Article series: 5 Clean Coding Tips – 2. Name Variables in a Meaningful Way

This is the second of the article series “5 tips for clean coding” to follow as soon as you’ve made the first steps into your coding career, in this article series. Read the introduction here, to find out why it is important to write clean code if you missed it.

When it comes to naming variables, there are a few official rules in the PEP8 style guide. A variable must start with an underscore or a letter and can be followed by a number of underscores or letters or digits. They cannot be reserved words: True, False, or, not, lambda etc. The preferred naming style is lowercase or lowercase_with_underscore. This all refers to variable names on a visual level. However, for readability purposes, the semantic level is as important, or maybe even more so. If it was for python, the variables could be named like this:

It wouldn’t make the slightest difference. But again, the code is not only for the interpreter to be read. It is for humans. Other people might need to look at your code to understand what you did, to be able to continue the work that you have already started. In any case, they need to be able to decipher what hides behind the variable names, that you’ve given the objects in your code. They will need to remember what they meant as they reappear in the code. And it might not be easy for them.

Remembering names is not an easy thing to do in all life situations. Let’s consider the following situation. You go to a party, there is a bunch of new people that you meet for the first time. They all have names and you try very hard to remember them all. Imagine how much easier would it be if you could call the new girl who came with John as the_girl_who_came_with_John. How much easier would it be to gossip to your friends about her? ‘Camilla is on the 5th glass of wine tonight, isn’t she?!.’ ‘Who are you talking about???’ Your friends might ask. ‘The_Girl_who_came_with_John.’ And they will all know. ‘It was nice to meet you girl_who_came_with_john, see you around.’ The good thing is that variables are not really like people. You can be a bit rude to them, they will not mind. You don’t have to force yourself or anyone else to remember an arbitrary name of a variable, that accidentally came to your mind in the moment of creation. Let your colleagues figure out what is what by a meaningful, straightforward description of it.

There is an important tradeoff to be aware of here. The lines of code should not exceed a certain length (79 characters, according to the PEP 8), therefore, it is recommended that you keep your names as short as possible. It is worth to give it a bit of thought about how you can name your variable in the most descriptive way, keeping it as short as possible. Keep in mind, that
the_blond_girl_in_a_dark_blue_dress_who_came_with_John_to_this_party might not be the best choice.

There are a few additional pieces of advice when it comes to naming your variables. First, try to always use pronounceable names. If you’ve ever been to an international party, you will know how much harder to remember is something that you cannot even repeat. Second, you probably have been taught over and over again that whenever you create a loop, you use i and j to denote the iterators.

It is probably engraved deep into the folds in your brain to write for i in…. You need to try and scrape it out of your cortex. Think about what the i stands for, what it really does and name it accordingly. Is i maybe the row_index? Is it a list_element?

Additionally, think about when to use a noun and where a verb. Variables usually are things and functions usually do things. So, it might be better to name functions with verb expressions, for example: get_id() or raise_to_power().

Moreover, it is a good practice to name constant numbers in the code. First, because when you name them you explain the meaning of the number. Second, because maybe one day you will have to change that number. If it appears multiple times in your code, you will avoid searching and changing it in every place. PEP 8 states that the constants should be named with UPPER_CASE_NAME. It is also quite common practice to explain the meaning of the constants with an inline comment at the end of the line, where the number appears. However, this approach will increase the line length and will require repeating the comment if the number appears more than one time in the code.

How Important is Customer Lifetime Value?

This is the third article of article series Getting started with the top eCommerce use cases.

Customer Lifetime Value

Many researches have shown that cost for acquiring a new customer is higher than the cost of retention of an existing customer which makes Customer Lifetime Value (CLV or LTV) one of the most important KPI’s. Marketing is about building a relationship with your customer and quality service matters a lot when it comes to customer retention. CLV is a metric which determines the total amount of money a customer is expected to spend in your business.

CLV allows marketing department of the company to understand how much money a customer is going  to spend over their  life cycle which helps them to determine on how much the company should spend to acquire each customer. Using CLV a company can better understand their customer and come up with different strategies either to retain their existing customers by sending them personalized email, discount voucher, provide them with better customer service etc. This will help a company to narrow their focus on acquiring similar customers by applying customer segmentation or look alike modeling.

One of the main focus of every company is Growth in this competitive eCommerce market today and price is not the only factor when a customer makes a decision. CLV is a metric which revolves around a customer and helps to retain valuable customers, increase revenue from less valuable customers and improve overall customer experience. Don’t look at CLV as just one metric but the journey to calculate this metric involves answering some really important questions which can be crucial for the business. Metrics and questions like:

  1. Number of sales
  2. Average number of times a customer buys
  3. Full Customer journey
  4. How many marketing channels were involved in one purchase?
  5. When the purchase was made?
  6. Customer retention rate
  7. Marketing cost
  8. Cost of acquiring a new customer

and so on are somehow associated with the calculation of CLV and exploring these questions can be quite insightful. Lately, a lot of companies have started to use this metric and shift their focuses in order to make more profit. Amazon is the perfect example for this, in 2013, a study by Consumers Intelligence Research Partners found out that prime members spends more than a non-prime member. So Amazon started focusing on Prime members to increase their profit over the past few years. The whole article can be found here.

How to calculate CLV?

There are several methods to calculate CLV and few of them are listed below.

Method 1: By calculating average revenue per customer

 

Figure 1: Using average revenue per customer

 

Let’s suppose three customers brought 745€ as profit to a company over a period of 2 months then:

CLV (2 months) = Total Profit over a period of time / Number of Customers over a period of time

CLV (2 months) = 745 / 3 = 248 €

Now the company can use this to calculate CLV for an year however, this is a naive approach and works only if the preferences of the customer are same for the same period of time. So let’s explore other approaches.

Method 2

This method requires to first calculate KPI’s like retention rate and discount rate.

 

CLV = Gross margin per lifespan ( Retention rate per month / 1 + Discount rate – Retention rate per month)

Where

Retention rate = Customer at the end of the month – Customer during the month / Customer at the beginning of the month ) * 100

Method 3

This method will allow us to look at other metrics also and can be calculated in following steps:

  1. Calculate average number of transactions per month (T)
  2. Calculate average order value (OV)
  3. Calculate average gross margin (GM)
  4. Calculate customer lifespan in months (ALS)

After calculating these metrics CLV can be calculated as:

 

CLV = T*OV*GM*ALS / No. of Clients for the period

where

Transactions (T) = Total transactions / Period

Average order value (OV) = Total revenue / Total orders

Gross margin (GM) = (Total revenue – Cost of sales/ Total revenue) * 100 [but how you calculate cost of sales is debatable]

Customer lifespan in months (ALS) = 1 / Churn Rate %

 

CLV can be calculated using any of the above mentioned methods depending upon how robust your company wants the analysis to be. Some companies are also using Machine learning models to predict CLV, maybe not directly but they use ML models to predict customer churn rate, retention rate and other marketing KPI’s. Some companies take advantage of all the methods by taking an average at the end.

Matrix search: Finding the blocks of neighboring fields in a matrix with Python

Task

In this article we will look at a solution in python to the following grid search task:

Find the biggest block of adjoining elements of the same kind and into how many blocks the matrix is divided. As adjoining blocks, we will consider field touching by the sides and not the corners.

Input data

For the ease of the explanation, we will be looking at a simple 3×4 matrix with elements of three different kinds, 0, 1 and 2 (see above). To test the code, we will simulate data to achieve different matrix sizes and a varied number of element types. It will also allow testing edge cases like, where all elements are the same or all elements are different.

To simulate some test data for later, we can use the numpy randint() method:

The code

How the code works

In summary, the algorithm loops through all fields of the matrix looking for unseen fields that will serve as a starting point for a local exploration of each block of color – the find_blocks() function. The local exploration is done by looking at the neighboring fields and if they are within the same kind, moving to them to explore further fields – the explore_block() function. The fields that have already been seen and counted are stored in the visited list.

find_blocks() function:

  1. Finds a starting point of a new block
  2. Runs a the explore_block() function for local exploration of the block
  3. Appends the size of the explored block
  4. Updates the list of visited points
  5. Returns the result, once all fields of the matrix have been visited.

explore_block() function:

  1. Takes the coordinates of the starting field for a new block and the list of visited points
  2. Creates the queue set with the starting point
  3. Sets the size of the current block (field_count) to 1
  4. Starts a while loop that is executed for as long as the queue is not empty
    1. Takes an element of the queue and uses its coordinates as the current location for further exploration
    2. Adds the current field to the visited list
    3. Explores the neighboring fields and if they belong to the same block, they are added to the queue
    4. The fields are taken off the queue for further exploration one by one until the queue is empty
  5. Returns the field_count of the explored block and the updated list of visited fields

Execute the function

The returned result is biggest block: 4, number of blocks: 4.

Run the test matrices:

Visualization

The matrices for the article were visualized with the seaborn heatmap() method.

Article series: 5 Clean Coding Tips – 1. Be Consistent

This is the first of the article series “5 tips for clean coding” to follow as soon as you’ve made the first steps into your coding career, in this article series. Read the introduction here, to find out why it is important to write clean code if you missed it.

Consistency is THE rule to follow if you want to make your code clean and increase readability. Not to make it sound desperate, but honestly, whatever you decide to do when it comes to the coding style, just be consistent. Whether you agree with any standards, formatting styles or don’t even know them, just be consistent. Don’t ever allow inconsistency to sneak into your script or your project. This will only bring confusion, disorientation, chaos and general misery.

The rules for how exactly keep your code clean and organized visually might differ slightly depending on the situation you find yourself in. The PEP 8 rules can be ambiguous in some places and leave room for interpretation. For example, the question, whether you use single or double quotes to denote a string, is open. It is possible, that your work environment already has a standard and you just need to comply with that. No room to show off your highly unique take on it, sorry. However, if you are working on your own and there is no one to roll their eyes looking at your messed-up code, you need to decide for yourself. Once you do, again, be consistent at the level of the script, project, your work in general. Otherwise, it will look messy, patchworky and simply unprofessional.

People famously are quick to ascribe intentionality, even to thermostats[i]. They will assume that the details of how you wrote your code are intentional. They will try to figure out why you are doing one thing in some places and a different thing in other places. If those differences came from you being careless and have no meaning behind them, the reader of your code will waste a lot of time trying to figure it out and end up frustrated. Remember the first few snippets of python code you have ever seen? Maybe you saw some code with double quotes and some with single quotes. You were green, knew nothing and quite possibly thought that they both have different meanings and you spent time trying to figure out why on earth in some places there is a single quote and in other double-quotes.

If those altruistic arguments do not really convince you, let’s see how consistency can serve to your own benefit. First, that outsider, who is looking at your code and is trying very hard to figure out what on Earth is going on, might be you. It might sound crazy, and it is, indeed, quite sad, but most likely, after 6 months of not looking at your code you will no longer remember what you did there if it is not documented well. Documenting in a homogenous way can take some time and some effort. Nevertheless, in general, code gets read many times after it has been written. When in doubt, sacrifice some of your writing time to increase readability and minimize the reading time later. It will pay off in the long run.

Having a set of rules at your disposal can make your work faster. You will avoid arguing with yourself about which option is the best one: mean_income, income_mean or income_avg. You can avoid making loads of small decisions as you write your code by making a set of global rules. In that way, you can allocate your energy and resources into solving the real problem. Not the how-do-I-format-this? one.

