Web Scraping Using R..!

In this blog, I’ll show you, How to Web Scrape using R..?

What is R..?

R is a programming language and its environment built for statistical analysis, graphical representation & reporting. R programming is mostly preferred by statisticians, data miners, and software programmers who want to develop statistical software.

R is also available as Free Software under the terms of the Free Software Foundation’s GNU General Public License in source code form.

Reasons to choose R

Reasons to choose R

Let’s begin our topic of Web Scraping using R.

Step 1- Select the website & the data you want to scrape.

I picked this website “https://www.alexa.com/topsites/countries/IN” and want to scrape data of Top 50 sites in India.

Data we want to scrape

Data we want to scrape

Step 2- Get to know the HTML tags using SelectorGadget.

In my previous blog, I already discussed how to inspect & find the proper HTML tags. So, now I’ll explain an easier way to get the HTML tags.

You have to go to Google chrome extension (chrome://extensions) & search SelectorGadget. Add it to your browser, it’s a quite good CSS selector.

Step 3- R Code

Evoking Important Libraries or Packages

I’m using RVEST package to scrape the data from the webpage; it is inspired by libraries like Beautiful Soup. If you didn’t install the package yet, then follow the code in the snippet below.

Step 4- Set the url of the website

Step 5- Find the HTML tags using SelectorGadget

It’s quite easy to find the proper HTML tags in which your data is present.

Firstly, I have to click on data using SelectorGadget which I want to scrape, it automatically selects the data which are similar to selected HTML tags. Before going forward, cross-check the selected values, are they correct or some junk data is also gets selected..? If you noticed our page has only 50 values, but you can see 156 values are selected.

Selection by SelectorGadget

Selection by SelectorGadget

So I need to remove unwanted values who get selected, once you click on them to deselect it, it turns red and others will turn yellow except our primary selection which turn to green. Now you can see only 50 values are selected as per our primary requirement but it’s not enough. I have to again cross-check that some required values are not exchanged with junk values.

If we satisfy with our selection then copy the HTML tag & include it into the code, else repeat this exercise.

Modified Selection by SelectorGadget

Step 6- Include the tag in our Code

After including the tags, our code is like this.

Code Snippet

If I run the code, values in each list object will be 50.

Data Stored in List Objects

Step 7- Creating DataFrame

Now, we create a dataframe with our list-objects. So for creating a dataframe, we always need to remember one thumb rule that is the number of rows (length of all the lists) should be equal, else we get an error.

Error appears when number of rows differs

Finally, Our DataFrame will look like this:

Our Final Data

Step 8- Writing our DataFrame to CSV file

We need our scraped data to be available locally for further analysis & model building or other purposes.

Our final piece of code to write it in CSV file is:

Writing to CSV file

Step 9- Check the CSV file

Data written in CSV file

Conclusion-

I tried to explain Web Scraping using R in a simple way, Hope this will help you in understanding it better.

Find full code on

https://github.com/vgyaan/Alexa/blob/master/webscrap.R

If you have any questions about the code or web scraping in general, reach out to me on LinkedIn!

Okay, we will meet again with the new exposer.

Till then,

Happy Coding..!

Interview – Customer Data Platform, more than CRM 2.0?

Interview with David M. Raab from the CDP Institute

David M. Raab is as a consultant specialized in marketing software and service vendor selection, marketing analytics and marketing technology assessment. Furthermore he is the founder of the Customer Data Platform Institute which is a vendor-neutral educational project to help marketers build a unified customer view that is available to all of their company systems.

Furthermore he is a Keynote-Speaker for the Predictive Analytics World Event 2019 in Berlin.

Data Science Blog: Mr. Raab, what exactly is a Customer Data Platform (CDP)? And where is the need for it?

The CDP Institute defines a Customer Data Platform as „packaged software that builds a unified, persistent customer database that is accessible by other systems“.  In plainer language, a CDP assembles customer data from all sources, combines it into customer profiles, and makes the profiles available for any use.  It’s important because customer data is collected in so many different systems today and must be unified to give customers the experience they expect.

Data Science Blog: Is it something like a CRM System 2.0? What Use Cases can be realized by a Customer Data Platform?

CRM systems are used to interact directly with customers, usually by telephone or in the field.  They work almost exclusively with data that is entered during those interactions.  This gives a very limited view of the customer since interactions through other channels such as order processing or Web sites are not included.  In fact, one common use case for CDP is to give CRM users a view of all customer interactions, typically by opening a window into the CDP database without needing to import the data into the CRM.  There are many other use cases for unified data, including customer segmentation, journey analysis, and personalization.  Anything that requires sharing data across different systems is a CDP use case.

Data Science Blog: When does a CDP make sense for a company? It is more relevant for retail and financial companies than for industrial companies, isn´t it?

CDP has been adopted most widely in retail and online media, where each customer has many interactions and there are many products to choose from.  This is a combination that can make good use of predictive modeling, which benefits greatly from having more complete data.  Financial services was slower to adopt, probably because they have fewer products but also because they already had pretty good customer data systems.  B2B has also been slow to adopt because so much of their customer relationship is handled by sales people.  We’ve more recently been seeing growth in additional sectors such as travel, healthcare, and education.  Those involve fewer transactions than retail but also rely on building strong customer relationships based on good data.

Data Science Blog: There are several providers for CDPs. Adobe, Tealium, Emarsys or Dynamic Yield, just to name some of them. Do they differ a lot between each other?

Yes they do.  All CDPs build the customer profiles I mentioned.  But some do more things, such as predictive modeling, message selection, and, increasingly, message delivery.  Of course they also vary in the industries they specialize in, regions they support, size of clients they work with, and many technical details.  This makes it hard to buy a CDP but also means buyers are more likely to find a system that fits their needs.

Data Science Blog: How established is the concept of the CDP in Europe in general? And how in comparison with the United States?

CDP is becoming more familiar in Europe but is not as well understood as in the U.S.  The European market spent a lot of money on Data Management Platforms (DMPs) which promised to do much of what a CDP does but were not able to because they do not store the level of detail that a CDP does.  Many DMPs also don’t work with personally identifiable data because the DMPs primarily support Web advertising, where many customers are anonymous.  The failures of DMPs have harmed CDPs because they have made buyers skeptical that any system can meet their needs, having already failed once.  But we are overcoming this as the market becomes better educated and more success stories are available.  What’s the same in Europe and the U.S. is that marketers face the same needs.  This will push European marketers towards CDPs as the best solution in many cases.

Data Science Blog: What are coming trends? What will be the main topic 2020?

We see many CDPs with broader functions for marketing execution: campaign management, personalization, and message delivery in particular.  This is because marketers would like to buy as few systems as possible, so they want broader scope in each systems.  We’re seeing expansion into new industries such as financial services, travel, telecommunications, healthcare, and education.  Perhaps most interesting will be the entry of Adobe, Salesforce, and Oracle, who have all promised CDP products late this year or early next year.  That will encourage many more people to consider buying CDPs.  We expect that market will expand quite rapidly, so current CDP vendors will be able to grow even as Adobe, Salesforce, and Oracle make new CDP sales.


You want to get in touch with Daniel M. Raab and understand more about the concept of a CDP? Meet him at the Predictive Analytics World 18th and 19th November 2019 in Berlin, Germany. As a Keynote-Speaker, he will introduce the concept of a Customer Data Platform in the light of Predictive Analytics. Click here to see the agenda of the event.

 


 

Wie passt Machine Learning in eine moderne Data- & Analytics Architektur?

Einleitung

Aufgrund vielfältiger potenzieller Geschäftschancen, die Machine Learning bietet, arbeiten mittlerweile viele Unternehmen an Initiativen für datengetriebene Innovationen. Dabei gründen sie Analytics-Teams, schreiben neue Stellen für Data Scientists aus, bauen intern Know-how auf und fordern von der IT-Organisation eine Infrastruktur für “heavy” Data Engineering & Processing samt Bereitstellung einer Analytics-Toolbox ein. Für IT-Architekten warten hier spannende Herausforderungen, u.a. bei der Zusammenarbeit mit interdisziplinären Teams, deren Mitglieder unterschiedlich ausgeprägte Kenntnisse im Bereich Machine Learning (ML) und Bedarfe bei der Tool-Unterstützung haben. Einige Überlegungen sind dabei: Sollen Data Scientists mit ML-Toolkits arbeiten und eigene maßgeschneiderte Algorithmen nur im Ausnahmefall entwickeln, damit später Herausforderungen durch (unkonventionelle) Integrationen vermieden werden? Machen ML-Funktionen im seit Jahren bewährten ETL-Tool oder in der Datenbank Sinn? Sollen ambitionierte Fachanwender künftig selbst Rohdaten aufbereiten und verknüpfen, um auf das präparierte Dataset einen populären Algorithmus anzuwenden und die Ergebnisse selbst interpretieren? Für die genannten Fragestellungen warten junge & etablierte Software-Hersteller sowie die Open Source Community mit “All-in-one”-Lösungen oder Machine Learning-Erweiterungen auf. Vor dem Hintergrund des Data Science Prozesses, der den Weg eines ML-Modells von der experimentellen Phase bis zur Operationalisierung beschreibt, vergleicht dieser Artikel ausgewählte Ansätze (Notebooks für die Datenanalyse, Machine Learning-Komponenten in ETL- und Datenvisualisierungs­werkzeugen vs. Speziallösungen für Machine Learning) und betrachtet mögliche Einsatzbereiche und Integrationsaspekte.

Data Science Prozess und Teams

Im Zuge des Big Data-Hypes kamen neben Design-Patterns für Big Data- und Analytics-Architekturen auch Begriffsdefinitionen auf, die Disziplinen wie Datenintegration von Data Engineering und Data Science vonein­ander abgrenzen [1]. Prozessmodelle, wie das ab 1996 im Rahmen eines EU-Förderprojekts entwickelte CRISP-DM (CRoss-Industry Standard Process for Data Mining) [2], und Best Practices zur Organisation erfolgreich arbeitender Data Science Teams [3] weisen dabei die Richtung, wie Unternehmen das Beste aus den eigenen Datenschätzen herausholen können. Die Disziplin Data Science beschreibt den, an ein wissenschaftliches Vorgehen angelehnten, Prozess der Nutzung von internen und externen Datenquellen zur Optimierung von Produkten, Dienstleistungen und Prozessen durch die Anwendung statistischer und mathematischer Modelle. Bild 1 stellt in einem Schwimmbahnen-Diagramm einzelne Phasen des Data Science Prozesses den beteiligten Funktionen gegenüber und fasst Erfahrungen aus der Praxis zusammen [5]. Dabei ist die Intensität bei der Zusammenarbeit zwischen Data Scientists und System Engineers insbesondere bei Vorbereitung und Bereitstellung der benötigten Datenquellen und später bei der Produktivsetzung des Ergebnisses hoch. Eine intensive Beanspruchung der Server-Infrastruktur ist in allen Phasen gegeben, bei denen Hands-on (und oft auch massiv parallel) mit dem Datenpool gearbeitet wird, z.B. bei Datenaufbereitung, Training von ML Modellen etc.

Abbildung 1: Beteiligung und Interaktion von Fachbereichs-/IT-Funktionen mit dem Data Science Team

Mitarbeiter vom Technologie-Giganten Google haben sich reale Machine Learning-Systeme näher angesehen und festgestellt, dass der Umsetzungsaufwand für den eigentlichen Kern (= der ML-Code, siehe den kleinen schwarzen Kasten in der Mitte von Bild 2) gering ist, wenn man dies mit der Bereitstellung der umfangreichen und komplexen Infrastruktur inklusive Managementfunktionen vergleicht [4].

Abbildung 2: Versteckte technische Anforderungen in maschinellen Lernsystemen

Konzeptionelle Architektur für Machine Learning und Analytics

Die Nutzung aller verfügbaren Daten für Analyse, Durchführung von Data Science-Projekten, mit den daraus resultierenden Maßnahmen zur Prozessoptimierung und -automatisierung, bedeutet für Unternehmen sich neuen Herausforderungen zu stellen: Einführung neuer Technologien, Anwendung komplexer mathematischer Methoden sowie neue Arbeitsweisen, die in dieser Form bisher noch nicht dagewesen sind. Für IT-Architekten gibt es also reichlich Arbeit, entweder um eine Data Management-Plattform neu aufzubauen oder um das bestehende Informationsmanagement weiterzuentwickeln. Bild 3 zeigt hierzu eine vierstufige Architektur nach Gartner [6], ausgerichtet auf Analytics und Machine Learning.

