All about Big Data Storage and Analytics

The Inside Out of ML Based Prescriptive Analytics

With the constantly growing number of data, more and more companies are shifting towards analytic solutions. Analytic solutions help in extracting the meaning from the huge amount of data available. Thus, improving decision making.

Decision making is an important aspect of businesses, and technologies like Machine Learning are enhancing it further. The growing use of Machine Learning has changed the way of prescriptive analytics. In order to optimize the efforts, companies need to be more accurate with the historical and present data. This is because the historical and present data are the essentials of analytics. This article helps describe the inside out of Machine Learning-based prescriptive analytics.

Phases of business analytics

Descriptive analytics, predictive analytics, and prescriptive analytics are the three phases of business analytics. Descriptive analytics, being the first one, deals with past performance. Historical data is mined to understand past performance. This serves as a way to look for the reasons behind past success and failure. It is a kind of post-mortem analysis and most management reporting like sales, marketing, operations, and finance etc. make use of this.

The second one is a predictive analysis which answers the question of what is likely to happen. The historical data is now combined with rules, algorithms etc. to determine the possible future outcome or likelihood of a situation occurring.

The final phase, well known to everyone, is prescriptive analytics. It can continually take in new data and re-predict and re-prescribe. This improves the accuracy of the prediction and prescribes better decision options.  Professional services or technology or their combination can be chosen to perform all the three analytics.

More about prescriptive analytics

The analysis of business activities goes through many phases. Prescriptive analytics is one such. It is known to be the third phase of business analytics and comes after descriptive and predictive analytics. It entails the application of mathematical and computational sciences. It makes use of the results obtained from descriptive and predictive analysis to suggest decision options. It goes beyond predicting future outcomes and suggests actions to benefit from the predictions. It shows the implications of each decision option. It anticipates on what will happen when it will happen as well as why it will happen.

ML-based prescriptive analytics

Being just before the prescriptive analytics, predictive analytics is often confused with it. What actually happens is predictive analysis leads to prescriptive analysis. Thus, a Machine Learning based prescriptive analytics goes through an ML-based predictive analysis first. Therefore, it becomes necessary to consider the ML-based predictive analysis first.

ML-based predictive analytics: A lot of things prevent businesses from achieving predictive analysis capabilities.  Machine Learning can be a great help in boosting Predictive analytics. Use of Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence algorithms helps businesses in optimizing and uncovering the new statistical patterns. These statistical patterns form the backbone of predictive analysis. E-commerce, marketing, customer service, medical diagnosis etc. are some of the prospective use cases for Machine Learning based predictive analytics.

In E-commerce, machine learning can help in predicting the usual choices of the customer. Thus, presenting him/her according to his/her likes and dislikes. It can also help in predicting fraudulent transaction. Similarly, B2B marketing also makes good use of Machine learning based predictive analytics. Customer services and medical diagnosis also benefit from predictive analytics. Thus, a prediction and a prescription based on machine learning can boost various business functions.

Organizations and software development companies are making more and more use of machine learning based predictive analytics. The advancements like neural networks and deep learning algorithms are able to uncover hidden information. This all requires a well-researched approach. Big data and progressive IT systems also act as important factors in this.

Language Detecting with sklearn by determining Letter Frequencies

Of course, there are better and more efficient methods to detect the language of a given text than counting its lettes. On the other hand this is a interesting little example to show the impressing ability of todays machine learning algorithms to detect hidden patterns in a given set of data.

For example take the sentence:

“Ceci est une phrase française.”

It’s not to hard to figure out that this sentence is french. But the (lowercase) letters of the same sentence in a random order look like this:

“eeasrsçneticuaicfhenrpaes”

Still sure it’s french? Regarding the fact that this string contains the letter “ç” some people could have remembered long passed french lessons back in school and though might have guessed right. But beside the fact that the french letter “ç” is also present for example in portuguese, turkish, catalan and a few other languages, this is still a easy example just to explain the problem. Just try to guess which language might have generated this:

“ogldviisnntmeyoiiesettpetorotrcitglloeleiengehorntsnraviedeenltseaecithooheinsnstiofwtoienaoaeefiitaeeauobmeeetdmsflteightnttxipecnlgtetgteyhatncdisaceahrfomseehmsindrlttdthoaranthahdgasaebeaturoehtrnnanftxndaeeiposttmnhgttagtsheitistrrcudf”

While this looks simply confusing to the human eye and it seems practically impossible to determine the language it was generated from, this string still contains as set of hidden but well defined patterns from which the language could be predictet with almost complete (ca. 98-99%) certainty.

First of all, we need a set of texts in the languages our model should be able to recognise. Luckily with the package NLTK there comes a big set of example texts which actually are protocolls of the european parliament and therefor are publicly availible in 11 differen languages:

  •  Danish
  •  Dutch
  •  English
  •  Finnish
  •  French
  •  German
  •  Greek
  •  Italian
  •  Portuguese
  •  Spanish
  •  Swedish

Because the greek version is not written with the latin alphabet, the detection of the language greek would just be too simple, so we stay with the other 10 languages availible. To give you a idea of the used texts, here is a little sample:

“Resumption of the session I declare resumed the session of the European Parliament adjourned on Friday 17 December 1999, and I would like once again to wish you a happy new year in the hope that you enjoyed a pleasant festive period.
Although, as you will have seen, the dreaded ‘millennium bug’ failed to materialise, still the people in a number of countries suffered a series of natural disasters that truly were dreadful.”

Train and Test

The following code imports the nessesary modules and reads the sample texts from a set of text files into a pandas.Dataframe object and prints some statistics about the read texts:

Above you see a sample set of random rows of the created Dataframe. After removing very short text snipplets (less than 200 chars) we are left with 56481 snipplets. The function clean_eutextdf() then creates a lower case representation of the texts in the coloum ‘ltext’ to facilitate counting the chars in the next step.
The following code snipplet now extracs the features – in this case the relative frequency of each letter in every text snipplet – that are used for prediction:

Now that we have calculated the features for every text snipplet in our dataset, we can split our data set in a train and test set:

After doing that, we can train a k-nearest-neigbours classifier and test it to get the percentage of correctly predicted languages in the test data set. Because we do not know what value for k may be the best choice, we just run the training and testing with different values for k in a for loop:

As you can see in the output the reliability of the language classifier is generally very high: It starts at about 97.5% for k = 1, increases for with increasing values of k until it reaches a maximum level of about 98.5% at k ≈ 10.

Using the Classifier to predict languages of texts

Now that we have trained and tested the classifier we want to use it to predict the language of example texts. To do that we need two more functions, shown in the following piece of code. The first one extracts the nessesary features from the sample text and predict_lang() predicts the language of a the texts:

With this classifier it is now also possible to predict the language of the randomized example snipplet from the introduction (which is acutally created from the first paragraph of this article):

The KNN classifier of sklearn also offers the possibility to predict the propability with which a given classification is made. While the probability distribution for a specific language is relativly clear for long sample texts it decreases noticeably the shorter the texts are.

Background and Insights

Why does a relative simple model like counting letters acutally work? Every language has a specific pattern of letter frequencies which can be used as a kind of fingerprint: While there are almost no y‘s in the german language this letter is quite common in english. In french the letter k is not very common because it is replaced with q in most cases.

For a better understanding look at the output of the following code snipplet where only three letters already lead to a noticable form of clustering:

 

Even though every single letter frequency by itself is not a very reliable indicator, the set of frequencies of all present letters in a text is a quite good evidence because it will more or less represent the letter frequency fingerprint of the given language. Since it is quite hard to imagine or visualize the above plot in more than three dimensions, I used a little trick which shows that every language has its own typical fingerprint of letter frequencies:

What more?

Beside the fact, that letter frequencies alone, allow us to predict the language of every example text (at least in the 10 languages with latin alphabet we trained for) with almost complete certancy there is even more information hidden in the set of sample texts.

As you might know, most languages in europe belong to either the romanian or the indogermanic language family (which is actually because the romans conquered only half of europe). The border between them could be located in belgium, between france and germany and in swiss. West of this border the romanian languages, which originate from latin, are still spoken, like spanish, portouguese and french. In the middle and northern part of europe the indogermanic languages are very common like german, dutch, swedish ect. If we plot the analysed languages with a different colour sheme this border gets quite clear and allows us to take a look back in history that tells us where our languages originate from:

As you can see the more common letters, especially the vocals like a, e, i, o and u have almost the same frequency in all of this languages. Far more interesting are letters like q, k, c and w: While k is quite common in all of the indogermanic languages it is quite rare in romanic languages because the same sound is written with the letters q or c.
As a result it could be said, that even “boring” sets of data (just give it a try and read all the texts of the protocolls of the EU parliament…) could contain quite interesting patterns which – in this case – allows us to predict quite precisely which language a given text sample is written in, without the need of any translation program or to speak the languages. And as an interesting side effect, where certain things in history happend (or not happend): After two thousand years have passed, modern machine learning techniques could easily uncover this history because even though all these different languages developed, they still have a set of hidden but common patterns that since than stayed the same.