It is not necessary that you make all those grand decisions right now. You also don’t have to make them for life, it’s ok to change your mind eventually, so don’t feel overwhelmed. But once you’ve learned this and that, spent a little time coding, have a good long look at your sprouting habits and decide what you are going to do about splitting those lines and stick to it!

References:

[i] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intentional_stance

Article series: 5 Clean Coding Tips

This series of articles will cover 5 clean coding tips to follow as soon as you’ve made the first steps into your coding career, with the example of python.

At the beginning of your adventure with coding, you might find that getting your code to compile without any errors and give you the output that you expect is hard enough. Conforming to any standards and style guides is at the very bottom of your concerns. You might be at the beginning of your career or you might have a lot of domain experience but not that much in coding. Or maybe until now you worked mostly on your own and never had to make your code available for others to work with it. In any case, it is worth acknowledging how crucial it is to write your code in a concise, readable and understandable way, and how much benefits it will eventually bring you.

The first thing to realize is that the whole clean coding concept has been developed for people, your fellow travelers, not for the computers. The compiler doesn’t care how you name your variables, how you split your lines or if everything is aligned in a pretty way. You could even write your code as a one gigantic, few-meters-long line, giving the interpreter just a signal – a semicolon, that the line should be split, and it will execute it perfectly.

However, it is likely that, the deeper you are into your career, the more people will have to read, understand and modify the code that you wrote. You will write code to communicate certain ideas and solutions with other people. Therefore, you need to be sure, that what you want to communicate is understandable, easy and quick to read. The coding best practice is to always code in a clean way, treating the code itself and not just the output as the result of your work.

There usually are fixed rules and standards regarding code readability. For python, it is the PEP 8[i]. Some companies elaborate on those standards where the PEP 8 is a bit vague or leaves room for interpretation. The exact formatting styles might differ at Facebook, Google[ii] or at the company you happen to work for. But before you get lost in the art of a perfect line splitting, brackets alignment technique, or the hopeless tabs or spaces battle, have a look at the 5 tips in the upcoming articles in this series. They are universal and might help you make your code, less of a chaotic mess and more of blissful delight.

List of articles in this series:

  1. Be consistent
  2. Name variables in a meaningful way
  3. Take advantage of the formatting tools (to be published soon)
  4. Stop commenting the obvious (to be published soon)
  5. Put yourself in somebody else’s shoes (to be published soon)
References:

[i] https://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0008/
[ii] http://google.github.io/styleguide/pyguide.html

Introduction to Recommendation Engines

This is the second article of article series Getting started with the top eCommerce use cases. If you are interested in reading the first article you can find it here.

What are Recommendation Engines?

Recommendation engines are the automated systems which helps select out similar things whenever a user selects something online. Be it Netflix, Amazon, Spotify, Facebook or YouTube etc. All of these companies are now using some sort of recommendation engine to improve their user experience. A recommendation engine not only helps to predict if a user prefers an item or not but also helps to increase sales, ,helps to understand customer behavior, increase number of registered users and helps a user to do better time management. For instance Netflix will suggest what movie you would want to watch or Amazon will suggest what kind of other products you might want to buy. All the mentioned platforms operates using the same basic algorithm in the background and in this article we are going to discuss the idea behind it.

What are the techniques?

There are two fundamental algorithms that comes into play when there’s a need to generate recommendations. In next section these techniques are discussed in detail.

Content-Based Filtering

The idea behind content based filtering is to analyse a set of features which will provide a similarity between items themselves i.e. between two movies, two products or two songs etc. These set of features once compared gives a similarity score at the end which can be used as a reference for the recommendations.

There are several steps involved to get to this similarity score and the first step is to construct a profile for each item by representing some of the important features of that item. In other terms, this steps requires to define a set of characteristics that are discovered easily. For instance, consider that there’s an article which a user has already read and once you know that this user likes this article you may want to show him recommendations of similar articles. Now, using content based filtering technique you could find the similar articles. The easiest way to do that is to set some features for this article like publisher, genre, author etc. Based on these features similar articles can be recommended to the user (as illustrated in Figure 1). There are three main similarity measures one could use to find the similar articles mentioned below.

 

Figure 1: Content-Based Filtering

 

 

Minkowski distance

Minkowski distance between two variables can be calculated as:

(x,y)= (\sum_{i=1}^{n}{|X_{i} - Y_{i}|^{p}})^{1/p}

 

Cosine Similarity

Cosine similarity between two variables can be calculated as :

  \mbox{Cosine Similarity} = \frac{\sum_{i=1}^{n}{x_{i} y_{i}}} {\sqrt{\sum_{i=1}^{n}{x_{i}^{2}}} \sqrt{\sum_{i=1}^{n}{y_{i}^{2}}}} \

 

Jaccard Similarity

 

  J(X,Y) = |X ∩ Y| / |X ∪ Y|

 

These measures can be used to create a matrix which will give you the similarity between each movie and then a function can be defined to return the top 10 similar articles.

 

Collaborative filtering

This filtering method focuses on finding how similar two users or two products are by analyzing user behavior or preferences rather than focusing on the content of the items. For instance consider that there are three users A,B and C.  We want to recommend some movies to user A, our first approach would be to find similar users and compare which movies user A has not yet watched and recommend those movies to user A.  This approach where we try to find similar users is called as User-User Collaborative Filtering.  

The other approach that could be used here is when you try to find similar movies based on the ratings given by others, this type is called as Item-Item Collaborative Filtering. The research shows that item-item collaborative filtering works better than user-user collaborative filtering as user behavior is really dynamic and changes over time. Also, there are a lot more users and increasing everyday but on the other side item characteristics remains the same. To calculate the similarities we can use Cosine distance.

 

Figure 2: Collaborative Filtering

 

Recently some companies have started to take advantage of both content based and collaborative filtering techniques to make a hybrid recommendation engine. The results from both models are combined into one hybrid model which provides more accurate recommendations. Five steps are involved to make a recommendation engine work which are collection of data, storing of data, analyzing the data, filtering the data and providing recommendations. There are a lot of attributes that are involved in order to collect user data including browsing history, page views, search logs, order history, marketing channel touch points etc. which requires a strong data architecture.  The collection of data is pretty straightforward but it can be overwhelming to analyze this amount of data. Storing this data could get tricky on the other hand as you need a scalable database for this kind of data. With the rise of graph databases this area is also improving for many use cases including recommendation engines. Graph databases like Neo4j can also help to analyze and find similar users and relationship among them. Analyzing the data can be carried in different ways, depending on how strong and scalable your architecture you can run real time, batch or near real time analysis. The fourth step involves the filtering of the data and here you can use any of the above mentioned approach to find similarities to finally provide the recommendations.

Having a good recommendation engine can be time consuming initially but it is definitely beneficial in the longer run. It not only helps to generate revenue but also helps to to improve your product catalog and customer service.

Multi-touch attribution: A data-driven approach

This is the first article of article series Getting started with the top eCommerce use cases.

What is Multi-touch attribution?

Customers shopping behavior has changed drastically when it comes to online shopping, as nowadays, customer likes to do a thorough market research about a product before making a purchase. This makes it really hard for marketers to correctly determine the contribution for each marketing channel to which a customer was exposed to. The path a customer takes from his first search to the purchase is known as a Customer Journey and this path consists of multiple marketing channels or touchpoints. Therefore, it is highly important to distribute the budget between these channels to maximize return. This problem is known as multi-touch attribution problem and the right attribution model helps to steer the marketing budget efficiently. Multi-touch attribution problem is well known among marketers. You might be thinking that if this is a well known problem then there must be an algorithm out there to deal with this. Well, there are some traditional models  but every model has its own limitation which will be discussed in the next section.

Traditional attribution models

Most of the eCommerce companies have a performance marketing department to make sure that the marketing budget is spent in an agile way. There are multiple heuristics attribution models pre-existing in google analytics however there are several issues with each one of them. These models are:

First touch attribution model

100% credit is given to the first channel as it is considered that the first marketing channel was responsible for the purchase.

Figure 1: First touch attribution model

Last touch attribution model

100% credit is given to the last channel as it is considered that the first marketing channel was responsible for the purchase.

Figure 2: Last touch attribution model

Linear-touch attribution model

In this attribution model, equal credit is given to all the marketing channels present in customer journey as it is considered that each channel is equally responsible for the purchase.

Figure 3: Linear attribution model

U-shaped or Bath tub attribution model

This is most common in eCommerce companies, this model assigns 40% to first and last touch and 20% is equally distributed among the rest.

Figure 4: Bathtub or U-shape attribution model

Data driven attribution models

Traditional attribution models follows somewhat a naive approach to assign credit to one or all the marketing channels involved. As it is not so easy for all the companies to take one of these models and implement it. There are a lot of challenges that comes with multi-touch attribution problem like customer journey duration, overestimation of branded channels, vouchers and cross-platform issue, etc.

Switching from traditional models to data-driven models gives us more flexibility and more insights as the major part here is defining some rules to prepare the data that fits your business. These rules can be defined by performing an ad hoc analysis of customer journeys. In the next section, I will discuss about Markov chain concept as an attribution model.

Markov chains

Markov chains concepts revolves around probability. For attribution problem, every customer journey can be seen as a chain(set of marketing channels) which will compute a markov graph as illustrated in figure 5. Every channel here is represented as a vertex and the edges represent the probability of hopping from one channel to another. There will be an another detailed article, explaining the concept behind different data-driven attribution models and how to apply them.

Figure 5: Markov chain example

Challenges during the Implementation

Transitioning from a traditional attribution models to a data-driven one, may sound exciting but the implementation is rather challenging as there are several issues which can not be resolved just by changing the type of model. Before its implementation, the marketers should perform a customer journey analysis to gain some insights about their customers and try to find out/perform:

  1. Length of customer journey.
  2. On an average how many branded and non branded channels (distinct and non-distinct) in a typical customer journey?
  3. Identify most upper funnel and lower funnel channels.
  4. Voucher analysis: within branded and non-branded channels.

When you are done with the analysis and able to answer all of the above questions, the next step would be to define some rules in order to handle the user data according to your business needs. Some of the issues during the implementation are discussed below along with their solution.

Customer journey duration

Assuming that you are a retailer, let’s try to understand this issue with an example. In May 2016, your company started a Fb advertising campaign for a particular product category which “attracted” a lot of customers including Chris. He saw your Fb ad while working in the office and clicked on it, which took him to your website. As soon as he registered on your website, his boss called him (probably because he was on Fb while working), he closed everything and went for the meeting. After coming back, he started working and completely forgot about your ad or products. After a few days, he received an email with some offers of your products which also he ignored until he saw an ad again on TV in Jan 2019 (after 3 years). At this moment, he started doing his research about your products and finally bought one of your products from some Instagram campaign. It took Chris almost 3 years to make his first purchase.

Figure 6: Chris journey

Now, take a minute and think, if you analyse the entire journey of customers like Chris, you would realize that you are still assigning some of the credit to the touchpoints that happened 3 years ago. This can be solved by using an attribution window. Figure 6 illustrates that 83% of the customers are making a purchase within 30 days which means the attribution window here could be 30 days. In simple words, it is safe to remove the touchpoints that happens after 30 days of purchase. This parameter can also be changed to 45 days or 60 days, depending on the use case.

