Applying Data Science Techniques in Python to Evaluate Ionospheric Perturbations from Earthquakes

Multi-GNSS (Galileo, GPS, and GLONASS) Vertical Total Electron Content Estimates: Applying Data Science techniques in Python to Evaluate Ionospheric Perturbations from Earthquakes

1 Introduction

Today, Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) observations are routinely used to study the physical processes that occur within the Earth’s upper atmosphere. Due to the experienced satellite signal propagation effects the total electron content (TEC) in the ionosphere can be estimated and the derived Global Ionosphere Maps (GIMs) provide an important contribution to monitoring space weather. While large TEC variations are mainly associated with solar activity, small ionospheric perturbations can also be induced by physical processes such as acoustic, gravity and Rayleigh waves, often generated by large earthquakes.

In this study Ionospheric perturbations caused by four earthquake events have been observed and are subsequently used as case studies in order to validate an in-house software developed using the Python programming language. The Python libraries primarily utlised are Pandas, Scikit-Learn, Matplotlib, SciPy, NumPy, Basemap, and ObsPy. A combination of Machine Learning and Data Analysis techniques have been applied. This in-house software can parse both receiver independent exchange format (RINEX) versions 2 and 3 raw data, with particular emphasis on multi-GNSS observables from GPS, GLONASS and Galileo. BDS (BeiDou) compatibility is to be added in the near future.

Several case studies focus on four recent earthquakes measuring above a moment magnitude (MW) of 7.0 and include: the 11 March 2011 MW 9.1 Tohoku, Japan, earthquake that also generated a tsunami; the 17 November 2013 MW 7.8 South Scotia Ridge Transform (SSRT), Scotia Sea earthquake; the 19 August 2016 MW 7.4 North Scotia Ridge Transform (NSRT) earthquake; and the 13 November 2016 MW 7.8 Kaikoura, New Zealand, earthquake.

Ionospheric disturbances generated by all four earthquakes have been observed by looking at the estimated vertical TEC (VTEC) and residual VTEC values. The results generated from these case studies are similar to those of published studies and validate the integrity of the in-house software.

2 Data Cleaning and Data Processing Methodology

Determining the absolute VTEC values are useful in order to understand the background ionospheric conditions when looking at the TEC perturbations, however small-scale variations in electron density are of primary interest. Quality checking processed GNSS data, applying carrier phase leveling to the measurements, and comparing the TEC perturbations with a polynomial fit creating residual plots are discussed in this section.

Time delay and phase advance observables can be measured from dual-frequency GNSS receivers to produce TEC data. Using data retrieved from the Center of Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) site (ftp://ftp.unibe.ch/aiub/CODE), the differential code biases are subtracted from the ionospheric observables.

2.1 Determining VTEC: Thin Shell Mapping Function

The ionospheric shell height, H, used in ionosphere modeling has been open to debate for many years and typically ranges from 300 – 400 km, which corresponds to the maximum electron density within the ionosphere. The mapping function compensates for the increased path length traversed by the signal within the ionosphere. Figure 1 demonstrates the impact of varying the IPP height on the TEC values.

Figure 1 Impact on TEC values from varying IPP heights. The height of the thin shell, H, is increased in 50km increments from 300 to 500 km.

2.2 Phase Smoothing

For dual-frequency GNSS users TEC values can be retrieved with the use of dual-frequency measurements by applying calculations. Calculation of TEC for pseudorange measurements in practice produces a noisy outcome and so the relative phase delay between two carrier frequencies – which produces a more precise representation of TEC fluctuations – is preferred. To circumvent the effect of pseudorange noise on TEC data, GNSS pseudorange measurements can be smoothed by carrier phase measurements, with the use of the carrier phase smoothing technique, which is often referred to as carrier phase leveling.

Figure 2 Phase smoothed code differential delay

2.3 Residual Determination

For the purpose of this study the monitoring of small-scale variations in ionospheric electron density from the ionospheric observables are of particular interest. Longer period variations can be associated with diurnal alterations, and changes in the receiver- satellite elevation angles. In order to remove these longer period variations in the TEC time series as well as to monitor more closely the small-scale variations in ionospheric electron density, a higher-order polynomial is fitted to the TEC time series. This higher-order polynomial fit is then subtracted from the observed TEC values resulting in the residuals. The variation of TEC due to the TID perturbation are thus represented by the residuals. For this report the polynomial order applied was typically greater than 4, and was chosen to emulate the nature of the arc for that particular time series. The order number selected is dependent on the nature of arcs displayed upon calculating the VTEC values after an initial inspection of the VTEC plots.

3 Results

3.1 Tohoku Earthquake

For this particular report, the sampled data focused on what was retrieved from the IGS station, MIZU, located at Mizusawa, Japan. The MIZU site is 39N 08′ 06.61″ and 141E 07′ 58.18″. The location of the data collection site, MIZU, and the earthquake epicenter can be seen in Figure 3.

Figure 3 MIZU IGS station and Tohoku earthquake epicenter [generated using the Python library, Basemap]

Figure 4 displays the ionospheric delay in terms of vertical TEC (VTEC), in units of TECU (1 TECU = 1016 el m-2). The plot is split into two smaller subplots, the upper section displaying the ionospheric delay (VTEC) in units of TECU, the lower displaying the residuals. The vertical grey-dashed lined corresponds to the epoch of the earthquake at 05:46:23 UT (2:46:23 PM local time) on March 11 2011. In the upper section of the plot, the blue line corresponds to the absolute VTEC value calculated from the observations, in this case L1 and L2 on GPS, whereby the carrier phase leveling technique was applied to the data set. The VTEC values are mapped from the STEC values which are calculated from the LOS between MIZU and the GPS satellite PRN18 (on Figure 4 denoted G18). For this particular data set as seen in Figure 4, a polynomial fit of  five degrees was applied, which corresponds to the red-dashed line. As an alternative to polynomial fitting, band-pass filtering can be employed when TEC perturbations are desired. However for the scope of this report polynomial fitting to the time series of TEC data was the only method used. In the lower section of Figure 4 the residuals are plotted. The residuals are simply the phase smoothed delay values (the blue line) minus the polynomial fit line (the red-dashed line). All ionosphere delay plots follow the same layout pattern and all time data is represented in UT (UT = GPS – 15 leap seconds, whereby 15 leap seconds correspond to the amount of leap seconds at the time of the seismic event). The time series shown for the ionosphere delay plots are given in terms of decimal of the hour, so that the format follows hh.hh.

Figure 4 VTEC and residual plot for G18 at MIZU on March 11 2011

3.2 South Georgia Earthquake

In the South Georgia Island region located in the North Scotia Ridge Transform (NSRT) plate boundary between the South American and Scotia plates on 19 August 2016, a magnitude of 7.4 MW earthquake struck at 7:32:22 UT. This subsection analyses the data retrieved from KEPA and KRSA. As well as computing the GPS and GLONASS TEC values, four Galileo satellites (E08, E14, E26, E28) are also analysed. Figure 5 demonstrates the TEC perturbations as computed for the Galileo L1 and L5 carrier frequencies.

Figure 5 VTEC and residual plots at KRSA on 19 August 2016. The plots are from the perspective of the GNSS receiver at KRSA, for four Galileo satellites (a) E08; (b) E14; (c) E24; (d) E26. The y-axes and x-axes in all plots do not conform with one another but are adjusted to fit the data. The y-axes for the residual section of each plot is consistent with one another.

Figure 6 Geometry of the Galileo (E08, E14, E24 and E26) satellites’ projected ground track whereby the IPP is set to 300km altitude. The orange lines correspond to tectonic plate boundaries.

4 Conclusion

The proximity of the MIZU site and magnitude of the Tohoku event has provided a remarkable – albeit a poignant – opportunity to analyse the ocean-ionospheric coupling aftermath of a deep submarine seismic event. The Tohoku event has also enabled the observation of the origin and nature of the TIDs generated by both a major earthquake and tsunami in close proximity to the epicenter. Further, the Python software developed is more than capable of providing this functionality, by drawing on its mathematical packages, such as NumPy, Pandas, SciPy, and Matplotlib, as well as employing the cartographic toolkit provided from the Basemap package, and finally by utilizing the focal mechanism generation library, Obspy.

Pre-seismic cursors have been investigated in the past and strongly advocated in particular by Kosuke Heki. The topic of pre-seismic ionospheric disturbances remains somewhat controversial. A potential future study area could be the utilization of the Python program – along with algorithmic amendments – to verify the existence of this phenomenon. Such work would heavily involve the use of Scikit-Learn in order to ascertain the existence of any pre-cursors.

Finally, the code developed is still retained privately and as of yet not launched to any particular platform, such as GitHub. More detailed information on this report can be obtained here:

Download as PDF

Maschinelles Lernen: Parametrisierte und nicht-parametrisierte Verfahren

Das ist Artikel 3 von 4 aus der Artikelserie – Was ist eigentlich Machine Learning?

Maschinelle Lernverfahren können voneinander unterschiedlich abgegrenzt werden, die den meisten Einsteigern bekannte Abgrenzung ist die zwischen überwachten und unüberwachten Verfahren. Eine weitere Abgrenzung zwischen den Lernverfahren, die weit weniger bekannt und verständlich ist, und um die es in diesem Artikel der Reihe gehen soll, ist die Unterscheidung in parametrisierte und nicht parametrisierte Lernverfahren. Gleich vorweg: Parametrisiert und nicht-parametrisierte bezieht sich auf das Modell (Trainingsergebnis), nicht auf die Algorithmen selbst (also nicht Parameter wie k-Werte, Iterations-, Gewichtungs- oder Regularisierungs-Parameter).

Parametrisierte Lernverfahren (parametric learning)

Parametrisierte Lernverfahren sind solche, die über ein Training mit sogenannten Trainingsdaten eine Funktion mit festen Parametern entwickeln, beispielsweise y = f(x) = x³ * a + x² * b + x *c + d. Diese Funktion hat dank einer festgesetzten Anzahl an Parametern eine feste Struktur, und genau dieser Fakt der Parameter-Struktur-Bestimmung a-priori macht das Lernverfahren zu einem parametrischen Lernverfahren. Nach dem Training stehen die Sturkur und die Parameter-Werte fest, beispielsweise y = x³ * 32 + x² * -4 + x * 2 + 102. Diese Funktion beschreibt den Zusammenhang zwischen dem Input x und dem Output y. Am einfachsten kann man sich das Prinzip des parametrischen Lernens demnach mit der Regression vorstellen: Eine Gerade oder eine Kurve wird über ein Trainingslauf durch eine Punktwolke gezogen und daraus die Funktion abgeleitet. Bei der Prädiktion wird diese Funktion dann dazu verwendet, mit den neuen Input-Werten den Output zu berechnen.