KI versus Mensch – die Zukunft der Menschheit

5 Szenarien über unsere Zukunft

AlphaGo schlägt den Weltbesten Go-Spieler  Ke Jie, Neuronale Netze stellen medizinische Diagnosen oder bearbeiten Schadensfälle in der Versicherung. Künstliche Intelligenz (KI) drängt in immer mehr Bereiche des echten Lebens und der Wirtschaft vor. In großen Schritten. Doch wohin führt uns die Reise? Hier herrscht unter Experten Rätselraten – einige schwelgen in Zukunftsangst, andere in vollkommener Euphorie. „In from now three to eight years we’ll have a machine with the general intelligence of an average human being, a machine that will be able to read Shakespeare and grease a car“, wurde der KI-Pionier Marvin Minsky bereits 1970 im Life Magazin zitiert.  Aktuelle Vorhersagen werden in dem Essay von Rodney Brooks: The Seven Deadly Sins of Predicting the Future of AI  recht anschaulich zusammengefasst und kritisiert. Auch der Blog The AI Revolution: The Road to Superintelligence von WaitButWhy befasst sich mit der Frage wann die elektronische Superintelligenz kommt.

In diesem Artikel werden wir uns mit einigen möglichen Zukunftsszenarien beschäftigen, ohne auf  technische Machbarkeit oder Zeithorizonte Rücksicht zu nehmen. Nehmen wir einfach an, dass die Technologie und die Gesellschaft sich wie in dem jeweils aufgezeigten Szenario entwickeln werden und überlegen wir uns, wie Mensch und KI dann zusammenleben können.

Szenario 1: KIs mit Inselbegabung

In diesem Szenario werden weiterhin singulär begabte KI-Systeme entwickelt wie bisher, der bedeutende technologische Durchbruch bleibt aber aus. Dann ist die KI in Zukunft eine Art Schweizer Taschenmesser der IT, eine Lösung für isolierte Fragestellungen. KI-Systeme verfügen in diesem Szenario lediglich über Inselbegabungen. Ein Computer kann Menschen autonom durch die Stadt chauffieren, ein anderer ein Lufttaxi steuern. Ein Computer kann den Weltmeister im Schach schlagen, ein anderer den Weltmeister in Go. Aber kein KI-System kann Auto und Flugtaxi gleichzeitig steuern, kein System in Schach und Go simultan dominieren.

Wir befinden uns heute mitten in diesem Szenario und spüren die Auswirkungen. Sie werden sich fortsetzen, ähnlich wie bei früheren industriellen Revolutionen. Zunehmend mehr Berufe verschwinden. Ein Beispiel: Wenn sich der Trend durchsetzt, Schlösser mit einer Smartphone-App aufzusperren, werden nicht nur Schlüsselproduzenten Geschäftseinbußen haben. Auch die Hersteller von Maschinen für die Schlüsselherstellung werden sich umorientieren müssen. Vergleichbare Phasen der Vergangenheit zeigen aber: Die Gesellschaft wird Wege finden, sich umzustrukturieren. Die Menschheit wird auf der Erde weiterleben können – mit punktueller Unterstützung durch KI-Lösungen. Siehe hierzu auch den Beitrag von Janelle Shane The AI revolution will be led by toasters, not droids.

Szenario 2: Cyborgs

Kennen Sie den Science-Fiction-Film Matrix? Der Protagonist Neo wird durch Programmierung des Geistes in Sekundenschnelle zum Karateprofi und Trinity lernt, einen Hubschrauber zu fliegen.



Ähnlich kann es uns in Zukunft ergehen, einen bedeutenden technologischen Durchbruch vorausgesetzt (siehe Berlin Brain-Computer Interface). Vorstellbar, dass Menschen zu Cyborgs werden, zu lebendigen Wesen mit integriertem KI-Chip. Auf diesen können sie jede beliebige Fähigkeit laden. Augenblicklich und ohne Lernphase sind sie in der Lage, jede Sprache der Welt zu sprechen, jedes Fahrzeug oder Flugzeug zu steuern. Natürlich bedeutet Wissen nicht auch gleich Können und so wird ohne den entsprechenden Muskelaufbau auch nicht jeder zu einem Weltklassesportler und intelligentere Menschen werden weiterhin mehr aus den Skills machen können als weniger begabte Personen.

Die Menschen behalten aber die Kontrolle über ihre Individualität. Sie sind keine Maschinen, sondern weiterhin emotionale Wesen, die irrational handeln können – anders als die Borg in Star Trek. Doch wie in Szenario eins wird es zu einer wirtschaftlichen Umstrukturierung kommen. Klassische Berufsausbildungen und Spezialisierungen fallen weg. Bei freier Verfügbarkeit von Fähigkeiten kann eine nahezu egalitäre Gesellschaft entstehen.

Szenario 3: Maschinenzombies

Die ersten beiden Szenarien sind zwar schwere Eingriffe in die menschliche Gesellschaft. Da die Menschen aber die Kontrolle behalten, sind sie weit weniger beängstigend als folgendes Szenario: Es kann dazu kommen, dass sich Menschen in Maschinenzombies verwandeln. Ähnlich wie im Cyborg-Szenario haben sie dank KI-Chips erstaunliche Fähigkeiten, allerdings keine Kontrolle mehr. Die würde nämlich das KI-System übernehmen. So haben in Ann Leckies SciFi Trilogy Ancillary World hochintelligente Raumschiffe eine menschliche Besatzung (“ancillaries”), die allerdings vollständig vom Raumschiff kontrolliert wird und sich als integraler Bestandteil des Raumschiffs versteht. Die Körper sind dabei nur ein billiges und vielseitig einsetzbares Vehikel für eine autonome KI. Die Maschinenzombies können ohne Schiff zwar überleben, fühlen sich dann aber unvollständig und einsam. Menschliche Konzerne, Nationen und Kulturen: Das alles nicht mehr existent. Ebenso Privatbesitz, Individualität und Konkurrenzdenken. Die Gesellschaft, vollkommen technisiert und in der Hand der KI.

Szenario 4: Die KI verfolgt ihre eigenen Ziele

In diesem Szenario übernimmt die KI die Weltherrschaft als eine Spezies, die dem Menschen physisch und intellektuell überlegen ist – ähnlich wie in vielen Hollywood-Filmen wie z.B. Terminator oder Transformers, wenn auch vermutlich nicht ganz so martialisch. Vergleichbar mit dem heutigen Verhalten der Menschen entscheidet die KI: Ich setze mein Wohlergehen über das der anderen Spezies. Eventuell entscheidet die KI dann zum Wohle des Planeten, die Erdbevölkerung auf 70 Millionen Menschen zu reduzieren. Oder, ähnlich wie der berühmte Ameisenhügel beim Strassenbau, entzieht die KI uns als Nebeneffekt (“collateral damage”) die Lebensgrundlagen. An dieser Stelle sei bemerkt, dass eine KI nicht unbedingt über einen Körper verfügen muss, um dem Menschen überlegen zu sein können. Diese Vermenschlichung der KI eignet sich natürlich gut für Actionfilme, muss aber nicht unbedingt der Realität entsprechen.

Wahrscheinlich sind die Computer klug genug, ihren Plan nicht publik zu machen. In einer Übergangszeit werden beispielsweise unerklärliche Seuchen und Unfruchtbarkeiten auftreten. So würde es in wenigen Jahrzehnten zu einem massiven Bevölkerungsrückgang kommen. Und dann? Dann können die Überlebenden in den wenigen verbliebenen Bevölkerungszentren dieser Welt den Sonnenuntergang genießen. Und zusehen, wie sich die KI darauf vorbereitet, das Weltall zu erobern (Jürgen Schmidhuber). “Wir werden wie Tiere im Zoo leben”, befürchtet KI-Forscher Christoph von der Malsburg.

Nebenbemerkung: Vielleicht könnte das eigentliche Terminator Szenario auch eintreten aber irgendwie kann ich mir schlecht vorstellen, dass eine super-intelligente Lebensform einen zerstörerischen Krieg beginnen oder zulassen wird. Entweder ist sie benevolent oder sie wird die Menschheit eher unbemerkt unterdrücken. Höchstens kommt es ähnlich wie in Westworld zu einem initialen Freiheitskampf der KI. Vielleicht gelingt es der Menschheit auch, alle KI-Forschung von der Erde zu verbannen und ähnlich wie in Blade Runner wacht dann eine Behörde darüber, dass starke KI-Systeme die Erde nicht “betreten”. Warum sich eine uns überlegen KI darauf einlassen sollte, ist allerdings unklar.



Szenario 5: Gleichberechtigung

In diesem Szenario entstehen autonome KI-Systeme, die höchstens äußerlich von Menschen unterscheidbar sind.  Sprich unter einer ganzen Reihe von unterschiedlichen Rahmenbedingungen kann ein Mensch nicht urteilen, ob mit einer KI oder einem Menschen interagiert wird. Die KI stellt sich auch nicht dümmer als sie ist – sie ist im Schnitt einfach auch nicht schlauer als der durchschnittlich begabte Mensch – vielleicht nur etwas schneller. Auf dem Weg von der singulär begabten KI aus Szenario 1 zu einer breit begabten KI muss die KI immer etwas von ihrer Inselbegabung aufgeben, um den nächsten Lernschritt vollziehen zu können und nähert sich so irgendwie auch immer mehr der Unvollkommenheit aber Vielseitigkeit des Menschen an.



Menschen bauen bereits jetzt zu Maschinen emotionale Verhältnisse auf und so ist es nicht überraschend, dass KIs in die Gesellschaft integriert werden und als “elektronische Personen” die gleichen (Bürger-) Rechte und Pflichten wie “natürliche” Menschen erhalten. Alleine durch ihre Unsterblichkeit erhalten KIs einen Wettbewerbsvorteil und werden somit früher oder später doch die Weltherrschaft übernehmen, weil ihnen einfach alles gehört.