Figure 7: Length of customer journey

Removal of direct marketing channel

A well known issue that every marketing analyst is aware of is, customers who are already aware of the brand usually comes to the website directly. This leads to overestimation of direct channel and branded channels start getting more credit. In this case, you can set a threshold (say 7 days) and remove these branded channels from customer journey.

Figure 8: Removal of branded channels

Cross platform problem

If some of your customers are using different devices to explore your products and you are not able to track them then it will make retargeting really difficult. In a perfect world these customers belong to same journey and if these can’t be combined then, except one, other paths would be considered as “non-converting path”. For attribution problem device could be thought of as a touchpoint to include in the path but to be able to track these customers across all devices would still be challenging. A brief introduction to deterministic and probabilistic ways of cross device tracking can be found here.

Figure 9: Cross platform clash

How to account for Vouchers?

To better account for vouchers, it can be added as a ‘dummy’ touchpoint of the type of voucher (CRM,Social media, Affiliate or Pricing etc.) used. In our case, we tried to add these vouchers as first touchpoint and also as a last touchpoint but no significant difference was found. Also, if the marketing channel of which the voucher was used was already in the path, the dummy touchpoint was not added.

Figure 10: Addition of Voucher as a touchpoint

Let me know in comments if you would like to add something or if you have a different perspective about this use case.

Wie funktioniert Natural Language Processing in der Praxis? Ein Überblick

Natural Language Processing (NLP,auf Deutsch auch als Computerlinguistik bezeichnet) gilt als ein Teilbereich des Machine Learning und der Sprachwissenschaften.

Beim NLP geht es vom Prinzip um das Extrahieren und Verarbeiten von Informationen, die in den natürlichen Sprachen enthalten sind. Im Rahmen von NLP wird die natürliche Sprache durch den Rechner in Zahlenabfolgen umgewandelt. Diese Zahlenabfolgen kann wiederum der Rechner benutzen, um Rückschlüsse auf unsere Welt zu ziehen. Kurz gesagt erlaubt NLP dem Computer unsere Sprache in ihren verschiedenen Formen zu verarbeiten. 

Eine ausführlichere Definition von NLP wurde auf dem Data Science Blog von Christopher Kipp vorgenommen. 

In diesem Beitrag werde ich dagegen einen Überblick über die spezifischen Schritte im NLP als Prozess darstellen, denn NLP erfolgt in mehreren Phasen, die aufeinander Folgen und zum Teil als Kreislauf verstanden werden können. In ihren Grundlagen ähneln sich diese Phasen bei jeder NLP-Anwendung, sei es Chatbot Erstellung oder Sentiment Analyse.

1. Datenreinigung / Normalisierung 

In dieser Phase werden die rohen Sprachdaten aus ihrem ursprünglichen Format entnommen, sodass am Ende nur reine Textdaten ohne Format erhalten bleiben. 

Beispielsweise können die Textdaten für unsere Analyse aus Webseiten stammen und nach ihrer Erhebung in HTML Code eingebettet sein.

Das Bild zeigt eine Beispielseite. Der Text hier ist noch in einen HTML Kontext eingebettet. Der erste Schritt muss daher sein, den Text von den diversen HTML-Tags zu bereinigen. 

 

2. Tokenisierung und Normalisierung (Tokenizing and Normalizing) 

Nach dem ersten Schritt steht als Ergebnis idealerweise reiner Text da, der aber auch Sprachelemente wie Punkte, Kommata sowie Groß- und Kleinschreibung beinhaltet. 

Hier kommt der nächste Schritt ins Spiel – die Entfernung der Interpunktion vom Text. Der Text wird auf diese Weise auf seine Wort-Bestandteile (sog. Tokens) reduziert. 

Zusätzlich zu diesem Schritt kann auch Groß- und Kleinschreibung entfernt werden (Normalisierung). Dies spart vor allem die Rechenkapazität. 

So wird aus folgendem Abschnitt:

Auf diese Weise können wir die Daten aggregieren und in Subsets analysieren. Wir müssen nicht immer das ganze Machine Learning in Hadoop und Spark auf dem gesamten Datensatz starten.

folgender Text 

auf diese weise können wir die daten aggregieren und in subsets analysieren wir müssen nicht immer das ganze machine learning in hadoop und spark auf dem gesamten datensatz starten

 

3. Füllwörterentfernung / Stop words removal 

Im nächsten Schritt entfernen wir die sogenannten Füllwörter wie „und“, „sowie“, „etc.“. In den entsprechenden Python Bibliotheken sind die gängigen Füllwörter bereits gespeichert und können leicht entfernt werden. Trotzdem ist hier Vorsicht geboten. Die Bedeutung der Füllwörter in einer Sprache verändert sich je nach Kontext. Aus diesem Grund ist dieser Schritt optional und die zu entfernenden Füllwörter müssen kontextabhängig ausgewählt werden. 

Nach diesem Schritt bleibt dann in unserem Beispiel folgender Text erhalten: 

können daten aggregieren subsets analysieren müssen nicht immer machine learning hadoop spark datensatz starten

 

4. Pats of speech (POS) 
Als weiterer Schritt können die Wörter mit ihrer korrekten Wortart markiert werden. Der Rechner markiert sie entsprechend als Verben, Nomen, Adjektive etc. Dieser Schritt könnte für manche Fälle der Grundformreduktion/Lemmatization notwendig sein (dazu sogleich unten).

 

5. Stemming und Lemmatization/Grundformreduktion

In weiteren Schritten kann weiter das sogenannte Stemming und Lemmatization folgen. Vom Prinzip werden hier die einzelnen Wörter in ihre Grundform bzw. Wörterbuchform gebracht. 

Im Fall von Stemming werden die Wörter am Ende einfach abgeschnitten und auf den Wortstamm reduziert. So wäre zum Beispiel das Verb „gehen“, „geht“ auf die Form „geh“ reduziert. 

Im Fall der Lemmatization bzw. Grundformreduktion werden die Wörter in ihre ursprüngliche Wörterbuchform gebracht: das Verb „geht“ wäre dann ins „gehen“ transformiert. 

Parts of Speech, Stemming als auch Lemmatising sind vorteilhaft für die Komplexitätsreduktion. Sie führen deswegen zu mehr Effizienz und schnellerer Anwendbarkeit. Dies geschieht allerdings auf Kosten der Präzision. Die auf diese Weise erstellten Listen können dann im Fall einer Suchmaschine weniger relevante Ergebnisse liefern.

Nachfolgende Schritte beim NLP transformieren den Text in mathematische Zahlenfolgen, die der Rechner verstehen kann. Wie wir in diesem Schritt vorgehen, hängt stark davon ab, was das eigentliche Ziel des Projektes sei. Es gibt ein breites Angebot an Python Paketen, die die Zahlenbildung je nach Projektziel unterschiedlich gestalten

 

6a. Bag of Words Methoden in Python (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bag-of-words_model)

Zu den Bag of Words Methoden in Python gehört das sogenannte TF-IDF Vectorizer. Die Transformationsmethode mit dem TF-IDF eignet sich beispielsweise zum Bau eines Spamdetektors, da der TF-IDF Vectorizer die Wörter im Kontext des Gesamtdokumentes betrachtet.

 

6b. Word Embeddings Methoden in Python: Word2Vec, GloVe (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Word_embedding)

Wie der Name bereits sagt transformiert Word2Vec die einzelnen Wörter zu Vektoren (Zahlenfolgen). Dabei werden ähnliche Wörter zu ähnlichen Vektoren transformiert. Die Methoden aus der Word Embeddings Kiste eignen sich zum Beispiel besser, um einen Chatbot zu erstellen. 

Im letzten Schritt des NLP können wir die so prozessierte Sprache in die gängigen Machine Learning Modelle einspeisen. Das Beste an den oben erwähnten NLP Techniken ist die Transformation der Sprache in Zahlensequenzen, die durch jeden ML Algorithmus analysiert werden können. Die weitere Vorgehensweise hängt hier nur noch vom Ziel des Projektes ab. 

Dies ist ein Überblick über die notwendigen (und optionalen) Schritte in einem NLP Verfahren. Natürlich hängt die Anwendung vom jeweiligen Use Case ab. Die hier beschriebenen NLP Phasen nehmen viele Ungenauigkeiten in Kauf, wie zum Beispiel die Reduzierung der Wörter auf Wortstämmen bzw. den Verzicht auf Großschreibung. Bei der Umsetzung in der Praxis müssen immer Kosten und Nutzen abgewogen werden und das Verfahren dem besonderen Fall angepasst werden. 

Quellen:
  • Mandy Gu: „Spam or Ham: Introduction to Natural Language Processing Part 2“ https://towardsdatascience.com/spam-or-ham-introduction-to-natural-language-processing-part-2-a0093185aebd
  • Christopher D. Manning, Prabhakar Raghavan & Hinrich Schütze: „Introduction to Information Retrieval”, Cambridge University Press, https://nlp.stanford.edu/IR-book/
  • Hobson Lane, Cole Howard, Hannes Max Hapke: „Natural Language Processing in Action. Understanding, analyzing, and generating text with Python.” Manning Shelter Island

Wie passt Machine Learning in eine moderne Data- & Analytics Architektur?

Einleitung

Aufgrund vielfältiger potenzieller Geschäftschancen, die Machine Learning bietet, arbeiten mittlerweile viele Unternehmen an Initiativen für datengetriebene Innovationen. Dabei gründen sie Analytics-Teams, schreiben neue Stellen für Data Scientists aus, bauen intern Know-how auf und fordern von der IT-Organisation eine Infrastruktur für “heavy” Data Engineering & Processing samt Bereitstellung einer Analytics-Toolbox ein. Für IT-Architekten warten hier spannende Herausforderungen, u.a. bei der Zusammenarbeit mit interdisziplinären Teams, deren Mitglieder unterschiedlich ausgeprägte Kenntnisse im Bereich Machine Learning (ML) und Bedarfe bei der Tool-Unterstützung haben. Einige Überlegungen sind dabei: Sollen Data Scientists mit ML-Toolkits arbeiten und eigene maßgeschneiderte Algorithmen nur im Ausnahmefall entwickeln, damit später Herausforderungen durch (unkonventionelle) Integrationen vermieden werden? Machen ML-Funktionen im seit Jahren bewährten ETL-Tool oder in der Datenbank Sinn? Sollen ambitionierte Fachanwender künftig selbst Rohdaten aufbereiten und verknüpfen, um auf das präparierte Dataset einen populären Algorithmus anzuwenden und die Ergebnisse selbst interpretieren? Für die genannten Fragestellungen warten junge & etablierte Software-Hersteller sowie die Open Source Community mit “All-in-one”-Lösungen oder Machine Learning-Erweiterungen auf. Vor dem Hintergrund des Data Science Prozesses, der den Weg eines ML-Modells von der experimentellen Phase bis zur Operationalisierung beschreibt, vergleicht dieser Artikel ausgewählte Ansätze (Notebooks für die Datenanalyse, Machine Learning-Komponenten in ETL- und Datenvisualisierungs­werkzeugen vs. Speziallösungen für Machine Learning) und betrachtet mögliche Einsatzbereiche und Integrationsaspekte.

