manchmal besser, im ersten Schritt einen Data Engineer oder Data Strategist einzustellen, bevor man mit dem Aufbau eines Data Science Team beginnt.

Data Science Blog: Es gibt viele Diskussionen darüber, wie man ein datengesteuertes Unternehmen aufbauen kann. Geht es bei Data Science nur darum, am Ende das Kundenverhalten besser zu verstehen?

Nein “Data Driven” bedeutet nicht nur, die Kunden besser zu verstehen – obwohl das eine Möglichkeit ist, wie Data Science einem Unternehmen helfen kann. Abgesehen vom Aufbau einer Organisation, die sich auf Daten und Analysen stützt, um Entscheidungen über das Kundenverhalten oder andere Aspekte zu treffen, bedeutet es, dass Daten das Unternehmen und seine Produkte voranbringen.

Data Science Blog: Die Zahl der Technologien, Tools und Frameworks nimmt zu, was zu mehr Komplexität führt. Müssen Unternehmen immer auf dem Laufenden bleiben oder könnte es ebenso hilfreich sein, zu warten und Pioniere zu imitieren?

Obwohl es generell für Unternehmen nicht ratsam ist, pauschal jede neue Entwicklung zu übernehmen, ist es wichtig, dass sie mit den neuen Rahmenbedingungen Schritt halten. Wenn ein Unternehmen wartet, um zu sehen, was andere tun, und deshalb nicht in neue Entwicklungen investiert, haben sie den Anschluss meist schon verpasst.

Data Science Blog: Global Player verfügen meist über ein großes Budget für Forschung und den Aufbau von Data Labs. Mittelständische Unternehmen stehen immer unter dem Druck, den Break-Even schnell zu erreichen. Wie können wir die Wertschöpfung von Data Science beschleunigen?

Ein Team zu haben, das sich auf ein bestimmtes Set von Projekten konzentriert, die gut durchdacht und auf das Geschäft ausgerichtet sind, macht den Unterschied aus. Data Science und Machine Learning müssen nicht auf Forschung und Innovation verzichten, um Werte zu schaffen. Der größte Unterschied besteht darin, dass sich kleinere Teams stärker bewusst sein müssen, wie sich ihre Projektwahl in neue Rahmenbedingungen und ihre besonderen akuten und kurzfristigen Geschäftsanforderungen einfügt.

Data Science Blog: Wie hilft Cloudera Fast Forward Labs anderen Unternehmen, den Einstieg in Machine Learning zu beschleunigen?

Wir beraten Unternehmen, basierend auf ihren speziellen Bedürfnissen, über die neuesten Trends im Bereich Machine Learning und Data Science. Und wir zeigen ihnen, wie sie ihre Datenteams aufbauen und strukturieren können, um genau die Fähigkeiten zu entwickeln, die sie benötigen, um ihre Ziele zu erreichen.

Data Science Blog: Zum Schluss noch eine Frage an unsere jüngeren Leser, die eine Karriere als Datenexperte anstreben: Was macht einen guten Data Scientist aus? Arbeiten sie lieber mit introvertierten Coding-Nerds oder den Data-loving Business-Experten?

Ein guter Data Scientist sollte sehr neugierig sein und eine Liebe für die Art und Weise haben, wie Daten zu neuen Entdeckungen und Innovationen führen und die nächste Generation von Produkten antreiben können.  Menschen, die im Data Science Umfeld erfolgreich sind, kommen nicht nur aus der IT. Sie können aus allen möglichen Bereichen kommen und über die unterschiedlichsten Backgrounds verfügen.

Interview – The Importance of Machine Learning for the Data Driven Business

To become more data-driven, organizations must mature their analytics and automate more of their decision making processes for innovation and differentiation. Data science seems like the right approach, yet is a new and fast moving field that seems to have as many dead ends as it has high ways to value. Cloudera Fast Forward Labs, led by Hilary Mason, shows companies the way.

Alice Albrecht is a research engineer at Cloudera Fast Forward Labs.  She spends her days researching the latest and greatest in machine learning and artificial intelligence and bringing that knowledge to working prototypes and delivering concrete advice for clients.  Prior to joining Fast Forward Labs, Alice worked in both finance and technology companies as a practicing data scientist, data science leader, and – most recently – a data product manager.  In addition to teaching machines to do cool things, Alice is passionate about mentoring and helping others grow in their careers.  Alice holds a PhD from Yale in cognitive neuroscience where she studied how humans summarize sensory information from the world around them and the neural substrates that underlie those summaries.