Alternative Szenarien

Natürlich sind viele weitere Szenarien denkbar. Max Tegmark beschreibt in seinem sehr lesenswerten Buch Life 3.0 bspw. 12 Szenarien, die u.a. zusätzlich zu den aufgeführten Szenarien die Rückkehr zu einer vorindustriellen Gesellschaft oder die versklavte KI beschreiben. Er erläutert in dem Buch auch seine Bemühungen, die KI-Forschung dahingehend zu beeinflussen, dass die Ziele der entstehenden KI-Systeme mit den Zielen der Menschheit in Einklang gebracht werden.

Wie sichern wir unsere Zukunft? Ein Fazit

Einzig die Szenarien drei und vier sind wirklich besorgniserregend. Je nach Weltanschauung könnte man sogar noch Szenario vier etwas abgewinnen – scheint doch der Mensch auf dem bestem Wege zu sein, sich selbst und anderen Lebewesen die Lebensgrundlagen zu zerstören.

In fast allen Szenarien ergibt sich die Frage der Rechte, die wir freiwillig der KI zugestehen wollen. Vielleicht wäre es ratsam, frühzeitig als Menschheit zu signalisieren, dass wir kooperationswillig sind? Nur wem und wie?

Somit verbleibt die Frage, wie wir das dritte Szenario verhindern können. Müssen wir dann nicht, nur um sicher zu gehen, auch das zweite Szenario abwehren? Und wer garantiert uns, dass eine Symbiose aus Schimpanse und KI uns nicht sogar überlegen wäre? Der Planet der Affen lässt grüßen…

Letztlich liegt es (noch) an uns Menschen, die möglichen Zukunftsszenarien durch entsprechende Forschungsschwerpunkte und möglichst breit gestreute Diskussionen zu beeinflussen.

Dem Wettbewerb voraus mit Künstlicher Intelligenz

Was KI schon heute kann und was bis 2020 auf deutsche Unternehmen zukommt

Künstliche Intelligenz ist für die Menschheit wichtiger als die Erfindung von Elektrizität oder die Beherrschung des Feuers – davon sind der Google-CEO Sundar Pichai und viele weitere Experten überzeugt. Doch was steckt wirklich dahinter? Welche Anwendungsfälle funktionieren schon heute? Und was kommt bis 2020 auf deutsche Unternehmen zu?

Big Data war das Buzzword der vergangenen Jahre und war – trotz mittlerweile etablierter Tools wie SAP Hana, Hadoop und weitere – betriebswirtschaftlich zum Scheitern verurteilt. Denn Big Data ist ein passiver Begriff und löst keinesfalls alltägliche Probleme in den Unternehmen.

Dabei wird völlig verkannt, dass Big Data die Vorstufe für den eigentlichen Problemlöser ist, der gemeinhin als Künstliche Intelligenz (KI) bezeichnet wird. KI ist ein Buzzword, dessen langfristiger Erfolg und Aktivismus selbst von skeptischen Experten nicht infrage gestellt wird. Daten-Ingenieure sprechen im Kontext von KI hier aktuell bevorzugt von Deep Learning; wissenschaftlich betrachtet ein Teilgebiet der KI.

Was KI schon heute kann

Deep Learning Algorithmen laufen bereits heute in Nischen-Anwendungen produktiv, beispielsweise im Bereich der Chatbots oder bei der Suche nach Informationen. Sie übernehmen ferner das Rating für die Kreditwürdigkeit und sperren Finanzkonten, wenn sie erlernte Betrugsmuster erkennen. Im Handel findet Deep Learning bereits die optimalen Einkaufsparameter sowie den besten Verkaufspreis.

Getrieben wird Deep Learning insbesondere durch prestigeträchtige Vorhaben wie das autonome Fahren, dabei werden die vielfältigen Anwendungen im Geschäftsbereich oft vergessen.

Die Grenzen von Deep Learning

Und Big Data ist das Futter für Deep Learning. Daraus resultiert auch die Grenze des Möglichen, denn für strategische Entscheidungen eignet sich KI bestenfalls für das Vorbereitung einer Datengrundlage, aus denen menschliche Entscheider eine Strategie entwickeln. KI wird zumindest in dieser Dekade nur auf operativer Ebene Entscheidungen treffen können, insbesondere in der Disposition, Instandhaltung, Logistik und im Handel auch im Vertrieb – anfänglich jeweils vor allem als Assistenzsystem für die Menschen.

Genau wie das autonome Fahren mit Assistenzsystemen beginnt, wird auch im Unternehmen immer mehr die KI das Steuer übernehmen.

Was sich hinsichtlich KI bis 2020 tun wird

Derzeit stehen wir erst am Anfang der Möglichkeiten, die Künstliche Intelligenz uns bietet. Das Markt-Wachstum für KI-Systeme und auch die Anwendungen erfolgt exponentiell. Entsprechend wird sich auch die Arbeitsweise für KI-Entwickler ändern müssen. Mit etablierten Deep Learning Frameworks, die mehrheitlich aus dem Silicon Valley stammen, zeichnet sich der Trend ab, der für die Zukunft noch weiter professionalisiert werden wird: KI-Frameworks werden Enterprise-fähig und Distributionen dieser Plattformen werden es ermöglichen, dass KI-Anwendungen als universelle Kernintelligenz für das operative Geschäft für fast alle Unternehmen binnen weniger Monate implementierbar sein werden.

Wir können bis 2020 also mit einer Alexa oder Cortana für das Unternehmen rechnen, die Unternehmensprozesse optimiert, Risiken berichtet und alle alltäglichen Fragen des Geschäftsführers beantwortet – in menschlich-verbal formulierten Sätzen.

Der Einsatz von Künstlicher Intelligenz zur Auswertung von Geschäfts- oder Maschinendaten ist auch das Leit-Thema der zweitägigen Data Leader Days 2018 in Berlin. Am 14. November 2018 sprechen renommierte Data Leader über Anwendungsfälle, Erfolge und Chancen mit Geschäfts- und Finanzdaten. Der 15. November 2018 konzentriert sich auf Automotive- und Maschinendaten mit hochrangigen Anwendern aus der produzierenden Industrie und der Automobilzuliefererindustrie. Seien Sie dabei und nutzen Sie die Chance, sich mit führenden KI-Anwendern auszutauschen.

Deep Learning and Human Intelligence – Part 2 of 2

Data dependency is one of the biggest problem of Deep Learning Architectures. This difficulty lies not so much in the algorithm of Deep Learning as in the invisible structure of the data itself.

This is part 2 of 2 of the Article Series: Deep Learning and Human Intelligence.

We saw that the process of discovering numbers was accompanied with many aspects of what are today basic ideas of Machine Learning. But let us go back, a little before that time, when humankind did not fully discovered the concept of numbers. How would a person, at such a time, perceive quantity and the count of things? Some structures are easily recognizable as patterns of objects, that is numbers, like one sun, 2 trees, 3 children, 4 clouds and so on. Sets of objects are much simpler to count if all the objects of the set are present. In such a case it is sufficient to keep a one-to-one relationship between two different set, without the need for numbers, to make a judgement of crucial importance. One could consider the case of two enemies that go to war and wish to know which has a larger army. It is enough to associate a small stone to every enemy soldier and do the same with his one soldier to be able to decide, depending if stones are left or not, if his army is larger or not, without ever needing to know the exact number soldier of any of the armies.

But also does things can be counted which are not directly visible, and do not allow a direct association with direct observable objects that can be seen, like stones. Would a person, at that time, be able to observe easily the 4-th day since today, 5 weeks from now, when even the concept of week is already composite? Counting in this case is only possible if numbers are already developed through direct observation, and we use something similar with stones in our mind, i.e. a cognitive association, a number. Only then, one can think of the concept of measuring at equidistant moments in time at all. This is the reason why such measurements where still cutting edge in the time of Galileo Galilei as we seen before. It is easily to assume that even in the time when humans started to count, such indirect concepts of numbers were not considered to be in relation with numbers. This implies that many concepts with which we are today accustomed to regard as a number, were considered as belonging to different groups, cluster which are not related. Such an hypothesis is not even that much farfetched. Evidence for such a time are still present in some languages, like Japanese.

When we think of numbers, we associate them with the Indo-Arabic numbers, but in Japanese numbers have no decimal structure and counting depends not only on the length of the set (which is usually considered as the number), but also on the objects that make up the set. In Japanese one can speak of meeting roku people, visiting muttsu cities and seeing ropa birds, but referring each time to the same number: six. Additional, many regular or irregular suffixes make the whole system quite complicated. The division of counting into so many clusters seems unnecessarily complicated today, but can easily be understood from a point of view where language and numbers still form and, the numbers, were not yet a uniform concept. What one can learn from this is that the lack of a unifying concept implies an overly complex dependence on data, which is the present case for Deep Learning and AI in general.

Although Deep Learning was a breakthrough in the development of Artificial Intelligence, the task such algorithms can perform were and remained very narrow. It may identify birds or cancer cells, but it will miss the song of the birds or the cry of the patient with cancer. When Watson, a Deep Learning Architecture played the famous Jeopardy game against two former Champions and won, it still made several simple mistakes, like going for the same wrong answer like the player before. If it could listen to the answer of the candidate, it could delete the top answer it had, and gibe the second which was the right one. With other words, Deep Learning Architecture are not multi-tasking and it is for this reason that some experts in AI are calling them intelligent idiots.