Abbildung 3: Konzeptionelle End-to-End Architektur für Machine Learning und Analytics

Was hat sich im Vergleich zu den traditionellen Data Warehouse- und Business Intelligence-Architekturen aus den 1990er Jahren geändert? Denkt man z.B. an die Präzisionsfertigung eines komplexen Produkts mit dem Ziel, den Ausschuss weiter zu senken und in der Produktionslinie eine höhere Produktivitätssteigerung (Kennzahl: OEE, Operational Equipment Efficiency) erzielen zu können: Die an der Produktherstellung beteiligten Fertigungsmodule (Spezialmaschinen) messen bzw. detektieren über zahlreiche Sensoren Prozesszustände, speicherprogrammierbare Steuerungen (SPS) regeln dazu die Abläufe und lassen zu Kontrollzwecken vom Endprodukt ein oder mehrere hochauflösende Fotos aufnehmen. Bei diesem Szenario entsteht eine Menge interessanter Messdaten, die im operativen Betrieb häufig schon genutzt werden. Z.B. für eine Echtzeitalarmierung bei Über- oder Unterschreitung von Schwellwerten in einem vorher definierten Prozessfenster. Während früher vielleicht aus Kostengründen nur Statusdaten und Störungsinformationen den Weg in relationale Datenbanken fanden, hebt man heute auch Rohdaten, z.B. Zeitreihen (Kraftwirkung, Vorschub, Spannung, Frequenzen,…) für die spätere Analyse auf.

Bezogen auf den Bereich Acquire bewältigt die IT-Architektur in Bild 3 nun Aufgaben, wie die Übernahme und Speicherung von Maschinen- und Sensordaten, die im Millisekundentakt Datenpunkte erzeugen. Während IoT-Plattformen das Registrieren, Anbinden und Management von Hunderten oder Tausenden solcher datenproduzierender Geräte („Things“) erleichtern, beschreibt das zugehörige IT-Konzept den Umgang mit Protokollen wie MQTT, OPC-UA, den Aufbau und Einsatz einer Messaging-Plattform für Publish-/Subscribe-Modelle (Pub/Sub) zur performanten Weiterverarbeitung von Massendaten im JSON-Dateiformat. Im Bereich Organize etablieren sich neben relationalen Datenbanken vermehrt verteilte NoSQL-Datenbanken zum Persistieren eingehender Datenströme, wie sie z.B. im oben beschriebenen Produktionsszenario entstehen. Für hochauflösende Bilder, Audio-, Videoaufnahmen oder andere unstrukturierte Daten kommt zusätzlich noch Object Storage als alternative Speicherform in Frage. Neben der kostengünstigen und langlebigen Datenauf­bewahrung ist die Möglichkeit, einzelne Objekte mit Metadaten flexibel zu beschreiben, um damit später die Auffindbarkeit zu ermöglichen und den notwendigen Kontext für die Analysen zu geben, hier ein weiterer Vorteil. Mit dem richtigen Technologie-Mix und der konsequenten Umsetzung eines Data Lake– oder Virtual Data Warehouse-Konzepts gelingt es IT-Architekten, vielfältige Analytics Anwendungsfälle zu unterstützen.

Im Rahmen des Data Science Prozesses spielt, neben der sicheren und massenhaften Datenspeicherung sowie der Fähigkeit zur gleichzeitigen, parallelen Verarbeitung großer Datenmengen, das sog. Feature-Engineering eine wichtige Rolle. Dazu wieder ein Beispiel aus der maschinellen Fertigung: Mit Hilfe von Machine Learning soll nach unbekannten Gründen für den zu hohen Ausschuss gefunden werden. Was sind die bestimmenden Faktoren dafür? Beeinflusst etwas die Maschinenkonfiguration oder deuten Frequenzveränderungen bei einem Verschleißteil über die Zeit gesehen auf ein Problem hin? Maschine und Sensoren liefern viele Parameter als Zeitreihendaten, aber nur einige davon sind – womöglich nur in einer bestimmten Kombination – für die Aufgabenstellung wirklich relevant. Daher versuchen Data Scientists bei der Feature-Entwicklung die Vorhersage- oder Klassifikationsleistung der Lernalgorithmen durch Erstellen von Merkmalen aus Rohdaten zu verbessern und mit diesen den Lernprozess zu vereinfachen. Die anschließende Feature-Auswahl wählt bei dem Versuch, die Anzahl von Dimensionen des Trainingsproblems zu verringern, die wichtigste Teilmenge der ursprünglichen Daten-Features aus. Aufgrund dieser und anderer Arbeitsschritte, wie z.B. Auswahl und Training geeigneter Algorithmen, ist der Aufbau eines Machine Learning Modells ein iterativer Prozess, bei dem Data Scientists dutzende oder hunderte von Modellen bauen, bis die Akzeptanzkriterien für die Modellgüte erfüllt sind. Aus technischer Sicht sollte die IT-Architektur auch bei der Verwaltung von Machine Learning Modellen bestmöglich unterstützen, z.B. bei Modell-Versionierung, -Deployment und -Tracking in der Produktions­umgebung oder bei der Automatisierung des Re-Trainings.

Die Bereiche Analyze und Deliver zeigen in Bild 3 einige bekannte Analysefähigkeiten, wie z.B. die Bereitstellung eines Standardreportings, Self-service Funktionen zur Geschäftsplanung sowie Ad-hoc Analyse und Exploration neuer Datasets. Data Science-Aktivitäten können etablierte Business Intelligence-Plattformen inhaltlich ergänzen, in dem sie durch neuartige Kennzahlen, das bisherige Reporting „smarter“ machen und ggf. durch Vorhersagen einen Blick in die nahe Zukunft beisteuern. Machine Learning-as-a-Service oder Machine Learning-Produkte sind alternative Darreichungsformen, um Geschäftsprozesse mit Hilfe von Analytik zu optimieren: Z.B. integriert in einer Call Center-Applikation, die mittels Churn-Indikatoren zu dem gerade anrufenden erbosten Kunden einen Score zu dessen Abwanderungswilligkeit zusammen mit Handlungsempfehlungen (Gutschein, Rabatt) anzeigt. Den Kunden-Score oder andere Risikoeinschätzungen liefert dabei eine Service Schnittstelle, die von verschiedenen unternehmensinternen oder auch externen Anwendungen (z.B. Smartphone-App) eingebunden und in Echtzeit angefragt werden kann. Arbeitsfelder für die IT-Architektur wären in diesem Zusammenhang u.a. Bereitstellung und Betrieb (skalierbarer) ML-Modelle via REST API’s in der Produktions­umgebung inklusive Absicherung gegen unerwünschten Zugriff.

Ein klassischer Ansatz: Datenanalyse und Machine Learning mit Jupyter Notebook & Python

Jupyter ist ein Kommandozeileninterpreter zum interaktiven Arbeiten mit der Programmiersprache Python. Es handelt sich dabei nicht nur um eine bloße Erweiterung der in Python eingebauten Shell, sondern um eine Softwaresuite zum Entwickeln und Ausführen von Python-Programmen. Funktionen wie Introspektion, Befehlszeilenergänzung, Rich-Media-Einbettung und verschiedene Editoren (Terminal, Qt-basiert oder browserbasiert) ermöglichen es, Python-Anwendungen als auch Machine Learning-Projekte komfortabel zu entwickeln und gleichzeitig zu dokumentieren. Datenanalysten sind bei der Arbeit mit Juypter nicht auf Python als Programmiersprache begrenzt, sondern können ebenso auch sog. Kernels für Julia, R und vielen anderen Sprachen einbinden. Ein Jupyter Notebook besteht aus einer Reihe von “Zellen”, die in einer Sequenz angeordnet sind. Jede Zelle kann entweder Text oder (Live-)Code enthalten und ist beliebig verschiebbar. Texte lassen sich in den Zellen mit einer einfachen Markup-Sprache formatieren, komplexe Formeln wie mit einer Ausgabe in LaTeX darstellen. Code-Zellen enthalten Code in der Programmiersprache, die dem aktiven Notebook über den entsprechenden Kernel (Python 2 Python 3, R, etc.) zugeordnet wurde. Bild 4 zeigt auszugsweise eine Analyse historischer Hauspreise in Abhängigkeit ihrer Lage in Kalifornien, USA (Daten und Notebook sind öffentlich erhältlich [7]). Notebooks erlauben es, ganze Machine Learning-Projekte von der Datenbeschaffung bis zur Evaluierung der ML-Modelle reproduzierbar abzubilden und lassen sich gut versionieren. Komplexe ML-Modelle können in Python mit Hilfe des Pickle Moduls, das einen Algorithmus zur Serialisierung und De-Serialisierung implementiert, ebenfalls transportabel gemacht werden.

 

Abbildung 4: Datenbeschaffung, Inspektion, Visualisierung und ML Modell-Training in einem Jupyter Notebook (Pro-grammiersprache: Python)

Ein Problem, auf das man bei der praktischen Arbeit mit lokalen Jupyter-Installationen schnell stößt, lässt sich mit dem “works on my machine”-Syndrom bezeichnen. Kleine Data Sets funktionieren problemlos auf einem lokalen Rechner, wenn sie aber auf die Größe des Produktionsdatenbestandes migriert werden, skaliert das Einlesen und Verarbeiten aller Daten mit einem einzelnen Rechner nicht. Aufgrund dieser Begrenzung liegt der Aufbau einer server-basierten ML-Umgebung mit ausreichend Rechen- und Speicherkapazität auf der Hand. Dabei ist aber die Einrichtung einer solchen ML-Umgebung, insbesondere bei einer on-premise Infrastruktur, eine Herausforderung: Das Infrastruktur-Team muss physische Server und/oder virtuelle Maschinen (VM’s) auf Anforderung bereitstellen und integrieren. Dieser Ansatz ist aufgrund vieler manueller Arbeitsschritte zeitaufwändig und fehleranfällig. Mit dem Einsatz Cloud-basierter Technologien vereinfacht sich dieser Prozess deutlich. Die Möglichkeit, Infrastructure on Demand zu verwenden und z.B. mit einem skalierbaren Cloud-Data Warehouse zu kombinieren, bietet sofortigen Zugriff auf Rechen- und Speicher-Ressourcen, wann immer sie benötigt werden und reduziert den administrativen Aufwand bei Einrichtung und Verwaltung der zum Einsatz kommenden ML-Software. Bild 5 zeigt den Code-Ausschnitt aus einem Jupyter Notebook, das im Rahmen des Cloud Services Amazon SageMaker bereitgestellt wird und via PySpark Kernel auf einen Multi-Node Apache Spark Cluster (in einer Amazon EMR-Umgebung) zugreift. In diesem Szenario wird aus einem Snowflake Cloud Data Warehouse ein größeres Data Set mit 220 Millionen Datensätzen via Spark-Connector komplett in ein Spark Dataframe geladen und im Spark Cluster weiterverarbeitet. Den vollständigen Prozess inkl. Einrichtung und Konfiguration aller Komponenten, beschreibt eine vierteilige Blog-Serie [8]). Mit Spark Cluster sowie Snowflake stehen für sich genommen zwei leistungsfähige Umgebungen für rechenintensive Aufgaben zur Verfügung. Mit dem aktuellen Snowflake Connector für Spark ist eine intelligente Arbeitsteilung mittels Query Pushdown erreichbar. Dabei entscheidet Spark’s optimizer (Catalyst), welche Aufgaben (Queries) aufgrund der effizienteren Verarbeitung an Snowflake delegiert werden [9].

Abbildung 5: Jupyter Notebook in der Cloud – integriert mit Multi-Node Spark Cluster und Snowflake Cloud Data Warehouse

Welches Machine Learning Framework für welche Aufgabenstellung?