Mit dem Festsetzen der Struktur der Funktion bereits vor dem Training sind einige Vor- und Nachteile verbunden:

Parametrische Lernverfahren sind manchmal etwas einfacher zu verstehen, da sich das Modell durchweg als “feste” Formel betrachten lässt. Dieser Vorteil ist jedoch gleichermaßen eine Einschränkung, denn parametrische Verfahren sind eher dazu geeignet, einfachere Zusammenhänge (mit nicht all zu vielen Dimensionen) zu berechnen. Dafür läuft das Training und vor allem die Prädiktion bei parametrischen Verfahren sehr viel schneller ab, als es bei nicht-parametrischen Verfahren der Fall ist, immerhin müssen die Eingabewerte bei der Prädiktion nur in die Funktion mit bekannter Struktur eingefügt und ausgerechnet werden. Man kann sich also merken: Beim parametrischen Lernen stehen die Parameter vorher fest, beim Training werden nur die “richtigen” Werte für die Parameter gefunden.

Schlussendlich kann generell gesagt werden, dass parametrische Funktionen weniger Datenpunkte als nicht-parametrische Lernverfahren benötigen und bei weniger Daten bessere Ergebnisse liefern. Bei sehr großen Datenmengen werden parametrische Funktionen eher schlechter gegenüber nicht-parametrischen Verfahren und neigen etwas zur Unteranpassung.

Zu den parametrischen Lernverfahren gehören:

  • Lineare und nicht-lineare Regression
  • Lineare Diskriminazanalyse
  • Logistische Regression
  • Naive Bayes Klassifikation
  • einfache künstliche neuronale Netze (z. B. MLP)
  • lineare Support Vector Machines (SVM)

Nicht-parametrisierte Lernverfahren (nonparametric learning)

Spricht man vom nicht-parametrisierten Lernen, ist die Verwirrung eigentlich vorprogrammiert, denn es bedeutet keinesfalls, dass es keine Parameter gibt, ganz im Gegenteil! Nicht-parametrische Verfahren arbeiten in aller Regel mit sehr viel mehr Parametern als die parametrischen Verfahren. Und nicht-parametrische Verfahren sind häufig dann im Einsatz, wenn die Anzahl an Daten und Dimensionen sehr groß ist und wenn nicht klar ist, welche Dimensionen voneinander unabhängig sind, aber in Abhängigkeit mit dem Klassifikations-/Regressionsergebnis stehen.

Auch nicht-parametrische Lernverfahren entwickeln eine Funktion, die den Zusammenhang zwischen dem Input und dem Output beschreibt. Jedoch wird die Struktur der Funktion vor dem Training nicht konkret über eine bestimmte Anzahl an Parametern festgelegt. Die Anzahl an Parametern wird erst zur Laufzeit des Trainings bestimmt und hier könnte jede neue Zeile in der Tabelle der Trainingsdaten einen neuen Parameter bedeuten (also beispielsweise dazu führen, dass ein neuer Ast eines Entscheidungsbaumes entsteht – oder auch nicht!).

Die Modellstruktur wird nicht über eine Funktion mit festen Parametern festgelegt, sondern bei jeder Prädiktion aus den Daten ermittelt. Tendenziell neigen nicht-parametrisierte Verfahren etwas mehr zur Überanpassung als parametrisierte Verfahren.

Zu den nicht-parametrisierten Lernverfahren gehören:

  • k-nächste Nachbarn Klassifikation/Regression
  • Entscheidungsbaum Klassifikation/Regression
  • Nicht-lineare Support Vector Machines (RBF Kernel SVM)

Kleiner Abgleich des Verständnisses

Der Unterschied zwischen parametrisierten und nicht-parametrisierten Verfahren wird so häufig falsch verstanden, dass es sich lohnt, etwas Zeit in eine kleine Wiederholung zu investieren, jedoch aus der FAQ-Perspektive:

Warum ist die Regressionsanalyse ein parametrisiertes Lernverfahren?

Bei der klassischen Regressionsrechnung müssen wir noch vor dem Training festlegen, über welche Funktion wir trainieren wollen. Eine lineare Funktion wie y = x * a + b? Oder doch lieber eine nicht-lineare Funktion wie y = x² * a + x * b + c? Die Struktur der Funktion, mit der wir die Punktwolke beschreiben möchten und mit der wir dann im Nachgang Prädiktionen für unbekannte x-Werte berechnen möchten, muss vor dem Training bestimmt werden.

Warum ist die k-nächste-Nachbarn-Bestimmung ein nicht-parametrisiertes Lernverfahren?

Hierbei handelt es sich um ein Lernen durch Ähnlichkeitsanalyse. Es werden gelabelte Datenpunkte gesammelt und erst bei der Prädiktion wird die multidimensionale Ähnlichkeit des neuen Datenpunktes mit den bekannten Datenpunkten bestimmt (Matrizen-Bildung über Distanzen zwischen den Datenpunkten im multidimensionalen Vektorraum). Das Modell lässt sich vorher nicht mal adäquat bestimmen.

Das Modell liegt sozusagen in den Daten. Der k-nächste-Nachbarn-Algorithmus (k-nN) zählt deshalb übrigens nicht nur zum nicht-parametrisierten Lernen, sondern ist darüber hinaus auch noch ein instanzbasiertes Lernen (Lazy Learning).

Warum sind Entscheidungsbäume nicht-parametrisierte Lernverfahren?

Entscheidungsbäume entwerfen Funktionen, die eine auf das Ergebnis bezogene Datenverteilung beschreiben. Jedoch wird vor der Entstehung dieses Modells (also vor dem Training) nicht die Anzahl der Parameter vorgegeben. Zwar ist es üblich, eine maximale Tiefe des Baumes vorzugeben (auch um Überanpassung zu vermeiden),  das Modell (die Struktur des Baumes) hängt jedoch von den Daten ab.

Warum ist Naive Bayes Klassifikation ein parametrisiertes Lernverfahren?

Naive Bayes Klassifikation gilt grundsätzlich als ein parametrisches Lernverfahren. Der Klassifikator errechnet eine Wahrscheinlichkeit, einer bestimmten Klasse zugehörig zu sein, über ein Produkt aus Wahrscheinlichkeiten des Auftretens voneinander (naive) unabhängiger Eingaben (x1, x2,… xn), in der Regel als multinominales Vokabular. Jede Eingabe (eindeutiges Element aus dem Vokabular) ist im Grunde eine Dimension und stellt einen Parameter dar, der im Vorfeld bekannt sein muss.

Es gibt allerdings auch Abwandlungen des Naive Bayes Klassifikators, bei denen mit Dichteschätzungen (1D Kernel Dichteschätzung) gerechnet wird, dann haben wir es wiederum mit Parametern zutun, die erst während der Trainingsphase entstehen.

Warum können Support Vector Machines sowohl parametrisierte als auch nicht-parametrisierte Lernverfahren darstellen?

Bei der linearen SVM werden die Werte der Parameter einer linearen Funktion (= feste Anzahl an Parametern) berechnet, die zwei Klassen linear trennt. Bei der nicht-linearen Klassentrennung funktioniert das leider nicht so einfach und es müssen kompliziertere Verfahren verwendet werden. Die bekannteste ist die Radial Basis Function Kernel-basierte SVM. Bei dieser RBF Kernel SVM wird eine Matrix über berechnete Distanzen zwischen den Datenpunkten erstellt und als Parameter verwendet. Da diese Parameter-Anzahl von den Daten abhängt, haben wir es mit einer nicht-parametrisierten Methode zutun (ähnlich wie beim k-nN).

Data Science Modeling and Featurization

Overview

Data modeling is an essential part of the data science pipeline. This, combined with the fact that it is a very rewarding process, makes it the one that often receives the most attention among data science learners. However, things are not as simple as they may seem, since there is much more to it than applying a function from a particular class of a package and applying it on the data available.

A big part of data science modeling involves evaluating a model, for example, making sure that it is robust and therefore reliable. Also, data science modeling is closely linked to creating an information rich feature set. Moreover, it entails a variety of other processes that ensure that the data at hand is harnessed as much as possible.

What Is a Robust Data Model?

When it comes to robust models, worthy of making it to production, these need to tick several boxes. First of all, they need to have a good performance, based on various metrics. Oftentimes a single metric can be misleading, as how well a model performs has many aspects, especially for classification problems.

In addition, a robust model has good generalization. This means that the model performs well for various datasets, not just the one it has been trained on.

Sensitivity analysis is another aspect of a data science modeling, something essential for thoroughly testing a model to ensure it is robust enough. Sensitivity is a condition whereby a model’s output is bound to change significantly if the inputs change even slightly. This is quite undesirable and needs to be checked since a robust model ought to be stable.

Finally, interpretability is an important aspect too, though it’s not always possible. This has to do with how easy it is to interpret a model’s results. Many modern models, however, are more like black boxes, making it particularly difficult to interpret them. Nevertheless, it is often preferable to opt for an interpretable model, especially if we need to defend its outputs to others.

How Is Featurization Accomplished?

In order for a model to maximize its potential, it needs an information rich set of features. The latter can be created in various ways. Whatever the case, cleaning up the data is a prerequisite. This involves removing or correcting problematic data points, filling in missing values wherever possible, and in some cases removing noisy variables.

Before you can use variables in a model, you need to perform normalization on them. This is usually accomplished through a linear transformation ensuring that the variable’s values are around a certain range. Oftentimes, normalization is sufficient for turning your variables into features, once they are cleaned.

Binning is another process that can aid in featurization. This entails creating nominal (discreet) variables, which can in turn be broken down into binary features, to be used in a data model.

Finally, some dimensionality reduction method (e.g. PCA) can be instrumental in shaping up your feature-set. This has to do with creating linear combinations of features, aka meta-features, which express the same information in fewer dimensions.

Some Useful Considerations

Beyond these basic attributes of data science modeling there several more that every data scientist has in mind in order to create something of value from the available data. Things like in-depth testing using sensitivity analysis, specialized sampling, and various aspects of model performance (as well as tweaking the model to optimize for a particular performance metric) are parts of data science modeling that require meticulous study and ample practice. After all, even though this part of data science is fairly easy to pick up, it takes a while to master, while performing well in it is something that every organization can benefit from.

Resources

To delve more into all this, there are various relevant resources you can leverage, helping you in not just the methodologies involved but also in the mindset behind them. Here are two of the most useful ones.

  1. Data Science Modeling Tutorial on the Safari platform
  2. Data Science Mindset, Methodologies and Misconceptions book (Technics Publications)

Maschinelles Lernen: Klassifikation vs Regression

Das ist Artikel 2 von 4 aus der Artikelserie – Was ist eigentlich Machine Learning? Die Unterscheidung zwischen Klassifikation und Regression ist ein wichtiger Schritt für das Verständnis von Predictive Analytics. Nun möchte ich eine Erklärung liefern, die den Unterschied (hoffentlich) deutlich macht.