Read this article in German:
“Interview – Die Bedeutung von Machine Learning für das Data Driven Business“

Data Science Blog: Ms. Albrecht, you are a well-known keynote speaker for data science and artificial intelligence. While data science has arrived business already, deep learning seems to be the new trend. Is artificial intelligence for business already normal business or is it an overrated hype?

I’d say it isn’t either of those two options.  Data science is now widely adopted but companies still struggle to integrate this new discipline into their existing businesses.  As for deep learning, it really depends on the company that’s looking into using this technique.  I wouldn’t say that deep learning is by any means part of business as usual- nor should it be.  It’s a tool like any other and building a capacity for using a tool without clearly defined business needs is a recipe for disaster.

Data Science Blog: Just to make sure what we are talking about: What are the differences and overlaps between data analytics, data science, machine learning, deep learning and artificial intelligence?

Here at Cloudera Fast Forward Labs, we like to think of data analytics as collecting data and counting things (mostly for quick charts and reports).  Data science solves business problems by counting cleverly and predicting things with the data that’s collected.  Machine learning is about solving problems with new kinds of feedback loops that improve with more data.  Deep learning is a particular type of machine learning and is not itself a separate concept or type of tool.  Artificial intelligence taps into something more complicated than what we’re seeing today – it’s much broader than training machines to repetitively do very specialized tasks or solve very narrow problems.

Data Science Blog: And how can we add the context to big data?

From a theoretical perspective, data science has been around for decades. The building blocks for modern day machine learning, deep learning and artificial intelligence are based on mathematical theorems  that go back to the 1940’s and 1950’s. The challenge was that at the time, compute power and data storage capacity were simply too expensive for the approaches to be implemented. Today that’s all changed.. Not only has the cost of data storage dropped considerably, open source technology like Apache Hadoop has made it possible to store any volume of data at costs approaching zero. Compute power, even highly specialised chip architectures, are now also available on demand and only for the time organisations need them through public and private cloud solutions. The decreased cost of both data storage and compute power, together with a growing list of tools and resources readily available via the open source community allows companies of any size to benefit from data (no matter that size of that data).

Data Science Blog: What are the challenges for organizations in getting started with data science?

I see two big challenges when getting started with data science.  One is ensuring that you have organizational alignment around exactly what type of work data scientists will deliver (and timing for those projects).  The second hurdle is around ensuring that you have the right data in place before you start hiring data scientists. This can be tricky if you don’t have in-house expertise in this area, so sometimes it’s better to hire a data engineer or a data strategist (or director of data science) before you ever get started building out a data science team.

Data Science Blog: There are many discussions about how to build a data-driven business. Is it just about using data science to get a better understanding of customer behavior?

No, being data driven doesn’t just mean better understanding your customers (though that is one way that data science can help in an organization).  Aside from building an organization that relies on data and analytics to help them make decisions (about customer behavior or otherwise), being a data-driven business means that data is powering your core products.

Data Science Blog: The number of technologies, tools and frameworks is increasing. For organizations this also means increasing complexity. Do companies need to stay always up-to-date or could it be an advice to wait and imitate pioneers later?

While it’s not critical (or advisable) for organizations to adopt every new advancement that comes along, it is critical for them to stay abreast of emerging frameworks.  If a business waits to see what others are doing, and therefore don’t invest in understanding how new advancements can affect their particular business, they’ve likely already missed the boat.

Data Science Blog: Global players have big budgets just for doing research and setting up data labs. Middle-sized companies need to see the break even point soon. How can we accelerate the value generation of data science?

Having a team that is highly focused on a specific set of projects that are well-scoped and aligned to the business makes all the difference.  Data science and machine learning don’t have to sacrifice doing research and being innovative in order to produce value.  The biggest difference is that smaller teams will have to be more aware of how their choice of project fits into emerging frameworks and their particular acute and near term business needs.

Data Science Blog: How does Cloudera Fast Forward Labs help other organizations to accelerate their start with machine learning?

We advise organizations, based on their particular needs, on what the latest advancements are in machine learning and data science, how to build and structure their data teams to develop the capabilities they need to meet their goals, and how to quickly implement custom forward-looking solutions using their own data and in-house expertise.

Data Science Blog: Finally, a question for our younger readers who are looking for a career as a data expert: What makes a good data scientist? Do you like to work with introverted coding nerds or the data loving business experts?

A good data scientists should be deeply curious and have a love for the ways in which data can lead to new discoveries and power the next generation of products.  We expect the people who thrive in this field to come from a variety of backgrounds and experiences.

Machine Learning vs Deep Learning – Wo liegt der Unterschied?

Machine Learning gehört zu den Industrie-Trends dieser Jahre, da besteht kein Zweifel. Oder war es Deep Learning? Oder Artificial Intelligence? Worin liegt da eigentlich der Unterschied? Dies ist Artikel 1 von 5 der Artikelserie –Einstieg in Deep Learning.