Bevor die nächsten Abschnitte weitere Werkzeuge und Technologien betrachten, macht es nicht nur für Data Scientists sondern auch für IT-Architekten Sinn, zunächst einen Überblick auf die derzeit verfügbaren Machine Learning Frameworks zu bekommen. Aus Architekturperspektive ist es wichtig zu verstehen, welche Aufgabenstellungen die jeweiligen ML-Frameworks adressieren, welche technischen Anforderungen und ggf. auch Abhängigkeiten zu den verfügbaren Datenquellen bestehen. Ein gemeinsamer Nenner vieler gescheiterter Machine Learning-Projekte ist häufig die Auswahl des falschen Frameworks. Ein Beispiel: TensorFlow ist aktuell eines der wichtigsten Frameworks zur Programmierung von neuronalen Netzen, Deep Learning Modellen sowie anderer Machine Learning Algorithmen. Während Deep Learning perfekt zur Untersuchung komplexer Daten wie Bild- und Audiodaten passt, wird es zunehmend auch für Use Cases benutzt, für die andere Frameworks besser geeignet sind. Bild 6 zeigt eine kompakte Entscheidungsmatrix [10] für die derzeit verbreitetsten ML-Frameworks und adressiert häufige Praxisprobleme: Entweder werden Algorithmen benutzt, die für den Use Case nicht oder kaum geeignet sind oder das gewählte Framework kann die aufkommenden Datenmengen nicht bewältigen. Die Unterteilung der Frameworks in Small Data, Big Data und Complex Data ist etwas plakativ, soll aber bei der Auswahl der Frameworks nach Art und Volumen der Daten helfen. Die Grenze zwischen Big Data zu Small Data ist dabei dort zu ziehen, wo die Datenmengen so groß sind, dass sie nicht mehr auf einem einzelnen Computer, sondern in einem verteilten Cluster ausgewertet werden müssen. Complex Data steht in dieser Matrix für unstrukturierte Daten wie Bild- und Audiodateien, für die sich Deep Learning Frameworks sehr gut eignen.

Abbildung 6: Entscheidungsmatrix zu aktuell verbreiteten Machine Learning Frameworks

Self-Service Machine Learning in Business Intelligence-Tools

Mit einfach zu bedienenden Business Intelligence-Werkzeugen zur Datenvisualisierung ist es für Analytiker und für weniger technisch versierte Anwender recht einfach, komplexe Daten aussagekräftig in interaktiven Dashboards zu präsentieren. Hersteller wie Tableau, Qlik und Oracle spielen ihre Stärken insbesondere im Bereich Visual Analytics aus. Statt statische Berichte oder Excel-Dateien vor dem nächsten Meeting zu verschicken, erlauben moderne Besprechungs- und Kreativräume interaktive Datenanalysen am Smartboard inklusive Änderung der Abfragefilter, Perspektivwechsel und Drill-downs. Im Rahmen von Data Science-Projekten können diese Werkzeuge sowohl zur Exploration von Daten als auch zur Visualisierung der Ergebnisse komplexer Machine Learning-Modelle sinnvoll eingesetzt werden. Prognosen, Scores und weiterer ML-Modell-Output lässt sich so schneller verstehen und unterstützt die Entscheidungsfindung bzw. Ableitung der nächsten Maßnahmen für den Geschäftsprozess. Im Rahmen einer IT-Gesamtarchitektur sind Analyse-Notebooks und Datenvisualisierungswerkzeuge für die Standard-Analytics-Toolbox Unternehmens gesetzt. Mit Hinblick auf effiziente Team-Zusammenarbeit, unternehmensinternen Austausch und Kommunikation von Ergebnissen sollte aber nicht nur auf reine Desktop-Werkzeuge gesetzt, sondern Server-Lösungen betrachtet und zusammen mit einem Nutzerkonzept eingeführt werden, um zehnfache Report-Dubletten, konkurrierende Statistiken („MS Excel Hell“) einzudämmen.

Abbildung 7: Datenexploration in Tableau – leicht gemacht für Fachanwender und Data Scientists

 

Zusätzliche Statistikfunktionen bis hin zur Möglichkeit R- und Python-Code bei der Analyse auszuführen, öffnet auch Fachanwender die Tür zur Welt des Maschinellen Lernens. Bild 7 zeigt das Werkzeug Tableau Desktop mit der Analyse kalifornischer Hauspreise (demselben Datensatz wie oben im Jupyter Notebook-Abschnitt wie in Bild 4) und einer Heatmap-Visualisierung zur Hervorhebung der teuersten Wohnlagen. Mit wenigen Klicks ist auch der Einsatz deskriptiver Statistik möglich, mit der sich neben Lagemaßen (Median, Quartilswerte) auch Streuungsmaße (Spannweite, Interquartilsabstand) sowie die Form der Verteilung direkt aus dem Box-Plot in Bild 7 ablesen und sogar über das Vorhandensein von Ausreißern im Datensatz eine Feststellung treffen lassen. Vorteil dieser Visualisierungen sind ihre hohe Informationsdichte, die allerdings vom Anwender auch richtig interpretiert werden muss. Bei der Beurteilung der Attribute, mit ihren Wertausprägungen und Abhängigkeiten innerhalb des Data Sets, benötigen Citizen Data Scientists (eine Wortschöpfung von Gartner) allerdings dann doch die mathematischen bzw. statistischen Grundlagen, um Falschinterpretationen zu vermeiden. Fraglich ist auch der Nutzen des Data Flow Editors [11] in Oracle Data Visualization, mit dem eins oder mehrere der im Werkzeug integrierten Machine Learning-Modelle trainiert und evaluiert werden können: technisch lassen sich Ergebnisse erzielen und anhand einiger Performance-Metriken die Modellgüte auch bewerten bzw. mit anderen Modellen vergleichen – aber wer kann die erzielten Ergebnisse (wissenschaftlich) verteidigen? Gleiches gilt für die Integration vorhandener R- und Python Skripte, die am Ende dann doch eine Einweisung der Anwender bzgl. Parametrisierung der ML-Modelle und Interpretationshilfen bei den erzielten Ergebnissen erfordern.

Machine Learning in und mit Datenbanken

Die Nutzung eingebetteter 1-click Analytics-Funktionen der oben vorgestellten Data Visualization-Tools ist zweifellos komfortabel und zum schnellen Experimentieren geeignet. Der gegenteilige und eher puristische Ansatz wäre dagegen die Implementierung eigener Machine Learning Modelle in der Datenbank. Für die Umsetzung des gewählten Algorithmus reichen schon vorhandene Bordmittel in der Datenbank aus: SQL inklusive mathematischer und statistische SQL-Funktionen, Tabellen zum Speichern der Ergebnisse bzw. für das ML-Modell-Management und Stored Procedures zur Abbildung komplexer Geschäftslogik und auch zur Ablaufsteuerung. Solange die Algorithmen ausreichend skalierbar sind, gibt es viele gute Gründe, Ihre Data Warehouse Engine für ML einzusetzen:

  • Einfachheit – es besteht keine Notwendigkeit, eine andere Compute-Plattform zu managen, zwischen Systemen zu integrieren und Daten zu extrahieren, transferieren, laden, analysieren usw.
  • Sicherheit – Die Daten bleiben dort, wo sie gut geschützt sind. Es ist nicht notwendig, Datenbank-Anmeldeinformationen in externen Systemen zu konfigurieren oder sich Gedanken darüber zu machen, wo Datenkopien verteilt sein könnten.
  • Performance – Eine gute Data Warehouse Engine verwaltet zur Optimierung von SQL Abfragen viele Metadaten, die auch während des ML-Prozesses wiederverwendet werden könnten – ein Vorteil gegenüber General-purpose Compute Plattformen.

Die Implementierung eines minimalen, aber legitimen ML-Algorithmus wird in [12] am Beispiel eines Entscheidungsbaums (Decision Tree) im Snowflake Data Warehouse gezeigt. Decision Trees kommen für den Aufbau von Regressions- oder Klassifikationsmodellen zum Einsatz, dabei teilt man einen Datensatz in immer kleinere Teilmengen auf, die ihrerseits in einem Baum organisiert sind. Bild 8 zeigt die Snowflake Benutzer­oberfläche und ein Ausschnitt von der Stored Procedure, die dynamisch alle SQL-Anweisungen zur Berechnung des Decision Trees nach dem ID3 Algorithmus [13] generiert.

Abbildung 8: Snowflake SQL-Editor mit Stored Procedure zur Berechnung eines Decission Trees

Allerdings ist der Entwicklungs- und Implementierungsprozess für ein Machine Learning Modell umfassender: Es sind relevante Daten zu identifizieren und für das ML-Modell vorzubereiten. Einfach Rohdaten bzw. nicht aggregierten Informationen aus Datenbanktabellen zu extrahieren reicht nicht aus, stattdessen benötigt ein ML-Modell als Input eine flache, meist sehr breite Tabelle mit vielen Aggregaten, die als Features bezeichnet werden. Erst dann kann der Prozess fortgesetzt und der für die Aufgabenstellung ausgewählte Algorithmus trainiert und die Modellgüte bewertet werden. Ist das Ergebnis zufriedenstellend, steht die Implementierung des ML-Modells in der Zielumgebung an und muss sich künftig beim Scoring „frischer Datensätze“ bewähren. Viele zeitaufwändige Teilaufgaben also, bei der zumindest eine Teilautomatisierung wünschenswert wäre. Allein die Datenaufbereitung kann schon bis zu 70…80% der gesamten Projektzeit beanspruchen. Und auch die Implementierung eines ML-Modells wird häufig unterschätzt, da in Produktionsumgebungen der unterstützte Technologie-Stack definiert und ggf. für Machine Learning-Aufgaben erweitert werden muss. Daher ist es reizvoll, wenn das Datenbankmanagement-System auch hier einsetzbar ist – sofern die geforderten Algorithmen dort abbildbar sind. Wie ein ML-Modell für die Kundenabwanderungsprognose (Churn Prediction) werkzeuggestützt mit Xpanse AI entwickelt und beschleunigt im Snowflake Cloud Data Warehouse bereitgestellt werden kann, beschreibt [14] sehr anschaulich: Die benötigten Datenextrakte sind schnell aus Snowflake entladen und stellen den Input für ein neues Xpanse AI-Projekt dar. Sobald notwendige Tabellenverknüpfungen und andere fachliche Informationen hinterlegt sind, analysiert das Tool Datenstrukturen und transformiert alle Eingangstabellen in eine flache Zwischentabelle (u.U. mit Hunderten von Spalten), auf deren Basis im Anschluss ML-Modelle trainiert werden. Nach dem ML-Modell-Training erfolgt die Begutachtung der Ergebnisse: das erstellte Dataset, Güte des ML-Modells und der generierte SQL(!) ETL-Code zur Erstellung der Zwischentabelle sowie die SQL-Repräsentation des ML-Modells, das basierend auf den Input-Daten Wahrscheinlichkeitswerte berechnet und in einer Scoring-Tabelle ablegt. Die Vorteile dieses Ansatzes sind liegen auf der Hand: kürzere Projektzeiten, der Einsatz im Rahmen des Snowflake Cloud Data Warehouse, macht das Experimentieren mit der Zuweisung dedizierter Compute-Ressourcen für die performante Verarbeitung äußerst einfach. Grenzen liegen wiederum bei der zur Verfügung stehenden Algorithmen.

Spezialisierte Software Suites für Machine Learning

Während sich im Markt etablierte Business Intelligence- und Datenintegrationswerkzeuge mit Erweiterungen zur Ausführung von Python- und R-Code als notwendigen Bestandteil der Analyse-Toolbox für den Data Science Prozess positionieren, gibt es daneben auch Machine-Learning-Plattformen, die auf die Arbeit mit künstlicher Intelligenz (KI) zugeschnittenen sind. Für den Einstieg in Data Science bieten sich die oft vorhandenen quelloffenen Distributionen an, die auch über Enterprise-Versionen mit erweiterten Möglichkeiten für beschleunigtes maschinelles Lernen durch Einsatz von Grafikprozessoren (GPUs), bessere Skalierung sowie Funktionen für das ML-Modell Management (z.B. durch Versionsmanagement und Automatisierung) verfügen.

Eine beliebte Machine Learning-Suite ist das Open Source Projekt H2O. Die Lösung des gleichnamigen kalifornischen Unternehmens verfügt über eine R-Schnittstelle und ermöglicht Anwendern dieser statistischen Programmiersprache Vorteile in puncto Performance. Die in H2O verfügbaren Funktionen und Algorithmen sind optimiert und damit eine gute Alternative für das bereits standardmäßig in den R-Paketen verfügbare Funktionsset. H2O implementiert Algorithmen aus dem Bereich Statistik, Data-Mining und Machine Learning (generalisierte Lineare Modelle, K-Means, Random Forest, Gradient Boosting und Deep Learning) und bietet mit einer In-Memory-Architektur und durch standardmäßige Parallelisierung über alle vorhandenen Prozessorkerne eine gute Basis, um komplexe Machine-Learning-Modelle schneller trainieren zu können. Bild 9 zeigt wieder anhand des Datensatzes zur Analyse der kalifornischen Hauspreise die webbasierte Benutzeroberfläche H20 Flow, die den oben beschriebenen Juypter Notebook-Ansatz mit zusätzlich integrierter Benutzerführung für die wichtigsten Prozessschritte eines Machine-Learning-Projektes kombiniert. Mit einigen Klicks kann das California Housing Dataset importiert, in einen H2O-spezifischen Dataframe umgewandelt und anschließend in Trainings- und Testdatensets aufgeteilt werden. Auswahl, Konfiguration und Training der Machine Learning-Modelle erfolgt entweder durch den Anwender im Einsteiger-, Fortgeschrittenen- oder Expertenmodus bzw. im Auto-ML-Modus. Daran anschließend erlaubt H20 Flow die Vorhersage für die Zielvariable (im Beispiel: Hauspreis) für noch unbekannte Datensätze und die Aufbereitung der Ergebnismenge. Welche Unterstützung H2O zur Produktivsetzung von ML-Modellen anbietet, wird an einem Beispiel in den folgenden Abschnitten betrachtet.

