The importance of being Data Scientist

Header-Image by Clint Adair on Unsplash.

The incredible results of Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence, Deep Learning in particular, could give the impression that Data Scientist are like magician. Just think of it. Recognising faces of people, translating from one language to another, diagnosing diseases from images, computing which product should be shown for us next to buy and so on from numbers only. Numbers which existed for centuries. What a perfect illusion. But it is only an illusion, as Data Scientist existed as well for centuries. However, there is a difference between the one from today compared to the one from the past: evolution.

The main activity of Data Scientist is to work with information also called data. Records of data are as old as mankind, but only within the 16 century did it include also numeric forms — as numbers started to gain more and more ground developing their own symbols. Numerical data, from a given phenomenon — being an experiment or the counts of sheep sold by week over the year –, was from early on saved in tabular form. Such a way to record data is interlinked with the supposition that information can be extracted from it, that knowledge — in form of functions — is hidden and awaits to be discovered. Collecting data and determining the function best fitting them let scientist to new insight into the law of nature right away: Galileo’s velocity law, Kepler’s planetary law, Newton theory of gravity etc.

Such incredible results where not possible without the data. In the past, one was able to collect data only as a scientist, an academic. In many instances, one needed to perform the experiment by himself. Gathering data was tiresome and very time consuming. No sensor which automatically measures the temperature or humidity, no computer on which all the data are written with the corresponding time stamp and are immediately available to be analysed. No, everything was performed manually: from the collection of the data to the tiresome computation.

More then that. Just think of Michael Faraday and Hermann Hertz and there experiments. Such endeavour where what we will call today an one-man-show. Both of them developed parts of the needed physics and tools, detailed the needed experiment settings, conducting the experiment and collect the data and, finally, computing the results. The same is true for many other experiments of their time. In biology Charles Darwin makes its case regarding evolution from the data collected in his expeditions on board of the Beagle over a period of 5 years, or Gregor Mendel which carry out a study of pea regarding the inherence of traits. In physics Blaise Pascal used the barometer to determine the atmospheric pressure or in chemistry Antoine Lavoisier discovers from many reaction in closed container that the total mass does not change over time. In that age, one person was enough to perform everything and was the reason why the last part, of a data scientist, could not be thought of without the rest. It was inseparable from the rest of the phenomenon.

With the advance of technology, theory and experimental tools was a specialisation gradually inescapable. As the experiments grow more and more complex, the background and condition in which the experiments were performed grow more and more complex. Newton managed to make first observation on light with a simple prism, but observing the line and bands from the light of the sun more than a century and half later by Joseph von Fraunhofer was a different matter. The small improvements over the centuries culminated in experiments like CERN or the Human Genome Project which would be impossible to be carried out by one person alone. Not only was it necessary to assign a different person with special skills for a separate task or subtask, but entire teams. CERN employs today around 17 500 people. Only in such a line of specialisation can one concentrate only on one task alone. Thus, some will have just the knowledge about the theory, some just of the tools of the experiment, other just how to collect the data and, again, some other just how to analyse best the recorded data.

If there is a specialisation regarding every part of the experiment, what makes Data Scientist so special? It is impossible to validate a theory, deciding which market strategy is best without the work of the Data Scientist. It is the reason why one starts today recording data in the first place. Not only the size of the experiment has grown in the past centuries, but also the size of the data. Gauss manage to determine the orbit of Ceres with less than 20 measurements, whereas the new picture about the black hole took 5 petabytes of recorded data. To put this in perspective, 1.5 petabytes corresponds to 33 billion photos or 66.5 years of HD-TV videos. If one includes also the time to eat and sleep, than 5 petabytes would be enough for a life time.

For Faraday and Hertz, and all the other scientist of their time, the goal was to find some relationship in the scarce data they painstakingly recorded. Due to time limitations, no special skills could be developed regarding only the part of analysing data. Not only are Data Scientist better equipped as the scientist of the past in analysing data, but they managed to develop new methods like Deep Learning, which have no mathematical foundation yet in spate of their success. Data Scientist developed over the centuries to the seldom branch of science which bring together what the scientific specialisation was forced to split.

What was impossible to conceive in the 19 century, became more and more a reality at the end of the 20 century and developed to a stand alone discipline at the beginning of the 21 century. Such a development is not only natural, but also the ground for the development of A.I. in general. The mathematical tools needed for such an endeavour where already developed by the half of the 20 century in the period when computing power was scars. Although the mathematical methods were present for everyone, to understand them and learn how to apply them developed quite differently within every individual field in which Machine Learning/A.I. was applied. The way the same method would be applied by a physicist, a chemist, a biologist or an economist would differ so radical, that different words emerged which lead to different langues for similar algorithms. Even today, when Data Science has became a independent branch, two different Data Scientists from different application background could find it difficult to understand each other only from a language point of view. The moment they look at the methods and code the differences will slowly melt away.

Finding a universal language for Data Science is one of the next important steps in the development of A.I. Then it would be possible for a Data Scientist to successfully finish a project in industry, turn to a new one in physics, then biology and returning to industry without much need to learn special new languages in order to be able to perform each tasks. It would be possible to concentrate on that what a Data Scientist does best: find the best algorithm. In other words, a Data Scientist could resolve problems independent of the background the problem was stated.

This is the most important aspect that distinguish the Data Scientist. A mathematician is limited to solve problems in mathematics alone, a physicist is able to solve problems only in physics, a biologist problems only in biology. With a unique language regarding the methods and strategies to solve Machine Learning/A.I. problems, a Data Scientist can solve a problem independent of the field. Specialisation put different branches of science at drift from each other, but it is the evolution of the role of the Data Scientist to synthesize from all of them and find the quintessence in a language which transpire beyond all the field of science. The emerging language of Data Science is a new building block, a new mathematical language of nature.

Although such a perspective does not yet exists, the principal component of Machine Learning/A.I. already have such proprieties partially in form of data. Because predicting for example the numbers of eggs sold by a company or the numbers of patients which developed immune bacteria to a specific antibiotic in all hospital in a country can be performed by the same prediction method. The data do not carry any information about the entities which are being predicted. It does not matter anymore if the data are from Faraday’s experiment, CERN of Human Genome. The same data set and its corresponding prediction could stand literary for anything. Thus, the result of the prediction — what we would call for a human being intuition and/or estimation — would be independent of the domain, the area of knowledge it originated.

It also lies at the very heart of A.I., the dream of researcher to create self acting entities, that is machines with consciousness. This implies that the algorithms must be able to determine which task, model is relevant at a given moment. It would be to cumbersome to have a model for every task and and every field and then try to connect them all in one. The independence of scientific language, like of data, is thus a mandatory step. It also means that developing A.I. is not only connected to develop a new consciousness, but, and most important, to the development of our one.

Mit Dashboards zur Prozessoptimierung

Geschäftlicher Erfolg ergibt sich oft aus den richtigen Fragen – zum Beispiel: „Wie kann ich sicherstellen, dass mein Produkt das beste ist?“, „Wie hebe ich mich von meinen Mitbewerbern ab?“ und „Wie baue ich mein Unternehmen weiter aus?“ Moderne Unternehmen gehen über derartige Fragen hinaus und stellen vielmehr die Funktionsweise ihrer Organisation in den Fokus. Fragen auf dieser Ebene lauten dann: „Wie kann ich meine Geschäftsprozesse so effizient wie möglich gestalten?“, „Wie kann ich Zusammenarbeit meiner Mitarbeiter verbessern?“ oder auch „Warum funktionieren die Prozesse meines Unternehmens nicht so, wie sie sollten?“

Um die Antworten auf diese (und viele andere!) Fragen zu erhalten, setzen immer mehr Unternehmen auf Process Mining. Process Mining hilft Unternehmen dabei, den versteckten Mehrwert in ihren Prozessen aufzudecken, indem Informationen zu Prozessmodellen aus den verschiedenen IT-Systemen eines Unternehmens automatisch erfasst werden. Auf diese Weise kann die End-to-End-Prozesslandschaft eines Unternehmens kontinuierlich überwacht werden. Manager und Mitarbeiter profitieren so von operativen Erkenntnissen und können potenzielle Risiken ebenso erkennen wie Möglichkeiten zur Verbesserung.