Data Science Prozess und Teams

Im Zuge des Big Data-Hypes kamen neben Design-Patterns für Big Data- und Analytics-Architekturen auch Begriffsdefinitionen auf, die Disziplinen wie Datenintegration von Data Engineering und Data Science vonein­ander abgrenzen [1]. Prozessmodelle, wie das ab 1996 im Rahmen eines EU-Förderprojekts entwickelte CRISP-DM (CRoss-Industry Standard Process for Data Mining) [2], und Best Practices zur Organisation erfolgreich arbeitender Data Science Teams [3] weisen dabei die Richtung, wie Unternehmen das Beste aus den eigenen Datenschätzen herausholen können. Die Disziplin Data Science beschreibt den, an ein wissenschaftliches Vorgehen angelehnten, Prozess der Nutzung von internen und externen Datenquellen zur Optimierung von Produkten, Dienstleistungen und Prozessen durch die Anwendung statistischer und mathematischer Modelle. Bild 1 stellt in einem Schwimmbahnen-Diagramm einzelne Phasen des Data Science Prozesses den beteiligten Funktionen gegenüber und fasst Erfahrungen aus der Praxis zusammen [5]. Dabei ist die Intensität bei der Zusammenarbeit zwischen Data Scientists und System Engineers insbesondere bei Vorbereitung und Bereitstellung der benötigten Datenquellen und später bei der Produktivsetzung des Ergebnisses hoch. Eine intensive Beanspruchung der Server-Infrastruktur ist in allen Phasen gegeben, bei denen Hands-on (und oft auch massiv parallel) mit dem Datenpool gearbeitet wird, z.B. bei Datenaufbereitung, Training von ML Modellen etc.

Abbildung 1: Beteiligung und Interaktion von Fachbereichs-/IT-Funktionen mit dem Data Science Team

Mitarbeiter vom Technologie-Giganten Google haben sich reale Machine Learning-Systeme näher angesehen und festgestellt, dass der Umsetzungsaufwand für den eigentlichen Kern (= der ML-Code, siehe den kleinen schwarzen Kasten in der Mitte von Bild 2) gering ist, wenn man dies mit der Bereitstellung der umfangreichen und komplexen Infrastruktur inklusive Managementfunktionen vergleicht [4].

Abbildung 2: Versteckte technische Anforderungen in maschinellen Lernsystemen

Konzeptionelle Architektur für Machine Learning und Analytics

Die Nutzung aller verfügbaren Daten für Analyse, Durchführung von Data Science-Projekten, mit den daraus resultierenden Maßnahmen zur Prozessoptimierung und -automatisierung, bedeutet für Unternehmen sich neuen Herausforderungen zu stellen: Einführung neuer Technologien, Anwendung komplexer mathematischer Methoden sowie neue Arbeitsweisen, die in dieser Form bisher noch nicht dagewesen sind. Für IT-Architekten gibt es also reichlich Arbeit, entweder um eine Data Management-Plattform neu aufzubauen oder um das bestehende Informationsmanagement weiterzuentwickeln. Bild 3 zeigt hierzu eine vierstufige Architektur nach Gartner [6], ausgerichtet auf Analytics und Machine Learning.

Abbildung 3: Konzeptionelle End-to-End Architektur für Machine Learning und Analytics

Was hat sich im Vergleich zu den traditionellen Data Warehouse- und Business Intelligence-Architekturen aus den 1990er Jahren geändert? Denkt man z.B. an die Präzisionsfertigung eines komplexen Produkts mit dem Ziel, den Ausschuss weiter zu senken und in der Produktionslinie eine höhere Produktivitätssteigerung (Kennzahl: OEE, Operational Equipment Efficiency) erzielen zu können: Die an der Produktherstellung beteiligten Fertigungsmodule (Spezialmaschinen) messen bzw. detektieren über zahlreiche Sensoren Prozesszustände, speicherprogrammierbare Steuerungen (SPS) regeln dazu die Abläufe und lassen zu Kontrollzwecken vom Endprodukt ein oder mehrere hochauflösende Fotos aufnehmen. Bei diesem Szenario entsteht eine Menge interessanter Messdaten, die im operativen Betrieb häufig schon genutzt werden. Z.B. für eine Echtzeitalarmierung bei Über- oder Unterschreitung von Schwellwerten in einem vorher definierten Prozessfenster. Während früher vielleicht aus Kostengründen nur Statusdaten und Störungsinformationen den Weg in relationale Datenbanken fanden, hebt man heute auch Rohdaten, z.B. Zeitreihen (Kraftwirkung, Vorschub, Spannung, Frequenzen,…) für die spätere Analyse auf.

Bezogen auf den Bereich Acquire bewältigt die IT-Architektur in Bild 3 nun Aufgaben, wie die Übernahme und Speicherung von Maschinen- und Sensordaten, die im Millisekundentakt Datenpunkte erzeugen. Während IoT-Plattformen das Registrieren, Anbinden und Management von Hunderten oder Tausenden solcher datenproduzierender Geräte („Things“) erleichtern, beschreibt das zugehörige IT-Konzept den Umgang mit Protokollen wie MQTT, OPC-UA, den Aufbau und Einsatz einer Messaging-Plattform für Publish-/Subscribe-Modelle (Pub/Sub) zur performanten Weiterverarbeitung von Massendaten im JSON-Dateiformat. Im Bereich Organize etablieren sich neben relationalen Datenbanken vermehrt verteilte NoSQL-Datenbanken zum Persistieren eingehender Datenströme, wie sie z.B. im oben beschriebenen Produktionsszenario entstehen. Für hochauflösende Bilder, Audio-, Videoaufnahmen oder andere unstrukturierte Daten kommt zusätzlich noch Object Storage als alternative Speicherform in Frage. Neben der kostengünstigen und langlebigen Datenauf­bewahrung ist die Möglichkeit, einzelne Objekte mit Metadaten flexibel zu beschreiben, um damit später die Auffindbarkeit zu ermöglichen und den notwendigen Kontext für die Analysen zu geben, hier ein weiterer Vorteil. Mit dem richtigen Technologie-Mix und der konsequenten Umsetzung eines Data Lake– oder Virtual Data Warehouse-Konzepts gelingt es IT-Architekten, vielfältige Analytics Anwendungsfälle zu unterstützen.

Im Rahmen des Data Science Prozesses spielt, neben der sicheren und massenhaften Datenspeicherung sowie der Fähigkeit zur gleichzeitigen, parallelen Verarbeitung großer Datenmengen, das sog. Feature-Engineering eine wichtige Rolle. Dazu wieder ein Beispiel aus der maschinellen Fertigung: Mit Hilfe von Machine Learning soll nach unbekannten Gründen für den zu hohen Ausschuss gefunden werden. Was sind die bestimmenden Faktoren dafür? Beeinflusst etwas die Maschinenkonfiguration oder deuten Frequenzveränderungen bei einem Verschleißteil über die Zeit gesehen auf ein Problem hin? Maschine und Sensoren liefern viele Parameter als Zeitreihendaten, aber nur einige davon sind – womöglich nur in einer bestimmten Kombination – für die Aufgabenstellung wirklich relevant. Daher versuchen Data Scientists bei der Feature-Entwicklung die Vorhersage- oder Klassifikationsleistung der Lernalgorithmen durch Erstellen von Merkmalen aus Rohdaten zu verbessern und mit diesen den Lernprozess zu vereinfachen. Die anschließende Feature-Auswahl wählt bei dem Versuch, die Anzahl von Dimensionen des Trainingsproblems zu verringern, die wichtigste Teilmenge der ursprünglichen Daten-Features aus. Aufgrund dieser und anderer Arbeitsschritte, wie z.B. Auswahl und Training geeigneter Algorithmen, ist der Aufbau eines Machine Learning Modells ein iterativer Prozess, bei dem Data Scientists dutzende oder hunderte von Modellen bauen, bis die Akzeptanzkriterien für die Modellgüte erfüllt sind. Aus technischer Sicht sollte die IT-Architektur auch bei der Verwaltung von Machine Learning Modellen bestmöglich unterstützen, z.B. bei Modell-Versionierung, -Deployment und -Tracking in der Produktions­umgebung oder bei der Automatisierung des Re-Trainings.

Die Bereiche Analyze und Deliver zeigen in Bild 3 einige bekannte Analysefähigkeiten, wie z.B. die Bereitstellung eines Standardreportings, Self-service Funktionen zur Geschäftsplanung sowie Ad-hoc Analyse und Exploration neuer Datasets. Data Science-Aktivitäten können etablierte Business Intelligence-Plattformen inhaltlich ergänzen, in dem sie durch neuartige Kennzahlen, das bisherige Reporting „smarter“ machen und ggf. durch Vorhersagen einen Blick in die nahe Zukunft beisteuern. Machine Learning-as-a-Service oder Machine Learning-Produkte sind alternative Darreichungsformen, um Geschäftsprozesse mit Hilfe von Analytik zu optimieren: Z.B. integriert in einer Call Center-Applikation, die mittels Churn-Indikatoren zu dem gerade anrufenden erbosten Kunden einen Score zu dessen Abwanderungswilligkeit zusammen mit Handlungsempfehlungen (Gutschein, Rabatt) anzeigt. Den Kunden-Score oder andere Risikoeinschätzungen liefert dabei eine Service Schnittstelle, die von verschiedenen unternehmensinternen oder auch externen Anwendungen (z.B. Smartphone-App) eingebunden und in Echtzeit angefragt werden kann. Arbeitsfelder für die IT-Architektur wären in diesem Zusammenhang u.a. Bereitstellung und Betrieb (skalierbarer) ML-Modelle via REST API’s in der Produktions­umgebung inklusive Absicherung gegen unerwünschten Zugriff.

Ein klassischer Ansatz: Datenanalyse und Machine Learning mit Jupyter Notebook & Python

Jupyter ist ein Kommandozeileninterpreter zum interaktiven Arbeiten mit der Programmiersprache Python. Es handelt sich dabei nicht nur um eine bloße Erweiterung der in Python eingebauten Shell, sondern um eine Softwaresuite zum Entwickeln und Ausführen von Python-Programmen. Funktionen wie Introspektion, Befehlszeilenergänzung, Rich-Media-Einbettung und verschiedene Editoren (Terminal, Qt-basiert oder browserbasiert) ermöglichen es, Python-Anwendungen als auch Machine Learning-Projekte komfortabel zu entwickeln und gleichzeitig zu dokumentieren. Datenanalysten sind bei der Arbeit mit Juypter nicht auf Python als Programmiersprache begrenzt, sondern können ebenso auch sog. Kernels für Julia, R und vielen anderen Sprachen einbinden. Ein Jupyter Notebook besteht aus einer Reihe von “Zellen”, die in einer Sequenz angeordnet sind. Jede Zelle kann entweder Text oder (Live-)Code enthalten und ist beliebig verschiebbar. Texte lassen sich in den Zellen mit einer einfachen Markup-Sprache formatieren, komplexe Formeln wie mit einer Ausgabe in LaTeX darstellen. Code-Zellen enthalten Code in der Programmiersprache, die dem aktiven Notebook über den entsprechenden Kernel (Python 2 Python 3, R, etc.) zugeordnet wurde. Bild 4 zeigt auszugsweise eine Analyse historischer Hauspreise in Abhängigkeit ihrer Lage in Kalifornien, USA (Daten und Notebook sind öffentlich erhältlich [7]). Notebooks erlauben es, ganze Machine Learning-Projekte von der Datenbeschaffung bis zur Evaluierung der ML-Modelle reproduzierbar abzubilden und lassen sich gut versionieren. Komplexe ML-Modelle können in Python mit Hilfe des Pickle Moduls, das einen Algorithmus zur Serialisierung und De-Serialisierung implementiert, ebenfalls transportabel gemacht werden.