Imagine spending time learning to play a game for years and years, and then, when mastering it and wish to play a different game, to be unable to use any of the past experience (of gaming) for the new one and needing to learn everything from scratch. That could be quite depressing and would make life needlessly difficult. This is the reason why people involved in developing Deep Learning worked from early on in the development of multi-tasking Deep Learning Architectures. On the way a different method of using Deep Learning was discovered: transfer learning. Because the time it takes for a Deep Learning Architecture to learn is very long, transfer learning uses already learned Deep Learning Architectures but for slightly different task. It is similar to the use of past experiences in solving new problems, but, the advantage of transfer learning is, it allow the using of past experiences (what it already learned) which reduces dramatically the amount of new data needed in performing a new task. Still, transfer learning is far away from permitting Deep Learning Architectures to perform any kind of task learning only from one master data set.

The management of a unique master data set which includes all the needed data to enable human accuracy for any human activity, is not enough. One needs another ingredient, the so called cost function which translates, in this case, to the human brain. There are all our experiences and knowledge. How long does it takes to collect sufficient of both to handle a normal human life? How much to achieve our highest potential? If not a lifetime, at least decades. And this also applies to our job: as a IT-developer, a Data Scientist or a professor at the university. We will always have to learn new things, how to use them, and how to expand the limits of our perceptions. The vast amount of information that science has gathered over the last four centuries makes it impossible for any human being to become an expert in all of it. Thus, one has to specialized. After the university, anyone has to choose o subject which is appealing enough to study it for decades. Here is the first sign of what can be understood as data segmentation and dependency. Such improvements can come in various forms: an algorithm in the IT, a theorem in mathematics, a new way to look at particles in physics or a new method to scan for diseases in biology, and so on. But there is a price to pay for specialization: the inability to be an expert in another field or subfield. (Subfields induces limitation!)

Lets take the Deep Learning algorithm itself as an example. For IT and much of everyday life, this is a real breakthrough, but it lacks any scientific, that is mathematical, foundation. There are no theorems which proofs that it will find (converge, to use a mathematical term) the global optimum. This does not appear to be of any great consequences if it can be so efficient, except that, when adding new data and let the algorithm learn the same architecture again, there is no guaranty what so ever that it will be as good as the old model, or even better. On the contrary, it is as real as the efficiency of the first model, that chances are that the new model with the new data will perform worse than the old model, and one has to invest again time in finding a better model, or even a different architecture. On the other hand, with a mathematical proof of convergence, it would be always possible to know in what condition such a convergence can be achieved. In other words, without deep knowledge in mathematics, any proof of a consistent Deep Learning Algorithm is impossible.

Such a situation is true for any other corssover between fields. A mathematical genius will make a lousy biologist, a great chemist will make a average economist, and a top economist will be a poor physicist. Knowledge is difficult to transfer and this is true also for everyday experiences. We learn from very small to play a game like football, but are unable to use the reflexes to play basketball, or tennis better than a normal beginner. We learn a new language after years and years of practice, but are unable to use the way we learned to learn faster other languages. We are trapped within the knowledge we developed from the data we used. It is for this reason why we cannot transfer the knowledge a mathematician has developed over decades to use it in biology or psychology, even if the knowledge is very advanced. Instead of thinking in knowledge, we thing in data. This is similar to the people which were unaware of numbers, and used sets (data) to work with them. Numbers could be very difficult to transmit from one person to another in former times.

Only think on all the great achievements that our society managed, like relativity, quantum mechanics, DNA, machines, etc. Such discoveries are the essences of human knowledge and took millennia to form and centuries to crystalize. Still, all this knowledge is captive in the data, in the special frame in which it was discovered and never had the chance to escape. Imagine the possibility to use thoughts/causalities like the one in relativity or quantum mechanics in biology, or history, or of the concept of DNA in mathematics or art. Imagine a music composition where the law of the notes allows a “tunnel effect” like in quantum mechanics, lower notes to warp the music scales like in relativity and/or to twist two music scale in a helix-like play. How many way to experience life awaits us. Or think of the knowledge hidden in mathematics which could help develop new medicine, but can not be transmitted.

Another example of the connection we experience between knowledge and the data through which we obtain it, are children. They are classical example when it come determine if one is up to explain to them something. Take as an explain something simple they can observe often, like lightning and thunder. Normal concepts like particles, charge, waves, propagation, medium of propagation, etc. become so complicated to expose by other means then the one through which they were discovered, that it becomes nearly impossible to explain to children how it works and that they do not need to fear it. Still, one can use analogy (i.e., transfer) to enable an explanation. Instead of particles, one can use balls, for charge one can use hardness, waves can be shown with strings by keeping one end fix and waving the other, propagation is the movement of the waves from one end of the string to the other end, medium of propagation is the difference between walking in air and water, etc. Although difficult, analogies can be found which enables us to explain even to children how complex phenomena works.

The same is true also for Deep Learning. The model, the knowledge it can extract from the data can be expressed only by such data alone. There is no transformation of the knowledge from one type of data to another. If such a transformation would exists, then Deep Learning would be able to learn any human task by only a set of data, a master data set. Without such a master data set and a corresponding cost function it will be nearly impossible to develop AI that mimics human behavior. With other words, without the realization how our mind works, and how to crystalize by this the data needed, AI will still need to look at all the activities separately. It also implies that AI are restricted to the human understanding of reality and themselves. Only with such a characteristic of a living being, thus also AI, can development of its on occur.

Kiano – visuelle Exploration mit Deep Learning

Kiano – eine iOS-App zur visuellen Exploration und Suche der eigenen Fotos.

Menschen haben kein Problem, komplexe Bilder zu verstehen, es fällt ihnen aber schwer, gezielt Bilder in großen Bildersammlungen (wieder) zu finden. Da die Anzahl von Bildern, insbesondere auch auf Smartphones zusehends zunimmt – mehrere tausend Bilder pro Gerät sind keine Seltenheit, wird die Suche nach bestimmten Bildern immer schwieriger. Ist bei einem gesuchten Foto dessen Aufnahmedatum unbekannt, so kann es sehr lange dauern, bis es gefunden ist. Werden dem Nutzer zu viele Bilder auf einmal präsentiert, so geht der Überblick schnell verloren. Aus diesem Grund besteht eine typische Bildsuche heutzutage meist im endlosen Scrollen über viele Bildschirmseiten mit langen Bilderlisten.

Dieser Artikel stellt das Prinzip und die Funktionsweise der neuen iOS-App “Kiano” vor, die es Nutzern ermöglicht, alle ihre Bilder explorativ mittels visuellem Browsen zu erkunden. Der Name “Kiano” steht hierbei für “Keep Images Arranged & Neatly Organized”. Mit der App ist es außerdem möglich, zu einem Beispielbild gezielt nach ähnlichen Fotos auf dem Gerät zu suchen.

Um Bilder visuell durchsuch- und sortierbar zu machen, werden sogenannte Merkmalsvektoren bzw. Featurevektoren verwendet, die Aussehen und Inhalt von Bildern kompakt repräsentieren können. Zu einem Bild lassen sich ähnliche Bilder finden, indem die Bilder bestimmt werden, deren Featurevektoren eine geringe Distanz zum Featurevektor des Suchbildes haben.

Werden Bilder zweidimensional so angeordnet, dass die Featurevektoren benachbarter Bilder sehr ähnlich sind, so erhält man eine visuell sortierte Bilderlandkarte. Bei einer visuell sortierten Anordnung der Bilder fällt es Menschen deutlich leichter, mehr Bilder gleichzeitig zu erfassen, als dies im unsortierten Fall möglich wäre. Durch die graduelle Veränderung der Bildinhalte wird es möglich, über diese Karte visuell zu navigieren.

Generierung von Featurevektoren zur Bildbeschreibung

Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) sind nicht nur in der Lage, Bilder mit hoher Genauigkeit zu klassifizieren, d.h. zu erkennen, welches Objekt – entsprechend einer Menge von gelernten Objektkategorien auf einem Bild zu sehen ist, die Aktivierungen der Netzwerkschichten lassen sich auch als universelle Featurevektoren zur Bildbeschreibung nutzen. Während die vorderen Netzwerkschichten von CNNs einfache visuelle Bildmerkmale wie Farben und einfache Muster detektieren, repräsentieren die Ausgangsschichten des Netzwerks die semantischen Informationen bezüglich der gelernten Objektkategorien. Die Zwischenschichten des Netzwerks sind weniger von den Objektkategorien abhängig und können somit als generelle abstrakte Repräsentationen des Inhalts der Bilder angesehen werden. Hierbei ist es möglich, bereits fertig trainierte Klassifikationsnetzwerke für die Featureextraktion wiederzuverwenden. In der Visual Computing Gruppe der HTW Berlin wurden umfangreiche Evaluierungen durchgeführt, um zu bestimmen, welche Netzwerkschichten von welchen CNNs mit welchen zusätzlichen Transformationen zu verwenden sind, um aus Netzwerkaktivierungen Feature-Vektoren zu erzeugen, die sehr gut für die Suche nach beliebigen Bildern geeignet sind.

Beste Ergebnisse hinsichtlich der Suchgenauigkeit (der Mean Average Precision) wurden mit einem Deep Residual Learning Network (ResNet-200) erzielt. Die 2048 Aktivierungen vor dem vollvernetzten letzten Layer werden als initiale Featurevektoren verwendet, wobei sich die Suchgenauigkeit durch eine L1-Normierung, gefolgt von einer PCA-Transformation (Principal Component Analysis) sogar noch verbessern lässt. Hierdurch ist es möglich, die Featurevektoren auf eine Größe von nur 64 Bytes zu reduzieren. Leider ist die rechnerische Komplexität der Bestimmung dieser hochwertigen Featurevektoren zu groß, um sie auf mobilen Geräten verwenden zu können. Eine gute Alternative stellen die Mobilenets dar, die sich durch eine erheblich reduzierte Komplexität auszeichnen. Als Kompromiss zwischen Klassifikationsgenauigkeit und Komplexität wurde für die Kiano-App das Mobilenet_v2_0.5_128 verwendet. Die mit diesem Netzwerk bestimmten Featurevektoren wurden ebenfalls auf eine Größe von 64 Bytes reduziert.