Process Mining ist jedoch keine „Wunderwaffe“, die Daten auf Knopfdruck in Erkenntnisse umwandelt. Eine Process-Mining-Software ist vielmehr als Werkzeug zu betrachten, das Informationen erzeugt, die anschließend analysiert und in Maßnahmen umgesetzt werden. Hierfür müssen die generierten Informationen den Entscheidungsträgern jedoch auch in einem verständlichen Format zur Verfügung stehen.

Bei den meisten Process-Mining-Tools steht nach wie vor die Verbesserung der Analysefunktionen im Fokus und die generierten Daten müssen von Experten oder Spezialisten innerhalb einer Organisation bewertet werden. Dies führt zwangsläufig dazu, dass es zwischen den einzelnen Schritten zu Verzögerungen kommt und die Abläufe bis zur Ergreifung von Maßnahmen ins Stocken geraten.

Process-Mining-Software, die einen kooperativeren Ansatz verfolgt und dadurch das erforderliche spezifische Fachwissen verringert, kann diese Lücke schließen. Denn nur wenn Informationen, Hypothesen und Analysen mit einer Vielzahl von Personen geteilt und erörtert werden, können am Ende aussagekräftige Erkenntnisse gewonnen werden.

Aktuelle Process-Mining-Software kann natürlich standardisierte Berichte und Informationen generieren. In einem sich immer schneller ändernden Geschäftsumfeld reicht dies jedoch möglicherweise nicht mehr aus. Das Erfolgsgeheimnis eines wirklich effektiven Process Minings besteht darin, Herausforderungen und geschäftliche Möglichkeiten vorherzusehen und dann in Echtzeit auf sie zu reagieren.

Dashboards der Zukunft

Nehmen wir ein analoges Beispiel, um aufzuzeigen, wie sich das Process Mining verbessern lässt. Der technologische Fortschritt soll die Dinge einfacher machen: Denken Sie beispielsweise an den Unterschied zwischen der handschriftlichen Erfassung von Ausgaben und einem Tabellenkalkulator. Stellen Sie sich nun vor, die Tabelle könnte Ihnen genau sagen, wann Sie sie lesen und wo Sie beginnen müssen, und würde Sie auf Fehler und Auslassungen aufmerksam machen, bevor Sie überhaupt bemerkt haben, dass sie Ihnen passiert sind.

Fortschrittliche Process-Mining-Tools bieten Unternehmen, die ihre Arbeitsweise optimieren möchten, genau diese Art der Unterstützung. Denn mit der richtigen Process-Mining-Software können individuelle operative Cockpits erstellt werden, die geschäftliche Daten in Echtzeit mit dem Prozessmanagement verbinden. Der Vorteil: Es werden nicht nur einzelne Prozesse und Ergebnisse kontinuierlich überwacht, sondern auch klare Einblicke in den Gesamtzustand eines Unternehmens geboten.

Durch die richtige Kombination von Process Mining mit den vorhandenen Prozessmodellen eines Unternehmens werden statisch dargestellte Funktionsweisen eines bestimmten Prozesses in dynamische Dashboards umgewandelt. Manager und Mitarbeiter erhalten so Warnungen über potenzielle Probleme und Schwachstellen in Ihren Prozessen. Und denken Sie daran, dynamisch heißt nicht zwingend störend: Die richtige Process-Mining-Software setzt an der richtigen Stelle in Ihren Prozessen an und bietet ein völlig neues Maß an Prozesstransparenz und damit an Prozessverständnis.

Infolgedessen können Transformationsinitiativen und andere Verbesserungspläne jederzeit angepasst und umstrukturiert werden und Entscheidungsträger mittels automatisierter Nachrichten sofort über Probleme informiert werden, sodass sich Korrekturmaßnahmen schneller als je zuvor umsetzen lassen. Der Vorteil: Unternehmen sparen Zeit und Geld, da Zykluszeiten verkürzt, Engpässe lokalisiert und nicht konforme Prozesse in der Prozesslandschaft der Organisation aufgedeckt werden.

Dynamische Dashboards von Signavio

 Testen Sie Signavio Process Intelligence und erleben Sie selbst, wie die modernste und fortschrittlichste Process-Mining-Software Ihnen dabei hilft, umsetzbare Einblicke in die Funktionsweise Ihres Unternehmens zu erhalten. Mit Signavios Live Insights profitieren Sie von einer zentralen Ansicht Ihrer Prozesse und Informationen, die in Form eines Ampelsystems dargestellt werden. Entscheiden Sie einfach, welche Prozesse und Aktivitäten Sie innerhalb eines Prozesses überwachen möchten, platzieren Sie Indikatoren und wählen Sie Grenzwerte aus. Alles Weitere übernimmt Signavio Process Intelligence, das Ihre Prozessmodelle mit den Daten verbindet.

Lassen Sie veraltete Arbeitsweisen hinter sich. Setzen Sie stattdessen auf faktenbasierte Erkenntnisse, um Ihre Geschäftstransformation zu unterstützen und Ihre Prozessmanagementinitiativen schneller zum Erfolg zu führen. Erfahren Sie mehr über Signavio Process Intelligence oder registrieren Sie sich für eine kostenlose 30-Tage-Testversion über www.signavio.com/try.

Erfahren Sie in unserem kostenlosen Whitepaper mehr über erfolgreiches Process Mining mit Signavio Process Intelligence.

Interview: Data Science im Einzelhandel

Interview mit Dr. Andreas Warntjen über den Weg zum daten-getriebenen Unternehmen – Data Science im Einzelhandel

Zur Einführung der Person:

Dr. Andreas Warntjen arbeitet seit Juli 2016 bei der Thalia Bücher GmbH, aktuell als Senior Manager Advanced and Predictive Analytics. Davor hat Herr Dr. Warntjen viele Jahre als Sozialwissenschaftler an ausländischen Universitäten geforscht. Er hat selbst langjährige Erfahrung in der statistischen Datenanalyse mit Stata, SPSS und R und arbeitet im Moment mit der in-memory Datenbank SAP HANA sowie Python und SAP’s Automated Predictive Library (APL).


Data Science Blog: Herr Dr. Warntjen, welche Bedeutung hat die Data Science für Sie und Ihren Bereich bei Thalia? Und wie ordnen Sie die verwandten Begriffe wie Predictive Analytics und Advanced Analytics im Kontext der geschäftlichen Entscheidungsfindung ein?

Data Science spielt bei Thalia in unterschiedlichsten Bereichen eine zunehmend größer werdende Rolle. Neben den klassischen Themen wie Betrugserkennung und Absatzprognosen ist für Thalia als Buchhändler Text Mining von zentraler Bedeutung. Das größte Potential liegt aus meiner Sicht darin, besser auf die Wünsche unserer  Kunden eingehen zu können.

Bei Thalia werden in schneller Taktung Innovationen eingeführt. Sei es die Filialabholung, bei der online bestellte Bücher innerhalb von 2 Stunden in einer Buchhandlung abgeholt werden können. Oder das Beratungs- und Bezahl-Tablet für die Mitarbeiter vor Ort. Oder Innovationen im Webshop. Bei der Beurteilung, ob diese Neuerungen tatsächlich Kundenwünsche effektiv und effizient erfüllen, kann Advanced Analytics helfen. Im Gegensatz zur klassischen Business Intelligence – die weiterhin eine wichtige Rolle bei der Entscheidungsfindung im Unternehmen spielen wird – berücksichtigt Advanced Analytics stärker die Vielfalt des Kundenverhaltens und der unterschiedlichen Situationen in den Filialen. Verfahren wie etwa multivariate Regressionsanalyse, Entscheidungsbäume und statistische Hypothesentest können die in Unternehmen etablierte Analyse von deskriptiven Statistiken – etwa der Vergleich von Umsatzzahlen zwischen Pilot- und Vergleichsfilialen mit Pivot-Tabellen – ergänzen.