 

Abbildung 4: Datenbeschaffung, Inspektion, Visualisierung und ML Modell-Training in einem Jupyter Notebook (Pro-grammiersprache: Python)

Ein Problem, auf das man bei der praktischen Arbeit mit lokalen Jupyter-Installationen schnell stößt, lässt sich mit dem “works on my machine”-Syndrom bezeichnen. Kleine Data Sets funktionieren problemlos auf einem lokalen Rechner, wenn sie aber auf die Größe des Produktionsdatenbestandes migriert werden, skaliert das Einlesen und Verarbeiten aller Daten mit einem einzelnen Rechner nicht. Aufgrund dieser Begrenzung liegt der Aufbau einer server-basierten ML-Umgebung mit ausreichend Rechen- und Speicherkapazität auf der Hand. Dabei ist aber die Einrichtung einer solchen ML-Umgebung, insbesondere bei einer on-premise Infrastruktur, eine Herausforderung: Das Infrastruktur-Team muss physische Server und/oder virtuelle Maschinen (VM’s) auf Anforderung bereitstellen und integrieren. Dieser Ansatz ist aufgrund vieler manueller Arbeitsschritte zeitaufwändig und fehleranfällig. Mit dem Einsatz Cloud-basierter Technologien vereinfacht sich dieser Prozess deutlich. Die Möglichkeit, Infrastructure on Demand zu verwenden und z.B. mit einem skalierbaren Cloud-Data Warehouse zu kombinieren, bietet sofortigen Zugriff auf Rechen- und Speicher-Ressourcen, wann immer sie benötigt werden und reduziert den administrativen Aufwand bei Einrichtung und Verwaltung der zum Einsatz kommenden ML-Software. Bild 5 zeigt den Code-Ausschnitt aus einem Jupyter Notebook, das im Rahmen des Cloud Services Amazon SageMaker bereitgestellt wird und via PySpark Kernel auf einen Multi-Node Apache Spark Cluster (in einer Amazon EMR-Umgebung) zugreift. In diesem Szenario wird aus einem Snowflake Cloud Data Warehouse ein größeres Data Set mit 220 Millionen Datensätzen via Spark-Connector komplett in ein Spark Dataframe geladen und im Spark Cluster weiterverarbeitet. Den vollständigen Prozess inkl. Einrichtung und Konfiguration aller Komponenten, beschreibt eine vierteilige Blog-Serie [8]). Mit Spark Cluster sowie Snowflake stehen für sich genommen zwei leistungsfähige Umgebungen für rechenintensive Aufgaben zur Verfügung. Mit dem aktuellen Snowflake Connector für Spark ist eine intelligente Arbeitsteilung mittels Query Pushdown erreichbar. Dabei entscheidet Spark’s optimizer (Catalyst), welche Aufgaben (Queries) aufgrund der effizienteren Verarbeitung an Snowflake delegiert werden [9].

Abbildung 5: Jupyter Notebook in der Cloud – integriert mit Multi-Node Spark Cluster und Snowflake Cloud Data Warehouse

Welches Machine Learning Framework für welche Aufgabenstellung?

Bevor die nächsten Abschnitte weitere Werkzeuge und Technologien betrachten, macht es nicht nur für Data Scientists sondern auch für IT-Architekten Sinn, zunächst einen Überblick auf die derzeit verfügbaren Machine Learning Frameworks zu bekommen. Aus Architekturperspektive ist es wichtig zu verstehen, welche Aufgabenstellungen die jeweiligen ML-Frameworks adressieren, welche technischen Anforderungen und ggf. auch Abhängigkeiten zu den verfügbaren Datenquellen bestehen. Ein gemeinsamer Nenner vieler gescheiterter Machine Learning-Projekte ist häufig die Auswahl des falschen Frameworks. Ein Beispiel: TensorFlow ist aktuell eines der wichtigsten Frameworks zur Programmierung von neuronalen Netzen, Deep Learning Modellen sowie anderer Machine Learning Algorithmen. Während Deep Learning perfekt zur Untersuchung komplexer Daten wie Bild- und Audiodaten passt, wird es zunehmend auch für Use Cases benutzt, für die andere Frameworks besser geeignet sind. Bild 6 zeigt eine kompakte Entscheidungsmatrix [10] für die derzeit verbreitetsten ML-Frameworks und adressiert häufige Praxisprobleme: Entweder werden Algorithmen benutzt, die für den Use Case nicht oder kaum geeignet sind oder das gewählte Framework kann die aufkommenden Datenmengen nicht bewältigen. Die Unterteilung der Frameworks in Small Data, Big Data und Complex Data ist etwas plakativ, soll aber bei der Auswahl der Frameworks nach Art und Volumen der Daten helfen. Die Grenze zwischen Big Data zu Small Data ist dabei dort zu ziehen, wo die Datenmengen so groß sind, dass sie nicht mehr auf einem einzelnen Computer, sondern in einem verteilten Cluster ausgewertet werden müssen. Complex Data steht in dieser Matrix für unstrukturierte Daten wie Bild- und Audiodateien, für die sich Deep Learning Frameworks sehr gut eignen.

Abbildung 6: Entscheidungsmatrix zu aktuell verbreiteten Machine Learning Frameworks

Self-Service Machine Learning in Business Intelligence-Tools

Mit einfach zu bedienenden Business Intelligence-Werkzeugen zur Datenvisualisierung ist es für Analytiker und für weniger technisch versierte Anwender recht einfach, komplexe Daten aussagekräftig in interaktiven Dashboards zu präsentieren. Hersteller wie Tableau, Qlik und Oracle spielen ihre Stärken insbesondere im Bereich Visual Analytics aus. Statt statische Berichte oder Excel-Dateien vor dem nächsten Meeting zu verschicken, erlauben moderne Besprechungs- und Kreativräume interaktive Datenanalysen am Smartboard inklusive Änderung der Abfragefilter, Perspektivwechsel und Drill-downs. Im Rahmen von Data Science-Projekten können diese Werkzeuge sowohl zur Exploration von Daten als auch zur Visualisierung der Ergebnisse komplexer Machine Learning-Modelle sinnvoll eingesetzt werden. Prognosen, Scores und weiterer ML-Modell-Output lässt sich so schneller verstehen und unterstützt die Entscheidungsfindung bzw. Ableitung der nächsten Maßnahmen für den Geschäftsprozess. Im Rahmen einer IT-Gesamtarchitektur sind Analyse-Notebooks und Datenvisualisierungswerkzeuge für die Standard-Analytics-Toolbox Unternehmens gesetzt. Mit Hinblick auf effiziente Team-Zusammenarbeit, unternehmensinternen Austausch und Kommunikation von Ergebnissen sollte aber nicht nur auf reine Desktop-Werkzeuge gesetzt, sondern Server-Lösungen betrachtet und zusammen mit einem Nutzerkonzept eingeführt werden, um zehnfache Report-Dubletten, konkurrierende Statistiken („MS Excel Hell“) einzudämmen.

Abbildung 7: Datenexploration in Tableau – leicht gemacht für Fachanwender und Data Scientists

 

Zusätzliche Statistikfunktionen bis hin zur Möglichkeit R- und Python-Code bei der Analyse auszuführen, öffnet auch Fachanwender die Tür zur Welt des Maschinellen Lernens. Bild 7 zeigt das Werkzeug Tableau Desktop mit der Analyse kalifornischer Hauspreise (demselben Datensatz wie oben im Jupyter Notebook-Abschnitt wie in Bild 4) und einer Heatmap-Visualisierung zur Hervorhebung der teuersten Wohnlagen. Mit wenigen Klicks ist auch der Einsatz deskriptiver Statistik möglich, mit der sich neben Lagemaßen (Median, Quartilswerte) auch Streuungsmaße (Spannweite, Interquartilsabstand) sowie die Form der Verteilung direkt aus dem Box-Plot in Bild 7 ablesen und sogar über das Vorhandensein von Ausreißern im Datensatz eine Feststellung treffen lassen. Vorteil dieser Visualisierungen sind ihre hohe Informationsdichte, die allerdings vom Anwender auch richtig interpretiert werden muss. Bei der Beurteilung der Attribute, mit ihren Wertausprägungen und Abhängigkeiten innerhalb des Data Sets, benötigen Citizen Data Scientists (eine Wortschöpfung von Gartner) allerdings dann doch die mathematischen bzw. statistischen Grundlagen, um Falschinterpretationen zu vermeiden. Fraglich ist auch der Nutzen des Data Flow Editors [11] in Oracle Data Visualization, mit dem eins oder mehrere der im Werkzeug integrierten Machine Learning-Modelle trainiert und evaluiert werden können: technisch lassen sich Ergebnisse erzielen und anhand einiger Performance-Metriken die Modellgüte auch bewerten bzw. mit anderen Modellen vergleichen – aber wer kann die erzielten Ergebnisse (wissenschaftlich) verteidigen? Gleiches gilt für die Integration vorhandener R- und Python Skripte, die am Ende dann doch eine Einweisung der Anwender bzgl. Parametrisierung der ML-Modelle und Interpretationshilfen bei den erzielten Ergebnissen erfordern.

Machine Learning in und mit Datenbanken

Die Nutzung eingebetteter 1-click Analytics-Funktionen der oben vorgestellten Data Visualization-Tools ist zweifellos komfortabel und zum schnellen Experimentieren geeignet. Der gegenteilige und eher puristische Ansatz wäre dagegen die Implementierung eigener Machine Learning Modelle in der Datenbank. Für die Umsetzung des gewählten Algorithmus reichen schon vorhandene Bordmittel in der Datenbank aus: SQL inklusive mathematischer und statistische SQL-Funktionen, Tabellen zum Speichern der Ergebnisse bzw. für das ML-Modell-Management und Stored Procedures zur Abbildung komplexer Geschäftslogik und auch zur Ablaufsteuerung. Solange die Algorithmen ausreichend skalierbar sind, gibt es viele gute Gründe, Ihre Data Warehouse Engine für ML einzusetzen:

  • Einfachheit – es besteht keine Notwendigkeit, eine andere Compute-Plattform zu managen, zwischen Systemen zu integrieren und Daten zu extrahieren, transferieren, laden, analysieren usw.
  • Sicherheit – Die Daten bleiben dort, wo sie gut geschützt sind. Es ist nicht notwendig, Datenbank-Anmeldeinformationen in externen Systemen zu konfigurieren oder sich Gedanken darüber zu machen, wo Datenkopien verteilt sein könnten.
  • Performance – Eine gute Data Warehouse Engine verwaltet zur Optimierung von SQL Abfragen viele Metadaten, die auch während des ML-Prozesses wiederverwendet werden könnten – ein Vorteil gegenüber General-purpose Compute Plattformen.

Die Implementierung eines minimalen, aber legitimen ML-Algorithmus wird in [12] am Beispiel eines Entscheidungsbaums (Decision Tree) im Snowflake Data Warehouse gezeigt. Decision Trees kommen für den Aufbau von Regressions- oder Klassifikationsmodellen zum Einsatz, dabei teilt man einen Datensatz in immer kleinere Teilmengen auf, die ihrerseits in einem Baum organisiert sind. Bild 8 zeigt die Snowflake Benutzer­oberfläche und ein Ausschnitt von der Stored Procedure, die dynamisch alle SQL-Anweisungen zur Berechnung des Decision Trees nach dem ID3 Algorithmus [13] generiert.