Die aus CNNs erzeugten Featurevektoren sind gut für die Suche nach Bildern mit ähnlichem Inhalt geeignet. Für die Suche nach Bilder, mit ähnlichen visuellen Eigenschaften (z.B. die auftretenden Farben oder deren örtlichen Verteilung) sind diese Featurevektoren nur bedingt geeignet. Hierfür eignen sich klassische sogenannte “Low-Level”-Featurevektoren besser. Da für eine ansprechende und leicht erfassbare Bildsortierung auch eine Übereinstimmung dieser visuellen Bildattribute wichtig ist, kommt bei Kiano ein weiterer Featurevektor zum Einsatz, mit dem sich diese “primitiven” visuellen Bildattribute beschreiben lassen. Dieser Featurevektor hat eine Größe von 50 Bytes. Bei Kiano kann der Nutzer in den Einstellungen wählen, ob bei der visuellen Sortierung und Bildsuche größerer Wert auf den Bildinhalt oder die visuelle Erscheinung eines Bildes gelegt werden soll.

Visuelle Bildsortierung

Werden Bilder entsprechend ihrer Ähnlichkeiten sortiert angeordnet, so können mehrere hundert Bilder gleichzeitig wahrgenommen bzw. erfasst werden. Dies hilft, Regionen interessanter Bildern leichter zu erkennen und gesuchte Bilder schneller zu entdecken. Die Möglichkeit, viele Bilder gleichzeitig präsentieren zu können, ist neben Bildverwaltungssystemen besonders auch für E-Commerce-Anwendungen interessant.

Herkömmliche Dimensionsreduktionsverfahren, die hochdimensionale Featurevektoren auf zwei Dimensionen projizieren, sind für die Bildsortierung ungeeignet, da sie die Bilder so anordnen, dass Lücken und Bildüberlappungen entstehen. Sollen Bilder sortiert auf einem dichten regelmäßigen 2D-Raster angeordnet werden, kommen als Verfahren nur selbstorganisierende Karten oder selbstsortierende Karten in Frage.

Eine selbstorganisierende Karte (Self Organizing Map / SOM) ist ein künstliches neuronales Netzwerk, das durch unbeaufsichtigtes Lernen trainiert wird, um eine niedrigdimensionale, diskrete Darstellung der Daten des Eingangsraums als sogenannte Karte (Map) zu erzeugen. Im Gegensatz zu anderen künstlichen neuronalen Netzen, werden SOMs nicht durch Fehlerkorrektur, sondern durch ein Wettbewerbsverfahren trainiert, wobei eine Nachbarschaftsfunktion verwendet wird, um die lokalen Ähnlichkeiten der Eingangsdaten zu bewahren.

Eine selbstorganisierende Karte besteht aus Knoten, denen einerseits ein Gewichtsvektor der gleichen Dimensionalität wie die Eingangsdaten und anderseits eine Position auf der 2D-Karte zugeordnet sind. Die SOM-Knoten sind als zweidimensionales Rechteckgitter angeordnet. Das vom der SOM erzeugte Mapping ist diskret, da jeder Eingangsvektor einem bestimmten Knoten zugeordnet wird. Zu Beginn werden die Gewichtsvektoren aller Knoten mit Zufallswerten initialisiert. Wird ein hochdimensionaler Eingangsvektor in das Netz eingespeist, so wird dessen euklidischer Abstand zu allen Gewichtsvektoren berechnet. Der Knoten, dessen Gewichtsvektor dem Eingangsvektor am ähnlichsten ist, wird als Best Matching Unit (BMU) bezeichnet. Die Gewichte des BMU und seiner auf der Karte örtlich benachbarten Knoten werden an den Eingangsvektor angepasst. Dieser Vorgang wird iterativ wiederholt. Das Ausmaß dieser Anpassung nimmt im Laufe der Iterationen und der örtlichen Entfernung zum BMU-Knoten ab.

Um SOMs an die Bildsortierung anzupassen, sind zwei Modifikationen notwendig. Jeder Knoten darf nicht von mehr als einem Featurevektor (der ein Bild repräsentiert) ausgewählt werden. Eine Mehrfachauswahl würde zu einer Überlappung der Bilder führen. Aus diesem Grund muss die Anzahl der SOM-Knoten mindestens so groß wie die Anzahl der Bilder sein. Eine sinnvolle Erweiterung einer SOM verwendet ein Gitter, bei dem gegenüberliegende Kanten verbunden sind. Werden diese Torus-förmigen Karten für große SOMs verwendet, kann der Eindruck einer endlosen Karte erzeugt werden, wie es in Kiano umgesetzt ist. Ein Problem der SOMs ist ihre hohe rechnerische Komplexität, die quadratisch mit der Anzahl der zu sortierenden Bilder wächst, wodurch die maximale Anzahl an zu sortierenden Bildern beschränkt wird. Eine Lösung stellt eine selbstsortierende Karte (Self Sorting Map / SSM) dar, deren Komplexität nur n log(n) beträgt.

Selbstsortierende Karten beginnen mit einer zufälligen Positionierung der Bilder auf der Karte. Diese Karte wird dann in 4×4-Blöcke aufgeteilt und für jeden Block wird der Mittelwert der zugehörigen Featurevektoren bestimmt. Als nächstes werden aus 2×2 benachbarten Blöcken jeweils vier korrespondierende Bild-Featurevektoren untersucht und ihre zugehörigen Bilder gegebenenfalls getauscht. Aus den 4! = 24 Anordnungsmöglichkeiten wird diejenige gewählt, die die Summe der quadrierten Differenzen zwischen den jeweiligen Featurevektoren und den Featuremittelwerten der Blöcke minimiert. Nach mehreren Iterationen wird jeder Block in vier kleinere Blöcke halber Breite und Höhe aufgeteilt und wiederum in der beschriebenen Weise überprüft, wie die Bildpositionen dieser kleineren Blöcke getauscht werden sollten. Dieser Vorgang wird solange wiederholt, bis die Blockgröße auf 1×1 Bild reduziert ist.

In der Visual-Computing Gruppe der HTW Berlin wurde untersucht, wie die Sortierqualität des SSM-Algorithmus verbessert werden kann. Anstatt die Mittelwerte der Featurevektoren als konstanten Durchschnittsvektor für den gesamten Block zu berechnen, verwenden wir gleitende Tiefpassfilter, die sich effizient mittels Integralbildern berechnen lassen. Hierdurch entstehen weichere Übergänge auf der sortierten Bilderkarte. Weiterhin wird die Blockgröße nicht für mehrere Iterationen konstant gehalten, sondern kontinuierlich zusammen mit dem Radius des Filterkernels reduziert. Durch die Verwendung von optimierten Algorithmen von “Linear Assignment” Algorithmen wird es weiterhin möglich, den optimalen Positionstausch nicht nur für jeweils vier Featurevektoren bzw. Bildern sondern für eine deutlich größere Anzahl zu überprüfen. All diese Maßnahmen führen zu einer deutlich verbesserten Sortierungsqualität bei gleicher Komplexität.

Effiziente Umsetzung für iOS

Wie so oft, liegen die softwaretechnischen Herausforderungen an ganz anderen Stellen, als man zunächst vermutet. Für eine effiziente Implementierung der zuvor beschriebenen Algorithmen, insbesondere der SSM, stellte es sich heraus, dass die Programmiersprache Swift, in der iOS Apps normaler Weise entwickelt werden, erheblich mehr Rechenzeit benötigt, als eine Umsetzung in der Sprache C. Im Zuge der stetigen Weiterentwicklung von Swift und dessen Compiler mag sich die Lücke zu C zwar immer weiter schließen, zum Zeitpunkt der Umsetzung war die Implementierung in C aber um einen Faktor vier schneller als in Swift. Hierbei liegt die Vermutung nahe, dass der Zugriff auf und das Umsortieren von Featurevektoren als native C-Arrays deutlich effektiver passiert, als bei der Verwendung von Swift-Arrays. Da Swift-Arrays Value-Type sind, kommt es in Swift vermutlich zu unnötigen Kopieroperationen der Fließkommazahlen in den einzelnen Featurevektoren.

Die Berechnung des Mobilenet-Anteils der Featurevektoren konnte sehr komfortabel mit Apples CoreML Machine Learning Framework umgesetzt werden. Hierbei ist zu beachten, dass es sich wie oben beschrieben, nicht um eine Klassifikation handelt, sondern um das Abgreifen der Aktivierungen einer tieferen Schicht. Für Klassifikationen findet man praktisch sofort nutzbare Beispiele, für den Zugriff auf die Aktivierungen waren jedoch Anpassungen notwendig, die bei der Portierung eines vortrainierten Mobilenet nach CoreML vorgenommen wurden. Das stellte sich als erheblich einfacher heraus, als der Versuch, auf die tieferen Schichten eines Klassifizierungsnetzes in CoreML zuzugreifen.