Abbildung 9: H2O Flow Benutzeroberfläche – Datenaufbereitung, ML-Modell-Training und Evaluierung.

Vom Prototyp zur produktiven Machine Learning-Lösung

Warum ist es für viele Unternehmen noch schwer, einen Nutzen aus ihren ersten Data Science-Aktivitäten, Data Labs etc. zu ziehen? In der Praxis zeigt sich, erst durch Operationalisierung von Machine Learning-Resultaten in der Produktionsumgebung entsteht echter Geschäftswert und nur im Tagesgeschäft helfen robuste ML-Modelle mit hoher Güte bei der Erreichung der gesteckten Unternehmensziele. Doch leider erweist sich der Weg vom Prototypen bis hin zum Produktiveinsatz bei vielen Initativen noch als schwierig. Bild 10 veranschaulicht ein typisches Szenario: Data Science-Teams fällt es in ihrer Data Lab-Umgebung technisch noch leicht, Prototypen leistungsstarker ML-Modelle mit Hilfe aktueller ML-Frameworks wie TensorFlow-, Keras- und Word2Vec auf ihren Laptops oder in einer Sandbox-Umgebung zu erstellen. Doch je nach verfügbarer Infrastruktur kann, wegen Begrenzungen bei Rechenleistung oder Hauptspeicher, nur ein Subset der Produktionsdaten zum Trainieren von ML-Modellen herangezogen werden. Ergebnispräsentationen an die Stakeholder der Data Science-Projekte erfolgen dann eher durch Storytelling in MS Powerpoint bzw. anhand eines Demonstrators – selten aber technisch schon so umgesetzt, dass anderere Applikationen z.B. über eine REST-API von dem neuen Risiko Scoring-, dem Bildanalyse-Modul etc. (testweise) Gebrauch machen können. Ausgestattet mit einer Genehmigung vom Management, übergibt das Data Science-Team ein (trainiertes) ML-Modell an das Software Engineering-Team. Nach der Übergabe muss sich allerdings das Engineering-Team darum kümmern, dass das ML-Modell in eine für den Produktionsbetrieb akzeptierte Programmiersprache, z.B. in Java, neu implementiert werden muss, um dem IT-Unternehmensstandard (siehe Line of Governance in Bild 10) bzw. Anforderungen an Skalierbarkeit und Laufzeitverhalten zu genügen. Manchmal sind bei einem solchen Extraschritt Abweichungen beim ML-Modell-Output und in jedem Fall signifikante Zeitverluste beim Deployment zu befürchten.

Abbildung 10: Übergabe von Machine Learning-Resultaten zur Produktivsetzung im Echtbetrieb

Unterstützt das Data Science-Team aktiv bei dem Deployment, dann wäre die Einbettung des neu entwickelten ML-Modells in eine Web-Applikation eine beliebte Variante, bei der typischerweise Flask, Tornado (beides Micro-Frameworks für Python) und Shiny (ein auf R basierendes HTML5/CSS/JavaScript Framework) als Technologiekomponenten zum Zuge kommen. Bei diesem Vorgehen müssen ML-Modell, Daten und verwendete ML-Pakete/Abhängigkeiten in einem Format verpackt werden, das sowohl in der Data Science Sandbox als auch auf Produktionsservern lauffähig ist. Für große Unternehmen kann dies einen langwierigen, komplexen Softwareauslieferungsprozess bedeuten, der ggf. erst noch zu etablieren ist. In dem Zusammenhang stellt sich die Frage, wie weit die Erfahrung des Data Science-Teams bei der Entwicklung von Webanwendungen reicht und Aspekte wie Loadbalancing und Netzwerkverkehr ausreichend berücksichtigt? Container-Virtualisierung, z.B. mit Docker, zur Isolierung einzelner Anwendungen und elastische Cloud-Lösungen, die on-Demand benötigte Rechenleistung bereitstellen, können hier Abhilfe schaffen und Teil der Lösungsarchitektur sein. Je nach analytischer Aufgabenstellung ist das passende technische Design [15] zu wählen: Soll das ML-Modell im Batch- oder Near Realtime-Modus arbeiten? Ist ein Caching für wiederkehrende Modell-Anfragen vorzusehen? Wie wird das Modell-Deployment umgesetzt, In-Memory, Code-unabhängig durch Austauschformate wie PMML, serialisiert via R- oder Python-Objekte (Pickle) oder durch generierten Code? Zusätzlich muss für den Produktiveinsatz von ML-Modellen auch an unterstützenden Konzepten zur Bereitstellung, Routing, Versions­management und Betrieb im industriellen Maßstab gearbeitet werden, damit zuverlässige Machine Learning-Produkte bzw. -Services zur internen und externen Nutzung entstehen können (siehe dazu Bild 11)

Abbildung 11: Unterstützende Funktionen für produktive Machine Learning-Lösungen

Die Deployment-Variante „Machine Learning Code-Generierung“ lässt sich gut an dem bereits mit H2O Flow besprochenen Beispiel veranschaulichen. Während Bild 9 hierzu die Schritte für Modellaufbau, -training und -test illustriert, zeigt Bild 12 den Download-Vorgang für den zuvor generierten Java-Code zum Aufbau eines ML-Modells zur Vorhersage kalifornischer Hauspreise. In dem generierten Java-Code sind die in H2O Flow vorgenommene Datenaufbereitung sowie alle Konfigurationen für den Gradient Boosting Machine (GBM)-Algorithmus gut nachvollziehbar, Bild 13 gibt mit den ersten Programmzeilen einen ersten Eindruck dazu und erinnert gleichzeitig an den ähnlichen Ansatz der oben mit dem Snowflake Cloud Data Warehouse und dem Tool Xpanse AI bereits beschrieben wurde.

Abbildung 12: H2O Flow Benutzeroberfläche – Java-Code Generierung und Download eines trainierten Models

Abbildung 13: Generierter Java-Code eines Gradient Boosted Machine – Modells zur Vorhersage kaliforn. Hauspreise

Nach Abschluss der Machine Learning-Entwicklung kann der Java-Code des neuen ML-Modells, z.B. unter Verwendung der Apache Kafka Streams API, zu einer Streaming-Applikation hinzugefügt und publiziert werden [16]. Vorteil dabei: Die Kafka Streams-Applikation ist selbst eine Java-Applikation, in die der generierte Code des ML-Modells eingebettet werden kann (siehe Bild 14). Alle zukünftigen Events, die neue Immobilien-Datensätze zu Häusern aus Kalifornien mit (denselben) Features wie Geoposition, Alter des Gebäudes, Anzahl Zimmer etc. enthalten und als ML-Modell-Input über Kafka Streams hereinkommen, werden mit einer Vorhersage des voraussichtlichen Gebäudepreises von dem auf historischen Daten trainierten ML-Algorithmus beantwortet. Ein Vorteil dabei: Weil die Kafka Streams-Applikation unter der Haube alle Funktionen von Apache Kafka nutzt, ist diese neue Anwendung bereits für den skalierbaren und geschäftskritischen Einsatz ausgelegt.

Abbildung 14: Deployment des generierten Java-Codes eines H2O ML-Models in einer Kafka Streams-Applikation

Machine Learning as a Service – “API-first” Ansatz

In den vorherigen Abschnitten kam bereits die Herausforderung zur Sprache, wenn es um die Überführung der Ergebnisse eines Datenexperiments in eine Produktivumgebung geht. Während die Mehrheit der Mitglieder eines Data Science Teams bevorzugt R, Python (und vermehrt Julia) als Programmiersprache einsetzen, gibt es auf der Abnehmerseite das Team der Softwareingenieure, die für technische Implementierungen in der Produktionsumgebung zuständig sind, womöglich einen völlig anderen Technologie-Stack verwenden (müssen). Im Extremfall droht das Neuimplementieren eines Machine Learning-Modells, im besseren Fall kann Code oder die ML-Modellspezifikation transferiert und mit wenig Aufwand eingebettet (vgl. das Beispiel H2O und Apache Kafka Streams Applikation) bzw. direkt in einer neuen Laufzeitumgebung ausführbar gemacht werden. Alternativ wählt man einen „API-first“-Ansatz und entkoppelt das Zusammenwirken von unterschiedlich implementierten Applikationen bzw. -Applikationsteilen via Web-API’s. Data Science-Teams machen hierzu z.B. die URL Endpunkte ihrer testbereiten Algorithmen bekannt, die von anderen Softwareentwicklern für eigene „smarte“ Applikationen konsumiert werden. Durch den Aufbau von REST-API‘s kann das Data Science-Team den Code ihrer ML-Modelle getrennt von den anderen Teams weiterentwickeln und damit eine Arbeitsteilung mit klaren Verantwortlichkeiten herbeiführen, ohne Teamkollegen, die nicht am Machine Learning-Aspekt des eines Projekts beteiligt sind, bei ihrer Arbeit zu blockieren.

Bild 15 zeigt ein einfaches Szenario, bei dem die Gegenstandserkennung von beliebigen Bildern mit einem Deep Learning-Verfahren umgesetzt ist. Einzelne Fotos können dabei via Kommandozeileneditor als Input für die Bildanalyse an ein vortrainiertes Machine Learning-Modell übermittelt werden. Die Information zu den erkannten Gegenständen inkl. Wahrscheinlichkeitswerten kommt dafür im Gegenzug als JSON-Ausgabe zurück. Für die Umsetzung dieses Beispiels wurde in Python auf Basis der Open Source Deep-Learning-Bibliothek Keras, ein vortrainiertes ML-Modell mit Hilfe des Micro Webframeworks Flask über eine REST-API aufrufbar gemacht. Die in [17] beschriebene Applikation kümmert sich außerdem darum, dass beliebige Bilder via cURL geladen, vorverarbeitet (ggf. Wandlung in RGB, Standardisierung der Bildgröße auf 224 x 224 Pixel) und dann zur Klassifizierung der darauf abgebildeten Gegenstände an das ML-Modell übergeben wird. Das ML-Modell selbst verwendet eine sog. ResNet50-Architektur (die Abkürzung steht für 50 Layer Residual Network) und wurde auf Grundlage der öffentlichen ImageNet Bilddatenbank [18] vortrainiert. Zu dem ML-Modell-Input (in Bild 15: Fußballspieler in Aktion) meldet das System für den Tester nachvollziehbare Gegenstände wie Fußball, Volleyball und Trikot zurück, fragliche Klassifikationen sind dagegen Taschenlampe (Torch) und Schubkarre (Barrow).

Abbildung 15: Gegenstandserkennung mit Machine Learning und vorgegebenen Bildern via REST-Service

Bei Aufbau und Bereitstellung von Machine Learning-Funktionen mittels REST-API’s bedenken IT-Architekten und beteiligte Teams, ob der Einsatzzweck eher Rapid Prototyping ist oder eine weitreichende Nutzung unterstützt werden muss. Während das oben beschriebene Szenario mit Python, Keras und Flask auf einem Laptop realisierbar ist, benötigen skalierbare Deep Learning Lösungen mehr Aufmerksamkeit hinsichtlich der Deployment-Architektur [19], in dem zusätzlich ein Message Broker mit In-Memory Datastore eingehende bzw. zu analysierende Bilder puffert und dann erst zur Batch-Verarbeitung weiterleitet usw. Der Einsatz eines vorgeschalteten Webservers, Load Balancers, Verwendung von Grafikprozessoren (GPUs) sind weitere denkbare Komponenten für eine produktive ML-Architektur.

Als abschließendes Beispiel für einen leistungsstarken (und kostenpflichtigen) Machine Learning Service soll die Bildanalyse von Google Cloud Vision [20] dienen. Stellt man dasselbe Bild mit der Fußballspielszene von Bild 15 und Bild 16 bereit, so erkennt der Google ML-Service neben den Gegenständen weit mehr Informationen: Kontext (Teamsport, Bundesliga), anhand der Gesichtserkennung den Spieler selbst  und aktuelle bzw. vorherige Mannschaftszugehörigkeiten usw. Damit zeigt sich am Beispiel des Tech-Giganten auch ganz klar: Es kommt vorallem auf die verfügbaren Trainingsdaten an, inwieweit dann mit Algorithmen und einer dazu passenden Automatisierung (neue) Erkenntnisse ohne langwierigen und teuren manuellen Aufwand gewinnen kann. Einige Unternehmen werden feststellen, dass ihr eigener – vielleicht einzigartige – Datenschatz einen echten monetären Wert hat?