Predictive Analytics kann helfen verschiedenste Geschäftsprozesse individuell für Kunden zu gestalten. Generell können auf Grundlage von automatischen, in Echtzeit erstellten Vorhersagen Prozesse im Unternehmen optimiert werden. Außerdem kann Predictive Analytics Mitarbeiter bei wiederkehrenden Tätigkeiten unterstützen, beispielsweise in der Disposition.

Data Science Blog: Welche Fähigkeiten benötigen gute Data Scientists denn wirklich zur Geschäftsoptimierung? Wie wichtig ist das Domänenwissen?

Die wichtigsten Eigenschaften eines Data Scientist sind große Neugierde, eine sehr analytische Denkweise und eine exzellente Kommunikationsfähigkeit. Um mit Data Science erfolgreich Geschäftsprozesse zu optimieren, benötigt man ein breites Wissensspektrum: vom Geschäftsprozess über das IT-Datenmodell und das Know-how zur Entwicklung von Vorhersagemodellen bis hin zur Prozessintegration. Das ist nur im Team machbar. Domänenwissen spielt dabei eine wichtige Rolle, weshalb es für den Data Scientist essentiell ist sich mit den Prozessverantwortlichen und Business Analysten auszutauschen.

Data Science Blog: Sie bearbeiten Anwendungsfälle für den Handel. Können sich Branchen die Anwendungsfälle gegenseitig abschauen oder sollte jede Branche auf sich selbst fokussiert bleiben?

Es gibt sowohl Anwendungsfälle, die für den Einzelhandel und andere Branchen gleichermaßen relevant sind, als auch Themen, die für Thalia als Buchhändler besonders wichtig sind.

Die Individualisierung im eCommerce ist ein branchenübergreifendes Thema. Analytisches CRM, etwa das zielsichere Ausspielen von Kampagnen oder eine passgenaue Kundensegmentierung, ist für eine Versicherung oder Bank genauso wichtig wie für den Baumarkt oder den Buchhändler. Die Warenkorbanalyse mit statistischen Algorithmen ist ein klassisches Data Mining-Thema, das für den Einzelhandel generell interessant ist.

Natürlich muss man sich vorab über die Besonderheiten des jeweiligen Geschäftsumfeldes Gedanken machen, aber prinzipiell kann man von Unternehmen oder Branchen lernen, die Advanced und Predictive Analytics schon seit Jahren oder Jahrzehnten nutzen. Die passende IT-Infrastruktur und das entsprechende Interesse vom Fachbereich vorausgesetzt, eignen sich diese Anwendungsfälle damit besonders für den Einstieg in Advanced und Predictive Analytics – auch für Mittelständler.

Das Kerngeschäft des Buchhändlers  Thalia ist es, Kunden mit für sie interessanten Geschichten zusammen zu bringen. Die Geschichten selber bestehen aus Text. Die Produktbeschreibungen („Klappentexte“) und -besprechungen liegen in Textform vor. Und Kundenfeedback – sei es auf Thalia.de oder in sozialen Medien – erreicht uns als Text. Erkenntnisse aus Texten abzuleiten (Text Mining) ist deshalb für Thalia wichtiger als für andere Einzelhändler.

Data Science Blog: Welche Algorithmen und Tools verwenden Sie für Ihre Anwendungsfälle? Womit machen Sie eher gute, womit eher schlechte Erfahrungen?

Die Palette bei Thalia reicht von A wie Automated Machine Learning bis Z wie Zeitreihenanalyse. Ich selber arbeite aktuell mit verschiedenen Klassifikationsalgorithmen (z.B., regularisierte logistische Regression,  Random Forest, XGB, Naive Bayes, SAP’s Automated Predictive Library). Im Bereich Text Mining beschäftigen wir uns im Moment unter anderem mit Topic Models und Word2Vec.

Sowohl Algorithmus als auch die Software muss zum Verwendungszweck passen. Bei der Auswahl des Algorithmus gibt es häufig einen Trade-off zwischen Interpretierbarkeit und Prognosegüte. Das muss zusammen mit der Fachabteilung je nach Anwendungsfall abgewogen werden.

Mit flexibler Open Source-Software wie etwa R oder Python lassen sich schnell Proof-of-Concept-Projekte verwirklichen. Für die Integration in bestehende Prozesse sind manchmal kommerzielle Software-Lösungen besser.

Data Science Blog: Soviel zum kurz- und mittelfristigen Start in die Datennutzung. Wie sieht es für die langfristige Verankerung von Advanced/Predictive Analytics im Unternehmen aus? Was muss hier im Rahmen der IT-Infrastruktur bedacht und verankert werden?

Ohne Daten keine Datenanalyse. Je flexibler man auf unterschiedliche Daten im Unternehmen zugreifen kann, desto höher die Innovationsgeschwindigkeit durch Advanced/Predictive Analytics. „Datensilos“ abzubauen bzw. zu vermeiden ist also ein sehr wichtiges Thema. Hohe Datenqualität und die umfassende Dokumentation von Daten sind auch essentiell. Das gilt natürlich nicht nur für Advanced und Predictive Analytics sondern auch für Business Intelligence.

Die langfristige Verankerung von Advanced und Predictive Analytics im Unternehmen verlangt den Aufbau und die kontinuierliche Weiterentwicklung von Infrastruktur in Form von Hardware, Software, Kompetenzen und Wissen, sowie Organisationsformen und Prozessen. Wertschöpfung durch Advanced bzw. Predictive Analytics erfordert das konstruktive Zusammenspiel von Domänenexpertise aus der Fachabteilung, Wissen über Datenstrukturen und -modellen  aus der IT-Abteilung bzw. BI/BW-Systemen und tiefem statistischem Know-how. Nur durch die Zusammenarbeit verschiedener Unternehmensbereiche entstehen Erfolge für das gesamte Unternehmen.

Data Science Blog: Auch organisatorisch sollte langfristig sicherlich einiges bedacht werden. Wann sollten Projekte in den jeweiligen Fachbereichen direkt umgesetzt werden? Wann vielleicht besser in einer zentralen Daten-Abteilung?

Das hängt von einer Reihe von Faktoren ab. Bei hochgradig spezialisiertem Know-how, von dem unterschiedliche Fachbereiche profitieren können, kann es Synergie-Effekte geben, wenn dies zentral organisiert ist. Eine zentrale Einheit kann vielleicht auch Innovationen breiter in ein Unternehmen tragen. Wenn bestimmte Anwendungsszenarien von Advanced/Predictive Analytics für eine Fachabteilung hingegen eine zentrale Rolle spielen oder sie sich ein einem sehr schnelllebigen Umfeld bewegt, dann wäre eine fachliche und organisatorische Verankerung im Fachbereich wichtig.

Visual Question Answering with Keras – Part 2: Making Computers Intelligent to answer from images

Making Computers Intelligent to answer from images

This is my second blog on Visual Question Answering, in the last blog, I have introduced to VQA, available datasets and some of the real-life applications of VQA. If you have not gone through then I would highly recommend you to go through it. Click here for more details about it.

In this blog post, I will walk through the implementation of VQA in Keras.

You can download the dataset from here: https://visualqa.org/index.html. All my experiments were performed with VQA v2 and I have used a very tiny subset of entire dataset i.e all samples for training and testing from the validation set.