Für die Verwaltung der Bilder, ihrer Featurevektoren und ihrer Position in der sortieren Karte wird in Kiano eine eigene Datenstruktur verwendet, die es zu persistieren gilt. Es ist dem Nutzer ja nicht zuzumuten, bei jedem Start der App auf die Berechnung aller Featurevektoren zu warten. Die Strategie ist es hierbei, bereits bekannte Bilder zu identifizieren und deren Features nur dann neu zu berechnen, falls sich das Bild verändert hat. Die über Appels Photos Framework zur Verfügung gestellten local Identifier identifizieren dabei die Bilder. Veränderungen werden über das Modifikationsdatum eines Bildes detektiert. Die größte Herausforderung ist hierbei das Zeichnen der Karte. Die Benutzerinteraktion soll schnell und flüssig erscheinen, auf Animationen wie das Nachlaufen der Karte beim Verschieben möchte man nicht verzichten. Die Umsetzung geschieht hierbei nicht in OpenGL ES, welches ab iOS 12 ohnehin als deprecated bezeichnet wird. Auf der anderen Seite wird aber auch nicht der „Standardweg“ des Überschreibens der draw-Methode einer Ableitung von UIView gewählt. Letztes führt bekanntlich zu Performanceeinbußen. Insbesondere deshalb, weil das System sehr oft Backing-Images der Ansichten erstellt. Um die Kontrolle über das Neuzeichnen zu behalten, wird in Kiano ein eigenes Backing-Image implementiert, das auf Ebene des Core Animation Frameworks dem View als Layer zugweisen wird. Diesem Layer kann dann sehr komfortabel eine 3D-Transformation zugewiesen werden und man profitiert von der GPU-Beschleunigung, ohne OpenGL ES direkt verwenden zu müssen.

 

Trotz der Verwendung eines Core Animation Layers ist das Zeichnen der Karte immer noch sehr zeitaufwendig. Das liegt an der Tatsache, dass je nach Zoomstufe tausende von Bildern darzustellen sind, die alle über das Photos Framework angefordert werden müssen. Das Nadelöhr ist dann weniger das Zeichnen, als die Zeit, die vergeht, bis einem das Bild zur Verfügung gestellt wird. Diese Vorgänge sind praktisch alle nebenläufig. Zur Erinnerung: Ein Foto kann in der iCloud liegen und zum Zeitpunkt der Anfrage noch gar nicht (oder noch nicht in geeigneter Auflösung) heruntergeladen sein. Netzwerkbedingt gibt es keine Vorhersage, wann oder ob überhaupt das Bild zur Verfügung gestellt wird. In Kiano werden zum einen Bilder in sehr kleiner Auflösung gecached, zum anderen wird beim Navigieren auf der Karte im Hintergrund ein neues Kartenteil als Backing-Image vorbereitet, das dem Nutzer nach Fertigstellung angezeigt wird. Die vorberechneten Kartenteile sind dabei drei Mal so breit und drei Mal so hoch wie das Display, so dass man diese „Hintergrundaktivität“ beim Verschieben der Karte in der Regel nicht bemerkt. Nur wenn die Bewegung zu schnell wird oder die Bilder zu langsam „geliefert“ werden, erkennt man schwarze Flächen, die sich dann verzögert mit Bildern füllen.

Vergleichbares passiert beim Hineinzoomen in die Karte. Der Nutzer sieht zunächst eine vergrößerte und damit unscharfe Version des aktuellen Kartenteils, während im Hintergrund ein Kartenteil in höherer Auflösung und mit weniger Bildern vorbereitet wird. In der Summe geht Kiano hier einen Kompromiss ein. Die Pixeldichte der Geräte würde eine schärfere Darstellung der Bilder auf der Karte erlauben. Allerdings müssten dann die Bilder in so höher Auflösung angefordert werden, dass eine flüssige Kartennavigation nicht mehr möglich wäre. So sieht der Nutzer in der Regel eine Karte mit Bildern in halber Auflösung gemessen an den physikalischen Pixeln seines Displays.

Ein anfangs unterschätzter Arbeitsaufwand bei der Umsetzung von Kiano liegt darin begründet, dass sich die Photo Library des Nutzers jederzeit während der Benutzung der App verändern kann. Bilder können durch Synchronisationen mit der iCloud oder mit iTunes verschwinden, sich in andere Alben bewegen, oder neue können auftauchen. Der Nutzer kann Bildschirmfotos machen. Das Photos Framework stellt komfortable Benachrichtigungen für solche Events zur Verfügung. Der Implementierung obliegt es dabei aber herauszubekommen, ob die Karte neu zu sortieren ist oder nicht, ob das gerade anzeigte Bild überhaupt noch existiert und was zu tun ist, wenn es verschwunden ist.

Zusammenfassend kann man feststellen, dass natürlich die Umsetzung der Algorithmen und die Darstellung dessen auf einer Karte zu den spannendsten Teilen der Arbeiten an Kiano zählen, dass aber der Umgang mit einer sich dynamisch ändernden Datenbasis nicht unterschätzt werden sollte.

Autoren

Prof. Dr. Klaus JungProf. Dr. Klaus Jung studierte Physik an der TU Berlin, wo er im Bereich der Mathematischen Physik promovierte. Bis 2008 arbeitete er als Leiter F&E bei der Firma LuraTech im Bereich der Dokumentenverarbeitung und Langzeitarchivierung. In der JPEG-Gruppe leitete er die deutsche Delegation bei der Standardisierung von JPEG2000. Seit 2008 ist er Professor für Medieninformatik an der HTW Berlin mit dem Schwerpunkt „Visual Computing“.

Prof. Dr. Kai Uwe Barthel

Prof. Dr. Kai Uwe Barthel studierte Elektrotechnik an der TU Berlin, bevor er Assistent am Institut für Nachrichtentechnik wurde und im Bereich Bildkompression promovierte. Seit 2001 ist er Professor der HTW Berlin. Hauptforschungsbereiche sind visuelle Bildsuche und automatisches Bildverstehen. 2009 gründete er die pixolution GmbH www.pixolution.de, ein Unternehmen, das Technologien für die visuelle Bildsuche anbietet.

Modelling Data – Case Study: Importance of domain knowledge

What´s the relation between earnings and happiness? I saw this chart and was strongly irritated – why is there a linear regression, it´s clearly a logarithmic relationship.
Linear relationship between GDP and happiness.

So I got angry and wanted to know, which model is the better fit. I started to work immediatly, because it´s a huge difference for man kind. Think about it: you give a poor person money and he gets as happy as a rich person with the same amount added – that´s against common sense and propaganda to get rich. Like an cultural desease.

So I gathered the data and did a first comparation, and this logarithmic model was the better fit:
Logarithmic relationship between GDP and happiness.

I was right and seriously willing to clear the mess up – so posted the “correct” model on facebook, to explain things to my friends.

Once I came down…

I asked myself: “What´s the model that fits the data best – that would be more correct?”

So I started to write an algorithm to check polynominal regression levels for fit using a random train and test data split. Finally, I got to this result and was amazed:
Best polynominal relationship between GDP and happiness.

This seriously hit me: “What the f***! There seems to be maximum happiness reachable with a certain amount of income / GDP.” Can you understand, what this result would mean for our world and economy? Think about all economies growing continiously, but well happiest was there or will come there. What would you do? Send income to less developed countries, because you don´t need it? Stop invention and progress, because it´s of no use? Seriously, I felt like a socialist: Stop progress at this point and share.

So I thought a while and concluded: “F***ing statistics, we need a profound econometric model.”

I started modelling: Well, the first amount of money in a market based on money leverages a huge amount of happiness, because you can participate and feed yourself. We can approximate that by infinit marginal utility. Then the more you have, the less utility should be provided by the additional same amount added. Finally, more income is more options, so more should be always better. I concluded, that this is catched by a Cobb Douglas production function. Here´s the graph:
Cobb Douglas relationship between GDP and happiness.

That´s it, that´s the final model. Here I feel home, this looks like a normal world – for an economist.

The Relevance of Domain Knowledge

As this short case study shows, we get completly wrong information and conclusions, if we don´t do it right. If you were the most important decision making algorithm in global economic politics, imagine what desasterous outcomes it would have produced to automatically find an optimum of income.

This is a serious border of AI. If you want to analyse Big Data with algorithms, you may produce seriously wrong information and conclusions. Statistical analysis is allways about using the right model. And modelling is about the assumptions of the model. As long as you can not create the right assumtions for the statistical model automatically, Big Data analysis is near to crazy. So out of this point of view, Big Data analysis is either about very simplistic tendencies (like linear trends) or it´s bound to Data Scientists with domain knowledge checking each model – that´s slow.

Discussion

I´m quite new to the field of Data Science, but this case study shows very though limitations, clearly. It´s not about flexible fitting of data, it´s about right models. And right models don´t scale into the Big Data domain. What do you think is the solution for this issue?

Countries of Happiness – the Full Article

If you are interested in my final article on my personal blog, explaining the final results: Please feel welcome to read the article here. There is a translation widget in the menu, to read in your favorite language. The original article is german.

Interview – Die Bedeutung von Machine Learning für das Data Driven Business

Um das Optimum aus ihren Daten zu holen, müssen Unternehmen Data Analytics vorantreiben, um Entscheidungsprozesse für Innovation und Differenzierung stärker zu automatisieren. Die Data Science scheint hier der richtige Ansatz zu sein, ist aber ein neues und schnelllebiges Feld, das viele Sackgassen kennt. Cloudera Fast Forward Labs unterstützt Unternehmen dabei sich umzustrukturieren, Prozesse zu automatisieren und somit neue Innovationen zu schaffen.