Regression – Die Vorhersage von stetigen Werten

Wir suchen bei der Regression demnach eine Funktion y = \alpha \cdot x + \beta, die unsere Punktwolke – mit der wir uns zutrauen, Vorhersagen über die abhängige Variable vornehmen zu können – möglichst gut beschreibt. Dabei ist y der Zielwert (abhängige Variable) und x der Eingabewert. Wir arbeiten also in einer zwei-dimensionalen Welt. Variablen, die die Funktion mathematisch definieren, werden oft als griechische Buchstaben darsgestellt. Die Variable \alpha (Alpha) ist der y-Achsenschnitt bei x = 0. Dieser wird als Bias, selten auch als Default-Wert, bezeichnet. Der Bias ist also der Wert, wenn die x-Eingabe gleich Null ist. Eine weitere Variable \beta (Beta) beschreibt die Steigung.

Ferner ist zu beachten, dass sich eine Punktwolke durch eine Gerade nie perfekt beschreiben lässt, und daher für jedes x_{i} ein Fehler \varepsilon_{i} existiert. Diesen Fehler wollen wir in diesem Artikel ignorieren.

In einem zwei-dimensionalen System (eine Eingabe und eine Ausgabe) sprechen wir von einer einfachen Regression. Generalisieren wir die Regressionsmethode auf ein multivariates System (mehr als eine Eingabe-Variable), werden die Variablen in der Regel nicht mehr als griechische Buchstaben (denn auch das griechische Alphabet ist endlich) dargestellt, sondern wir nehmen eines abstrahierende Darstellung über Gewichtungen (weights). Dies ist eine sehr treffende Symbolisierungen, denn sowohl der Bias (w_{0} statt \alpha) als auch die Steigungen (w_{1\ldots n}) sind nichts anderes als Gewichtungen zwischen den Eingaben.

    \[y = w_{0} \cdot x_{0} + w_{1} \cdot x_{1} + \ldots + w_{n} \cdot x_{n}\]

y ist eine Summe aus den jeweiligen Produkten aus x_{i} und w_{i}. Verkürzt ausgedrückt:

    \[y = \sum_{i=0}^n w_{i} \cdot x_{i}\]

Noch kürzer ausgedrückt:

    \[y = w^T \cdot x\]

Anmerkung: Das hochgestellte T steht für Transponieren, eine Notation aus der linearen Algebra, die im Ergebnis nichts anderes bewirkt als y = \sum_{i=0}^n w_{i} \cdot x_{i}.

Diese mathematische lineare Funktion kann wie folgt abgebildet werden:

Der Output ist gleich y bzw. die Ausgabe der Nettoeingabe (Net Sum) w^T \cdot x. Auf der linken Seite finden wir alle Eingabewerte, wobei der erste Wert statisch mit 1.0 belegt ist, nur für den Zweck, den Bias (w_{0}) in der Nettoeingabe aufrecht zu erhalten. Im Falle einer einfachen linearen Regression hätten wir also eine Funktion mit zwei Gewichten: y = 1 \cdot w_{0} + x \cdot w_{1}

Das Modell beschreibt, wie aus einer Reihe von Eingabewerten (n = Anzahl an x-Dimensionen) und einer Reihe von Gewichtungen (n + 1) eine Funktion entsteht, die einen y-Wert berechnet. Diese Berechnung wird auch als Forward-Propagation bezeichnet.
Doch welche Werte brauchen wir für die Gewichtungen, damit bei gegebenen x-Werten ein (mehr oder weniger) korrekter y-Wert berechnet wird? Anders gefragt, wie schaffen wir es, dass die Forward-Propagation die richtigen Werte ausspuckt?

Mit einem Training via Backpropagation!


Einfache Erklärung der Backpropagation

Die Backpropagation ist ein Optimierungsverfahren, unter Einsatz der Gradientenmethode, den Fehler einer Forward-Propagation zu berechnen und die Gewichtungen in Gegenrichtung des Fehlers anzupassen. Optimiert wird in der Form, dass der Fehler minimiert wird. Es ist ein iteratives Verfahren, bei dem mit jedem Iterationsschritt wieder eine Forward-Propagation auf Basis von Trainingsdaten durchgeführt wird und die Prädiktionsergebnisse mit den vorgegebenen Ergebnissen (der gekennzeichneten Trainingsdaten) verglichen und damit die Fehler berechnet werden. Die resultierende Fehlerfunktion ist konvex, ableitbar und hat ein zentrales globales Minimum. Dieses Minimum finden wir durch diese iterative Vorgehensweise.


Die Backpropagation zu erklären, erfordert einen separaten Artikel. Merken wir uns einfach: Die Backpropagation nutzt eine Fehlerfunktion, um die Werte der Gewichtungen schrittweise entgegen des Fehlers (bei jeder Forward-Propagation) bis zu einem Punkt anzupassen, bis keine wesentliche Verbesserung (Reduzierung des Fehlers) mehr eintritt. Nach dem Vollzug der Backpropagation erhalten wir die “richtigen” Gewichtungen und haben eine Funktion zur Vorhersage von y-Werten bei Eingabe neuer x-Werte.

Klassifikation – Die Vorhersage von Gruppenzugehörigkeiten

Bei der Klassifikation möchten wir jedoch keine Gerade oder Kurve vorhersagen, die sich durch eine Punktwolke legt, sondern wie möchten Punktwolken voneinander als Klassen unterscheiden, um später hinzukommende Punkte ihren richtigen Klassen zuweisen zu können (Klassifikation). Wir können jedoch auf dem vorherigen Modell der Prädiktion von stetigen Werten aufbauen und auch die Backpropagation zum Training einsetzen, möchten das Training dann jedoch auf die Trennung der Punktwolken ausrichten.

Hinweis: Regressions- und Klassifikationsherausforderungen werden in den Dimensionen unterschiedlich dargestellt. Zur Veranschaulichung: Während wir bei der einfachen Regression eine x-Eingabe als unabhängige Variable und eine y-Ausgabe als abhängige Variable haben, haben wir bei einer zwei-dimensionalen Klassifikation zwei x-Dimensionen als Eingabe. Die Klassen sind die y-Ausgabe (hier als Farben visualisiert).

Ergänzen wir das Modell nun um eine Aktivierungsfunktion, dass die stetigen Werte der Nettosumme über eine Funktion in Klassen unterteilt, erhalten wir einen Klassifikator: Den Perceptron-Klassifikator. Das Perzeptron gilt als der einfachste Klassifikator und ist bereits die kleinste Form eines künstlichen neuronalen Netzes. Es funktioniert nur bei linearer Trennbarkeit der Klassen.

Was soll die Aktivierungsfunktion bewirken? Wir berechnen wieder eine Nettoeingabe w^T \cdot x, die uns stetige Werte ausgiebt. Wir haben also immer noch unsere Gewichtungen, die wir trainieren können. Nun trainieren wir nur nicht auf eine “korrekte” stetige Ausgabe der Nettoeingabe hin, sondern auf eine korrekte Ausgabe der Aktivierungsfunktion \phi (Phi), die uns die stetigen Werte der Nettoeingabe in einen binären Wert (z. B. 0 oder 1) umwandelt. Das Perzeptron ist die kleinste Form des künstlichen neuronalen Netzes und funktioniert wie der lineare Regressor, jedoch ergänzt um eine Aktivierungsfunktion die bewirken soll, dass ein Neuron (hier: der einzelne Output) “feuert” oder nicht “feuert”.  Es ist ein binärer Klassifikator, der beispielsweise die Wertebereiche -1 oder +1 annehmen kann.

Das Perceptron verwendet die einfachste Form der Aktivierungsfunktion: Eine Sprungfunktion, die einer einfachen if… else… Anweisung gleich kommt.

    \[ y = \phi(w^T \cdot x) = \left\{ \begin{array}{12} 1  &  w^T \cdot x > 0\\ -1 & \text{otherwise} \end{array} \]

Fazit – Unterschied zwischen Klassifikation und Regression

Mathematisch müssen sich Regression und Klassifikation gar nicht all zu sehr voneinander unterscheiden. Viele Verfahren der Klassifikation lassen sich mit nur wenig Anpassung auch zur Regression anwenden, oder umgekehrt. Künstliche neuronale Netze, k-nächste-Nachbarn und Entscheidungsbäume sind gute Beispiele, die in der Praxis sowohl für Klassifkation als auch für Regression eingesetzt werden, natürlich mit unterschiedlichen Stärken und Schwächen.

Unterschiedlich ist jedoch der Zweck der Anwendung: Bei der Regression möchten wir stetige Werte vorhersagen (z. B. Temperatur der Maschine), bei der Klassifikation hingegen Klassen unterscheiden (z. B. Maschine überhitzt oder überhitzt nicht).

Unterschiede zwischen linearer und nicht-linearer Klassifikation und linearer und nicht-linearer Regression. Für Einsteiger in diese Thematik ist beachten, dass jede maschinell erlernte Klassifikation und Regression einen gewissen Fehler hat, der unter Betrachtung der Trainings- und Testdaten zu minimieren ist, jedoch nie ganz verschwindet.

Und Clustering?

Clustering ist eine Disziplin des unüberwachten Lernens, um Gruppen von Klassen bzw. Grenzen dieser Klassen innerhalb von unbekannten Daten zu finden. Es ist im Prinzip eine untrainierte Klassifikation zum Zwecke des Data Minings. Clustering gehört auch zum maschinellen Lernen, ist aber kein Predictive Analytics. Da keine – mit dem gewünschten Ergebnis vorliegende – Trainingsdaten vorliegen, kann auch kein Training über eine Backpropagation erfolgen. Clustering ist folglich eine schwache Klassifikation, die mit den trainingsbasierten Klassifikationsverfahren nicht funktioniert.

Process Analytics – Data Analysis for Process Audit & Improvement

Process Mining: Innovative data analysis for process optimization and audit

Step-by-Step: New ways to detect compliance violations with Process Analytics

In the course of the advancing digitization, an enormous upheaval of everyday work is currently taking place to ensure the complete recording of all steps in IT systems. In addition, companies are increasingly confronted with increasingly demanding regulatory requirements on their IT systems.


Read this article in German:
“Process Mining: Innovative Analyse von Datenspuren für Audit und Forensik “


The unstoppable trend towards a connected world will further increase the possibilities of process transparency, but many processes in the company area are already covered by one or more IT systems. Each employee, as well as any automated process, leaves many data traces in IT backend systems, from which processes can be replicated retroactively or in real time. These include both obvious processes, such as the entry of a recorded purchase order or invoice, as well as partially hidden processes, such as the modification of certain entries or deletion of these business objects.