Table of contents:

  1. Preprocessing Data
  2. Process overview for VQA
  3. Data Preprocessing – Images
  4. Data Preprocessing through the spaCy library- Questions
  5. Model Architecture
  6. Defining model parameters
  7. Evaluating the model
  8. Final Thought
  9. References

NOTE: The purpose of this blog is not to get the state-of-art performance on VQA. But the idea is to get familiar with the concept. All my experiments were performed with the validation set only.

Full code on my Github here.


1. Preprocessing Data:

If you have downloaded the dataset then the question and answers (called as annotations) are in JSON format. I have provided the code to extract the questions, annotations and other useful information in my Github repository. All extracted information is stored in .txt file format. After executing code the preprocessing directory will have the following structure.

All text files will be used for training.

 

2. Process overview for VQA:

As we have discussed in previous post visual question answering is broken down into 2 broad-spectrum i.e. vision and text.  I will represent the Neural Network approach to this problem using the Convolutional Neural Network (for image data) and Recurrent Neural Network(for text data). 

If you are not familiar with RNN (more precisely LSTM) then I would highly recommend you to go through Colah’s blog and Andrej Karpathy blog. The concepts discussed in this blogs are extensively used in my post.

The main idea is to get features for images from CNN and features for the text from RNN and finally combine them to generate the answer by passing them through some fully connected layers. The below figure shows the same idea.

 

I have used VGG-16 to extract the features from the image and LSTM layers to extract the features from questions and combining them to get the answer.

3. Data Preprocessing – Images:

Images are nothing but one of the input to our model. But as you already may know that before feeding images to the model we need to convert into the fixed-size vector.

So we need to convert every image into a fixed-size vector then it can be fed to the neural network. For this, we will use the VGG-16 pretrained model. VGG-16 model architecture is trained on millions on the Imagenet dataset to classify the image into one of 1000 classes. Here our task is not to classify the image but to get the bottleneck features from the second last layer.

Hence after removing the softmax layer, we get a 4096-dimensional vector representation (bottleneck features) for each image.

Image Source: https://www.cs.toronto.edu/~frossard/post/vgg16/

 

For the VQA dataset, the images are from the COCO dataset and each image has unique id associated with it. All these images are passed through the VGG-16 architecture and their vector representation is stored in the “.mat” file along with id. So in actual, we need not have to implement VGG-16 architecture instead we just do look up into file with the id of the image at hand and we will get a 4096-dimensional vector representation for the image.

4. Data Preprocessing through the spaCy library- Questions:

spaCy is a free, open-source library for advanced Natural Language Processing (NLP) in Python. As we have converted images into a fixed 4096-dimensional vector we also need to convert questions into a fixed-size vector representation. For installing spaCy click here

You might know that for training word embeddings in Keras we have a layer called an Embedding layer which takes a word and embeds it into a higher dimensional vector representation. But by using the spaCy library we do not have to train the get the vector representation in higher dimensions.

 

This model is actually trained on billions of tokens of the large corpus. So we just need to call the vector method of spaCy class and will get vector representation for word.

After fitting, the vector method on tokens of each question will get the 300-dimensional fixed representation for each word.

5. Model Architecture:

In our problem the input consists of two parts i.e an image vector, and a question, we cannot use the Sequential API of the Keras library. For this reason, we use the Functional API which allows us to create multiple models and finally merge models.

The below picture shows the high-level architecture idea of submodules of neural network.

After concatenating the 2 different models the summary will look like the following.

The below plot helps us to visualize neural network architecture and to understand the two types of input:

 

6. Defining model parameters:

The hyperparameters that we are going to use for our model is defined as follows:

If you know what this parameter means then you can play around it and can get better results.

Time Taken: I used the GPU on https://colab.research.google.com and hence it took me approximately 2 hours to train the model for 5 epochs. However, if you train it on a PC without GPU, it could take more time depending on the configuration of your machine.

7. Evaluating the model:

Since I have used the very small dataset for performing these experiments I am not able to get very good accuracy. The below code will calculate the accuracy of the model.

 

Since I have trained a model multiple times with different parameters you will not get the same accuracy as me. If you want you can directly download mode.h5 file from my google drive.

 

8. Final Thoughts:

One of the interesting thing about VQA is that it a completely new field. So there is absolutely no end to what you can do to solve this problem. Below are some tips while replicating the code.

  1. Start with a very small subset of data: When you start implementing I suggest you start with a very small amount of data. Because once you are ready with the whole setup then you can scale it any time.
  2. Understand the code: Understanding code line by line is very much helpful to match your theoretical knowledge. So for that, I suggest you can take very few samples(maybe 20 or less) and run a small chunk (2 to 3 lines) of code to get the functionality of each part.
  3. Be patient: One of the mistakes that I did while starting with this project was to do everything at one go. If you get some error while replicating code spend 4 to 5 days harder on that. Even after that if you won’t able to solve, I would suggest you resume after a break of 1 or 2 days. 

VQA is the intersection of NLP and CV and hopefully, this project will give you a better understanding (more precisely practically) with most of the deep learning concepts.

If you want to improve the performance of the model below are few tips you can try:

  1. Use larger datasets
  2. Try Building more complex models like Attention, etc
  3. Try using other pre-trained word embeddings like Glove 
  4. Try using a different architecture 
  5. Do more hyperparameter tuning

The list is endless and it goes on.

In the blog, I have not provided the complete code you can get it from my Github repository.

9. References:

  1. https://blog.floydhub.com/asking-questions-to-images-with-deep-learning/
  2. https://tryolabs.com/blog/2018/03/01/introduction-to-visual-question-answering/
  3. https://github.com/sominwadhwa/vqamd_floyd

Wie passt Machine Learning in eine moderne Data- & Analytics Architektur?

Einleitung

Aufgrund vielfältiger potenzieller Geschäftschancen, die Machine Learning bietet, arbeiten mittlerweile viele Unternehmen an Initiativen für datengetriebene Innovationen. Dabei gründen sie Analytics-Teams, schreiben neue Stellen für Data Scientists aus, bauen intern Know-how auf und fordern von der IT-Organisation eine Infrastruktur für “heavy” Data Engineering & Processing samt Bereitstellung einer Analytics-Toolbox ein. Für IT-Architekten warten hier spannende Herausforderungen, u.a. bei der Zusammenarbeit mit interdisziplinären Teams, deren Mitglieder unterschiedlich ausgeprägte Kenntnisse im Bereich Machine Learning (ML) und Bedarfe bei der Tool-Unterstützung haben. Einige Überlegungen sind dabei: Sollen Data Scientists mit ML-Toolkits arbeiten und eigene maßgeschneiderte Algorithmen nur im Ausnahmefall entwickeln, damit später Herausforderungen durch (unkonventionelle) Integrationen vermieden werden? Machen ML-Funktionen im seit Jahren bewährten ETL-Tool oder in der Datenbank Sinn? Sollen ambitionierte Fachanwender künftig selbst Rohdaten aufbereiten und verknüpfen, um auf das präparierte Dataset einen populären Algorithmus anzuwenden und die Ergebnisse selbst interpretieren? Für die genannten Fragestellungen warten junge & etablierte Software-Hersteller sowie die Open Source Community mit “All-in-one”-Lösungen oder Machine Learning-Erweiterungen auf. Vor dem Hintergrund des Data Science Prozesses, der den Weg eines ML-Modells von der experimentellen Phase bis zur Operationalisierung beschreibt, vergleicht dieser Artikel ausgewählte Ansätze (Notebooks für die Datenanalyse, Machine Learning-Komponenten in ETL- und Datenvisualisierungs­werkzeugen vs. Speziallösungen für Machine Learning) und betrachtet mögliche Einsatzbereiche und Integrationsaspekte.