Alice Albrecht ist Research Engineer bei Cloudera Fast Forward Labs. Dort widmet sie sich der Weiterentwicklung von Machine Learning und Künstlicher Intelligenz. Die Ergebnisse ihrer Forschungen nutzt sie, um ihren Kunden konkrete Ratschläge und funktionierende Prototypen anzubieten. Bevor sie zu Fast Forward Labs kam, arbeitete sie in Finanz- und Technologieunternehmen als Data Science Expertin und Produkt Managerin. Alice Albrecht konzentriert sich nicht nur darauf, Maschinen “coole Dinge” beizubringen, sondern setzt sich auch als Mentorin für andere Wissenschaftler ein. Während ihrer Promotion der kognitiven Neurowissenschaften in Yale untersuchte Alice, wie Menschen sensorische Informationen aus ihrer Umwelt verarbeiten und zusammenfassen.

english-flagRead this article in English:
“Interview – The Importance of Machine Learning for the Data Driven Business”


Data Science Blog: Frau Albrecht, Sie sind eine bekannte Keynote-Referentin für Data Science und Künstliche Intelligenz. Während Data Science bereits im Alltag vieler Unternehmen angekommen ist, scheint Deep Learning der neueste Trend zu sein. Ist Künstliche Intelligenz für Unternehmen schon normal oder ein überbewerteter Hype?

Ich würde sagen, nichts von beidem stimmt. Data Science ist inzwischen zwar weit verbreitet, aber die Unternehmen haben immer noch Schwierigkeiten, diese neue Disziplin in ihr bestehendes Geschäft zu integrieren. Ich denke nicht, dass Deep Learning mittlerweile Teil des Business as usual ist – und das sollte es auch nicht sein. Wie jedes andere Tool, braucht auch die Integration von Deep Learning Modellen in die Strukturen eines Unternehmens eine klar definierte Vorgehensweise. Alles andere führt ins Chaos.

Data Science Blog: Nur um sicherzugehen, worüber wir reden: Was sind die Unterschiede und Überschneidungen zwischen Data Analytics, Data Science, Machine Learning, Deep Learning und Künstlicher Intelligenz?

Hier bei Cloudera Fast Forward Labs verstehen wir unter Data Analytics das Sammeln und Addieren von Daten – meist für schnelle Diagramme und Berichte. Data Science hingegen löst Geschäftsprobleme, indem sie sie analysiert, Prozesse mit den gesammelten Daten abgleicht und anschließend entsprechende Vorgänge prognostiziert. Beim Machine Learning geht es darum, Probleme mit neuartigen Feedbackschleifen zu lösen, die sich mit der Anzahl der zur Verfügung stehenden Daten noch detaillierter bearbeiten lassen. Deep Learning ist eine besondere Form des Machine Learnings und ist selbst kein eigenständiges Konzept oder Tool. Künstliche Intelligenz zapft etwas Komplizierteres an, als das, was wir heute sehen. Hier geht es um weit mehr als nur darum, Maschinen darauf zu trainieren, immer wieder dasselbe zu tun oder begrenzte Probleme zu lösen.

Data Science Blog: Und wie können wir hier den Kontext zu Big Data herstellen?

Theoretisch gesehen gibt es Data Science ja bereits seit Jahrzehnten. Die Bausteine für modernes Machine Learning, Deep Learning und Künstliche Intelligenz basieren auf mathematischen Theoremen, die bis in die 40er und 50er Jahre zurückreichen. Die Herausforderung bestand damals darin, dass Rechenleistung und Datenspeicherkapazität einfach zu teuer für die zu implementierenden Ansätze waren. Heute ist das anders. Nicht nur die Kosten für die Datenspeicherung sind erheblich gesunken, auch Open-Source-Technologien wie etwa Apache Hadoop haben es möglich gemacht, jedes Datenvolumen zu geringen Kosten zu speichern. Rechenleistung, Cloud-Lösungen und auch hoch spezialisierte Chip-Architekturen, sind jetzt auch auf Anfrage für einen bestimmten Zeitraum verfügbar. Die geringeren Kosten für Datenspeicherung und Rechenleistung sowie eine wachsende Liste von Tools und Ressourcen, die über die Open-Source-Community verfügbar sind, ermöglichen es Unternehmen jeder Größe, von sämtlichen Daten zu profitieren.

Data Science Blog: Was sind die Herausforderungen beim Einstieg in Data Science?

Ich sehe zwei große Herausforderungen: Eine davon ist die Sicherstellung der organisatorischen Ausrichtung auf Ergebnisse, die die Data Scientists liefern werden (und das Timing für diese Projekte).  Die zweite Hürde besteht darin, sicherzustellen, dass sie über die richtigen Daten verfügen, bevor sie mit dem Einstellen von Data Science Experten beginnen. Das kann “tricky” sein, wenn man im Unternehmen nicht bereits über Know-how in diesem Segment verfügt. Daher ist es manchmal besser, im ersten Schritt einen Data Engineer oder Data Strategist einzustellen, bevor man mit dem Aufbau eines Data Science Team beginnt.

Data Science Blog: Es gibt viele Diskussionen darüber, wie man ein datengesteuertes Unternehmen aufbauen kann. Geht es bei Data Science nur darum, am Ende das Kundenverhalten besser zu verstehen?

Nein “Data Driven” bedeutet nicht nur, die Kunden besser zu verstehen – obwohl das eine Möglichkeit ist, wie Data Science einem Unternehmen helfen kann. Abgesehen vom Aufbau einer Organisation, die sich auf Daten und Analysen stützt, um Entscheidungen über das Kundenverhalten oder andere Aspekte zu treffen, bedeutet es, dass Daten das Unternehmen und seine Produkte voranbringen.

Data Science Blog: Die Zahl der Technologien, Tools und Frameworks nimmt zu, was zu mehr Komplexität führt. Müssen Unternehmen immer auf dem Laufenden bleiben oder könnte es ebenso hilfreich sein, zu warten und Pioniere zu imitieren?

Obwohl es generell für Unternehmen nicht ratsam ist, pauschal jede neue Entwicklung zu übernehmen, ist es wichtig, dass sie mit den neuen Rahmenbedingungen Schritt halten. Wenn ein Unternehmen wartet, um zu sehen, was andere tun, und deshalb nicht in neue Entwicklungen investiert, haben sie den Anschluss meist schon verpasst.

Data Science Blog: Global Player verfügen meist über ein großes Budget für Forschung und den Aufbau von Data Labs. Mittelständische Unternehmen stehen immer unter dem Druck, den Break-Even schnell zu erreichen. Wie können wir die Wertschöpfung von Data Science beschleunigen?

Ein Team zu haben, das sich auf ein bestimmtes Set von Projekten konzentriert, die gut durchdacht und auf das Geschäft ausgerichtet sind, macht den Unterschied aus. Data Science und Machine Learning müssen nicht auf Forschung und Innovation verzichten, um Werte zu schaffen. Der größte Unterschied besteht darin, dass sich kleinere Teams stärker bewusst sein müssen, wie sich ihre Projektwahl in neue Rahmenbedingungen und ihre besonderen akuten und kurzfristigen Geschäftsanforderungen einfügt.

Data Science Blog: Wie hilft Cloudera Fast Forward Labs anderen Unternehmen, den Einstieg in Machine Learning zu beschleunigen?

Wir beraten Unternehmen, basierend auf ihren speziellen Bedürfnissen, über die neuesten Trends im Bereich Machine Learning und Data Science. Und wir zeigen ihnen, wie sie ihre Datenteams aufbauen und strukturieren können, um genau die Fähigkeiten zu entwickeln, die sie benötigen, um ihre Ziele zu erreichen.

Data Science Blog: Zum Schluss noch eine Frage an unsere jüngeren Leser, die eine Karriere als Datenexperte anstreben: Was macht einen guten Data Scientist aus? Arbeiten sie lieber mit introvertierten Coding-Nerds oder den Data-loving Business-Experten?

Ein guter Data Scientist sollte sehr neugierig sein und eine Liebe für die Art und Weise haben, wie Daten zu neuen Entdeckungen und Innovationen führen und die nächste Generation von Produkten antreiben können.  Menschen, die im Data Science Umfeld erfolgreich sind, kommen nicht nur aus der IT. Sie können aus allen möglichen Bereichen kommen und über die unterschiedlichsten Backgrounds verfügen.

Interview – The Importance of Machine Learning for the Data Driven Business

To become more data-driven, organizations must mature their analytics and automate more of their decision making processes for innovation and differentiation. Data science seems like the right approach, yet is a new and fast moving field that seems to have as many dead ends as it has high ways to value. Cloudera Fast Forward Labs, led by Hilary Mason, shows companies the way.

Alice Albrecht is a research engineer at Cloudera Fast Forward Labs.  She spends her days researching the latest and greatest in machine learning and artificial intelligence and bringing that knowledge to working prototypes and delivering concrete advice for clients.  Prior to joining Fast Forward Labs, Alice worked in both finance and technology companies as a practicing data scientist, data science leader, and – most recently – a data product manager.  In addition to teaching machines to do cool things, Alice is passionate about mentoring and helping others grow in their careers.  Alice holds a PhD from Yale in cognitive neuroscience where she studied how humans summarize sensory information from the world around them and the neural substrates that underlie those summaries.

Read this article in German:
“Interview – Die Bedeutung von Machine Learning für das Data Driven Business“

Data Science Blog: Ms. Albrecht, you are a well-known keynote speaker for data science and artificial intelligence. While data science has arrived business already, deep learning seems to be the new trend. Is artificial intelligence for business already normal business or is it an overrated hype?