Abbildung 16: Machine Learning Bezahlprodukt (Google Vision)

Fazit

Machine Learning ist eine interessante “Challenge” für Architekten. Folgende Punkte sollte man bei künftigen Initativen berücksichtigen:

  • Finden Sie das richtige Geschäftsproblem bzw geeignete Use Cases
  • Identifizieren und definieren Sie die Einschränkungen (Sind z.B. genug Daten vorhanden?) für die zu lösende Aufgabenstellung
  • Nehmen Sie sich Zeit für das Design von Komponenten und Schnittstellen
  • Berücksichtigen Sie frühzeitig mögliche organisatorische Gegebenheiten und Einschränkungen
  • Denken Sie nicht erst zum Schluss an die Produktivsetzung Ihrer analytischen Modelle oder Machine Learning-Produkte
  • Der Prozess ist insgesamt eine Menge Arbeit, aber es ist keine Raketenwissenschaft.

Quellenverzeichnis

[1] Bill Schmarzo: “What’s the Difference Between Data Integration and Data Engineering?”, LinkedIn Pulse -> Link, 2018
[2] William Vorhies: “CRISP-DM – a Standard Methodology to Ensure a Good Outcome”, Data Science Central -> Link, 2016
[3] Bill Schmarzo: “A Winning Game Plan For Building Your Data Science Team”, LinkedIn Pulse -> Link, 2018
[4] D. Sculley, G. Holt, D. Golovin, E. Davydov, T. Phillips, D. Ebner, V. Chaudhary, M. Young, J.-F. Crespo, D. Dennison: “Hidden technical debt in Machine learning systems”. In NIPS’15 Proceedings of the 28th International Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems – Volume 2, 2015
[5] K. Bollhöfer: „Data Science – the what, the why and the how!“, Präsentation von The unbelievable Machine Company, 2015
[6] Carlton E. Sapp: “Preparing and Architecting for Machine Learning”, Gartner, 2017
[7] A. Geron: “California Housing” Dataset, Jupyter Notebook. GitHub.com -> Link, 2018
[8] R. Fehrmann: “Connecting a Jupyter Notebook to Snowflake via Spark” -> Link, 2018
[9] E. Ma, T. Grabs: „Snowflake and Spark: Pushing Spark Query Processing to Snowflake“ -> Link, 2017
[10] Dr. D. James: „Entscheidungsmatrix „Machine Learning“, it-novum.com ->  Link, 2018
[11] Oracle Analytics@YouTube: “Oracle DV – ML Model Comparison Example”, Video -> Link
[12] J. Weakley: Machine Learning in Snowflake, Towards Data Science Blog -> Link, 2019
[13] Dr. S. Sayad: An Introduction to Data Science, Website -> Link, 2019
[14] U. Bethke: Build a Predictive Model on Snowflake in 1 day with Xpanse AI, Blog à Link, 2019
[15] Sergei Izrailev: Design Patterns for Machine Learning in Production, Präsentation H2O World, 2017
[16] K. Wähner: How to Build and Deploy Scalable Machine Learning in Production with Apache Kafka, Confluent Blog -> Link, 2017
[17] A. Rosebrock: “Building a simple Keras + deep learning REST API”, The Keras Blog -> Link, 2018
[18] Stanford Vision Lab, Stanford University, Princeton University: Image database, Website -> Link
[19] A. Rosebrock: “A scalable Keras + deep learning REST API”, Blog -> Link, 2018
[20] Google Cloud Vision API (Beta Version) -> Link, abgerufen 2018

 

 

 

 

DS-GVO: Wie das moderne Data-Warehouse Unternehmen entlastet

Artikel des Blog-Sponsors: Snowflake

Viele Aktivitäten, die zur Einhaltung der DS-GVO-Anforderungen beitragen, liegen in den Händen der Unternehmen selbst. Deren IT-Anbieter sollten dazu beitragen, die Compliance-Anforderungen dieser Unternehmen zu erfüllen. Die SaaS-Anbieter eines Unternehmens sollten zumindest die IT-Sicherheitsanforderungen erfüllen, die sich vollständig in ihrem Bereich befinden und sich auf die Geschäfts- und Datensicherheit ihrer Kunden auswirken.

Snowflake wurde von Grund auf so gestaltet, dass die Einhaltung der DS-GVO erleichtert wird – und von Beginn darauf ausgelegt, enorme Mengen strukturierter und semistrukturierter Daten mit der Leichtigkeit von Standard-SQL zu verarbeiten. Die Zugänglichkeit und Einfachheit von SQL gibt Organisationen die Flexibilität, alle unter der DS-GVO erforderlichen Aktualisierungen, Änderungen oder Löschungen nahtlos vorzunehmen. Snowflakes Unterstützung für semistrukturierte Daten kann die Anpassung an neue Felder und andere Änderungen der Datensätze erleichtern. Darüber hinaus war die Sicherheit von Anfang an von grundlegender Bedeutung für Architektur, Implementierung und Betrieb von Snowflakes Data-Warehouse-as-a-Service.

Ein Grundprinzip der DS-GVO

Ein wichtiger Faktor für die Einhaltung der DS-GVO ist, zu verstehen, welche Daten eine Organisation besitzt und auf wen sie sich beziehen. Diese Anforderung macht es nötig, dass Daten strukturiert, organisiert und einfach zu suchen sind.

Die relationale SQL-Datenbankarchitektur von Snowflake bietet eine erheblich vereinfachte Struktur und Organisation, was sicherstellt, dass jeder Datensatz einen eindeutigen und leicht identifizierbaren Speicherort innerhalb der Datenbank besitzt. Snowflake-Kunden können auch relationalen Speicher mit dem Variant-Spaltentyp von Snowflake für semistrukturierte Daten kombinieren. Dieser Ansatz erweitert die Einfachheit des relationalen Formats auf die Schema-Flexibilität semistrukturierter Daten.

Snowflake ist noch leistungsfähiger durch seine Fähigkeit, massive Nebenläufigkeit zu unterstützen. Bei größeren Organisationen können Dutzende oder sogar Hunderte nebenläufiger Datenänderungen, -abfragen und -suchvorgänge zu einem bestimmten Zeitpunkt auftreten. Herkömmliche Data-Warehouses können nicht zu einem bestimmten Zeitpunkt über einen einzelnen Rechen-Cluster hinaus skaliert werden, was zu langen Warteschlangen und verzögerter Compliance führt. Snowflakes Multi-Cluster-Architektur für gemeinsam genutzte Daten löst dieses Problem, indem sie so viele einzigartige Rechen-Cluster bereitstellen kann, wie für einen beliebigen Zweck nötig sind, was zu einer effizienteren Workload-Isolierung und höherem Abfragedurchsatz führt. Jeder Mitarbeiter kann sehr große Datenmengen mit so vielen nebenläufigen Benutzern oder Operationen wie nötig speichern, organisieren, ändern, suchen und abfragen.

Rechte von Personen, deren Daten verarbeitet werden („Datensubjekte“)

Organisationen, die von der DS-GVO betroffen sind, müssen sicherstellen, dass sie Anfragen betroffener Personen nachkommen können. Einzelpersonen haben jetzt erheblich erweiterte Rechte, um zu erfahren, welche Art von Daten eine Organisation über sie besitzt, und das Recht, den Zugriff und/oder die Korrektur ihrer Daten anzufordern, die Daten zu löschen und/oder die Daten an einen neuen Provider zu übertragen. Bei der Bereitstellung dieser Dienste müssen Organisationen ziemlich schnell reagieren, in der Regel innerhalb von 30 Tagen. Daher müssen sie ihre Geschäftssysteme und ihr Data-Warehouse schnell durchsuchen können, um alle personenbezogenen Daten zu finden, die mit einer Person in Verbindung stehen, und entsprechende Maßnahmen ergreifen.

Organisationen können in großem Umfang von der Speicherung aller Daten in einem Data-Warehouse-as-a-Service mit vollen DML- und SQL-Fähigkeiten profitieren. Dies erleichtert das (mühevolle) Durchsuchen getrennter Geschäftssysteme und Datenspeicher, um die relevanten Daten zu finden. Und das wiederum hilft sicherzustellen, dass einzelne Datensätze durchsucht, gelöscht, eingeschränkt, aktualisiert, aufgeteilt und auf andere Weise manipuliert werden können, um sie an entsprechende Anfragen betroffener Personen anzupassen. Außerdem können Daten so verschoben werden, dass sie der Anforderung einer Anfrage zum „Recht auf Datenübertragbarkeit“ entsprechen. Von Anfang an wurde Snowflake mit ANSI-Standard-SQL und vollständiger DML-Unterstützung entwickelt, um sicherzustellen, dass diese Arten von Operationen möglich sind.

Sicherheit

Leider erfordern es viele herkömmliche Data-Warehouses, dass sich Unternehmen selbst um die IT-Sicherheit kümmern und diese mit anderen Services außerhalb des Kernangebots kombiniert wird. Außerdem bieten sie manchmal noch nicht einmal standardmäßige Verschlüsselung.

Als Data-Warehouse, das speziell für die Cloud entwickelt wurde und das Sicherheit als zentrales Element bietet, umfasst Snowflake unter anderem folgende integrierte Schutzfunktionen:

  • Minimaler Betriebsaufwand: Weniger Komplexität durch automatische Performance, Sicherheit und Hochverfügbarkeit, sodass die Infrastruktur nicht optimiert werden muss und kein Tuning nötig ist.
  • Durchgängige Verschlüsselung: Automatische Verschlüsselung aller Daten jederzeit (in ruhendem und bewegtem Zustand).
  • Umfassender Schutz: Zu den Sicherheitsfunktionen zählen Multi-Faktor-Authentifizierung, rollenbasierte Zugriffskontrolle, IP-Adressen-Whitelisting, zentralisierte Authentifizierung und jährliche Neuverschlüsselung verschlüsselter Daten.
  • Tri-Secret Secure: Kundenkontrolle und Datenschutz durch die Kombination aus einem vom Kunden, einem von Snowflake bereitgestellten Verschlüsselungsschlüssel und Benutzerzugangsdaten.
  • Unterstützung für AWS Private Link: Kunden können Daten zwischen ihrem virtuellen privaten Netzwerk und Snowflake übertragen, ohne über das Internet gehen zu müssen. Dadurch ist die Konnektivität zwischen den Netzwerken sicher und einfacher zu verwalten.
  • Stärkere unternehmensinterne Datenabgrenzung dank Snowflake Data Sharing: Organisationen können die Datenfreigabefunktionen von Snowflake nutzen, um nicht personenbezogene Daten mit anderen Abteilungen zu teilen, die keinen Zugriff benötigen – indem sie strengere Sicherheits- und DS-GVO-Kontrollen durchsetzen.
  • Private Umgebung: Unternehmen können eine dedizierte, verwaltete Snowflake- Instanz in einer separaten AWS Virtual Private Cloud (VPC) abrufen.

Rechenschaftspflicht

Was die Komplexität weiter erhöht: Organisationen müssen auch sicherstellen, dass sie und die Organisationen und Tools, mit denen sie arbeiten, Compliance nachweisen können. Snowflake prüft und verfeinert seine IT-Sicherheitspraxis regelmäßig mit peniblen Penetrationstests. Snowflakes Data-Warehouse-as-a-Service ist zertifiziert nach SOC 2 Type II, ist PCI-DSS-konform und unterstützt HIPAA-Compliance. Um Anfragen von Personen, deren Daten verarbeitet werden („Datensubjekte“), zu entsprechen, können Kunden genutzte Daten überprüfen.

Zusätzlich zu diesen Standardfunktionen und -validierungen schützt Snowflake seine Kunden auch durch den Datenschutznachtrag („Data Protection Addendum“), der genau auf die Anforderungen der DS-GVO abgestimmt ist. Snowflake hält sich außerdem an penibel vertraglich festgelegte Sicherheitsverpflichtungen („contractual security commitments“), um effizientere Transaktionen und eine vereinfachte Sorgfaltspflicht zu ermöglichen.