1 Understanding Process Analytics

Process Analytics is a data-driven methodology of the actual process analysis, which originates in forensics. In the wake of the increasing importance of computer crime, it became necessary to identify and analyze the data traces that potential criminals left behind in IT systems in order to reconstruct the event as much as possible.

With the trend towards Big Data Analytics, Process Analytics has not only received new data bases, but has also been further developed as an analytical method. In addition, the visualization enables the analyst or the report recipient to have a deeper understanding of even more complex business processes.

While conventional process analysis primarily involves employee interviews and monitoring of the employees at the desk in order to determine actual processes, Process Analytics is a leading method, which is purely fact-based and thus objectively approaching the processes. It is not the employees who are asked, but the IT systems, which not only store all the business objects recorded in a table-oriented manner, but also all process activities. Every IT system for enterprise purposes log all relevant activities of the whole business process, in the background and invisible to the users, such as orders, invoices or customer orders, with a time stamp.

2 The right choice of the processes to analyze

Today almost every company works with at least one ERP system. As other systems are often used, it is clear which processes can not be analyzed: Those processes, which are still carried out exclusively on paper and in the minds of the employees, which are typical decision-making processes at the strategic level and not logged in IT systems.

Operational processes, however, are generally recorded almost seamlessly in IT systems. Furthermore, almost all operational decisions are recorded by status flags in datasets.

The operational processes, which can be reconstructed and analyzed with Process Mining very well and which are of equal interest from the point of view of compliance, include for example:

– Procurement

– Logistics / Transport

– Sales / Ordering

– Warranty / Claim Management

– Human Resource Management

Process Analytics enables the greatest possible transparency across all business processes, regardless of the sector and the department. Typical case IDs are, for example, sales order number, procurement order number, customer or material numbers.

3 Selection of relevant IT systems

In principle, every IT system used in the company should be examined with regard to the relevance for the process to be analyzed. As a rule, only the ERP system (SAP ERP or others) is relevant for the analysis of the purchasing processes. However, for other process areas there might be other IT systems interesting too, for example separate accounting systems, a CRM or a MES system, which must then also be included.

Occasionally, external data should also be integrated if they provide important process information from externally stored data sources – for example, data from logistics partners.

4 Data Preparation

Before the start of the data-driven process analysis, the data directly or indirectly indicating process activities must be identified, extracted and processed in the data sources. The data are stored in database tables and server logs and are collected via a data warehousing procedure and converted into a process protocol or – also called – event log.

The event log is usually a very large and wide table which, in addition to the actual process activities, also contains parameters which can be used to filter cases and activities. The benefit of this filter option is, for example, to show only process flows where special product groups, prices, quantities, volumes, departments or employee groups are involved.

5 Analysis Execution

The actual inspection is done visually and thus intuitively with an interactive process flow diagram, which represents the actual processes as they could be extracted from the IT systems. The event log generated by the data preparation is loaded into a data visualization software (e.g. Celonis PM Software), which displays this log by using the case IDs and time stamps and transforms this information in a graphical process network. The process flows are therefore not modeled by human “process thinkers”, as is the case with the target processes, but show the real process flows given by the IT systems. Process Mining means, that our enterprise databases “talk” about their view of the process.

The process flows are visualized and statistically evaluated so that concrete statements can be made about the process performance and risk estimations relevant to compliance.

6 Deviation from target processes

The possibility of intuitive filtering of the process presentation also enables an analysis of all deviation of our real process from the desired target process sequences.

The deviation of the actual processes from the target processes is usually underestimated even by IT-affine managers – with Process Analytics all deviations and the general process complexity can now be investigated.

6 Detection of process control violations

The implementation of process controls is an integral part of a professional internal control system (ICS), but the actual observance of these controls is often not proven. Process Analytics allows circumventing the dual control principle or the detection of functional separation conflicts. In addition, the deliberate removal of internal control mechanisms by executives or the incorrect configuration of the IT systems are clearly visible.

7 Detection of previously unknown behavioral patterns

After checking compliance with existing controls, Process Analytics continues to be used to recognize previously unknown patterns in process networks, which point to risks or even concrete fraud cases and are not detected by any control due to their previously unknown nature. In particular, the complexity of everyday process interlacing, which is often underestimated as already mentioned, only reveals fraud scenarios that would previously not have been conceivable.

8 Reporting – also possible in real time

As a highly effective audit analysis, Process Analytics is already an iterative test at intervals of three to twelve months. After the initial implementation, compliance violations, weak or even ineffective controls, and even cases of fraud, are detected reliably. The findings can be used in the aftermath to stop the weaknesses. A further implementation of the analysis after a waiting period makes it possible to assess the effectiveness of the measures taken.

In some application scenarios, the seamless integration of the process analysis with the visual dashboard to the IT system landscape is recommended so that processes can be monitored in near real-time. This connection can also be supplemented by notification systems, so that decision makers and auditors are automatically informed about the latest process bottlenecks or violations via SMS or e-mail.

Fazit

Process Analytics is, in the course of the digitalization, the highly effective methodology from the area of ​​Big Data Analysis for detecting compliance-relevant events throughout the company and also providing visual support for forensic data analysis. Since this is a method, and not a software, an expansion of the IT system landscape, especially for entry, is not absolutely necessary, but can be carried out by internal or external employees at regular intervals.

ID3-Algorithmus: Ein Rechenbeispiel

Dieser Artikel ist Teil 3 von 4 der Artikelserie Maschinelles Lernen mit Entscheidungsbaumverfahren und nun wollen wir einen Entscheidungsbaum aus Daten herleiten, jedoch ohne Programmierung, sondern direkt auf Papier (bzw. HTML :-).

Folgender Datensatz sei gegeben:

Zeile Kundenart Zahlungsgeschwindigkeit Kauffrequenz Herkunft Zahlungsmittel: Rechnung?
 1  Neukunde  niedrig  niedrig  Inland  false
 2  Neukunde  niedrig  niedrig  Ausland  false
 3  Stammkunde  niedrig  niedrig  Inland  true
 4  Normalkunde  mittel  niedrig  Inland  true
 5  Normalkunde  hoch  hoch  Inland  true
 6  Normalkunde  hoch  hoch  Ausland  false
 7  Stammkunde  hoch  hoch  Ausland  true
 8  Neukunde  mittel  niedrig  Inland  false
 9  Neukunde  hoch  hoch  Inland  true
 10  Normalkunde  mittel  hoch  Inland  true
 11  Neukunde  mittel  hoch  Ausland  true
 12  Stammkunde  mittel  niedrig  Ausland  true
 13  Stammkunde  niedrig  hoch  Inland  true
 14  Normalkunde  mittel  niedrig  Ausland  false

Gleich vorweg ein Disclaimer: Der Datensatz ist natürlich überaus klein, ja gerade zu winzig. Dafür würden wir in der Praxis niemals einen Machine Learning Algorithmus einsetzen. Dennoch bleiben wir besser übersichtlich und nachvollziehbar mit diesen 14 Zeilen. Das Lernziel dieser Übung ist es, ein Gefühl für die Erstellung von Entscheidungsbäumen zu erhalten.
Zu beachten ist ferner, dass dieser Datensatz bereits aggregiert ist, denn eigentlich nummerisch abbildbare Daten wurden in Klassen zusammengefasst.

Das Ziel:

Der Datensatz spielt wieder, welchem Kunden (ID) bisher die Zahlung per Rechnung erlaubt und nicht widerrufen wurde. Das Ziel soll sein, eine Vorhersage darüber zu machen zu können, wann ein Kunde per Rechnung zahlen darf und wann nicht (dann per Vorkasse).

Der Algorithmus:

Wir verwenden den ID3-Algorithmus in seiner Reinform. Der ID3-Algorithmus ist der gängigste Algorithmus zum Aufbau datengetriebener Entscheidungsbäume und es gibt mehrere Abwandlungen. Die Vorgehensweise des Algorithmus wird in dem Teil 2 der Artikelserie Entscheidungsbaum-Algorithmus ID3 erläutert.

1. Schritt: Auswählen des Attributes mit dem höchsten Informationsgewinn

Der Informationsgewinn eines Attributes (A) im Sinne des ID3-Algorithmus ist die Differenz aus der Entropie (E(S)) (siehe Teil 1 der Artikelserie Entropie, ein Maß für die Unreinheit in Daten) des gesamten Datensatzes (S) und der Summe aus den gewichteten Entropien des Attributes für jeden einzelnen Wert (Value i), der im Attribut vorkommt:
IG(S, A) = H(S) - \sum_{i=1}^n \frac{\bigl|S_i\bigl|}{\bigl|S\bigl|} \cdot H(S_i)

1.1 Gesamt-Entropie des Datensatzes berechnen

Erstmal schauen wir uns die Entropie des gesamten Datensatzes an. Die Entropie bezieht sich dabei auf das gewünschte Klassifikationsergebnis, also ist die Zahlung via Rechnung erlaubt oder nicht? Diese Frage wird entweder mit true oder false beantwortet.

H(S) = - \frac{9}{14} \cdot \log_2(\frac{9}{4}) - \frac{5}{14} \cdot \log_2(\frac{5}{4})  = 0.94

1.2 Berechnung der Informationsgewinne aller Attribute

Berechnen wir nun also die Informationsgewinne über alle Spalten.