Abbildung 8: Snowflake SQL-Editor mit Stored Procedure zur Berechnung eines Decission Trees

Allerdings ist der Entwicklungs- und Implementierungsprozess für ein Machine Learning Modell umfassender: Es sind relevante Daten zu identifizieren und für das ML-Modell vorzubereiten. Einfach Rohdaten bzw. nicht aggregierten Informationen aus Datenbanktabellen zu extrahieren reicht nicht aus, stattdessen benötigt ein ML-Modell als Input eine flache, meist sehr breite Tabelle mit vielen Aggregaten, die als Features bezeichnet werden. Erst dann kann der Prozess fortgesetzt und der für die Aufgabenstellung ausgewählte Algorithmus trainiert und die Modellgüte bewertet werden. Ist das Ergebnis zufriedenstellend, steht die Implementierung des ML-Modells in der Zielumgebung an und muss sich künftig beim Scoring „frischer Datensätze“ bewähren. Viele zeitaufwändige Teilaufgaben also, bei der zumindest eine Teilautomatisierung wünschenswert wäre. Allein die Datenaufbereitung kann schon bis zu 70…80% der gesamten Projektzeit beanspruchen. Und auch die Implementierung eines ML-Modells wird häufig unterschätzt, da in Produktionsumgebungen der unterstützte Technologie-Stack definiert und ggf. für Machine Learning-Aufgaben erweitert werden muss. Daher ist es reizvoll, wenn das Datenbankmanagement-System auch hier einsetzbar ist – sofern die geforderten Algorithmen dort abbildbar sind. Wie ein ML-Modell für die Kundenabwanderungsprognose (Churn Prediction) werkzeuggestützt mit Xpanse AI entwickelt und beschleunigt im Snowflake Cloud Data Warehouse bereitgestellt werden kann, beschreibt [14] sehr anschaulich: Die benötigten Datenextrakte sind schnell aus Snowflake entladen und stellen den Input für ein neues Xpanse AI-Projekt dar. Sobald notwendige Tabellenverknüpfungen und andere fachliche Informationen hinterlegt sind, analysiert das Tool Datenstrukturen und transformiert alle Eingangstabellen in eine flache Zwischentabelle (u.U. mit Hunderten von Spalten), auf deren Basis im Anschluss ML-Modelle trainiert werden. Nach dem ML-Modell-Training erfolgt die Begutachtung der Ergebnisse: das erstellte Dataset, Güte des ML-Modells und der generierte SQL(!) ETL-Code zur Erstellung der Zwischentabelle sowie die SQL-Repräsentation des ML-Modells, das basierend auf den Input-Daten Wahrscheinlichkeitswerte berechnet und in einer Scoring-Tabelle ablegt. Die Vorteile dieses Ansatzes sind liegen auf der Hand: kürzere Projektzeiten, der Einsatz im Rahmen des Snowflake Cloud Data Warehouse, macht das Experimentieren mit der Zuweisung dedizierter Compute-Ressourcen für die performante Verarbeitung äußerst einfach. Grenzen liegen wiederum bei der zur Verfügung stehenden Algorithmen.

Spezialisierte Software Suites für Machine Learning

Während sich im Markt etablierte Business Intelligence- und Datenintegrationswerkzeuge mit Erweiterungen zur Ausführung von Python- und R-Code als notwendigen Bestandteil der Analyse-Toolbox für den Data Science Prozess positionieren, gibt es daneben auch Machine-Learning-Plattformen, die auf die Arbeit mit künstlicher Intelligenz (KI) zugeschnittenen sind. Für den Einstieg in Data Science bieten sich die oft vorhandenen quelloffenen Distributionen an, die auch über Enterprise-Versionen mit erweiterten Möglichkeiten für beschleunigtes maschinelles Lernen durch Einsatz von Grafikprozessoren (GPUs), bessere Skalierung sowie Funktionen für das ML-Modell Management (z.B. durch Versionsmanagement und Automatisierung) verfügen.

Eine beliebte Machine Learning-Suite ist das Open Source Projekt H2O. Die Lösung des gleichnamigen kalifornischen Unternehmens verfügt über eine R-Schnittstelle und ermöglicht Anwendern dieser statistischen Programmiersprache Vorteile in puncto Performance. Die in H2O verfügbaren Funktionen und Algorithmen sind optimiert und damit eine gute Alternative für das bereits standardmäßig in den R-Paketen verfügbare Funktionsset. H2O implementiert Algorithmen aus dem Bereich Statistik, Data-Mining und Machine Learning (generalisierte Lineare Modelle, K-Means, Random Forest, Gradient Boosting und Deep Learning) und bietet mit einer In-Memory-Architektur und durch standardmäßige Parallelisierung über alle vorhandenen Prozessorkerne eine gute Basis, um komplexe Machine-Learning-Modelle schneller trainieren zu können. Bild 9 zeigt wieder anhand des Datensatzes zur Analyse der kalifornischen Hauspreise die webbasierte Benutzeroberfläche H20 Flow, die den oben beschriebenen Juypter Notebook-Ansatz mit zusätzlich integrierter Benutzerführung für die wichtigsten Prozessschritte eines Machine-Learning-Projektes kombiniert. Mit einigen Klicks kann das California Housing Dataset importiert, in einen H2O-spezifischen Dataframe umgewandelt und anschließend in Trainings- und Testdatensets aufgeteilt werden. Auswahl, Konfiguration und Training der Machine Learning-Modelle erfolgt entweder durch den Anwender im Einsteiger-, Fortgeschrittenen- oder Expertenmodus bzw. im Auto-ML-Modus. Daran anschließend erlaubt H20 Flow die Vorhersage für die Zielvariable (im Beispiel: Hauspreis) für noch unbekannte Datensätze und die Aufbereitung der Ergebnismenge. Welche Unterstützung H2O zur Produktivsetzung von ML-Modellen anbietet, wird an einem Beispiel in den folgenden Abschnitten betrachtet.

Abbildung 9: H2O Flow Benutzeroberfläche – Datenaufbereitung, ML-Modell-Training und Evaluierung.

Vom Prototyp zur produktiven Machine Learning-Lösung

Warum ist es für viele Unternehmen noch schwer, einen Nutzen aus ihren ersten Data Science-Aktivitäten, Data Labs etc. zu ziehen? In der Praxis zeigt sich, erst durch Operationalisierung von Machine Learning-Resultaten in der Produktionsumgebung entsteht echter Geschäftswert und nur im Tagesgeschäft helfen robuste ML-Modelle mit hoher Güte bei der Erreichung der gesteckten Unternehmensziele. Doch leider erweist sich der Weg vom Prototypen bis hin zum Produktiveinsatz bei vielen Initativen noch als schwierig. Bild 10 veranschaulicht ein typisches Szenario: Data Science-Teams fällt es in ihrer Data Lab-Umgebung technisch noch leicht, Prototypen leistungsstarker ML-Modelle mit Hilfe aktueller ML-Frameworks wie TensorFlow-, Keras- und Word2Vec auf ihren Laptops oder in einer Sandbox-Umgebung zu erstellen. Doch je nach verfügbarer Infrastruktur kann, wegen Begrenzungen bei Rechenleistung oder Hauptspeicher, nur ein Subset der Produktionsdaten zum Trainieren von ML-Modellen herangezogen werden. Ergebnispräsentationen an die Stakeholder der Data Science-Projekte erfolgen dann eher durch Storytelling in MS Powerpoint bzw. anhand eines Demonstrators – selten aber technisch schon so umgesetzt, dass anderere Applikationen z.B. über eine REST-API von dem neuen Risiko Scoring-, dem Bildanalyse-Modul etc. (testweise) Gebrauch machen können. Ausgestattet mit einer Genehmigung vom Management, übergibt das Data Science-Team ein (trainiertes) ML-Modell an das Software Engineering-Team. Nach der Übergabe muss sich allerdings das Engineering-Team darum kümmern, dass das ML-Modell in eine für den Produktionsbetrieb akzeptierte Programmiersprache, z.B. in Java, neu implementiert werden muss, um dem IT-Unternehmensstandard (siehe Line of Governance in Bild 10) bzw. Anforderungen an Skalierbarkeit und Laufzeitverhalten zu genügen. Manchmal sind bei einem solchen Extraschritt Abweichungen beim ML-Modell-Output und in jedem Fall signifikante Zeitverluste beim Deployment zu befürchten.

Abbildung 10: Übergabe von Machine Learning-Resultaten zur Produktivsetzung im Echtbetrieb

Unterstützt das Data Science-Team aktiv bei dem Deployment, dann wäre die Einbettung des neu entwickelten ML-Modells in eine Web-Applikation eine beliebte Variante, bei der typischerweise Flask, Tornado (beides Micro-Frameworks für Python) und Shiny (ein auf R basierendes HTML5/CSS/JavaScript Framework) als Technologiekomponenten zum Zuge kommen. Bei diesem Vorgehen müssen ML-Modell, Daten und verwendete ML-Pakete/Abhängigkeiten in einem Format verpackt werden, das sowohl in der Data Science Sandbox als auch auf Produktionsservern lauffähig ist. Für große Unternehmen kann dies einen langwierigen, komplexen Softwareauslieferungsprozess bedeuten, der ggf. erst noch zu etablieren ist. In dem Zusammenhang stellt sich die Frage, wie weit die Erfahrung des Data Science-Teams bei der Entwicklung von Webanwendungen reicht und Aspekte wie Loadbalancing und Netzwerkverkehr ausreichend berücksichtigt? Container-Virtualisierung, z.B. mit Docker, zur Isolierung einzelner Anwendungen und elastische Cloud-Lösungen, die on-Demand benötigte Rechenleistung bereitstellen, können hier Abhilfe schaffen und Teil der Lösungsarchitektur sein. Je nach analytischer Aufgabenstellung ist das passende technische Design [15] zu wählen: Soll das ML-Modell im Batch- oder Near Realtime-Modus arbeiten? Ist ein Caching für wiederkehrende Modell-Anfragen vorzusehen? Wie wird das Modell-Deployment umgesetzt, In-Memory, Code-unabhängig durch Austauschformate wie PMML, serialisiert via R- oder Python-Objekte (Pickle) oder durch generierten Code? Zusätzlich muss für den Produktiveinsatz von ML-Modellen auch an unterstützenden Konzepten zur Bereitstellung, Routing, Versions­management und Betrieb im industriellen Maßstab gearbeitet werden, damit zuverlässige Machine Learning-Produkte bzw. -Services zur internen und externen Nutzung entstehen können (siehe dazu Bild 11)

Abbildung 11: Unterstützende Funktionen für produktive Machine Learning-Lösungen

Die Deployment-Variante „Machine Learning Code-Generierung“ lässt sich gut an dem bereits mit H2O Flow besprochenen Beispiel veranschaulichen. Während Bild 9 hierzu die Schritte für Modellaufbau, -training und -test illustriert, zeigt Bild 12 den Download-Vorgang für den zuvor generierten Java-Code zum Aufbau eines ML-Modells zur Vorhersage kalifornischer Hauspreise. In dem generierten Java-Code sind die in H2O Flow vorgenommene Datenaufbereitung sowie alle Konfigurationen für den Gradient Boosting Machine (GBM)-Algorithmus gut nachvollziehbar, Bild 13 gibt mit den ersten Programmzeilen einen ersten Eindruck dazu und erinnert gleichzeitig an den ähnlichen Ansatz der oben mit dem Snowflake Cloud Data Warehouse und dem Tool Xpanse AI bereits beschrieben wurde.