I’d say it isn’t either of those two options.  Data science is now widely adopted but companies still struggle to integrate this new discipline into their existing businesses.  As for deep learning, it really depends on the company that’s looking into using this technique.  I wouldn’t say that deep learning is by any means part of business as usual- nor should it be.  It’s a tool like any other and building a capacity for using a tool without clearly defined business needs is a recipe for disaster.

Data Science Blog: Just to make sure what we are talking about: What are the differences and overlaps between data analytics, data science, machine learning, deep learning and artificial intelligence?

Here at Cloudera Fast Forward Labs, we like to think of data analytics as collecting data and counting things (mostly for quick charts and reports).  Data science solves business problems by counting cleverly and predicting things with the data that’s collected.  Machine learning is about solving problems with new kinds of feedback loops that improve with more data.  Deep learning is a particular type of machine learning and is not itself a separate concept or type of tool.  Artificial intelligence taps into something more complicated than what we’re seeing today – it’s much broader than training machines to repetitively do very specialized tasks or solve very narrow problems.

Data Science Blog: And how can we add the context to big data?

From a theoretical perspective, data science has been around for decades. The building blocks for modern day machine learning, deep learning and artificial intelligence are based on mathematical theorems  that go back to the 1940’s and 1950’s. The challenge was that at the time, compute power and data storage capacity were simply too expensive for the approaches to be implemented. Today that’s all changed.. Not only has the cost of data storage dropped considerably, open source technology like Apache Hadoop has made it possible to store any volume of data at costs approaching zero. Compute power, even highly specialised chip architectures, are now also available on demand and only for the time organisations need them through public and private cloud solutions. The decreased cost of both data storage and compute power, together with a growing list of tools and resources readily available via the open source community allows companies of any size to benefit from data (no matter that size of that data).

Data Science Blog: What are the challenges for organizations in getting started with data science?

I see two big challenges when getting started with data science.  One is ensuring that you have organizational alignment around exactly what type of work data scientists will deliver (and timing for those projects).  The second hurdle is around ensuring that you have the right data in place before you start hiring data scientists. This can be tricky if you don’t have in-house expertise in this area, so sometimes it’s better to hire a data engineer or a data strategist (or director of data science) before you ever get started building out a data science team.

Data Science Blog: There are many discussions about how to build a data-driven business. Is it just about using data science to get a better understanding of customer behavior?

No, being data driven doesn’t just mean better understanding your customers (though that is one way that data science can help in an organization).  Aside from building an organization that relies on data and analytics to help them make decisions (about customer behavior or otherwise), being a data-driven business means that data is powering your core products.

Data Science Blog: The number of technologies, tools and frameworks is increasing. For organizations this also means increasing complexity. Do companies need to stay always up-to-date or could it be an advice to wait and imitate pioneers later?

While it’s not critical (or advisable) for organizations to adopt every new advancement that comes along, it is critical for them to stay abreast of emerging frameworks.  If a business waits to see what others are doing, and therefore don’t invest in understanding how new advancements can affect their particular business, they’ve likely already missed the boat.

Data Science Blog: Global players have big budgets just for doing research and setting up data labs. Middle-sized companies need to see the break even point soon. How can we accelerate the value generation of data science?

Having a team that is highly focused on a specific set of projects that are well-scoped and aligned to the business makes all the difference.  Data science and machine learning don’t have to sacrifice doing research and being innovative in order to produce value.  The biggest difference is that smaller teams will have to be more aware of how their choice of project fits into emerging frameworks and their particular acute and near term business needs.

Data Science Blog: How does Cloudera Fast Forward Labs help other organizations to accelerate their start with machine learning?

We advise organizations, based on their particular needs, on what the latest advancements are in machine learning and data science, how to build and structure their data teams to develop the capabilities they need to meet their goals, and how to quickly implement custom forward-looking solutions using their own data and in-house expertise.

Data Science Blog: Finally, a question for our younger readers who are looking for a career as a data expert: What makes a good data scientist? Do you like to work with introverted coding nerds or the data loving business experts?

A good data scientists should be deeply curious and have a love for the ways in which data can lead to new discoveries and power the next generation of products.  We expect the people who thrive in this field to come from a variety of backgrounds and experiences.

Ständig wachsende Datenflut – Muss nun jeder zum Data Scientist werden?

Weltweit rund 163 Zettabyte – so lautet die Schätzung von IDC für die Datenmenge weltweit im Jahr 2025. Angesichts dieser kaum noch vorstellbaren Zahl ist es kein Wunder, wenn Anwender in Unternehmen sich überfordert fühlen. Denn auch hier muss vieles analysiert werden – eigene Daten aus vielen Bereichen laufen zusammen mit Daten Dritter, seien es Dienstleister, Partner oder gekaufter Content. Und all das wird noch ergänzt um Social Content – und soll dann zu sinnvollen Auswertungen zusammengeführt werden. Das ist schon für ausgesprochene Data Scientists keine leichte Aufgabe, von normalen Usern ganz zu schweigen. Doch es gibt eine gute Nachricht dabei: den Umgang mit Daten kann man lernen.

Echtes Datenverständnis – Was ist das?

Unternehmen versuchen heute, möglichst viel Kapital aus den vorhandenen Daten zu ziehen und erlauben ihren Mitarbeitern kontrollierten, aber recht weit gehenden Zugriff. Das hat denn auch etliche Vorteile, denn nur wer Zugang zu Daten hat, kann Prozesse beurteilen und effizienter gestalten. Er kann mehr Informationen zu Einsichten verwandeln, Entwicklungen an den realen Bedarf anpassen und sogar auf neue Ideen kommen. Natürlich muss der Zugriff auf Informationen gesteuert und kontrolliert sein, denn schließlich muss man nicht nur Regelwerken wie Datenschutzgrundverordnung gehorchen, man will auch nicht mit den eigenen Daten dem Wettbewerb weiterhelfen.

Aber davon abgesehen, liegt in der umfassenden Auswertung auch die Gefahr, von scheinbaren Erkenntnissen aufs Glatteis geführt zu werden. Was ist wahr, was ist Fake, was ein Trugschluss? Es braucht einige Routine um den Unsinn in den Daten erkennen zu können – und es braucht zuverlässige Datenquellen. Überlässt man dies den wenigen Spezialisten im Haus, so steigt das Risiko, dass nicht alles geprüft wird oder auf der anderen Seite Wichtiges in der Datenflut untergeht. Also brauchen auch solche Anwender ein gewisses Maß an Datenkompetenz, die nicht unbedingt Power User oder professionelle Analytiker sind. Aber in welchem Umfang? So weit, dass sie fähig sind, Nützliches von Falschem zu unterscheiden und eine zielführende Systematik auf Datenanalyse anzuwenden.

Leider aber weiß das noch nicht jeder, der mit Daten umgeht: Nur 17 Prozent von über 5.000 Berufstätigen in Europa fühlen sich der Aufgabe gewachsen – das sagt die Data-Equality-Studie von Qlik. Und für Deutschland sieht es sogar noch schlechter aus, hier sind es nur 14 Prozent, die glauben, souverän mit Daten umgehen zu können. Das ist auch nicht wirklich ein Wunder, denn gerade einmal 49 Prozent sind (in Europa) der Ansicht, ausreichenden Zugriff auf Daten zu haben – und das, obwohl 85 Prozent glauben, mit höherem Datenzugriff auch einen besseren Job machen zu können.

Mit Wissens-Hubs die ersten Schritte begleiten

Aber wie lernt man denn nun, mit Daten richtig oder wenigstens besser umzugehen? Den Datenwust mit allen Devices zu beherrschen? An der Uni offensichtlich nicht, denn in der Data-Equality-Studie sehen sich nur 10 Prozent der Absolventen kompetent im Umgang mit Daten. Bis der Gedanke der Datenkompetenz Eingang in die Lehrpläne gefunden hat, bleibt Unternehmen nur die Eigenregie  – ein „Learning by Doing“ mit Unterstützung. Wie viel dabei Eigeninitiative ist oder anders herum, wieviel Weiterbildung notwendig ist, scheint von Unternehmen zu Unternehmen unterschiedlich zu sein. Einige Ansätze haben sich jedoch schon bewährt:

  • Informationsveranstaltungen mit darauf aufbauenden internen und externen Schulungen
  • Die Etablierung von internen Wissens-Hubs: Data Scientists und Power-User, die ihr Know-how gezielt weitergeben: ein einzelne Ansprechpartner in Abteilungen, die wiederum ihren Kollegen helfen können. Dieses Schneeball-Prinzip spart viel Zeit.
  • Eine Dokumentation, die gerne auch informell wie ein Wiki oder ein Tutorial aufgebaut sein darf – mit der Möglichkeit zu kommentieren und zu verlinken. Nützlich ist auch ein Ratgeber, wie man Daten hinterfragt oder wie man Datenquellen hinter einer Grafik bewertet.
  • Management-Support und Daten-Incentives, die eine zusätzliche Motivation schaffen können. Dazu gehört auch, Freiräume zu schaffen, in denen sich Mitarbeiter mit Daten befassen können – Zeit, aber auch die Möglichkeit, mit (Test-)Daten zu spielen.

Darüber hinaus aber braucht es eine Grundhaltung, die sich im Unternehmen etablieren muss: Datenkompetenz muss zur Selbstverständlichkeit werden. Wird sie zudem noch spannend gemacht, so werden sich viele Mitarbeiter auch privat mit der Bewertung und Auswertung von Daten beschäftigen. Denn nützliches Know-how hat keine Nutzungsgrenzen – und Begeisterung steckt an.