Data Science Prozess und Teams

Im Zuge des Big Data-Hypes kamen neben Design-Patterns für Big Data- und Analytics-Architekturen auch Begriffsdefinitionen auf, die Disziplinen wie Datenintegration von Data Engineering und Data Science vonein­ander abgrenzen [1]. Prozessmodelle, wie das ab 1996 im Rahmen eines EU-Förderprojekts entwickelte CRISP-DM (CRoss-Industry Standard Process for Data Mining) [2], und Best Practices zur Organisation erfolgreich arbeitender Data Science Teams [3] weisen dabei die Richtung, wie Unternehmen das Beste aus den eigenen Datenschätzen herausholen können. Die Disziplin Data Science beschreibt den, an ein wissenschaftliches Vorgehen angelehnten, Prozess der Nutzung von internen und externen Datenquellen zur Optimierung von Produkten, Dienstleistungen und Prozessen durch die Anwendung statistischer und mathematischer Modelle. Bild 1 stellt in einem Schwimmbahnen-Diagramm einzelne Phasen des Data Science Prozesses den beteiligten Funktionen gegenüber und fasst Erfahrungen aus der Praxis zusammen [5]. Dabei ist die Intensität bei der Zusammenarbeit zwischen Data Scientists und System Engineers insbesondere bei Vorbereitung und Bereitstellung der benötigten Datenquellen und später bei der Produktivsetzung des Ergebnisses hoch. Eine intensive Beanspruchung der Server-Infrastruktur ist in allen Phasen gegeben, bei denen Hands-on (und oft auch massiv parallel) mit dem Datenpool gearbeitet wird, z.B. bei Datenaufbereitung, Training von ML Modellen etc.

Abbildung 1: Beteiligung und Interaktion von Fachbereichs-/IT-Funktionen mit dem Data Science Team

Mitarbeiter vom Technologie-Giganten Google haben sich reale Machine Learning-Systeme näher angesehen und festgestellt, dass der Umsetzungsaufwand für den eigentlichen Kern (= der ML-Code, siehe den kleinen schwarzen Kasten in der Mitte von Bild 2) gering ist, wenn man dies mit der Bereitstellung der umfangreichen und komplexen Infrastruktur inklusive Managementfunktionen vergleicht [4].

Abbildung 2: Versteckte technische Anforderungen in maschinellen Lernsystemen

Konzeptionelle Architektur für Machine Learning und Analytics

Die Nutzung aller verfügbaren Daten für Analyse, Durchführung von Data Science-Projekten, mit den daraus resultierenden Maßnahmen zur Prozessoptimierung und -automatisierung, bedeutet für Unternehmen sich neuen Herausforderungen zu stellen: Einführung neuer Technologien, Anwendung komplexer mathematischer Methoden sowie neue Arbeitsweisen, die in dieser Form bisher noch nicht dagewesen sind. Für IT-Architekten gibt es also reichlich Arbeit, entweder um eine Data Management-Plattform neu aufzubauen oder um das bestehende Informationsmanagement weiterzuentwickeln. Bild 3 zeigt hierzu eine vierstufige Architektur nach Gartner [6], ausgerichtet auf Analytics und Machine Learning.

Abbildung 3: Konzeptionelle End-to-End Architektur für Machine Learning und Analytics

Was hat sich im Vergleich zu den traditionellen Data Warehouse- und Business Intelligence-Architekturen aus den 1990er Jahren geändert? Denkt man z.B. an die Präzisionsfertigung eines komplexen Produkts mit dem Ziel, den Ausschuss weiter zu senken und in der Produktionslinie eine höhere Produktivitätssteigerung (Kennzahl: OEE, Operational Equipment Efficiency) erzielen zu können: Die an der Produktherstellung beteiligten Fertigungsmodule (Spezialmaschinen) messen bzw. detektieren über zahlreiche Sensoren Prozesszustände, speicherprogrammierbare Steuerungen (SPS) regeln dazu die Abläufe und lassen zu Kontrollzwecken vom Endprodukt ein oder mehrere hochauflösende Fotos aufnehmen. Bei diesem Szenario entsteht eine Menge interessanter Messdaten, die im operativen Betrieb häufig schon genutzt werden. Z.B. für eine Echtzeitalarmierung bei Über- oder Unterschreitung von Schwellwerten in einem vorher definierten Prozessfenster. Während früher vielleicht aus Kostengründen nur Statusdaten und Störungsinformationen den Weg in relationale Datenbanken fanden, hebt man heute auch Rohdaten, z.B. Zeitreihen (Kraftwirkung, Vorschub, Spannung, Frequenzen,…) für die spätere Analyse auf.

Bezogen auf den Bereich Acquire bewältigt die IT-Architektur in Bild 3 nun Aufgaben, wie die Übernahme und Speicherung von Maschinen- und Sensordaten, die im Millisekundentakt Datenpunkte erzeugen. Während IoT-Plattformen das Registrieren, Anbinden und Management von Hunderten oder Tausenden solcher datenproduzierender Geräte („Things“) erleichtern, beschreibt das zugehörige IT-Konzept den Umgang mit Protokollen wie MQTT, OPC-UA, den Aufbau und Einsatz einer Messaging-Plattform für Publish-/Subscribe-Modelle (Pub/Sub) zur performanten Weiterverarbeitung von Massendaten im JSON-Dateiformat. Im Bereich Organize etablieren sich neben relationalen Datenbanken vermehrt verteilte NoSQL-Datenbanken zum Persistieren eingehender Datenströme, wie sie z.B. im oben beschriebenen Produktionsszenario entstehen. Für hochauflösende Bilder, Audio-, Videoaufnahmen oder andere unstrukturierte Daten kommt zusätzlich noch Object Storage als alternative Speicherform in Frage. Neben der kostengünstigen und langlebigen Datenauf­bewahrung ist die Möglichkeit, einzelne Objekte mit Metadaten flexibel zu beschreiben, um damit später die Auffindbarkeit zu ermöglichen und den notwendigen Kontext für die Analysen zu geben, hier ein weiterer Vorteil. Mit dem richtigen Technologie-Mix und der konsequenten Umsetzung eines Data Lake– oder Virtual Data Warehouse-Konzepts gelingt es IT-Architekten, vielfältige Analytics Anwendungsfälle zu unterstützen.

Im Rahmen des Data Science Prozesses spielt, neben der sicheren und massenhaften Datenspeicherung sowie der Fähigkeit zur gleichzeitigen, parallelen Verarbeitung großer Datenmengen, das sog. Feature-Engineering eine wichtige Rolle. Dazu wieder ein Beispiel aus der maschinellen Fertigung: Mit Hilfe von Machine Learning soll nach unbekannten Gründen für den zu hohen Ausschuss gefunden werden. Was sind die bestimmenden Faktoren dafür? Beeinflusst etwas die Maschinenkonfiguration oder deuten Frequenzveränderungen bei einem Verschleißteil über die Zeit gesehen auf ein Problem hin? Maschine und Sensoren liefern viele Parameter als Zeitreihendaten, aber nur einige davon sind – womöglich nur in einer bestimmten Kombination – für die Aufgabenstellung wirklich relevant. Daher versuchen Data Scientists bei der Feature-Entwicklung die Vorhersage- oder Klassifikationsleistung der Lernalgorithmen durch Erstellen von Merkmalen aus Rohdaten zu verbessern und mit diesen den Lernprozess zu vereinfachen. Die anschließende Feature-Auswahl wählt bei dem Versuch, die Anzahl von Dimensionen des Trainingsproblems zu verringern, die wichtigste Teilmenge der ursprünglichen Daten-Features aus. Aufgrund dieser und anderer Arbeitsschritte, wie z.B. Auswahl und Training geeigneter Algorithmen, ist der Aufbau eines Machine Learning Modells ein iterativer Prozess, bei dem Data Scientists dutzende oder hunderte von Modellen bauen, bis die Akzeptanzkriterien für die Modellgüte erfüllt sind. Aus technischer Sicht sollte die IT-Architektur auch bei der Verwaltung von Machine Learning Modellen bestmöglich unterstützen, z.B. bei Modell-Versionierung, -Deployment und -Tracking in der Produktions­umgebung oder bei der Automatisierung des Re-Trainings.