Machine Learning

Maschinelles Lernen (ML) ist eine Sammlung von mathematischen Methoden der Mustererkennung. Diese Methoden erkennen Muster beispielsweise durch bestmögliche, auf eine bestmögliche Entropie gerichtete, Zerlegung von Datenbeständen in hierarchische Strukturen (Entscheidungsbäume). Oder über Vektoren werden Ähnlichkeiten zwischen Datensätzen ermittelt und daraus trainiert (z. B. k-nearest-Neighbour, nachfolgend einfach kurz: k-nN) oder untrainiert (z.B. k-Means) Muster erschlossen.

Algorithmen des maschinellen Lernens sind tatsächlich dazu in der Lage, viele alltägliche oder auch sehr spezielle Probleme zu lösen. In der Praxis eines Entwicklers für Machine Learning stellen sich jedoch häufig Probleme, wenn es entweder zu wenige Daten gibt oder wenn es zu viele Dimensionen der Daten gibt. Entropie-getriebene Lern-Algorithmen wie Entscheidungsbäume werden bei vielen Dimensionen zu komplex, und auf Vektorräumen basierende Algorithmen wie der k-nächste-Nachbarn-Algorithmus sind durch den Fluch der Dimensionalität in ihrer Leistung eingeschränkt.


Der Fluch der Dimensionalität

Datenpunkte sind in einem zwei-dimensionalen Raum gut vorstellbar und auch ist es vorstellbar, das wir einen solchen Raum (z. B. ein DIN-A5-Papierblatt) mit vielen Datenpunkten vollschreiben. Belassen wir es bei der Anzahl an Datenpunkten, nehmen jedoch weitere Dimensionen hinzu (zumindest die 3. Dimension können wir uns noch gut vorstellen), werden die Abstände zwischen den Punkten größer. n-dimensionale Räume können gewaltig groß sein, so dass Algorithmen wie der k-nN nicht mehr gut funktionieren (der n-dimensionale Raum ist einfach zu leer).


Auch wenn es einige Konzepte zum besseren Umgang mit vielen Dimensionen gibt (z. B. einige Ideen des Ensemble Learnings)

Feature Engineering

Um die Anzahl an Dimensionen zu reduzieren, bedienen sich Machine Learning Entwickler statistischer Methoden, um viele Dimensionen auf die (wahrscheinlich) nützlichsten zu reduzieren: sogenannte Features. Dieser Auswahlprozess nennt sich Feature Engineering und bedingt den sicheren Umgang mit Statistik sowie idealerweise auch etwas Fachkenntnisse des zu untersuchenden Fachgebiets.
Bei der Entwicklung von Machine Learning für den produktiven Einsatz arbeiten Data Scientists den Großteil ihrer Arbeitszeit nicht an der Feinjustierung ihrer Algorithmen des maschinellen Lernens, sondern mit der Auswahl passender Features.

Deep Learning

Deep Learning (DL) ist eine Disziplin des maschinellen Lernes unter Einsatz von künstlichen neuronalen Netzen. Während die Ideen für Entscheidungsbäume, k-nN oder k-Means aus einer gewissen mathematischen Logik heraus entwickelt wurden, gibt es für künstliche neuronale Netze ein Vorbild aus der Natur: Biologische neuronale Netze.

Prinzip-Darstellung eines künstlichen neuronalen Netzes mit zwei Hidden-Layern zwischen einer Eingabe- und Ausgabe-Schicht.

Wie künstliche neuronale Netze im Detail funktionieren, erläutern wir in den nächsten zwei Artikeln dieser Artikelserie, jedoch vorab schon mal so viel: Ein Eingabe-Vektor (eine Reihe von Dimensionen) stellt eine erste Schicht dar, die über weitere Schichten mit sogenannten Neuronen erweitert oder reduziert und über Gewichtungen abstrahiert wird, bis eine Ausgabeschicht erreicht wird, die einen Ausgabe-Vektor erzeugt (im Grunde ein Ergebnis-Schlüssel, der beispielsweise eine bestimmte Klasse ausweist: z. B. Katze oder Hund). Durch ein Training werden die Gewichte zwischen den Neuronen so angepasst, dass bestimmte Eingabe-Muster (z. B. Fotos von Haustieren) immer zu einem bestimmten Ausgabe-Muster führen (z. B. “Das Foto zeigt eine Katze”).