Attribut Subset Count(true) Count(false)
Kundenart “Neukunde” 2 3
“Stammkunde” 4 0
“Normalkunde” 3 2

Wir zerlegen den gesamten Datensatz gedanklich in drei Kategorien der Kundenart und berechnen die Entropie bezogen auf das Klassifikationsziel:

H(S_{Neukunde}) = - \frac{2}{5} \cdot \log_2(\frac{2}{5}) - \frac{3}{5} \cdot \log_2(\frac{3}{5})  = 0.97

H(S_{Stammkunde}) = - \frac{4}{4} \cdot \log_2(\frac{4}{4}) - \frac{0}{4} \cdot \log_2(\frac{0}{4})  = 0.00

H(S_{Normalkunde}) = - \frac{3}{5} \cdot \log_2(\frac{3}{5}) - \frac{2}{5} \cdot \log_2(\frac{2}{5})  = 0.97

Zur Erinnerung, der Informationsgewinn (Information Gain) wird wie folgt berechnet:

    \[ IG(S, A_{Kundenart}) =  - \sum_{i=1}^n \frac{\bigl|S_i\bigl|}{\bigl|S\bigl|} \cdot H(S_i) \]

Angewendet auf das Attribut “Kundenart”…

    \[ IG(S, A_{Kundenart}) =  H(S) - \frac{\bigl|S_{Neukunde}\bigl|}{\bigl|S\bigl|} \cdot H(S_{Neukunde}) - \frac{\bigl|S_{Stammkunde}\bigl|}{\bigl|S\bigl|} \cdot H(S_{Stammkunde}) - \frac{\bigl|S_{Normalkunde}\bigl|}{\bigl|S\bigl|} \cdot H(S_{Normalkunde}) \]

… erhalten wir der Formal nach folgenden Informationsgewinn:

    \[ IG(S, A_{Kundenart}) =  0.94 - \frac{5}{14} \cdot 0.97 - \frac{4}{14} \cdot 0.00 - \frac{5}{14} \cdot 0.97 = 0.247 \]

Nun für die weiteren Spalten:

Attribut Subset Count(true) Count(false)
Zahlungsgeschwindigkeit “niedrig” 2 2
“mittel” 4 2
“schnell” 3 1

Entropien für die “Zahlungsgeschwindigkeit”:

H(S_{niedrig}) = - \frac{2}{4} \cdot \log_2(\frac{2}{4}) - \frac{2}{4} \cdot \log_2(\frac{2}{4})  = 1.00

H(S_{mittel}) = - \frac{4}{6} \cdot \log_2(\frac{4}{6}) - \frac{2}{6} \cdot \log_2(\frac{2}{6})  = 0.92

H(S_{schnell}) = - \frac{3}{4} \cdot \log_2(\frac{3}{4}) - \frac{1}{4} \cdot \log_2(\frac{1}{4})  = 0.81

So berechnen wir wieder den Informationsgewinn:

    \[ IG(S, A_{Zahlungsgeschwindigkeit}) =  H(S) - \frac{\bigl|S_{niedrig}\bigl|}{\bigl|S\bigl|} \cdot H(S_{niedrig}) - \frac{\bigl|S_{mittel}\bigl|}{\bigl|S\bigl|} \cdot H(S_{mittel}) - \frac{\bigl|S_{schnell}\bigl|}{\bigl|S\bigl|} \cdot H(S_{schnell}) \]

Einsatzen und ausrechnen:

    \[ IG(S, A_{Zahlungsgeschwindigkeit}) =  0.94 - \frac{4}{14} \cdot 1.00 - \frac{6}{14} \cdot 0.92 - \frac{4}{14} \cdot 0.81 = 0.029 \]

Und nun für die Spalte “Kauffrequenz”:

Attribut Subset Count(true) Count(false)
Kauffrequenz “niedrig” 3 4
“hoch” 6 1

Entropien:

H(S_{niedrig}) = - \frac{3}{7} \cdot \log_2(\frac{3}{7}) - \frac{4}{7} \cdot \log_2(\frac{4}{7})  = 0.99

H(S_{hoch}) = - \frac{6}{7} \cdot \log_2(\frac{6}{7}) - \frac{1}{7} \cdot \log_2(\frac{1}{7})  = 0.59

Informationsgewinn:

    \[ IG(S, A_{Kauffrequenz}) =  H(S) - \frac{\bigl|S_{niedrig}\bigl|}{\bigl|S\bigl|} \cdot H(S_{niedrig}) - \frac{\bigl|S_{hoch}\bigl|}{\bigl|S\bigl|} \cdot H(S_{hoch}) \]

Einsetzen und Ausrechnen:

    \[ IG(S, A_{Kauffrequenz}) =  0.94 - \frac{7}{14} \cdot 1.00 - \frac{7}{14} \cdot 0.59 = 0.150 \]

Und last but not least die Spalte “Herkunft”:

Attribut Subset Count(true) Count(false)
Herkunft “Inland” 6 2
“Ausland” 3 3

Entropien:

H(S_{Inland}) = - \frac{6}{8} \cdot \log_2(\frac{6}{8}) - \frac{2}{8} \cdot \log_2(\frac{2}{8})  = 0.81

H(S_{Ausland}) = - \frac{3}{6} \cdot \log_2(\frac{3}{6}) - \frac{3}{6} \cdot \log_2(\frac{3}{6})  = 1.00

Informationsgewinn:

    \[ IG(S, A_{Herkunft}) =  H(S) - \frac{\bigl|S_{Inland}\bigl|}{\bigl|S\bigl|} \cdot H(S_{Inland}) - \frac{\bigl|S_{Ausland}\bigl|}{\bigl|S\bigl|} \cdot H(S_{Ausland}) \]

Einsetzen und Ausrechnen:

    \[ IG(S, A_{Herkunft}) =  0.94 - \frac{8}{14} \cdot 0.81 - \frac{6}{14} \cdot 1.00 = 0.05 \]

2. Schritt: Anlegen des Wurzel-Knotens

Der Informationsgewinn ist für das Attribut “Kundenart” am größten, daher entscheiden wir uns im Sinne des ID3-Algorithmus für dieses Attribut als Wurzel-Knoten.

3. Schritt: Rekursive Wiederholung (!!!)

Nun stellt sich natürlich die Frage: Wie geht es weiter?

Der Algorithmus kann eigentlich nur eines: Einen Wurzelknoten finden. Diesen Vorgang müssen wir nun nur noch rekursiv wiederholen, und das tun wir wie folgt.

Der Datensatz wurde bereits aufgeteilt in die drei Kundenarten. Für jede Kundenart ergibt sich jeweils ein Subset mit den verbleibenden Attributen. Für alle drei Subsets erstellen wir dann wieder einen Wurzelknoten, so dass ein neuer Ast entsteht.

3.1 Erster Rekursionsschritt

Machen wir also weiter und bestimmen wir das nächste Attribut nach der Kundenart, für die Fälle Kundenart = “Neukunde”:

Zeile Kundenart Zahlungsgeschwindigkeit Kauffrequenz Herkunft Zahlungsmittel: Rechnung?
 1  Neukunde  niedrig  niedrig  Inland  false
 2  Neukunde  niedrig  niedrig  Ausland  false
 8  Neukunde  mittel  niedrig  Inland  false
 9  Neukunde  hoch  hoch  Inland  true
 11  Neukunde  mittel  hoch  Ausland  true

Die Entropie des Gesamtdatensatzes (ja, es ist für diesen Schritt betrachtet der gesamte Datensatz!) ist wie folgt:

H(S_{Neukunde}) = - \frac{2}{5} \cdot \log_2(\frac{2}{5}) - \frac{3}{5} \cdot \log_2(\frac{3}{5})  = 0.97

Die Entropie ist weit weg von einer bestimmten Wahrscheinlichkeit (nahe der Gleichverteilung). Daher müssen wir hier nochmal ansetzen und losrechnen:

Entropien für “Zahlungsgeschwindigkeit” bei Neukunden:

H(S_{niedrig}) = 0.00

H(S_{mittel}) = 1.00

H(S_{hoch}) = 0.00

Informationsgewinn des Attributes “Zahlungsgeschwindigkeit” bei Neukunden:

    \[ IG(S_{Neukunde},A_{Zahlungsgeschwindigkeit}) = 0.97 - \frac{3}{5} \cdot 0.00 - \frac{2}{5} \cdot 1.00 -  \frac{1}{5} \cdot 0.00 = 0.57 \]

Betrachtung der Spalte “Kauffrequenz” bei Neukunden:

Entropien für “Kauffrequenz” bei Neukunden:

H(S_{niedrig}) = 0.00

H(S_{hoch}) = 0.00

Informationsgewinn des Attributes “Kauffrequenz” bei Neukunden:

    \[ IG(S_{Neukunde},A_{Kauffrequenz}) = 0.97 - \frac{3}{5} \cdot 0.00 - \frac{2}{5} \cdot 0.00 = 0.97 \]

Betrachtung der Spalte “Herkunft” bei Neukunden:

Entropien für “Herkunft” bei Neukunden:

H(S_{Inland}) = 0.92

H(S_{hoch}) = 1.00

Informationsgewinn des Attributes “Herkunft” bei Neukunden:

    \[ IG(S_{Neukunde},A_{Herkunft}) = 0.97 - \frac{3}{5} \cdot 0.92 - \frac{2}{5} \cdot 1.00 = 0.018 \]

Wir entscheiden uns also für das Attribut “Kauffrequenz” als Ast nach der Entscheidung “Neukunde”, denn dieses Attribut bring uns den größten Informationsgewinn und trennt uns die Unterscheidung für oder gegen das Zahlungsmittel “Rechnung” eindeutig auf.

3.1 Zweiter Rekursionsschritt

Was passiert mit der Kundenart “Stammkunde”?

Zeile Kundenart Zahlungsgeschwindigkeit Kauffrequenz Herkunft Zahlungsmittel: Rechnung?
 3  Stammkunde  niedrig  niedrig  Inland  true
 7  Stammkunde  hoch  hoch  Ausland  true
 12  Stammkunde  mittel  niedrig  Ausland  true
 13  Stammkunde  niedrig  hoch  Inland  true

Die Antwort ist einfach: Nichts!
Wer ein Stammkunde ist, dem wurde stets die Zahlung per Rechnung erlaubt.

H(S_{Stammkunde}) = 0.0

3.1 Dritter Rekursionsschritt

Fehlt nun nur noch die Frage nach der Unterscheidung von Normalkunden.

Zeile Kundenart Zahlungsgeschwindigkeit Kauffrequenz Herkunft Zahlungsmittel: Rechnung?
 4  Normalkunde  mittel  niedrig  Inland  true
 5  Normalkunde  hoch  hoch  Inland  true
 6  Normalkunde  hoch  hoch  Ausland  false
 14  Normalkunde  mittel  niedrig  Ausland  false

Zwar ist die Entropie des Subsets der Normalkunden…

H(S_{Normalkunde}) = 1.0

… denkbar schlecht, da maximal. Aber wir können genauso vorgehen, wie wir es bei dem Subset der Neukunden getan haben. Ich nehme es nun aber vorweg: Wenn wir uns den Datensatz näher ansehen, erkennen wir, dass wir diese Gesamtentropie von 1.0 für das Subset “Normalkunde” nicht mit den Attributen “Kauffrequenz” oder “Herkunft” reduzieren können, da dieses auch für sich betrachtet in Entropien der Größe 1.0 erhalten werden. Das Attribut “Herkunft” hingegen teilt den Datensatz sauber in true und false auf:

Somit ist der Informationsgewinn für das Attribut “Herkunft” am größten und wir haben unseren Baum komplett und – glücklicherweise – eindeutig bestimmen können!