Die Bereiche Analyze und Deliver zeigen in Bild 3 einige bekannte Analysefähigkeiten, wie z.B. die Bereitstellung eines Standardreportings, Self-service Funktionen zur Geschäftsplanung sowie Ad-hoc Analyse und Exploration neuer Datasets. Data Science-Aktivitäten können etablierte Business Intelligence-Plattformen inhaltlich ergänzen, in dem sie durch neuartige Kennzahlen, das bisherige Reporting „smarter“ machen und ggf. durch Vorhersagen einen Blick in die nahe Zukunft beisteuern. Machine Learning-as-a-Service oder Machine Learning-Produkte sind alternative Darreichungsformen, um Geschäftsprozesse mit Hilfe von Analytik zu optimieren: Z.B. integriert in einer Call Center-Applikation, die mittels Churn-Indikatoren zu dem gerade anrufenden erbosten Kunden einen Score zu dessen Abwanderungswilligkeit zusammen mit Handlungsempfehlungen (Gutschein, Rabatt) anzeigt. Den Kunden-Score oder andere Risikoeinschätzungen liefert dabei eine Service Schnittstelle, die von verschiedenen unternehmensinternen oder auch externen Anwendungen (z.B. Smartphone-App) eingebunden und in Echtzeit angefragt werden kann. Arbeitsfelder für die IT-Architektur wären in diesem Zusammenhang u.a. Bereitstellung und Betrieb (skalierbarer) ML-Modelle via REST API’s in der Produktions­umgebung inklusive Absicherung gegen unerwünschten Zugriff.

Ein klassischer Ansatz: Datenanalyse und Machine Learning mit Jupyter Notebook & Python

Jupyter ist ein Kommandozeileninterpreter zum interaktiven Arbeiten mit der Programmiersprache Python. Es handelt sich dabei nicht nur um eine bloße Erweiterung der in Python eingebauten Shell, sondern um eine Softwaresuite zum Entwickeln und Ausführen von Python-Programmen. Funktionen wie Introspektion, Befehlszeilenergänzung, Rich-Media-Einbettung und verschiedene Editoren (Terminal, Qt-basiert oder browserbasiert) ermöglichen es, Python-Anwendungen als auch Machine Learning-Projekte komfortabel zu entwickeln und gleichzeitig zu dokumentieren. Datenanalysten sind bei der Arbeit mit Juypter nicht auf Python als Programmiersprache begrenzt, sondern können ebenso auch sog. Kernels für Julia, R und vielen anderen Sprachen einbinden. Ein Jupyter Notebook besteht aus einer Reihe von “Zellen”, die in einer Sequenz angeordnet sind. Jede Zelle kann entweder Text oder (Live-)Code enthalten und ist beliebig verschiebbar. Texte lassen sich in den Zellen mit einer einfachen Markup-Sprache formatieren, komplexe Formeln wie mit einer Ausgabe in LaTeX darstellen. Code-Zellen enthalten Code in der Programmiersprache, die dem aktiven Notebook über den entsprechenden Kernel (Python 2 Python 3, R, etc.) zugeordnet wurde. Bild 4 zeigt auszugsweise eine Analyse historischer Hauspreise in Abhängigkeit ihrer Lage in Kalifornien, USA (Daten und Notebook sind öffentlich erhältlich [7]). Notebooks erlauben es, ganze Machine Learning-Projekte von der Datenbeschaffung bis zur Evaluierung der ML-Modelle reproduzierbar abzubilden und lassen sich gut versionieren. Komplexe ML-Modelle können in Python mit Hilfe des Pickle Moduls, das einen Algorithmus zur Serialisierung und De-Serialisierung implementiert, ebenfalls transportabel gemacht werden.

 

Abbildung 4: Datenbeschaffung, Inspektion, Visualisierung und ML Modell-Training in einem Jupyter Notebook (Pro-grammiersprache: Python)

Ein Problem, auf das man bei der praktischen Arbeit mit lokalen Jupyter-Installationen schnell stößt, lässt sich mit dem “works on my machine”-Syndrom bezeichnen. Kleine Data Sets funktionieren problemlos auf einem lokalen Rechner, wenn sie aber auf die Größe des Produktionsdatenbestandes migriert werden, skaliert das Einlesen und Verarbeiten aller Daten mit einem einzelnen Rechner nicht. Aufgrund dieser Begrenzung liegt der Aufbau einer server-basierten ML-Umgebung mit ausreichend Rechen- und Speicherkapazität auf der Hand. Dabei ist aber die Einrichtung einer solchen ML-Umgebung, insbesondere bei einer on-premise Infrastruktur, eine Herausforderung: Das Infrastruktur-Team muss physische Server und/oder virtuelle Maschinen (VM’s) auf Anforderung bereitstellen und integrieren. Dieser Ansatz ist aufgrund vieler manueller Arbeitsschritte zeitaufwändig und fehleranfällig. Mit dem Einsatz Cloud-basierter Technologien vereinfacht sich dieser Prozess deutlich. Die Möglichkeit, Infrastructure on Demand zu verwenden und z.B. mit einem skalierbaren Cloud-Data Warehouse zu kombinieren, bietet sofortigen Zugriff auf Rechen- und Speicher-Ressourcen, wann immer sie benötigt werden und reduziert den administrativen Aufwand bei Einrichtung und Verwaltung der zum Einsatz kommenden ML-Software. Bild 5 zeigt den Code-Ausschnitt aus einem Jupyter Notebook, das im Rahmen des Cloud Services Amazon SageMaker bereitgestellt wird und via PySpark Kernel auf einen Multi-Node Apache Spark Cluster (in einer Amazon EMR-Umgebung) zugreift. In diesem Szenario wird aus einem Snowflake Cloud Data Warehouse ein größeres Data Set mit 220 Millionen Datensätzen via Spark-Connector komplett in ein Spark Dataframe geladen und im Spark Cluster weiterverarbeitet. Den vollständigen Prozess inkl. Einrichtung und Konfiguration aller Komponenten, beschreibt eine vierteilige Blog-Serie [8]). Mit Spark Cluster sowie Snowflake stehen für sich genommen zwei leistungsfähige Umgebungen für rechenintensive Aufgaben zur Verfügung. Mit dem aktuellen Snowflake Connector für Spark ist eine intelligente Arbeitsteilung mittels Query Pushdown erreichbar. Dabei entscheidet Spark’s optimizer (Catalyst), welche Aufgaben (Queries) aufgrund der effizienteren Verarbeitung an Snowflake delegiert werden [9].

Abbildung 5: Jupyter Notebook in der Cloud – integriert mit Multi-Node Spark Cluster und Snowflake Cloud Data Warehouse

Welches Machine Learning Framework für welche Aufgabenstellung?