Fazit

Im Rahmen der Europäischen Datenschutz-Grundverordnung müssen Unternehmen technische Maßnahmen ergreifen, mit deren Hilfe sie den Anforderungen ihrer Kunden in Bezug auf Datenschutz und Schutz der Privatsphäre gerecht werden können. Snowflake bietet hier nicht nur den Vorteil, alle wichtigen Kundendaten an einem einzigen Ort zu speichern, sondern ermöglicht auch das schnelle Auffinden und Abrufen dieser Daten, sodass Unternehmen im Bedarfsfall schnell aktiv werden können.

Consider Anonymization – Process Mining Rule 3 of 4

This is article no. 3 of the four-part article series Privacy, Security and Ethics in Process Mining.

Read this article in German:
Datenschutz, Sicherheit und Ethik beim Process Mining – Regel 3 von 4

If you have sensitive information in your data set, instead of removing it you can also consider the use of anonymization. When you anonymize a set of values, then the actual values (for example, the employee names “Mary Jones”, “Fred Smith”, etc.) will be replaced by another value (for example, “Resource 1”, “Resource 2”, etc.).

If the same original value appears multiple times in the data set, then it will be replaced with the same replacement value (“Mary Jones” will always be replaced by “Resource 1”). This way, anonymization allows you to obfuscate the original data but it preserves the patterns in the data set for your analysis. For example, you will still be able to analyze the workload distribution across all employees without seeing the actual names.

Some process mining tools (Disco and ProM) include anonymization functionality. This means that you can import your data into the process mining tool and select which data fields should be anonymized. For example, you can choose to anonymize just the Case IDs, the resource name, attribute values, or the timestamps. Then you export the anonymized data set and you can distribute it among your team for further analysis.

Do:

  • Determine which data fields are sensitive and need to be anonymized (see also the list of common process mining attributes and how they are impacted if anonymized).
  • Keep in mind that despite the anonymization certain information may still be identifiable. For example, there may be just one patient having a very rare disease, or the birthday information of your customer combined with their place of birth may narrow down the set of possible people so much that the data is not anonymous anymore.

Don’t:

  • Anonymize the data before you have cleaned your data, because after the anonymization the data cleaning may not be possible anymore. For example, imagine that slightly different customer category names are used in different regions but they actually mean the same. You would like to merge these different names in a data cleaning step. However, after you have anonymized the names as “Category 1”, “Category 2”, etc. the data cleaning cannot be done anymore.
  • Anonymize fields that do not need to be anonymized. While anonymization can help to preserve patterns in your data, you can easily lose relevant information. For example, if you anonymize the Case ID in your incident management process, then you cannot look up the ticket number of the incident in the service desk system anymore. By establishing a collaborative culture around your process mining initiative (see guideline No. 4) and by working in a responsible, goal-oriented way, you can often work openly with the original data that you have within your team.

R Data Frames meistern mit dplyr – Teil 2

Dieser Artikel ist Teil 2 von 2 aus der Artikelserie R Data Frames meistern mit dplyr.

Noch mehr Datenbank-Features

Im ersten Teil dieser Artikel-Serie habe ich die Parallelen zwischen Data Frames in R und Relationen in SQL herausgearbeitet und gezeigt, wie das Paket dplyr eine Reihe von SQL-analogen Operationen auf Data Frames standardisiert und optimiert. In diesem Teil möchte ich nun drei weitere Analogien aufzeigen. Es handelt sich um die

  • Window Functions in dplyr als Entsprechung zu analytischen Funktionen in SQL,
  • Joins zwischen Data Frames als Pendant zu Tabellen-Joins
  • Delegation von Data Frame-Operationen zu einer bestehenden SQL-Datenbank

Window Functions

Im letzten Teil habe ich gezeigt, wie durch die Kombination von group_by() und summarise() im Handumdrehen Aggregate entstehen. Das Verb group_by() schafft dabei, wie der Name schon sagt, eine Gruppierung der Zeilen des Data Frame anhand benannter Schlüssel, die oft ordinaler oder kategorialer Natur sind (z.B. Datum, Produkt oder Mitarbeiter).

Ersetzt man die Aggregation mit summarise() durch die Funktion mutate(), um neue Spalten zu bilden, so ist der Effekt des group_by() weiterhin nutzbar, erzeugt aber „Windows“, also Gruppen von Datensätzen des Data Frames mit gleichen Werten der Gruppierungskriterien. Auf diesen Gruppen können nun mittels mutate() beliebige R-Funktionen angewendet werden. Das Ergebnis ist im Gegensatz zu summarise() keine Verdichtung auf einen Datensatz pro Gruppe, sondern eine Erweiterung jeder einzelnen Zeile um neue Werte. Das soll folgendes Beispiel verdeutlichen:

Das group_by() unterteilt den Data Frame nach den 4 gleichen Werten von a. Innerhalb dieser Gruppen berechnen die beispielsweise eingesetzten Funktionen

  • row_number(): Die laufende Nummer in dieser Gruppe
  • n(): Die Gesamtgröße dieser Gruppe
  • n_distinct(b): Die Anzahl verschiedener Werte von b innerhalb der Gruppe
  • rank(desc(b)): Den Rang innerhalb der selben Gruppe, absteigend nach b geordnet
  • lag(b): Den Wert von b der vorherigen Zeile innerhalb derselben Gruppe
  • lead(b): Analog den Wert von b der folgenden Zeile innerhalb derselben Gruppe
  • mean(b): Den Mittelwert von b innerhalb der Gruppe
  • cumsum(b): Die kumulierte Summe der b-Werte innerhalb der Gruppe.

Wichtig ist hierbei, dass die Anwendung dieser Funktionen nicht dazu führt, dass die ursprüngliche Reihenfolge der Datensätze im Data Frame geändert wird. Hier erweist sich ein wesentlicher Unterschied zwischen Data Frames und Datenbank-Relationen von Vorteil: Die Reihenfolge von Datensätzen in Data Frames ist stabil und definiert. Sie resultiert aus der Abfolge der Elemente auf den Vektoren, die die Data Frames bilden. Im Gegensatz dazu haben Tabellen und Views keine Reihenfolge, auf die man sich beim SELECT verlassen kann. Nur mit der ORDER BY-Klausel über eindeutige Schlüsselwerte erreicht man eine definierte, stabile Reihenfolge der resultierenden Datensätze.

Die Wirkungsweise von Window Functions wird noch besser verständlich, wenn in obiger Abfrage das group_by(a) entfernt wird. Dann wirken alle genannten Funktionen auf der einzigen Gruppe, die existiert, nämlich dem gesamten Data Frame:

Anwendbar sind hierbei sämtliche Funktionen, die auf Vektoren wirken. Diese müssen also wie in unserem Beispiel nicht unbedingt aus dplyr stammen. Allerdings komplettiert das Package die Menge der sinnvoll anwendbaren Funktionen um einige wichtige Elemente wie cumany() oder n_distinct().

Data Frames Hand in Hand…

In relationalen Datenbanken wird häufig angestrebt, das Datenmodell zu normalisieren. Dadurch bekommt man die negativen Folgen von Datenredundanz, wie Inkonsistenzen bei Datenmanipulationen und unnötig große Datenvolumina, in den Griff. Dies geschieht unter anderem dadurch, dass tabellarische Datenbestände aufgetrennt werden Stammdaten- und Faktentabellen. Letztere beziehen sich über Fremdschlüsselspalten auf die Primärschlüssel der Stammdatentabellen. Durch Joins, also Abfragen über mehrere Tabellen und Ausnutzen der Fremdschlüsselbeziehungen, werden die normalisierten Tabellen wieder zu einem fachlich kompletten Resultat denormalisiert.

In den Data Frames von R trifft man dieses Modellierungsmuster aus verschiedenen Gründen weit seltener an als in RDBMS. Dennoch gibt es neben der Normalisierung/Denormalisierung andere Fragestellungen, die sich gut durch Joins beantworten lassen. Neben der Zusammenführung von Beobachtungen unterschiedlicher Quellen anhand charakteristischer Schlüssel sind dies bestimmte Mengenoperationen wie Schnitt- und Differenzmengenbildung.

Die traditionelle R-Funktion für den Join zweier Data Frames lautet merge(). dplyr erweitert den Funktionsumfang dieser Funktion und sorgt für sprechendere Funktionsnamen und Konsistenz mit den anderen Operationen.

Hier ein synthetisches Beispiel:

Nun gilt es, die Verkäufe aus dem Data Frame sales mit den Produkten in products zusammenzuführen und auf Basis von Produkten Bilanzen zu erstellen. Diese Denormalisierung geschieht durch das Verb inner_join() auf zweierlei Art und Weise:

Die Ergebnisse sind bis auf die Reihenfolge der Spalten und der Zeilen identisch. Außerdem ist im einen Fall der gemeinsame Schlüssel der Produkt-Id als prod_id, im anderen Fall als id enthalten. dplyr entfernt also die Spalten-Duplikate der Join-Bedingungen. Letzere wird bei Bedarf im by-Argument der Join-Funktion angegeben. R-Experten erkennen hier einen „Named Vector“, also einen Vektor, bei dem jedes Element einen Namen hat. Diese Syntax verwendet dplyr, um elegant die äquivalenten Spalten zu kennzeichnen. Wird das Argument by weggelassen, so verwendet dplyr im Sinne eines „Natural Join“ automatisch alle Spalten, deren Namen in beiden Data Frames vorkommen.

Natürlich können wir dieses Beispiel mit den anderen Verben erweitern, um z.B. eine Umsatzbilanz pro Produkt zu erreichen:

dplyr bringt insgesamt 6 verschiedene Join-Funktionen mit: Neben dem bereits verwendeten Inner Join gibt es die linksseitigen und rechtsseitigen Outer Joins und den Full Join. Diese entsprechen genau der Funktionalität von SQL-Datenbanken. Daneben gibt es die Funktion semi_join(), die in SQL etwa folgendermaßen ausgedrückt würde:

Das Gegenteil, also ein NOT EXISTS, realisiert die sechste Join-Funktion: anti_join(). Im folgenden Beispiel sollen alle Produkte ausgegeben werden, die noch nie verkauft wurden:

… und in der Datenbank

Wir schon mehrfach betont, hat dplyr eine Reihe von Analogien zu SQL-Operationen auf relationalen Datenbanken. R Data Frames entsprechen Tabellen und Views und die dplyr-Operationen den Bausteinen von SELECT-Statements. Daraus ergibt sich die Möglichkeit, dplyr-Funktionen ohne viel Zutun auf eine bestehende Datenbank und deren Relationen zu deligieren.

Mir fallen folgende Szenarien ein, wo dies sinnvoll erscheint:

  • Die zu verarbeitende Datenmenge ist zu groß für das Memory des Rechners, auf dem R läuft.
  • Die interessierenden Daten liegen bereits als Tabellen und Views auf einer Datenbank vor.
  • Die Datenbank hat Features, wie z.B. Parallelverarbeitung oder Bitmap Indexe, die R nicht hat.

In der aktuellen Version 0.5.0 kann dplyr nativ vier Datenbank-Backends ansprechen: SQLite, MySQL, PostgreSQL und Google BigQuery. Ich vermute, unter der Leserschaft des Data Science Blogs dürfte MySQL (oder der Fork MariaDB) die weiteste Verbreitung haben, weshalb ich die folgenden Beispiele darauf zeige. Allerdings muss man beachten, dass MySQL keine Window Funktionen kennt, was sich 1:1 auf die Funktionalität von dplyr auswirkt.

Im folgenden möchte ich zeigen, wie dplyr sich gegen eine bestehende MySQL-Datenbank verbindet und danach einen bestehenden R Data Frame in eine neue Datenbanktabelle wegspeichert:

Die erste Anweisung verbindet R mit einer bestehenden MySQL-Datenbank. Danach lade ich den Data Frame diamonds aus dem Paket ggplot2. Mit str() wird deutlich, dass drei darin enthaltene Variablen vom Typ Factor sind. Damit dplyr damit arbeiten kann, werden sie mit mutate() in Character-Vektoren gewandelt. Dann erzeugt die Funktion copy_to() auf der MySQL-Datenbank eine leere Tabelle namens diamonds, in die die Datensätze kopiert werden. Danach erhält die Tabelle noch drei Indexe (von dem der erste aus drei Segmenten besteht), und zum Schluß führt dplyr noch ein ANALYSE der Tabelle durch, um die Werteverteilungen auf den Spalten für kostenbasierte Optimierung zu bestimmen.