Ergebnis: Der Entscheidungsbaum

Somit haben wir den Entscheidungsbaum über den ID3-Algorithmus erstellt, der eine Auskunft darüber macht, ob einem Kunden die Zahlung über Rechnung (statt Vorkasse) erlaubt wird:

true = Rechnung als Zahlungsmittel erlaubt
false = Rechnung als Zahlungsmittel nicht erlaubt

Ensemble Learning

Stellen Sie sich vor, Sie haben die Frage Ihres Lebens vor sich. Die korrekte Beantwortung dieser Frage wird Ihr Leben positiv beeinflussen, andernfalls negativ. Aber Sie haben Glück: Sie dürfen einen Experten, den Sie auswählen dürfen, um Rat fragen oder Sie dürfen eine annonyme Gruppe, sagen wir 1.000 Personen, um Rat fragen. Welchen Rat würden Sie sich einholen? Die einzelne Experten-Meinung oder die aggriegierte Antwort einer ganzen Gruppe von Menschen?
Oder wie wäre es mit einer Gruppe von Experten?

Ensemble Learning

Beim Einsatz eines maschinellen Lernalgorithmus auf ein bestimmtes Problem kann durchaus eine angemessene Präzision (Accuracy, eine Quote an Prädiktionsergebnissen, die als korrekt einzustufen sind) erzielt werden, doch oftmals reicht die Verlässlichkeit eines einzelnen Algorithmus nicht aus. Algorithmen können mit unterschiedlichen Parametern verwendet werden, die sich bei bestimmten Daten-Situationen verschieden auswirken. Bestimmte Algorithmen neigen zur Unteranpassung (Underfitting), andere zur Überanpassung (Overfitting).

Soll Machine Learning für den produktiven Einsatz mit bestmöglicher Zuverlässigkeit entwickelt und eingesetzt werden, kommt sinnvollerweise Ensemble Learning zum Einsatz. Beim Ensemble Learning wird ein Ensemble (Kollektiv von Prädiktoren) gebildet um ein Ensemble Average (Kollektivmittelwert) zu bilden. Sollte also beispielsweise einige Klassifizierer bei bestimmten Daten-Eingaben in ihren Ergebnissen ausreißen, steuern andere Klassifizierer dagegen. Ensemble Learning kommt somit in der Hoffnung zum Einsatz, dass eine Gruppe von Algorithmen ein besseres Ergebnis im Mittel erzeugen als es ein einzelner Algorithmus könnte.

Ich spreche nachfolgend bevorzugt von Klassifizierern, jedoch kommt Ensemble Learning auch bei der Regression zum Einsatz.

Voting Classifiers (bzw. Voting Regressors)

Eine häufige Form – und i.d.R. auch als erstes Beispiel eines Ensemble Learners – ist das Prinzip der Voting Classifiers. Das Prinzip der Voting Classifiers ist eine äußerst leicht nachvollziehbare Idee des Ensemble Learnings und daher vermutlich auch eine der bekanntesten Form der Kollektivmittelwert-Bildung. Gleich vorweg: Ja, es gibt auch Voting Regressors, jedoch ist dies ein Konzept, das nicht ganz ohne umfassendere Aggregation auf oberster Ebene auskommen wird, daher wäre für die Zwecke der akkurateren Regression eher das Stacking (siehe unten) sinnvoll.

Eine häufige Frage im Data Science ist, welcher Klassifizierer für bestimmte Zwecke die besseren sind: Entscheidungsbäume, Support-Vector-Machines, k-nächste-Nachbarn oder logistische Regressionen?

Warum nicht einfach alle nutzen? In der Tat wird genau das nicht selten praktiziert. Das Ziel dieser Form des Ensemble Learnings ist leicht zu erkennen: Die unterschiedlichen Schwächen aller Algorithmen sollen sich – so die Hoffnung – gegenseitig aufheben. Alle Algorithmen (dabei können auch mehrere gleiche Algorithmen mit jedoch jeweils unterschiedlichen Paramtern gemeint sein, z. B. mehrere knN-Klassifizierer mit unterschiedlichen k-Werten und Dimensionsgewichtungen) werden auf dasselbe Problem hin trainiert.

Stacking

Bei der Prädiktion werden entweder alle Klassifizierer gleich behandelt oder unterschiedlich gewichtet (wobei größere Unterschiede der Gewichtungen unüblich, und vermutlich auch nicht sinnvoll, sind). Entsprechend einer Ensemble-Regel werden die Ergebnisse aller Klassifizierer aggregiert, bei Klassifikation durch eine Mehrheitsentscheidung, bei Regression meistens durch Durchschnittsbildung oder (beim Stacking) durch einen weiteren Regressor.

Abgesehen davon, dass wir mit dem Ensemble-Klassifizierer bzw. Regressoren vermutlich bessere Ergebnisse haben werden, haben wir nun auch eine weitere Information hinzubekommen: Eine Entropie über die Wahrscheinlichkeit. Bestenfalls haben alle Klassifizierer die gleiche Vorhersage berechnet, schlechtestensfalls haben wir ein Unentschieden. So können wir Vorhersagen in ihrer Aussagekraft bewerten. Analog kann bei Regressionen die Varianz der Ergebnisse herangezogen werden, um das Ergebnis in seiner Aussagekraft zu bewerten.

Betrachtung im Kontext von: Eine Kette ist nur so stark, wie ihr schwächstes Glied

Oft heißt es, dass Ensemble Learning zwar bessere Ergebnisse hervorbringt, als der schwächste Klassifizier in der Gruppe, aber auch schlechtere als der beste Klassifizierer. Ist Ensemble Learning also nur ein Akt der Ratlosigkeit, welcher Klassifizierer eigentlich der bessere wäre?

Ja und nein. Ensemble Learning wird tatsächlich in der Praxis dazu verwendet, einzelne Schwächen abzufangen und auch Ausreißer-Verhalten auf bisher andersartiger Daten abzuschwächen. Es ist ferner jedoch so, dass Ensemble Learner mit vielen Klassifizieren sogar bessere Vorhersagen liefern kann, als der beste Klassifizierer im Programm.

Das liegt an dem Gesetz der großen Zahlen, dass anhand eines Beispiels verdeutlicht werden kann: Bei einem (ausbalanzierten) Münzwurf liegt die Wahrscheinlichkeit bei genau 50,00% dafür, Kopf oder Zahl zu erhalten. Werfe ich die Münze beispielsweise zehn Mal, erhalte ich aber vielleicht drei Mal Kopf und sieben mal Zahl. Werfe ich sie 100 Mal, erhalte ich vielleicht 61 Mal Kopf und 39 Mal Zahl. Selbst nur 20 Mal die Zahl zu erhalten, wäre bei nur 100 Würfen gar nicht weit weg von unwahrscheinlich. Würde ich die Münze jedoch 10.000 Male werfen, würde ich den 50% schon sehr annähern, bei 10 Millionen Würfen wird sich die Verteilung ganz sicher als Gleichverteilung mit 50,0x% für Kopf oder Zahl einpendeln.

Nun stellt man sich (etwas überspitzt, da analog zu den Wünzwürfen) nun einen Ensemble Learner mit einer Gruppe von 10.000 Klassifiziern vor. Und angenommen, jeder einzelne Klassifizierer ist enorm schwach, denn eine richtige Vorhersage trifft nur mit einer Präzision von 51% zu (also kaum mehr als Glücksspiel), dann würde jedoch die Mehrheit der 10.000 Klassifizierer (nämlich 51%) richtig liegen und die Mehrheitsentscheidung in den absolut überwiegenden Fällen die korrekte Vorhersage treffen.

Was hingehen in diesem Kontext zutrifft: Prädiktionen via Ensemble Learning sind zwangsläufig langsam. Durch Parallelisierung der Klassifikation kann natürlich viel Zeit eingespart werden, dann ist das Ensemble Learning jedoch mindestens immer noch so langsam, wie der langsamste Klassifizierer.

Bagging

Ein Argument gegen den Einsatz von gänzlich verschiedenen Algortihmen ist, dass ein solcher Ensemble Learner nur schwer zu verstehen und einzuschätzen ist (übrigens ein generelles Problem im maschinellen Lernen). Bereits ein einzelner Algorithmus (z. B. Support Vector Machine) kann nach jedem Training alleine auf Basis der jeweils ausgewählten Daten (zum Training und zum Testen) recht unterschiedlich in seiner Vorhersage ausfallen.

Bagging (kurze Form von Bootstrap Aggregation) ist ein Ensemble Learning Prinzip, bei dem grundsätzlich der gleiche Algorithmus parallel mit unterschiedlichen Aufteilungen der Daten trainiert (und natürlich getestet) wird. Die Aufteilung der Daten kann dabei komplett (der vollständige Datensatz wird verteilt und verwendet) oder auch nur über Stichproben erfolgen (dann gibt es mehrfach verwendete Datenpunkte, aber auch solche, die überhaupt nicht verwendet werden). Das Ziel ist dabei insbesondere, im Endergebnis Unter- und Überanpassung zu vermeiden. Gibt es viele Dichte-Cluster und Ausreißer in den Daten, wird nicht jeder Klassifizierer sich diesen angepasst haben können. Jede Instanz der Klassifizierer erhält weitgehend unterschiedliche Daten mit eigenen Ausreißern und Dichte-Clustern, dabei darf es durchaus Überschneidungen bei der Datenaufteilung geben.

Pasting

Pasting ist fast genau wie Bagging, nur mit dem kleinen aber feinen Unterschied, dass sich die Datenaufteilung nicht überschneiden darf. Wird ein Datenpunkt durch Zufallsauswahl einem Klassifizierer zugewiesen, wird er nicht mehr für einen anderen Klassifizierer verwendet. Über die Trainingsdaten des einen Klassifizierers verfügt demnach kein anderer Klassifizierer. Die Klassifizierer sind somit völlig unabhängig voneinander trainiert, was manchmal explizit gewollt sein kann. Pasting setzt natürlich voraus, dass genug Daten vorhanden sind. Diese Voraussetzung ist gleichermaßen auch eine Antwort auf viele Probleme: Wie können große Datenmengen schnell verarbeitet werden? Durch die Aufteilung ohne Überschneidung auf parallele Knoten.

Random Forest

Random Forests sollten an dieser Stelle im Text eigentlich nicht stehen, denn sie sind ein Beispiel des parallelen Ensembles bzw. des Voting Classifiers mit Entscheidungsbäumen (Decision Trees). Random Forests möchte ich an dieser Stelle dennoch ansprechen, denn sie sind eine äußerst gängige Anwendung des Baggings oder (seltener) auch des Pastings für Entscheidungsbaumverfahren. Die Datenmenge wird durch Zufall aufgeteilt und aus jeder Aufteilung heraus wird ein Entscheidungsbaum erstellt. Eine Mehrheitsentscheidung der Klassifikationen aller Bäume ist das Ensemble Learning des Random Forests.

Random Forest ist ein Verfahren der Klassifikation oder Regression, das bereits so üblich ist, dass es mittlerweile längst in (fast) allen Machine Learning Bibliotheken implemeniert ist und – dank dieser Implementierung – in der Anwendung nicht komplizierter, als ein einzelner Entscheidungsbaum.