Bevor die nächsten Abschnitte weitere Werkzeuge und Technologien betrachten, macht es nicht nur für Data Scientists sondern auch für IT-Architekten Sinn, zunächst einen Überblick auf die derzeit verfügbaren Machine Learning Frameworks zu bekommen. Aus Architekturperspektive ist es wichtig zu verstehen, welche Aufgabenstellungen die jeweiligen ML-Frameworks adressieren, welche technischen Anforderungen und ggf. auch Abhängigkeiten zu den verfügbaren Datenquellen bestehen. Ein gemeinsamer Nenner vieler gescheiterter Machine Learning-Projekte ist häufig die Auswahl des falschen Frameworks. Ein Beispiel: TensorFlow ist aktuell eines der wichtigsten Frameworks zur Programmierung von neuronalen Netzen, Deep Learning Modellen sowie anderer Machine Learning Algorithmen. Während Deep Learning perfekt zur Untersuchung komplexer Daten wie Bild- und Audiodaten passt, wird es zunehmend auch für Use Cases benutzt, für die andere Frameworks besser geeignet sind. Bild 6 zeigt eine kompakte Entscheidungsmatrix [10] für die derzeit verbreitetsten ML-Frameworks und adressiert häufige Praxisprobleme: Entweder werden Algorithmen benutzt, die für den Use Case nicht oder kaum geeignet sind oder das gewählte Framework kann die aufkommenden Datenmengen nicht bewältigen. Die Unterteilung der Frameworks in Small Data, Big Data und Complex Data ist etwas plakativ, soll aber bei der Auswahl der Frameworks nach Art und Volumen der Daten helfen. Die Grenze zwischen Big Data zu Small Data ist dabei dort zu ziehen, wo die Datenmengen so groß sind, dass sie nicht mehr auf einem einzelnen Computer, sondern in einem verteilten Cluster ausgewertet werden müssen. Complex Data steht in dieser Matrix für unstrukturierte Daten wie Bild- und Audiodateien, für die sich Deep Learning Frameworks sehr gut eignen.

Abbildung 6: Entscheidungsmatrix zu aktuell verbreiteten Machine Learning Frameworks

Self-Service Machine Learning in Business Intelligence-Tools

Mit einfach zu bedienenden Business Intelligence-Werkzeugen zur Datenvisualisierung ist es für Analytiker und für weniger technisch versierte Anwender recht einfach, komplexe Daten aussagekräftig in interaktiven Dashboards zu präsentieren. Hersteller wie Tableau, Qlik und Oracle spielen ihre Stärken insbesondere im Bereich Visual Analytics aus. Statt statische Berichte oder Excel-Dateien vor dem nächsten Meeting zu verschicken, erlauben moderne Besprechungs- und Kreativräume interaktive Datenanalysen am Smartboard inklusive Änderung der Abfragefilter, Perspektivwechsel und Drill-downs. Im Rahmen von Data Science-Projekten können diese Werkzeuge sowohl zur Exploration von Daten als auch zur Visualisierung der Ergebnisse komplexer Machine Learning-Modelle sinnvoll eingesetzt werden. Prognosen, Scores und weiterer ML-Modell-Output lässt sich so schneller verstehen und unterstützt die Entscheidungsfindung bzw. Ableitung der nächsten Maßnahmen für den Geschäftsprozess. Im Rahmen einer IT-Gesamtarchitektur sind Analyse-Notebooks und Datenvisualisierungswerkzeuge für die Standard-Analytics-Toolbox Unternehmens gesetzt. Mit Hinblick auf effiziente Team-Zusammenarbeit, unternehmensinternen Austausch und Kommunikation von Ergebnissen sollte aber nicht nur auf reine Desktop-Werkzeuge gesetzt, sondern Server-Lösungen betrachtet und zusammen mit einem Nutzerkonzept eingeführt werden, um zehnfache Report-Dubletten, konkurrierende Statistiken („MS Excel Hell“) einzudämmen.

Abbildung 7: Datenexploration in Tableau – leicht gemacht für Fachanwender und Data Scientists

 

Zusätzliche Statistikfunktionen bis hin zur Möglichkeit R- und Python-Code bei der Analyse auszuführen, öffnet auch Fachanwender die Tür zur Welt des Maschinellen Lernens. Bild 7 zeigt das Werkzeug Tableau Desktop mit der Analyse kalifornischer Hauspreise (demselben Datensatz wie oben im Jupyter Notebook-Abschnitt wie in Bild 4) und einer Heatmap-Visualisierung zur Hervorhebung der teuersten Wohnlagen. Mit wenigen Klicks ist auch der Einsatz deskriptiver Statistik möglich, mit der sich neben Lagemaßen (Median, Quartilswerte) auch Streuungsmaße (Spannweite, Interquartilsabstand) sowie die Form der Verteilung direkt aus dem Box-Plot in Bild 7 ablesen und sogar über das Vorhandensein von Ausreißern im Datensatz eine Feststellung treffen lassen. Vorteil dieser Visualisierungen sind ihre hohe Informationsdichte, die allerdings vom Anwender auch richtig interpretiert werden muss. Bei der Beurteilung der Attribute, mit ihren Wertausprägungen und Abhängigkeiten innerhalb des Data Sets, benötigen Citizen Data Scientists (eine Wortschöpfung von Gartner) allerdings dann doch die mathematischen bzw. statistischen Grundlagen, um Falschinterpretationen zu vermeiden. Fraglich ist auch der Nutzen des Data Flow Editors [11] in Oracle Data Visualization, mit dem eins oder mehrere der im Werkzeug integrierten Machine Learning-Modelle trainiert und evaluiert werden können: technisch lassen sich Ergebnisse erzielen und anhand einiger Performance-Metriken die Modellgüte auch bewerten bzw. mit anderen Modellen vergleichen – aber wer kann die erzielten Ergebnisse (wissenschaftlich) verteidigen? Gleiches gilt für die Integration vorhandener R- und Python Skripte, die am Ende dann doch eine Einweisung der Anwender bzgl. Parametrisierung der ML-Modelle und Interpretationshilfen bei den erzielten Ergebnissen erfordern.

Machine Learning in und mit Datenbanken

Die Nutzung eingebetteter 1-click Analytics-Funktionen der oben vorgestellten Data Visualization-Tools ist zweifellos komfortabel und zum schnellen Experimentieren geeignet. Der gegenteilige und eher puristische Ansatz wäre dagegen die Implementierung eigener Machine Learning Modelle in der Datenbank. Für die Umsetzung des gewählten Algorithmus reichen schon vorhandene Bordmittel in der Datenbank aus: SQL inklusive mathematischer und statistische SQL-Funktionen, Tabellen zum Speichern der Ergebnisse bzw. für das ML-Modell-Management und Stored Procedures zur Abbildung komplexer Geschäftslogik und auch zur Ablaufsteuerung. Solange die Algorithmen ausreichend skalierbar sind, gibt es viele gute Gründe, Ihre Data Warehouse Engine für ML einzusetzen:

  • Einfachheit – es besteht keine Notwendigkeit, eine andere Compute-Plattform zu managen, zwischen Systemen zu integrieren und Daten zu extrahieren, transferieren, laden, analysieren usw.
  • Sicherheit – Die Daten bleiben dort, wo sie gut geschützt sind. Es ist nicht notwendig, Datenbank-Anmeldeinformationen in externen Systemen zu konfigurieren oder sich Gedanken darüber zu machen, wo Datenkopien verteilt sein könnten.
  • Performance – Eine gute Data Warehouse Engine verwaltet zur Optimierung von SQL Abfragen viele Metadaten, die auch während des ML-Prozesses wiederverwendet werden könnten – ein Vorteil gegenüber General-purpose Compute Plattformen.

Die Implementierung eines minimalen, aber legitimen ML-Algorithmus wird in [12] am Beispiel eines Entscheidungsbaums (Decision Tree) im Snowflake Data Warehouse gezeigt. Decision Trees kommen für den Aufbau von Regressions- oder Klassifikationsmodellen zum Einsatz, dabei teilt man einen Datensatz in immer kleinere Teilmengen auf, die ihrerseits in einem Baum organisiert sind. Bild 8 zeigt die Snowflake Benutzer­oberfläche und ein Ausschnitt von der Stored Procedure, die dynamisch alle SQL-Anweisungen zur Berechnung des Decision Trees nach dem ID3 Algorithmus [13] generiert.