Abbildung 12: H2O Flow Benutzeroberfläche – Java-Code Generierung und Download eines trainierten Models

Abbildung 13: Generierter Java-Code eines Gradient Boosted Machine – Modells zur Vorhersage kaliforn. Hauspreise

Nach Abschluss der Machine Learning-Entwicklung kann der Java-Code des neuen ML-Modells, z.B. unter Verwendung der Apache Kafka Streams API, zu einer Streaming-Applikation hinzugefügt und publiziert werden [16]. Vorteil dabei: Die Kafka Streams-Applikation ist selbst eine Java-Applikation, in die der generierte Code des ML-Modells eingebettet werden kann (siehe Bild 14). Alle zukünftigen Events, die neue Immobilien-Datensätze zu Häusern aus Kalifornien mit (denselben) Features wie Geoposition, Alter des Gebäudes, Anzahl Zimmer etc. enthalten und als ML-Modell-Input über Kafka Streams hereinkommen, werden mit einer Vorhersage des voraussichtlichen Gebäudepreises von dem auf historischen Daten trainierten ML-Algorithmus beantwortet. Ein Vorteil dabei: Weil die Kafka Streams-Applikation unter der Haube alle Funktionen von Apache Kafka nutzt, ist diese neue Anwendung bereits für den skalierbaren und geschäftskritischen Einsatz ausgelegt.

Abbildung 14: Deployment des generierten Java-Codes eines H2O ML-Models in einer Kafka Streams-Applikation

Machine Learning as a Service – “API-first” Ansatz

In den vorherigen Abschnitten kam bereits die Herausforderung zur Sprache, wenn es um die Überführung der Ergebnisse eines Datenexperiments in eine Produktivumgebung geht. Während die Mehrheit der Mitglieder eines Data Science Teams bevorzugt R, Python (und vermehrt Julia) als Programmiersprache einsetzen, gibt es auf der Abnehmerseite das Team der Softwareingenieure, die für technische Implementierungen in der Produktionsumgebung zuständig sind, womöglich einen völlig anderen Technologie-Stack verwenden (müssen). Im Extremfall droht das Neuimplementieren eines Machine Learning-Modells, im besseren Fall kann Code oder die ML-Modellspezifikation transferiert und mit wenig Aufwand eingebettet (vgl. das Beispiel H2O und Apache Kafka Streams Applikation) bzw. direkt in einer neuen Laufzeitumgebung ausführbar gemacht werden. Alternativ wählt man einen „API-first“-Ansatz und entkoppelt das Zusammenwirken von unterschiedlich implementierten Applikationen bzw. -Applikationsteilen via Web-API’s. Data Science-Teams machen hierzu z.B. die URL Endpunkte ihrer testbereiten Algorithmen bekannt, die von anderen Softwareentwicklern für eigene „smarte“ Applikationen konsumiert werden. Durch den Aufbau von REST-API‘s kann das Data Science-Team den Code ihrer ML-Modelle getrennt von den anderen Teams weiterentwickeln und damit eine Arbeitsteilung mit klaren Verantwortlichkeiten herbeiführen, ohne Teamkollegen, die nicht am Machine Learning-Aspekt des eines Projekts beteiligt sind, bei ihrer Arbeit zu blockieren.

Bild 15 zeigt ein einfaches Szenario, bei dem die Gegenstandserkennung von beliebigen Bildern mit einem Deep Learning-Verfahren umgesetzt ist. Einzelne Fotos können dabei via Kommandozeileneditor als Input für die Bildanalyse an ein vortrainiertes Machine Learning-Modell übermittelt werden. Die Information zu den erkannten Gegenständen inkl. Wahrscheinlichkeitswerten kommt dafür im Gegenzug als JSON-Ausgabe zurück. Für die Umsetzung dieses Beispiels wurde in Python auf Basis der Open Source Deep-Learning-Bibliothek Keras, ein vortrainiertes ML-Modell mit Hilfe des Micro Webframeworks Flask über eine REST-API aufrufbar gemacht. Die in [17] beschriebene Applikation kümmert sich außerdem darum, dass beliebige Bilder via cURL geladen, vorverarbeitet (ggf. Wandlung in RGB, Standardisierung der Bildgröße auf 224 x 224 Pixel) und dann zur Klassifizierung der darauf abgebildeten Gegenstände an das ML-Modell übergeben wird. Das ML-Modell selbst verwendet eine sog. ResNet50-Architektur (die Abkürzung steht für 50 Layer Residual Network) und wurde auf Grundlage der öffentlichen ImageNet Bilddatenbank [18] vortrainiert. Zu dem ML-Modell-Input (in Bild 15: Fußballspieler in Aktion) meldet das System für den Tester nachvollziehbare Gegenstände wie Fußball, Volleyball und Trikot zurück, fragliche Klassifikationen sind dagegen Taschenlampe (Torch) und Schubkarre (Barrow).

Abbildung 15: Gegenstandserkennung mit Machine Learning und vorgegebenen Bildern via REST-Service

Bei Aufbau und Bereitstellung von Machine Learning-Funktionen mittels REST-API’s bedenken IT-Architekten und beteiligte Teams, ob der Einsatzzweck eher Rapid Prototyping ist oder eine weitreichende Nutzung unterstützt werden muss. Während das oben beschriebene Szenario mit Python, Keras und Flask auf einem Laptop realisierbar ist, benötigen skalierbare Deep Learning Lösungen mehr Aufmerksamkeit hinsichtlich der Deployment-Architektur [19], in dem zusätzlich ein Message Broker mit In-Memory Datastore eingehende bzw. zu analysierende Bilder puffert und dann erst zur Batch-Verarbeitung weiterleitet usw. Der Einsatz eines vorgeschalteten Webservers, Load Balancers, Verwendung von Grafikprozessoren (GPUs) sind weitere denkbare Komponenten für eine produktive ML-Architektur.

Als abschließendes Beispiel für einen leistungsstarken (und kostenpflichtigen) Machine Learning Service soll die Bildanalyse von Google Cloud Vision [20] dienen. Stellt man dasselbe Bild mit der Fußballspielszene von Bild 15 und Bild 16 bereit, so erkennt der Google ML-Service neben den Gegenständen weit mehr Informationen: Kontext (Teamsport, Bundesliga), anhand der Gesichtserkennung den Spieler selbst  und aktuelle bzw. vorherige Mannschaftszugehörigkeiten usw. Damit zeigt sich am Beispiel des Tech-Giganten auch ganz klar: Es kommt vorallem auf die verfügbaren Trainingsdaten an, inwieweit dann mit Algorithmen und einer dazu passenden Automatisierung (neue) Erkenntnisse ohne langwierigen und teuren manuellen Aufwand gewinnen kann. Einige Unternehmen werden feststellen, dass ihr eigener – vielleicht einzigartige – Datenschatz einen echten monetären Wert hat?

Abbildung 16: Machine Learning Bezahlprodukt (Google Vision)

Fazit

Machine Learning ist eine interessante “Challenge” für Architekten. Folgende Punkte sollte man bei künftigen Initativen berücksichtigen:

  • Finden Sie das richtige Geschäftsproblem bzw geeignete Use Cases
  • Identifizieren und definieren Sie die Einschränkungen (Sind z.B. genug Daten vorhanden?) für die zu lösende Aufgabenstellung
  • Nehmen Sie sich Zeit für das Design von Komponenten und Schnittstellen
  • Berücksichtigen Sie frühzeitig mögliche organisatorische Gegebenheiten und Einschränkungen
  • Denken Sie nicht erst zum Schluss an die Produktivsetzung Ihrer analytischen Modelle oder Machine Learning-Produkte
  • Der Prozess ist insgesamt eine Menge Arbeit, aber es ist keine Raketenwissenschaft.

Quellenverzeichnis

[1] Bill Schmarzo: “What’s the Difference Between Data Integration and Data Engineering?”, LinkedIn Pulse -> Link, 2018
[2] William Vorhies: “CRISP-DM – a Standard Methodology to Ensure a Good Outcome”, Data Science Central -> Link, 2016
[3] Bill Schmarzo: “A Winning Game Plan For Building Your Data Science Team”, LinkedIn Pulse -> Link, 2018
[4] D. Sculley, G. Holt, D. Golovin, E. Davydov, T. Phillips, D. Ebner, V. Chaudhary, M. Young, J.-F. Crespo, D. Dennison: “Hidden technical debt in Machine learning systems”. In NIPS’15 Proceedings of the 28th International Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems – Volume 2, 2015
[5] K. Bollhöfer: „Data Science – the what, the why and the how!“, Präsentation von The unbelievable Machine Company, 2015
[6] Carlton E. Sapp: “Preparing and Architecting for Machine Learning”, Gartner, 2017
[7] A. Geron: “California Housing” Dataset, Jupyter Notebook. GitHub.com -> Link, 2018
[8] R. Fehrmann: “Connecting a Jupyter Notebook to Snowflake via Spark” -> Link, 2018
[9] E. Ma, T. Grabs: „Snowflake and Spark: Pushing Spark Query Processing to Snowflake“ -> Link, 2017
[10] Dr. D. James: „Entscheidungsmatrix „Machine Learning“, it-novum.com ->  Link, 2018
[11] Oracle Analytics@YouTube: “Oracle DV – ML Model Comparison Example”, Video -> Link
[12] J. Weakley: Machine Learning in Snowflake, Towards Data Science Blog -> Link, 2019
[13] Dr. S. Sayad: An Introduction to Data Science, Website -> Link, 2019
[14] U. Bethke: Build a Predictive Model on Snowflake in 1 day with Xpanse AI, Blog à Link, 2019
[15] Sergei Izrailev: Design Patterns for Machine Learning in Production, Präsentation H2O World, 2017
[16] K. Wähner: How to Build and Deploy Scalable Machine Learning in Production with Apache Kafka, Confluent Blog -> Link, 2017
[17] A. Rosebrock: “Building a simple Keras + deep learning REST API”, The Keras Blog -> Link, 2018
[18] Stanford Vision Lab, Stanford University, Princeton University: Image database, Website -> Link
[19] A. Rosebrock: “A scalable Keras + deep learning REST API”, Blog -> Link, 2018
[20] Google Cloud Vision API (Beta Version) -> Link, abgerufen 2018

 

 

 

 

Erstellen und benutzen einer Geodatenbank

In diesem Artikel soll es im Gegensatz zum vorherigen Artikel Alles über Geodaten weniger darum gehen, was man denn alles mit Geodaten machen kann, dafür aber mehr darum wie man dies anstellt. Es wird gezeigt, wie man aus dem öffentlich verfügbaren Datensatz des OpenStreetMap-Projekts eine Geodatenbank erstellt und einige Beispiele dafür gegeben, wie man diese abfragen und benutzen kann.

Wahl der Datenbank

Prinzipiell gibt es zwei große “geo-kompatible” OpenSource-Datenbanken bzw. “Datenbank-AddOn’s”: Spatialite, welches auf SQLite aufbaut, und PostGIS, das PostgreSQL verwendet.