Stacking

Stacking ist eine Erweiterung des Voting Classifiers oder Voting Regressors um eine höhere Ebene (Blending-Level), die die beste Aggregation der Einzel-Ergebnisse erlernt. An der Spitze steht beim Stacking (mindestens) ein weiterer Klassifikator oder Regressor

Stacking ist insbesondere dann sinnvoll, wenn die Ergebnisse der einzelnen Algorithmen sehr unterschiedlich ausfallen können, was bei der Regression – da stetige Werte statt wenige Klassen – nahezu immer der Fall ist. Stacking-Algorithmen können sogar mehrere Schichten umfassen, was ihr Training wesentlich schwieriger gestaltet.

Boosting (Sequential Ensemble Learning)

Bagging, Pasting und Stacking sind parallele Verfahren des Ensemble Learning (was nicht bedeutet, dass die parallel dargestellten Algorithmen in der Praxis nicht doch sequenziell abgearbeitet werden). Zwangsweise sequenziell durchgeführt wird hingegen das Boosting, bei dem wir schwache Klassifizierer bzw. Regressoren durch Iteration in ihrem Training verstärken wollen. Boosting kann somit als eine Alternative zum Deep Learning gesehen werden. Während beim Deep Learning ein starker Algorithmus durch ein mehrschichtiges künstliches neuronales Netz dafür entworfen und trainiert wird, um ein komplexes Problem zu lösen (beispielsweise Testerkennung [OCR]), können derartige Herausforderungen auch mit schwächeren Klassifikatoren unter Einsatz von Boosting realisiert werden.

Boosting bezieht sich allein auf das Training und ist aus einer Not heraus entstanden: Wie bekommen wir bessere Prädiktionen mit einem eigentlich schwachen Lernalgorithmus, der tendenziell Unteranpassung erzeugt? Boosting ist eine Antwort auf Herausforderungen der Klassifikation oder Regression, bei der ein Algorithmus iterativ, also in mehreren Durchläufen, durch Anpassung von Gewichten trainiert wird.

Eines der bekanntesten Boosting-Verfahren ist AdaBoost. Der erste Schritt ist ein normales Training. Beim darauffolgenden Testen zeigen sich Klassifikations-/Regressionsfehler. Die fehlerhaft vorhergesagten Datenpunkte werden dann für einen nächsten Durchlauf höher gewichtet. Diese Iteration läuft einige Male, bis die Fehlerquote sich nicht mehr verbessert.

Bei AdaBoost werden falsch vorhergesagte Datensätze im jeweils nächsten Durchlauf höher gewichtet. Bei einem alternativen Boosing-Verfahren, dem Gradient Boosting (auf Basis der Gradientenmethode), werden Gewichtungen explizit in Gegenrichtung des Prädiktionsfehlers angepasst.

Was beispielsweise beim Voting Classifier der Random Forest ist, bei dem mehrere Entscheidungsbäume parallel arbeiten, sind das Äquvivalent beim Boosting die Gradient Boosted Trees, bei denen jeder Baum nur einen Teil der Daten akkurat beschreiben kann, die sequentielle Verschachtelung der Bäume jedoch auch herausfordernde Klassifikationen meistert.

Um bei dem Beispiel der Entscheidungsbäume zu bleiben: Sowohl Random Forests als auch Gradient Boosted Trees arbeiten grundsätzlich mit flachen Bäumen (schwache Klassifikatoren). Gradient Boosted Trees können durch die iterative Verstärkung generell eine höhere Präzision der Prädiktion erreichen als Random Forests, wenn die Feature- und Parameter-Auswahl bereits zu Anfang sinnvoll ist. Random Forests sind hingegen wiederum robuster bei der Feature- und Parameter-Auswahl, verstärken sich jedoch nicht gegenseitig, sondern sind in ihrem Endergebnis so gut, wie die Mehrheit der Bäume.

Buchempfehlungen

Mehr zum Thema Machine Learning und Ensemble Learning gewünscht? Folgende zwei Buchempfehlungen bieten nicht nur Erklärungen, sondern demonstrieren Ensemble Learning auch mit Beispiel-Code mit Python Scikit-Learn.

Hands-On Machine Learning with Scikit-Learn and TensorFlow: Concepts, Tools, and Techniques for Building Intelligent Systems Machine Learning mit Python: Das Praxis-Handbuch für Data Science, Predictive Analytics und Deep Learning (mitp Professional)

Big Data Essentials – Intro

1. Big Data Definition

Data umfasst Nummern, Text, Bilder, Audio, Video und jede Art von Informationen die in Ihrem Computer gespeichert werden können. Big Data umfasst Datenmengen, die eine oder mehrere der folgenden Eigenschaften aufweisen: Hohes Volumen (High Volume), hohe Vielfalt (High Variety) und / oder eine notwendige hohe Geschwindigkeit (High Velocity) zur Auswertung. Diese drei Eigenschaften werden oft auch als die 3V’s von Big Data bezeichnet.

1.1. Volumen: Menge der erzeugten Daten

Volumen bezieht sich auf die Menge der generierten Daten. Traditionelle Datenanalysemodelle erfordern typischerweise Server mit großen Speicherkapazitäten, bei massiver Rechenleistung sind diese Modelle nicht gut skalierbar. Um die Rechenleistung zu erhöhen, müssen Sie weiter investieren, möglicherweise auch in teurere proprietäre Hardware. Die NASA ist eines von vielen Unternehmen, die enorme Mengen an Daten sammeln. Ende 2014 sammelte die NASA alle paar Sekunden etwa 1,73 GB an Daten. Und auch dieser Betrag der Datenansammlung steigt an, so dass die Datenerfassung entsprechend exponentiell mitwachsen muss. Es resultieren sehr hohe Datenvolumen und es kann schwierig sein, diese zu speichern.

1.2. Vielfalt: Unterschiedliche Arten von Daten

Das  traditionelle  Datenmodell (ERM)  erfordert  die  Entwicklung  eines  Schemas,  das  die  Daten in ein Korsett zwingt. Um das Schema zu erstellen, muss man das Format der Daten kennen, die gesammelt werden. Daten  können  wie  XML-Dateien  strukturiert  sein,  halb  strukturiert  wie  E-Mails oder unstrukturiert wie Videodateien.

Wikipedia – als Beispiel – enthält mehr als nur Textdaten, es enthält Hyperlinks, Bilder, Sound-Dateien und viele andere Datentypen mit mehreren verschiedenen Arten von Daten. Insbesondere unstrukturierte   Daten haben   eine   große   Vielfalt.  Es   kann   sehr   schwierig   sein, diese Vielfalt in einem Datenmodell zu beschreiben.

1.3. Geschwindigkeit: Geschwindigkeit, mit der Daten genutzt werden

Traditionelle Datenanalysemodelle wurden für die Stapelverarbeitung (batch processing) entwickelt. Sie sammeln die gesamte Datenmenge und verarbeiten sie, um sie in die Datenbank zu speichern. Erst mit einer Echtzeitanalyse der Daten kann schnell auf Informationen reagiert werden. Beispielsweise können Netzwerksensoren, die mit dem Internet der Dinge (IoT) verbunden sind, tausende von Datenpunkten pro Sekunde erzeugen. Im Gegensatz zu Wikipedia, deren Daten später verarbeitet werden können, müssen Daten von Smartphones und anderen Netzwerkteilnehmern mit entsprechender Sensorik in  Echtzeit  verarbeitet  werden.

2. Geschichte von Big Data

2.1. Google Solution

  • Google File System speichert die Daten, Bigtable organisiert die Daten und MapReduce verarbeitet es.
  • Diese Komponenten arbeiten zusammen auf einer Sammlung von Computern, die als Cluster bezeichnet werden.
  • Jeder einzelne Computer in einem Cluster wird als Knoten bezeichnet.

2.2 Google File System

Das Google File System (GFS) teilt Daten in Stücke ‚Chunks’ auf. Diese ‚Chunks’ werden verteilt und auf verschiedene Knoten in einem Cluster nachgebildet. Der Vorteil ist nicht nur die mögliche parallele Verarbeitung bei der späteren Analysen, sondern auch die Datensicherheit. Denn die Verteilung und die Nachbildung schützen vor Datenverlust.

2.3. Bigtable

Bigtable ist ein Datenbanksystem, das GFS zum Speichern und Abrufen von Daten verwendet. Trotz seines Namens ist Bigtable nicht nur eine sehr große Tabelle. Bigtable ordnet die Datenspeicher mit einem Zeilenschlüssel, einem Spaltenschlüssel und einem Zeitstempel zu. Auf diese Weise können dieselben Informationen über einen längeren Zeitraum hinweg erfasst werden, ohne dass bereits vorhandene Einträge überschrieben werden. Die Zeilen sind dann in den Untertabellen partitioniert, die über einem Cluster verteilt sind. Bigtable wurde entwickelt, um riesige Datenmengen zu bewältigen, mit der Möglichkeit, neue Einträge zum Cluster hinzuzufügen, ohne dass eine der vorhandenen Dateien neu konfiguriert werden muss.

2.4. MapReduce

Als dritter Teil des Puzzles wurde ein Parallelverarbeitungsparadigma namens MapReduce genutzt, um die bei GFS gespeicherten Daten zu verarbeiten. Der Name MapReduce wird aus den Namen von zwei Schritten im Prozess übernommen. Obwohl der Mapreduce-Prozess durch Apache Hadoop berühmt geworden ist, ist das kaum eine neue Idee. In der Tat können viele gängige Aufgaben wie Sortieren und Falten von Wäsche als Beispiele für den MapReduce- Prozess betrachtet werden.

Quadratische Funktion:

  • wendet die gleiche Logik auf jeden Wert an, jeweils einen Wert
  • gibt das Ergebnis für jeden Wert aus
    (map square'(1 2 3 4)) = (1 4 9 16)

Additionsfunktion

  • wendet die gleiche Logik auf alle Werte an, die zusammen genommen werden.
    (reduce + ‘(1 4 9 16)) = 30

Die Namen Map und Reduce können bei der Programmierung mindestens bis in die 70er-Jahre zurückverfolgt werden. In diesem Beispiel sieht man, wie die Liste das MapReduce-Modell verwendet. Zuerst benutzt man Map der Quadratfunktion auf einer Eingangsliste für die Quadratfunktion, da sie abgebildet ist, alle angelegten Eingaben und erzeugt eine einzige Ausgabe pro Eingabe, in diesem Fall (1, 4, 9 und 16). Additionsfunktion reduziert die Liste und erzeugt eine einzelne Ausgabe von 30, der die Summe aller Eingänge ist.