Meistens aber wird bereits eine bestehende Datenbanktabelle die interessierenden Daten enthalten. In diesem Fall lautet die Funktion zum Erstellen des Delegats tbl():

Die Rückgabewerte von copy_to() und von tbl() sind natürlich keine reinrassigen Data Frames, sondern Objekte, auf die die Operationen von dplyr wirken können, indem sie auf die Datenbank deligiert werden. Im folgenden Beispiel sollen alle Diamanten, die ein Gewicht von mindestens 1 Karat haben, pro Cut, Color und Clarity nach Anzahl und mittlerem Preis bilanziert werden:

Die Definition der Variablen bilanz geschieht dabei komplett ohne Interaktion mit der Datenbank. Erst beim Anzeigen von Daten wird das notwendige SQL ermittelt und auf der DB ausgeführt. Die ersten 10 resultierenden Datensätze werden angezeigt. Mittels der mächtigen Funktion explain() erhalten wir das erzeugte SQL-Kommando und sogar den Ausführungsplan auf der Datenbank. SQL-Kundige werden erkennen, dass die verketteten dplyr-Operationen in verschachtelte SELECT-Statements umgesetzt werden.

Zu guter Letzt sollen aber meistens die Ergebnisse der dplyr-Operationen irgendwie gesichert werden. Hier hat der Benutzer die Wahl, ob die Daten auf der Datenbank in einer neuen Tabelle gespeichert werden sollen oder ob sie komplett nach R transferiert werden sollen. Dies erfolgt mit den Funktionen compute() bzw. collect():

Durch diese beiden Operationen wurde eine neue Datenbanktabelle „t_bilanz“ erzeugt und danach der Inhalt der Bilanz als Data Frame zurück in den R-Interpreter geholt. Damit schließt sich der Kreis.

Fazit

Mit dem Paket dplyr von Hadley Wickham wird die Arbeit mit R Data Frames auf eine neue Ebene gehoben. Die Operationen sind konsistent, vollständig und performant. Durch den Verkettungs-Operator %>% erhalten sie auch bei hoher Komplexität eine intuitive Syntax. Viele Aspekte der Funktionalität lehnen sich an Relationale Datenbanken an, sodass Analysten mit SQL-Kenntnissen rasch viele Operationen auf R Data Frames übertragen können.

Zurück zu R Data Frames meistern mit dplyr – Teil 1.

 

Mobilgeräte-Sicherheit

Safety first! Testen Sie Ihr Wissen rund um Mobile Device Management!

Mobile Device Management (MDM) unterstützt nicht nur der Verwaltung von mobilen Endgeräten und die Software- und Datenverteilung. Es ermöglicht vor allem, die nötige Sicherheit, Transparenz und Kontrolle beim Einsatz von Smartphones und Tablets zu schaffen.

Sicherheit ist das A und O bei der unternehmensinternen Nutzung von Mobilgeräten. Neben der klassischen Geräteverwaltung bilden deshalb Security-Funktionen wie Datenverschlüsselung, Remote-Recovery, App Blacklists und ein Malware-Schutz die Hauptpfeiler von MDM-Lösungen.

Zuverlässige Schutzfunktionen sollen vor allem verhindern, dass interne Daten unkontrolliert das Unternehmen verlassen. Zu diesem Zweck sorgt ein MDM-Client auf dem mobilen Device für die Einhaltung der Corporate-Regeln. Solche Regeln könnten beispielsweise die Nutzung von Kamera oder Bluetooth verbieten oder die Installation bestimmter Apps und Browser. Auch Jailbreak und Rooten stehen oft auf der Verbotsliste.

Neben Unterlassungen lassen sich auch Gebote vorschreiben, etwa, dass die Geräte beim Einschalten durch eine PIN-Eingabe entsperrt werden müssen, dass Daten auf den Devices per Backup vor Verlusten geschützt und gestohlene oder verlorene Geräte bereinigt werden müssen.

Solche Policy-Vorgaben werden per Echtzeitüberwachung kontrolliert – gerade beim Arbeiten mit kritischen Datensätzen wie personenbezogenen Daten, Kontodaten und anderen vertraulichen Informationen eine absolute Notwendigkeit. Verstößt ein Nutzer gegen eine oder mehrere dieser Regeln wird der Zugriff auf die geschäftskritischen Ressourcen blockiert. Als letzte Konsequenz und bei Verlust oder Diebstahl kann das Smartphone oder Tablet auch gesperrt oder dessen Inhalte kontrolliert gelöscht werden. Die Lokalisierung, das Sperren und Löschen der mobilen Devices sollte deshalb auch über die Luftschnittstelle möglich sein.

Herausforderung BYOD

Eine weitere Sicherheitshürde ist zu bewältigen, wenn das Unternehmen seinen Mitarbeitern die berufliche Nutzung ihrer privaten Geräte erlaubt: In solchen BYOD-Szenarien (BYOD = Bring Your Own Device) ist die strikte Trennung privater und geschäftlicher Daten ein Muss. Während Unternehmen stets im Auge behalten müssen, welche geschäftskritischen Daten ihre Mitarbeiter erheben, verarbeiten und nutzen, müssen deren private Daten privat bleiben. Hier haben sich Container-Lösungen etabliert. Diese stellen sicher, dass die Anwendungen und ihre Daten in einem abgeschotteten Umfeld (Container) – sauber getrennt voneinander – laufen.

Mit einer Container-Lösung lässt sich beispielsweise verhindern, dass Firmeninformationen per Copy & Paste auf Facebook oder Twitter landen. Ein Zugriff aus dem Firmenkontext auf die private Facebook- oder Twitter-App wäre damit schlichtweg nicht möglich. Durch Container lassen sich somit viele Schwachstellen eliminieren.

Für einen absolut sicheren, rollenbasierten Datenaustausch hochsensibler Dokumente empfiehlt sich die Einrichtung eines Secure Data Rooms. Dieser ist vollständig isoliert und durch multiple Sicherheitsstandards vor unbefugten Zugriffen gesichert. Dem Secure Data Room sind Rollenrechte hinterlegt, so dass nur bestimmte, authentifizierte Nutzergruppen auf diesen Raum zugreifen können. So lässt sich zum Beispiel für die Vorstandsebene ein Secure Data Room anlegen, in dem Geschäftsberichte und Verträge abgelegt und – je nach erlaubten Bearbeitungsstufen – eingesehen oder auch bearbeitet werden können.

In Zusammenarbeit mit IBM

 

Finance Controlling und NoSQL Data Science – zwei Welten treffen aufeinander

Wenn ein konservativer, geschäftskritischer Fachbereich auf neue Technologien mit anderen, kreativen Möglichkeiten trifft, führt das zu Reibungen, aber auch zu Ergebnissen, die andere Personen auf neue Ideen bringen können. Bei dem hier geschilderten Anwendungsfall geht es um die Ermittlung einer kurzfristigen Erfolgrechnung (KER) unter Nutzung von NoSQL-Technologien. Einer Aufgabenstellung, die für beide Seiten sehr lehrreich war.

1-opener-image

Erinnern Sie sich noch an die Werbespots von Apple mit Justin Long und John Hodgman als menschlicher Apple und Personal Computer? Ähnlich wie in den Werbespots sind die beiden Bereiche Finance Controlling und Data Science zu betrachten. Der eine eher konservativ, geschäftskritisch, mit etablierten Methoden und Verfahren; der andere mit einem Zoo voller verschiedener Werkzeuge für den kreativen Umgang mit Daten. Insbesondere wenn dann auch noch NoSQL ins Spiel kommt, mag man glauben, dass keinerlei Berührungspunkte existieren. Dennoch eignen sich neue Technologien auch für etablierte Bereiche und können diese bereichern und auf neue Ideen bringen.

Bei einer kurzfristigen Erfolgsrechnung (sog. KER) handelt es sich um die Aufstellung kaufmännischer Kennzahlen und den Vergleich über Zeiträume. Unter anderem wird hierbei auch häufig von Deckungsbeitragsrechnung oder Betriebsergebnisrechnung gesprochen. Eine KER wird vom Controlling daher aus der kaufmännischen Software generiert (z.B. SAP FiCo) und zumeist nur als Datei oder tatsächlich noch auf Papier an Bereichsleiter oder die Geschäftsführung übergeben.

Ergänzend zu der standardisierten Aufstellung sollte es in dem hier geschilderten Fall möglich sein, dass die Berechnung der KER unter Berücksichtigung von Filtermöglichkeiten ad hoc durch einen Endanwender möglich sein soll. Das bedeutet, dass nicht mehr nur ausschließlich das Controlling die Erfolgsrechnung generieren kann, sondern auch jeder Fachbereich selbständig für sich. Dementsprechend müssen die Werkzeuge aus dem Data Science einmal konfiguriert und benutzerfreundlich bereitgestellt werden.

Die Generierung einer Erfolgrechnung mag auf den ersten Blick nicht direkt als Aufgabe für einen Data Scientist wirken, schließlich sind die Daten und deren Aufbau bekannt, genauso wie die Form des Endergebnisses. Dennoch stellen sich der Vielzahl bekannter Variablen, genauso viele unbekannte gegenüber. Denn wenn ein relationales Modell einfach in eine neue Technologie (NoSQL) überführt wird, hat man nichts dabei gewonnen. Erst der kreative Einsatz neuer Methoden und der etwas andere Umgang mit bekannten Daten führt zu einer Verbesserung und neuen Idee.

Daten

Bei den zu verarbeitenden Daten handelt es sich um Buchungsdaten (SAP Export), Plandaten (csv-Export aus einem Planungssystem) und um manuelle Informationen aus Excel (als csv-Dateien). Insgesamt sind es mindestens neun Datenquellen unterschiedlicher Qualität. Insbesondere bei den manuell erstellten Excel-Daten muss mehrfach geprüft werden, ob die Dateien in dem vereinbarten Format vorliegen. (Gerade bei manuell gepflegten Daten greift Murphys Law – immer!)

Die Inhalte der Excel-Daten reichern die anderen beiden Quelldaten durch weitere Informationen an. Hierbei handelt es sich u.a. um Mappinginformationen zur Ergänzung kurzer Schreibweisen oder maskierter Inhalte, damit diese durch Endanwender gelesen werden können. Beispielsweise sind Kostenstellen in Unternehmensbereiche, Abteilungen und Produktgruppen zu entschlüsseln.

Bei den Buchungsdaten aus dem SAP-System handelt es sich um die monatlichen Saldenwerte eines Kontos, die granular auf Kostenstelle, Marke, Periode und weitere Merkmale heruntergebrochen wurden. Damit wird also nicht pro Monat ein Kontensaldo übergeben, sondern eine Vielzahl von Salden je Konto, je nachdem, wie viele Merkmale geliefert werden.

Beispiel für eine Zeile aus dem SAP-Export:

Je Periode (im Regelfall: Monate) wird eine Datei geliefert; dabei ist aus dem Dateinamen die Betriebszugehörigkeit und die Periode abzulesen. Es gilt zudem, dass ein Unternehmen in mehr als 12 Perioden pro Jahr Buchungen durchführen kann (in diesem Fall bis zu 16).

Die Buchungsinformationen und alle weiteren Dateien werden mit einer Java-Anwendung in die NoSQL-Datenbank importiert. Hierbei wird auf eine multi-model Datenbank zurückgegriffen, um im späteren Verlauf verschiedene NoSQL-Technologien nutzen zu können (z.B. documentstore, graphdb, multi-value und bi-temporal).2-KER-Modell

Modellierung

Für jede Datenquelle wird eine Datensatzart genutzt. Relational gesprochen bedeutet das eine Tabelle je Quelle oder für Benutzer von document stores: eine “collection” für gleichartige Dokumente.

Bei der gewählten Datenbank wird allerdings nicht zwischen verschiedenen “collections” unterschieden. Nur durch ein Feld je Datensatz wird der Typ des Datensatzes festgelegt. In der Anwendung wird dieses Feld interpretiert und der Datensatz entsprechend angezeigt (anhand von Templates für die JSON-Ausgabe). Da – wie bei document stores üblich – die Dokumente ein dynamisches Schema aufweisen, können sich alle Datensätze in ihrer Art und Ausprägung (Key/Values) unterscheiden.

Als Ergänzung zu den bisherigen Quelldaten werden innerhalb der Datenbank weitere Datensätze für das Layout der KER-Ausgabe angelegt. Diese beschreiben im Prinzip nur die Reihenfolge und den Inhalt der späteren Ausgabe (dazu später mehr).

Nach dem Import der Datensätze werden innerhalb der Datenbank zwischen den Datensätzen Verlinkungen (Graphen) etabliert. So zeigen beispielsweise alle Buchungen auf das jeweils betroffene Konto oder eine KER-Ergebniszeile auf eine Kontengruppe. Aus der Skizze zum Datenmodell können die relevanten Verlinkungen abgelesen werden.