PostGIS bietet zum Teil eine einfachere Syntax, welche manchmal weniger Tipparbeit verursacht. So kann man zum Beispiel um die Entfernung zwischen zwei Orten zu ermitteln einfach schreiben:

während dies in Spatialite “nur” mit einer normalen Funktion möglich ist:

Trotztdem wird in diesem Artikel Spatialite (also SQLite) verwendet, da dessen Einrichtung deutlich einfacher ist (schließlich sollen interessierte sich alle Ergebnisse des Artikels problemlos nachbauen können, ohne hierfür einen eigenen Datenbankserver aufsetzen zu müssen).

Der Hauptunterschied zwischen PostgreSQL und SQLite (eigentlich der Unterschied zwischen SQLite und den meissten anderen Datenbanken) ist, dass für PostgreSQL im Hintergrund ein Server laufen muss, an welchen die entsprechenden Queries gesendet werden, während SQLite ein “normales” Programm (also kein Client-Server-System) ist welches die Queries selber auswertet.

Hierdurch fällt beim Aufsetzen der Datenbank eine ganze Menge an Konfigurationsarbeit weg: Welche Benutzer gibt es bzw. akzeptiert der Server? Welcher Benutzer bekommt welche Rechte? Über welche Verbindung wird auf den Server zugegriffen? Wie wird die Sicherheit dieser Verbindung sichergestellt? …

Während all dies bei SQLite (und damit auch Spatialite) wegfällt und die Einrichtung der Datenbank eigentlich nur “installieren und fertig” ist, muss auf der anderen Seite aber auch gesagt werden dass SQLite nicht gut für Szenarien geeignet ist, in welchen viele Benutzer gleichzeitig (insbesondere schreibenden) Zugriff auf die Datenbank benötigen.

Benötigte Software und ein Beispieldatensatz

Was wird für diesen Artikel an Software benötigt?

SQLite3 als Datenbank

libspatialite als “Geoplugin” für SQLite

spatialite-tools zum erstellen der Datenbank aus dem OpenStreetMaps (*.osm.pbf) Format

python3, die beiden GeoModule spatialite, folium und cartopy, sowie die Module pandas und matplotlib (letztere gehören im Bereich der Datenauswertung mit Python sowieso zum Standart). Für pandas gibt es noch die Erweiterung geopandas sowie eine praktisch unüberschaubare Anzahl weiterer geographischer Module aber bereits mit den genannten lassen sich eine Menge interessanter Dinge herausfinden.

– und natürlich einen Geodatensatz: Zum Beispiel sind aus dem OpenStreetMap-Projekt extrahierte Datensätze hier zu finden.

Es ist ratsam, sich hier erst einmal einen kleinen Datensatz herunterzuladen (wie zum Beispiel einen der Stadtstaaten Bremen, Hamburg oder Berlin). Zum einen dauert die Konvertierung des .osm.pbf-Formats in eine Spatialite-Datenbank bei größeren Datensätzen unter Umständen sehr lange, zum anderen ist die fertige Datenbank um ein vielfaches größer als die stark gepackte Originaldatei (für “nur” Deutschland ist die fertige Datenbank bereits ca. 30 GB groß und man lässt die Konvertierung (zumindest am eigenen Laptop) am besten über Nacht laufen – willkommen im Bereich “BigData”).

Erstellen eine Geodatenbank aus OpenStreetMap-Daten

Nach dem Herunterladen eines Datensatzes der Wahl im *.osm.pbf-Format kann hieraus recht einfach mit folgendem Befehl aus dem Paket spatialite-tools die Datenbank erstellt werden:

Erkunden der erstellten Geodatenbank

Nach Ausführen des obigen Befehls sollte nun eine Datei mit dem gewählten Namen (im Beispiel bremen-latest.sqlite) im aktuellen Ordner vorhanden sein – dies ist bereits die fertige Datenbank. Zunächst sollte man mit dieser Datenbank erst einmal dasselbe machen, wie mit jeder anderen Datenbank auch: Sich erst einmal eine Weile hinsetzen und schauen was alles an Daten in der Datenbank vorhanden und vor allem wo diese Daten in der erstellten Tabellenstruktur zu finden sind. Auch wenn dieses Umschauen prinzipiell auch vollständig über die Shell oder in Python möglich ist, sind hier Programme mit graphischer Benutzeroberfläche (z. B. spatialite-gui oder QGIS) sehr hilfreich und sparen nicht nur eine Menge Zeit sondern vor allem auch Tipparbeit. Wer dies tut, wird feststellen, dass sich in der generierten Datenbank einige dutzend Tabellen mit Namen wie pt_addresses, ln_highway und pg_boundary befinden.

Die Benennung der Tabellen folgt dem Prinzip, dass pt_*-Tabellen Punkte im Geokoordinatensystem wie z. B. Adressen, Shops, Bäckereien und ähnliches enthalten. ln_*-Tabellen enthalten hingegen geographische Entitäten, welche sich als Linien darstellen lassen, wie beispielsweise Straßen, Hochspannungsleitungen, Schienen, ect. Zuletzt gibt es die pg_*-Tabellen welche Polygone – also Flächen einer bestimmten Form enthalten. Dazu zählen Landesgrenzen, Bundesländer, Inseln, Postleitzahlengebiete, Landnutzung, aber auch Gebäude, da auch diese jeweils eine Grundfläche besitzen. In dem genannten Datensatz sind die Grundflächen von Gebäuden – zumindest in Europa – nahezu vollständig. Aber auch der Rest der Welt ist für ein “Wikipedia der Kartographie” insbesondere in halbwegs besiedelten Gebieten bemerkenswert gut erfasst, auch wenn nicht unbedingt davon ausgegangen werden kann, dass abgelegenere Gegenden (z. B. irgendwo auf dem Land in Südamerika) jedes Gebäude eingezeichnet ist.

Verwenden der Erstellten Datenbank

Auf diese Datenbank kann nun entweder direkt aus der Shell über den Befehl

zugegriffen werden oder man nutzt das gleichnamige Python-Paket:

Nach Eingabe der obigen Befehle in eine Python-Konsole, ein Jupyter-Notebook oder ein anderes Programm, welches die Anbindung an den Python-Interpreter ermöglicht, können die von der Datenbank ausgegebenen Ergebnisse nun direkt in ein Pandas Data Frame hineingeladen und verwendet/ausgewertet/analysiert werden.

Im Grunde wird hierfür “normales SQL” verwendet, wie in anderen Datenbanken auch. Der folgende Beispiel gibt einfach die fünf ersten von der Datenbank gefundenen Adressen aus der Tabelle pt_addresses aus:

Link zur Ausgabe

Es wird dem Leser sicherlich aufgefallen sein, dass die Spalte “Geometry” (zumindest für das menschliche Auge) nicht besonders ansprechend sowie auch nicht informativ aussieht: Der Grund hierfür ist, dass diese Spalte die entsprechende Position im geographischen Koordinatensystem aus Gründen wie dem deutlich kleineren Speicherplatzbedarf sowie der damit einhergehenden Optimierung der Geschwindigkeit der Datenbank selber, in binärer Form gespeichert und ohne weitere Verarbeitung auch als solche ausgegeben wird.

Glücklicherweise stellt spatialite eine ganze Reihe von Funktionen zur Verarbeitung dieser geographischen Informationen bereit, von denen im folgenden einige beispielsweise vorgestellt werden:

Für einzelne Punkte im Koordinatensystem gibt es beispielsweise die Funktionen X(geometry) und Y(geometry), welche aus diesem “binären Wirrwarr” den Längen- bzw. Breitengrad des jeweiligen Punktes als lesbare Zahlen ausgibt.

Ändert man also das obige Query nun entsprechend ab, erhält man als Ausgabe folgendes Ergebnis in welchem die Geometry-Spalte der ausgegebenen Adressen in den zwei neuen Spalten Longitude und Latitude in lesbarer Form zu finden ist:

Link zur Tabelle

Eine weitere häufig verwendete Funktion von Spatialite ist die Distance-Funktion, welche die Distanz zwischen zwei Orten berechnet.

Das folgende Beispiel sucht in der Datenbank die 10 nächstgelegenen Bäckereien zu einer frei wählbaren Position aus der Datenbank und listet diese nach zunehmender Entfernung auf (Achtung – die frei wählbare Position im Beispiel liegt in München, wer die selbe Position z. B. mit dem Bremen-Datensatz verwendet, wird vermutlich etwas weiter laufen müssen…):

Link zur Ausgabe

Ein Anwendungsfall für eine solche Liste können zum Beispiel Programme/Apps wie maps.me oder Google-Maps sein, in denen User nach Bäckereien, Geldautomaten, Supermärkten oder Apotheken “in der Nähe” suchen können sollen.

Diese Liste enthält nun alle Informationen die grundsätzlich gebraucht werden, ist soweit auch informativ und wird in den meißten Fällen der Datenauswertung auch genau so gebraucht, jedoch ist diese für das Auge nicht besonders ansprechend.

Viel besser wäre es doch, die gefundenen Positionen auf einer interaktiven Karte einzuzeichnen:

Was kann man sonst interessantes mit der erstellten Datenbank und etwas Python machen? Wer in Deutschland ein wenig herumgekommen ist, dem ist eventuell aufgefallen, dass sich die Endungen von Ortsnamen stark unterscheiden: Um München gibt es Stadteile und Dörfer namens Garching, Freising, Aubing, ect., rund um Stuttgart enden alle möglichen Namen auf “ingen” (Plieningen, Vaihningen, Echterdingen …) und in Berlin gibt es Orte wie Pankow, Virchow sowie eine bunte Auswahl weiterer *ow’s.

Das folgende Query spuckt gibt alle “village’s”, “town’s” und “city’s” aus der Tabelle pt_place, also Dörfer und Städte, aus:

Link zur Ausgabe

Graphisch mit matplotlib und cartopy in ein Koordinatensystem eingetragen sieht diese Verteilung folgendermassen aus:

Die Grafik zeigt, dass stark unterschiedliche Vorkommen der verschiedenen Ortsendungen in Deutschland (Clustering). Über das genaue Zustandekommen dieser Verteilung kann ich hier nur spekulieren, jedoch wird diese vermutlich ähnlichen Prozessen unterliegen wie beispielsweise die Entwicklung von Dialekten.

Wer sich die Karte etwas genauer anschaut wird merken, dass die eingezeichneten Landesgrenzen und Küstenlinien nicht besonders genau sind. Hieran wird ein interessanter Effekt von häufig verwendeten geographischen Entitäten, nämlich Linien und Polygonen deutlich. Im Beispiel werden durch die beiden Zeilen

die bereits im Modul cartopy hinterlegten Daten verwendet. Genaue Verläufe von Küstenlinien und Landesgrenzen benötigen mit wachsender Genauigkeit hingegen sehr viel Speicherplatz, da mehr und mehr zu speichernde Punkte benötigt werden (genaueres siehe hier).

Schlussfolgerung

Man kann also bereits mit einigen Grundmodulen und öffentlich verfügbaren Datensätzen eine ganze Menge im Bereich der Geodaten erkunden und entdecken. Gleichzeitig steht, insbesondere für spezielle Probleme, eine große Bandbreite weiterer Software zur Verfügung, für welche dieser Artikel zwar einen Grundsätzlichen Einstieg geben kann, die jedoch den Rahmen dieses Artikels sprengen würden.