Google nutzte die Leistung von MapReduce, um einen Suchmaschinen-Markt zu dominieren. Das Paradigma kam in der 19. Websearch-Engine zum Einsatz und etablierte sich innerhalb weniger Jahre und ist bis heute noch relevant. Google verwendete MapReduce auf verschiedene Weise, um die Websuche zu verbessern. Es wurde verwendet, um den Seiteninhalt zu indexieren und ein Ranking über die Relevant einer Webseite zu berechnen.

Dieses  Beispiel  zeigt  uns  den MapReduce-Algorithmus, mit dem Google Wordcount auf Webseiten ausführte. Die Map-Methode verwendet als Eingabe einen Schlüssel (key) und einen Wert, wobei der Schlüssel den Namen des Dokuments darstellt  und  der  Wert  der  Kontext  dieses Dokuments ist. Die Map-Methode durchläuft jedes Wort im Dokument und gibt es als Tuple zurück, die aus dem Wort und dem Zähler 1 besteht.

Die   Reduce-Methode   nimmt   als   Eingabe auch  einen  Schlüssel  und  eine  Liste  von  Werten an, in der der Schlüssel ein Wort darstellt. Die  Liste  von  Werten  ist  die  Liste  von  Zählungen dieses Worts. In diesem Beispiel ist der Wert 1. Die Methode “Reduce” durchläuft alle Zählungen. Wenn die Schleife beendet ist, um die Methode zu reduzieren, wird sie als Tuple zurückgegeben, die aus dem Wort und seiner Gesamtanzahl besteht.

 

The importance of domain knowledge – A healthcare data science perspective

Data scientists have (and need) many skills. They are frequently either former academic researchers or software engineers, with knowledge and skills in statistics, programming, machine learning, and many other domains of mathematics and computer science. These skills are general and allow data scientists to offer valuable services to almost any field. However, data scientists in some cases find themselves in industries they have relatively little knowledge of.

This is especially true in the healthcare field. In healthcare, there is an enormous amount of important clinical knowledge that might be relevant to a data scientist. It is unreasonable to expect a data scientist to not only have all of the skills typically required of a data scientist, but to also have all of the knowledge a medical professional may have.

Why is domain knowledge necessary?

This lack of domain knowledge, while perfectly understandable, can be a major barrier to healthcare data scientists. For one thing, it’s difficult to come up with project ideas in a domain that you don’t know much about. It can also be difficult to determine the type of data that may be helpful for a project – if you want to build a model to predict a health outcome (for example, whether a patient has or is likely to develop a gastrointestinal bleed), you need to know what types of variables might be related to this outcome so you can make sure to gather the right data.

Knowing the domain is useful not only for figuring out projects and how to approach them, but also for having rules of thumb for sanity checks on the data. Knowing how data is captured (is it hand-entered? Is it from machines that can give false readings for any number of reasons?) can help a data scientist with data cleaning and from going too far down the wrong path. It can also inform what true outliers are and which values might just be due to measurement error.

Often the most challenging part of building a machine learning model is feature engineering. Understanding clinical variables and how they relate to a health outcome is extremely important for this. Is a long history of high blood pressure important for predicting heart problems, or is only very recent history? How long a time horizon is considered ‘long’ or ‘short’ in this context? What other variables might be related to this health outcome? Knowing the domain can help direct the data exploration and greatly speed (and enhance) the feature engineering process.

Once features are generated, knowing what relationships between variables are plausible helps for basic sanity checks. If you’re finding the best predictor of hospitalization is the patient’s eye color, this might indicate an issue with your code. Being able to glance at the outcome of a model and determine if they make sense goes a long way for quality assurance of any analytical work.

Finally, one of the biggest reasons a strong understanding of the data is important is because you have to interpret the results of analyses and modeling work. Knowing what results are important and which are trivial is important for the presentation and communication of results. An analysis that determines there is a strong relationship between age and mortality is probably well-known to clinicians, while weaker but more surprising associations may be of more use. It’s also important to know what results are actionable. An analysis that finds that patients who are elderly are likely to end up hospitalized is less useful for trying to determine the best way to reduce hospitalizations (at least, without further context).

How do you get domain knowledge?

In some industries, such as tech, it’s fairly easy and straightforward to see an end-user’s prospective. By simply viewing a website or piece of software from the user’s point of view, a data scientist can gain a lot of the needed context and background knowledge needed to understand where their data is coming from and how their model output is being used. In the healthcare industry, it’s more difficult. A data scientist can’t easily choose to go through med school or the experience of being treated for a chronic illness. This means there is no easy single answer to where to gain domain knowledge. However, there are many avenues available.

Reading literature and attending presentations can boost one’s domain knowledge. However, it’s often difficult to find resources that are penetrable for someone who is not already a clinician. To gain deep knowledge, one needs to be steeped in the topic. One important avenue to doing this is through the establishment of good relationships with clinicians. Clinicians can be powerful allies that can help point you in the right direction for understanding your data, and simply by chatting with them you can gain important insights. They can also help you visit the clinics or practices to interact with the people that perform the procedures or even watch the procedures being done. At Fresenius Medical Care, where I work, members of my team regularly visit clinics. I have in the last year visited one of our dialysis clinics, a nephrology practice, and a vascular care unit. These experiences have been invaluable to me in developing my knowledge of the treatment of chronic illnesses.

In conclusion, it is crucial for data scientists to acquire basic familiarity in the field they are working in and in being part of collaborative teams that include people who are technically knowledgeable in the field they work in. This said, acquiring even an essential understanding (such as “Medicine 101”) may go a long way for the data scientists in being able to become self-sufficient in essential feature selection and design.

 

Shiny Web Applikationen

Jede Person, die irgendwie mit Daten arbeitet, kommt nicht herum, aus Analysen oder Modellen gezogene Erkenntnisse mit anderen zu teilen. Meist haben diese Personen keinen statistischen oder mathematischen Hintergrund. Für diese sollten die Ergebnisse nicht nur verständlich, sondern im besten Fall auch visuell ansprechend aufbereitet sein. Neben recht teuren Softwarelösungen wie Tableau oder QlikView gibt es von R-Studio auch eine (zumindest im kleinen Rahmen) kostenfreie Lösung – R-Shiny.

Shiny ist ein R Paket, mit dessen Hilfe man interaktive Webapplikationen oder Dashboards erstellen kann, bei dem man auf den vollen Funktionsumfang aller R-Pakete zugreifen kann.

Bei der Erstellung für einfache Shiny-Apps sind keine HTML, CSS oder Javascript Kenntnisse nötig. Shiny teilt sich im Prinzip in zwei Programme: Das Front-End wird in der Datei ui.r festgelegt. Alles was im Back-End passiert, wird in der Datei server.r beschrieben. R-Studio übernimmt danach das Rendern des Front- Ends und man erhält eine übliche HTML-Datei, in dessen Backend R läuft.

Die Vorteile der Einfachheit, nur mit R eine funktionale Web-App erstellen können, hat natürlich auch seine Nachteile. Shiny ist, was das Design betrifft, eher limitiert und auch die Platzierung von Inputs wie Slidern, Drop-Downs oder auch Outputs wie Grafiken oder Tabellen ist stark beschränkt.

Eine kaum bekannte und dokumentierte Funktion von R-Shiny ist die Funktion „htmlTemplate“. Mit dieser lassen sich komplett in HTML, CSS und gegebenenfalls Javascript geschriebene Websites mit der vollen Funktionalität von R im Back-End integrieren – und sehen um Längen besser aus als rein in R geschriebene Web-Apps.

Wie man auf diese Art Shiny Apps programmiert zeige ich nun anhand des Folgenden Beispiels. Die folgenden Erklärungen sind mit Absicht kurz gehalten und stellen kein Tutorial dar, sondern sollen vielmehr die Möglichkeiten der Funktion „htmlTemplate“ zeigen.

Zunächst zur ui.R:

Der Code in der ui.R Datei ist recht einfach gehalten. Es werden nur die Bibliotheken geladen, auf die R zugreifen muss. Danach wird das html Template mit dem entsprechenden Namen geladen. Ansonsten werden in dieser Datei nur Input und Output als Variablen festgelegt.

 

In der Server.R Datei wird in diesem Beispiel der bekannte und oft verwendete Datensatz Mtcars verwendet. Zunächst wird mit dem Paket dplyr und der Funktion filter ein neuer Datensatz berechnet, der auf Nutzereingaben reagiert (sliderInput, siehe ui.R). Wenn in R-Shiny in DataFrames Berechnungen durchgeführt werden, müssen diese immer in einem sog. reactive Statement stehen. Danach werden mittels ggplot2 insgesamt drei Plots zu dem Datensatz erstellt.

Plot 1 stellt einen Zusammenhang zwischen Gewicht und Benzinverbrauch mittels linearer Regression dar. Plot 2 zeigt an, wie viele Zylinder die Fahrzeuge aus dem gefilterten Datensatz haben und Plot 3 zeigt die Korrelationen zwischen den Variablen an. Diese drei Plots sollen dem Endnutzer interaktiv zur Verfügung stehen.

 

In dieser HTML Datei wird die Struktur der Web App festgelegt. Diese enthält neben reichlich HTML auch ein paar Zeilen Internal Javascript, mit dem sich die die Diagramme ein- und ausblenden lassen. Das wichtigste in dieser Datei ist jedoch die Funktionsweise, mit der die in der ui.R Datei die Variablen an das Template übergeben werden. Jede template.html muss im Kopf (<head> … /<head>) die Funktion {{ headContent() }} enthalten. Damit werden die für Shiny benötigte Depedencies beim Rendern geladen. Diese übrigen, in der ui.R Datei deklarierten Variablen, werden ebenfalls mittels zwei geschweiften Klammern an das Template übergeben.

 

Nun muss für das Styling der App nur doch eine CSS-Datei geladen werden. Wichtig ist zu beachten, dass externe CSS Dateien bei Shiny immer in einem gesonderten Ordner mit dem Namen „www“ abgespeichert werden müssen. Auf diesen Ordner wird in der HTML Datei nicht gesondert verwiesen. Es reicht der Verweis <link rel=’stylesheet’ href=’style.css’/>.

Für den Upload der Datei müssen server.R, ui.R und template.html auf einer Ebene liegen, während wie bereits erwähnt die CSS Datei in einem gesonderten Ordner namens „www“ abliegen muss.

Die Web App liegt unter folgendem Link ab: https://markuslang1987.shinyapps.io/CustomShiny/

Einiges an der App ist sicherlich Spielerei, der Artikel soll in erster Linie aber die Möglichkeiten zeigen, die man mit einem selbst erstellten HTML Template im Gegensatz zu den recht eingeschränkten Möglichkeiten der normalen Shiny Programmierung zur Verfügung hat. Außerdem möchte ich mit diesem Artikel zeigen, dass Webentwicklung und Data Science/Analytics nicht zwangsläufig komplett voneinander unabhängige Welten sind.