Anzumerken ist hier, dass ein Konto in mehreren Kontengruppen auftreten kann. Eine einzelne n:m-Verlinkung wird daher in diesem Fall über separate Datensätze abgehandelt und nicht in einem Datensatz mit einer Unterstruktur. Das wäre zwar auch möglich, erschwert und verlangsamt allerdings etwaige Aktualisierungen, da die csv-Quelle nur eine Zeile je Zuweisung liefert.

Für die Speicherung der Buchungsinformationen wird auf die Funktionalität der bi-temporalen Datenhaltung 3-bitemporalzurückgegriffen. Hierbei erhält jeder Feldinhalt in einem Datensatz (optional) den Vermerk des Gültigkeitszeitpunktes. Neben dem Transaktionszeitpunkt (wann wurden die Daten gespeichert) ist also auch erkennbar ab (oder auch bis) wann ein Inhalt gültig ist. Dabei ist zu beachten, dass “nicht-gültig” etwas anderes ist, als “falsch”. In dieser Art der Verwendung steht “nicht-gültig” für “nicht mehr aktuell” oder auch “noch nicht aktuell”.

Durch diese Art der Datensatzspeicherung reduziert sich die Anzahl der Buchungsdatensätze auf einen Bruchteil des ursprünglichen Datenbestandes. Beispiel: Es werden jeden Monat 10.000 Buchungen geliefert. Für 16 Monate ergeben sich somit 160.000 Datensätze. Da diese bi-temporal gespeichert werden, bleibt es bei 10.000 Datensätzen in der Datenbank mit je max. 16 Gültigkeitswerten je Feld (für jede Periode).

Hier sei noch angemerkt, dass ein Wert so lange gültig ist, bis ein anderer Wert diesen ergänzt. Wird also für Januar ein bestimmter Wert geliefert und im Laufe des Jahres nicht geändert, bleibt dieser bestehen und wird nicht nochmal gespeichert. Statt 16 Einträgen, bleibt es also bei einem.

Ergänzend dazu stellt sich die Frage zum Umgang mit den Perioden 13 bis 16. Da ein Jahr nur 12 Monate besitzt, können diese nicht einfach mit einem falschen Datum gespeichert werden. Hier greift allerdings der Umstand, dass speziell in diesem Anwendungsfall erst am Ende eines Monats durch den Monatsabschluss alle Buchungen korrekt sind. Innerhalb eines Monats ist das nicht der Fall. Es gibt also genau einen (und nur einen) korrekten Zeitpunkt, an dem die Werte korrekt und gültig sind. Die Werte einer Buchung zu diesem Zeitpunkt werden also nur zu einem Tag in dem Datensatz gespeichert.

Schaut man sich nun den Screenshot des Datensatzes mit den Monatswerten an, fällt auf, dass die Salden-Werte (im Feld “SAP-Werte”) jeweils zum Zweiten eines Monats gespeichert wurden. Da es nur einen gültigen Wert je Monat gibt, ist das Datum irrelevant (es hätte auch der Dritte oder Vierte des Monats sein können). Für jede Periode größer 12 wurde einfach vorgesehen, dass diese ab dem 13.12. eines Jahres hinterlegt werden (d.h. für Periode 14 der 14.12.; Periode 15 der 15.12. usw.). Und da zum Anfang eines Jahres alle Buchungen zu bestimmten Konten auf Null gesetzt werden müssen (also zum 01.01.) bietet sich der Zweite eines Monats an.

Nach dem Einlesen aller gelieferten csv-Dateien, erfolgt die Erzeugung von weiteren Datensätzen für das Layout der Ergebnisrechnung. Diese werden einmalig angelegt und können über eine Benutzeroberfläche vom Anwender angepasst werden.

Wie in der Skizze zum Datenmodell zu erkennen, besteht das Layout der KER aus zwei Datensatztypen. Einmal aus der Layout-Definition (nur ein Datensatz) und zum Zweiten aus mehreren Ergebniszeilen, die jeweils über einen Datensatz beschrieben werden.

4-KER-Layout 5-KER-ErgZeile

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beide Datensatztypen bestehen dabei fast ausschließlich aus Linkfeldern (Graphen). Das KER-Layout verweist damit auf die beteiligten Zeilen in der Reihenfolge, wie sie später angezeigt werden; ein Datensatz für eine KER-Zeile verweist auf die jeweiligen Kontengruppen.

In einem zusätzlichen Textfeld einer KER-Zeile wird zudem die Formel eingetragen, über die bei der späteren Anzeige ad hoc das Ergebnis der jeweiligen Zeile berechnet wird (in dem abgebildeten, einfachen Fall nur die Summe zweier Kontengruppen). Dazu steht serverseitig die Bibliothek der Google V8 Javascript-Engine zur Verfügung.

Der Screenshot der Ergebniszeile zeigt zudem die Verwendung von “multi-values” in einem Datensatz. Hierbei können verschiedene Inhalte in einem Feld abgelegt und auch mit anderen Feldern kombiniert werden. In diesem Fall gehören jeweils eine Kontengruppe und der prozentuale Bezug zueinander. Andere Anwendungsfälle sind bspw. die Bankverbindungen oder Kontaktdaten einer Person, da diese auch aus mehreren, zusammengehörenden Feldern bestehen und jede Person mehrere besitzen kann.

Bis hierher wurden die Daten importiert, das Datenmodell aufgebaut und die Datensätze miteinander verlinkt. Aus der NoSQL-Trickkiste nutzen wir die bitemporale Datenhaltung, Graphen, multi-values und document stores. Dadurch wird die Anzahl der Datensätze reduziert und das Datenmodell vereinfacht. Im nächsten Schritt geht es darum, die KER-Ausgabe aufzubereiten und die Ergebnisse – unter Berücksichtigung von Filtermöglichkeiten – mit Hilfe von serverseitigem JavaScript zu berechnen.

Anwendung

Der Anwendungsfall KER-Liste ist im Rahmen eines Gesamtprojektes ein Teilaspekt. Daher wurde auf vorhandene Werkzeuge zurückgegriffen, um mit den gegebenen Mitteln den maximalen Nutzen zu erreichen.

Als System steht eine multi-model NoSQL-Platform zur Verfügung, die mehrere Bereiche der NoSQL-Welt abdeckt und nicht nur eine Datenbank beinhaltet, sondern gleich ein ganzes Arsenal an Werkzeugen, um Lösungen zu erschaffen. Dazu gehört unter anderem auch eine standardisierte Webanwendung, in der durch einfache Konfigurationen Anwendungen definiert werden und die es ermöglicht, die serverseitige Bibliothek der Google V8 Javascript-Engine zu nutzen. Dadurch wird ein Großteil des Anwendungsfalles aus der Softwareentwicklung herausgelöst und an den Fachbereich übertragen.

Hierbei ist zu beachten, dass der Data Scientist sich nicht von dem Fachthema vollständig lösen kann. Ein Grundverständnis ist notwendig, um zu verstehen, wie die Problemlage ist und was das Endergebnis sein soll. Genauso muss der Fachbereich Grundlagen des Datenhandlings und des Systems verstehen. Nur beide zusammen können in einer transparenten Kommunikationsstruktur Lösungen erarbeiten.

Nach der Konfiguration des Datenmodells und dem Import der Daten wurde alles Weitere in der Standardanwendung der NoSQL-Plattform umgesetzt. Dieses beinhaltet unter anderem die Konfiguration der Erfolgsrechnung, wie auch den JavaScript-Teil zur Ermittlung der Ergebnisse und später auch die grafische Ausgabe in Form eines Dashboards mit den gleichen Filter-Möglichkeiten der KER-Ausgabe.

Um innerhalb der Anwendung die kurzfristige Erfolgsrechnung zu erzeugen, wird auf die Funktion von Listen zurückgegriffen. Diese können, ausgehend von einem Datensatz, die Graph-Strukturen auflösen und so hierarchische Ausgaben erzeugen. Als Ergänzung dazu ist eine Integration von Javascript innerhalb der Listen möglich, so dass Berechnungen serverseitig durchgeführt und Ergebnisse zur Anzeige gebracht werden können. Darüber hinaus ist die Nutzung über eine HTTP API möglich, um die Anwendung ggf. später durch weitere Funktionen zu erweitern.6-KER-Modell-Hierarchisch

Ausgehend von dem definierten Datensatz für das KER-Layout ermöglicht die Listenfunktionalität die Konfiguration von sog. Sublisten (also Listen in Listen in Listen in …). Hierbei verfolgt die Liste die Graphenstruktur und bringt die jeweiligen Datensätze zur Anzeige. Durch das genutzte Modell ist der Startpunkt somit ein einzelner Datensatz, zu dem dann hierarchisch alle weiteren Datensätze dazu geladen werden.

Die entstehende Baumstrukur ist im ersten Schritt leer und muss im Anschluss durch JavaScript gefüllt werden. Dazu wird einerseits auf die Inhalte aus der untersten Ebene zurückgegriffen, um die Saldenwerte zu lesen; andererseits auch auf die hinterlegten Formeln jeder Ergebniszeile, um mit den Summen der Kontengruppen die Ergebnisse zu ermitteln.

Das Zauberwort bei der Nutzung von Javascript heißt hier “eval”. Durch diese Funktion werden Strings als Script evaluiert. Im Detail werden durch reguläre Ausdrücke die Begriffe in den Formeln (Namen der Kontengruppen) durch die Summenwerte der jeweiligen Kontengruppe ersetzt und danach mit Hilfe von “eval” ausgeführt. Das Ergebnis wird dann an die entsprechende Position in der Liste geschrieben.

Im Weiteren erhalten bestimmte Werte noch unterschiedliche Formate, um den kosmetischen Aspekt zu erfüllen. Am Ende erhält der Anwender eine KER-Liste.

7-ker-Beispiel

Filter

Die Generierung einer vollständigen KER dauert bis zu fünf Sekunden. Dabei liegen bis zu 40.000 Buchungsdatensätze zu Grunde. Durch einen interaktiven Filter kann der Anwender den Umfang der Liste und die Berechnung entsprechend einschränken. Folgende Felder aus den Buchungsdatensätzen stehen dabei für Filterkombinationen zur Verfügung:

  • Buchungskreise (Filialen): 14
  • Geschäftsbereich (Abteilung): 32
  • Kostenstelle: 56
  • Marke: 9
  • Absatzkanal: 12

Hierbei kann der Anwender jede beliebige Kombination in jeder erdenklichen Reihenfolge zur Filterung nutzen. Die Liste wird entsprechend neu berechnet und in unter fünf Sekunden zur Anzeige gebracht (wegen der reduzierten Datenmenge häufig in unter einer Sekunde).

Als Ergänzung zu den Filtermöglichkeiten kann auch der zeitliche Aspekt berücksichtigt werden. Da die Buchungsinformationen bitemporal gespeichert wurden, besteht in der Liste die Möglichkeit, ein beliebiges Datum zu wählen und sich die Werte dazu anzeigen zu lassen.

Gesamtfunktion und Ausblick

Durch den generalistischen Ansatz des Datenmodells und der gewählten Datenbank konnte nicht nur die kurzfristige Erfolgsrechnung in der üblichen, tabellarischen Form ausgegeben werden. Ferner wurde eine grafische Ausgabe mit der Bibliothek d3.js realisiert, so dass jede Führungskraft in der Lage ist, eine ad hoc Analyse durchzuführen. (Ich spreche hier gerne von KRV-tauglich. “Kinder, Rentner, Vorstände”).

Derzeitig wird JavaScript innerhalb von Listen genutzt, um bei Bedarf Werte zu errechnen. Als Ausblick steht hier in Kürze die Möglichkeit zur Verfügung, dass Scripte auch innerhalb von Datensätze abgelegt und autonom von der Datenbank selber ausgeführt werden. Das hat zur Folge, dass Objekte (Datensätze) Algorithmen beinhalten und selbständig Informationen suchen und generieren.

Verwendete NoSQL-Methoden

  • document store
  • GraphDB
  • multi-Value
  • Bitemporal

Erwähnte Technologien, Produkte und Marken in diesem Artikel

Der hier beschriebene Anwendungsfall soll zeigen, dass Data Science nicht nur Endergebnisse liefert, die quasi durch eine “black box” entstanden, dessen Vorgehensweise nur eingeweihte Personen beherrschen und beurteilen können. Es ist vielmehr so, dass die “Wissenschaft” das Wissen dafür schafft, damit ein “normaler” Anwender mit den Daten umgehen kann und einen Mehrwert daraus erhält.