Der Vorteil von künstlichen neuronalen Netzen ist die sehr tiefgehende Abstraktion von Zusammenhängen zwischen Eingabe-Daten und zwischen den abstrahierten Neuronen-Werten mit den Ausgabe-Daten. Dies geschieht über mehrere Schichten (Layer) der Netze, die sehr spezielle Probleme lösen können. Aus diesen Tatsachen leitet sich der übergeordnete Name ab: Deep Learning

Deep Learning kommt dann zum Einsatz, wenn andere maschinelle Lernverfahren an Grenzen stoßen und auch dann, wenn auf ein separates Feature Engineering verzichtet werden muss, denn neuronale Netze können über mehrere Schichten viele Eingabe-Dimensionen von selbst auf die Features reduzieren, die für die korrekte Bestimmung der Ausgabe notwendig sind.

Convolutional Neuronal Network

Convolutional Neuronal Networks (CNN) sind neuronale Netze, die vor allem für die Klassifikation von Bilddaten verwendet werden. Sie sind im Kern klassische neuronale Netze, die jedoch eine Faltungs- und eine Pooling-Schicht vorgeschaltet haben. Die Faltungsschicht ließt den Daten-Input (z. B. ein Foto) mehrfach hintereinander, doch jeweils immer nur einen Ausschnitt daraus (bei Fotos dann einen Sektor des Fotos), die Pooling-Schicht reduzierte die Ausschnittsdaten (bei Fotos: Pixel) auf reduzierte Informationen. Daraufhin folgt das eigentliche neuronale Netz.

CNNs sind im Grunde eine spezialisierte Form von künstlichen neuronalen Netzen, die das Feature-Engineering noch geschickter handhaben.

Deep Autoencoder

Gegenwärtig sind die meisten künstlichen neuronalen Netze ein Algorithmen-Modell für das überwachte maschinelle Lernen (Klassifikation oder Regression), jedoch kommen sie auch zum unüberwachten Lernen (Clustering oder Dimensionsreduktion) zum Einsatz, die sogenannten Deep Autoencoder.

Deep Autoencoder sind neuronale Netze, die im ersten Schritt eine große Menge an Eingabe-Dimensionen auf vergleichsweise wenige Dimensionen reduzieren. Die Reduktion (Encoder) erfolgt nicht abrupt, sondern schrittweise über mehrere Schichten, die reduzierten Dimensionen werden zum Feature-Vektor. Daraufhin kommt der zweite Teil des neuronalen Netzes zum Einsatz: Die reduzierten Dimensionen werden über weitere Schichten wieder erweitert, die ursprünglichen Dimensionen als abstrakteres Modell wieder rekonstruiert (Decoder). Der Sinn von Deep Autoencodern sind abstrakte Ähnlichkeitsmodelle zu erstellen. Ein häufiges Einsatzgebiet sind beispielsweise das maschinelle Identifizieren von ähnlichen Bildern, Texten oder akkustischen Signalmustern.

Artificial Intelligence

Artificial Intelligence (AI) oder künstliche Intelligenz (KI) ist ein wissenschaftlicher Bereich, der das maschinelle Lernen beinhaltet, jedoch noch weitere Bereiche kennt, die für den Aufbau einer KI von Nöten sind. Eine künstliche Intelligenz muss nicht nur Lernen, sie muss auch Wissen effizient abspeichern, einordnen bzw. sortieren und abrufen können. Sie muss ferner über eine Logik verfügen, wie sie das Wissen und das Gelernte einsetzen muss. Denken wir an biologische Intelligenzen, ist es etwa nicht so, dass jegliche Fähigkeiten erlernt wurden, einige sind mit der Geburt bereits ausgebildet oder liegen als sogenannter Instinkt vor.

Ein einzelner Machine Learning Algorithmus würde wohl kaum einen Turing-Test bestehen oder einen Roboter komplexe Aufgaben bewältigen lassen. Daher muss eine künstliche Intelligenz weit mehr können, als bestimmte Dinge zu erlernen. Zum wissenschaftlichen Gebiet der künstlichen Intelligenz gehören zumindest:

  • Machine Learning (inkl. Deep Learning und Ensemble Learning)
  • Mathematische Logik
    • Aussagenlogik
    • Prädikatenlogik
    • Default-Logik
    • Modal-Logik
  • Wissensbasierte Systeme
    • relationale Algebra
    • Graphentheorie
  • Such- und Optimierungsverfahren:
    • Gradientenverfahren
    • Breitensuche & Tiefensuche

AI(ML(DL))

Buch-Empfehlungen

Grundkurs Künstliche Intelligenz: Eine praxisorientierte Einführung (Computational Intelligence) Praxiseinstieg Deep Learning: Mit Python, Caffe, TensorFlow und Spark eigene Deep-Learning-Anwendungen erstellen