Abbildung 8: Snowflake SQL-Editor mit Stored Procedure zur Berechnung eines Decission Trees

Allerdings ist der Entwicklungs- und Implementierungsprozess für ein Machine Learning Modell umfassender: Es sind relevante Daten zu identifizieren und für das ML-Modell vorzubereiten. Einfach Rohdaten bzw. nicht aggregierten Informationen aus Datenbanktabellen zu extrahieren reicht nicht aus, stattdessen benötigt ein ML-Modell als Input eine flache, meist sehr breite Tabelle mit vielen Aggregaten, die als Features bezeichnet werden. Erst dann kann der Prozess fortgesetzt und der für die Aufgabenstellung ausgewählte Algorithmus trainiert und die Modellgüte bewertet werden. Ist das Ergebnis zufriedenstellend, steht die Implementierung des ML-Modells in der Zielumgebung an und muss sich künftig beim Scoring „frischer Datensätze“ bewähren. Viele zeitaufwändige Teilaufgaben also, bei der zumindest eine Teilautomatisierung wünschenswert wäre. Allein die Datenaufbereitung kann schon bis zu 70…80% der gesamten Projektzeit beanspruchen. Und auch die Implementierung eines ML-Modells wird häufig unterschätzt, da in Produktionsumgebungen der unterstützte Technologie-Stack definiert und ggf. für Machine Learning-Aufgaben erweitert werden muss. Daher ist es reizvoll, wenn das Datenbankmanagement-System auch hier einsetzbar ist – sofern die geforderten Algorithmen dort abbildbar sind. Wie ein ML-Modell für die Kundenabwanderungsprognose (Churn Prediction) werkzeuggestützt mit Xpanse AI entwickelt und beschleunigt im Snowflake Cloud Data Warehouse bereitgestellt werden kann, beschreibt [14] sehr anschaulich: Die benötigten Datenextrakte sind schnell aus Snowflake entladen und stellen den Input für ein neues Xpanse AI-Projekt dar. Sobald notwendige Tabellenverknüpfungen und andere fachliche Informationen hinterlegt sind, analysiert das Tool Datenstrukturen und transformiert alle Eingangstabellen in eine flache Zwischentabelle (u.U. mit Hunderten von Spalten), auf deren Basis im Anschluss ML-Modelle trainiert werden. Nach dem ML-Modell-Training erfolgt die Begutachtung der Ergebnisse: das erstellte Dataset, Güte des ML-Modells und der generierte SQL(!) ETL-Code zur Erstellung der Zwischentabelle sowie die SQL-Repräsentation des ML-Modells, das basierend auf den Input-Daten Wahrscheinlichkeitswerte berechnet und in einer Scoring-Tabelle ablegt. Die Vorteile dieses Ansatzes sind liegen auf der Hand: kürzere Projektzeiten, der Einsatz im Rahmen des Snowflake Cloud Data Warehouse, macht das Experimentieren mit der Zuweisung dedizierter Compute-Ressourcen für die performante Verarbeitung äußerst einfach. Grenzen liegen wiederum bei der zur Verfügung stehenden Algorithmen.

Spezialisierte Software Suites für Machine Learning

Während sich im Markt etablierte Business Intelligence- und Datenintegrationswerkzeuge mit Erweiterungen zur Ausführung von Python- und R-Code als notwendigen Bestandteil der Analyse-Toolbox für den Data Science Prozess positionieren, gibt es daneben auch Machine-Learning-Plattformen, die auf die Arbeit mit künstlicher Intelligenz (KI) zugeschnittenen sind. Für den Einstieg in Data Science bieten sich die oft vorhandenen quelloffenen Distributionen an, die auch über Enterprise-Versionen mit erweiterten Möglichkeiten für beschleunigtes maschinelles Lernen durch Einsatz von Grafikprozessoren (GPUs), bessere Skalierung sowie Funktionen für das ML-Modell Management (z.B. durch Versionsmanagement und Automatisierung) verfügen.

Eine beliebte Machine Learning-Suite ist das Open Source Projekt H2O. Die Lösung des gleichnamigen kalifornischen Unternehmens verfügt über eine R-Schnittstelle und ermöglicht Anwendern dieser statistischen Programmiersprache Vorteile in puncto Performance. Die in H2O verfügbaren Funktionen und Algorithmen sind optimiert und damit eine gute Alternative für das bereits standardmäßig in den R-Paketen verfügbare Funktionsset. H2O implementiert Algorithmen aus dem Bereich Statistik, Data-Mining und Machine Learning (generalisierte Lineare Modelle, K-Means, Random Forest, Gradient Boosting und Deep Learning) und bietet mit einer In-Memory-Architektur und durch standardmäßige Parallelisierung über alle vorhandenen Prozessorkerne eine gute Basis, um komplexe Machine-Learning-Modelle schneller trainieren zu können. Bild 9 zeigt wieder anhand des Datensatzes zur Analyse der kalifornischen Hauspreise die webbasierte Benutzeroberfläche H20 Flow, die den oben beschriebenen Juypter Notebook-Ansatz mit zusätzlich integrierter Benutzerführung für die wichtigsten Prozessschritte eines Machine-Learning-Projektes kombiniert. Mit einigen Klicks kann das California Housing Dataset importiert, in einen H2O-spezifischen Dataframe umgewandelt und anschließend in Trainings- und Testdatensets aufgeteilt werden. Auswahl, Konfiguration und Training der Machine Learning-Modelle erfolgt entweder durch den Anwender im Einsteiger-, Fortgeschrittenen- oder Expertenmodus bzw. im Auto-ML-Modus. Daran anschließend erlaubt H20 Flow die Vorhersage für die Zielvariable (im Beispiel: Hauspreis) für noch unbekannte Datensätze und die Aufbereitung der Ergebnismenge. Welche Unterstützung H2O zur Produktivsetzung von ML-Modellen anbietet, wird an einem Beispiel in den folgenden Abschnitten betrachtet.

Abbildung 9: H2O Flow Benutzeroberfläche – Datenaufbereitung, ML-Modell-Training und Evaluierung.

Vom Prototyp zur produktiven Machine Learning-Lösung

Warum ist es für viele Unternehmen noch schwer, einen Nutzen aus ihren ersten Data Science-Aktivitäten, Data Labs etc. zu ziehen? In der Praxis zeigt sich, erst durch Operationalisierung von Machine Learning-Resultaten in der Produktionsumgebung entsteht echter Geschäftswert und nur im Tagesgeschäft helfen robuste ML-Modelle mit hoher Güte bei der Erreichung der gesteckten Unternehmensziele. Doch leider erweist sich der Weg vom Prototypen bis hin zum Produktiveinsatz bei vielen Initativen noch als schwierig. Bild 10 veranschaulicht ein typisches Szenario: Data Science-Teams fällt es in ihrer Data Lab-Umgebung technisch noch leicht, Prototypen leistungsstarker ML-Modelle mit Hilfe aktueller ML-Frameworks wie TensorFlow-, Keras- und Word2Vec auf ihren Laptops oder in einer Sandbox-Umgebung zu erstellen. Doch je nach verfügbarer Infrastruktur kann, wegen Begrenzungen bei Rechenleistung oder Hauptspeicher, nur ein Subset der Produktionsdaten zum Trainieren von ML-Modellen herangezogen werden. Ergebnispräsentationen an die Stakeholder der Data Science-Projekte erfolgen dann eher durch Storytelling in MS Powerpoint bzw. anhand eines Demonstrators – selten aber technisch schon so umgesetzt, dass anderere Applikationen z.B. über eine REST-API von dem neuen Risiko Scoring-, dem Bildanalyse-Modul etc. (testweise) Gebrauch machen können. Ausgestattet mit einer Genehmigung vom Management, übergibt das Data Science-Team ein (trainiertes) ML-Modell an das Software Engineering-Team. Nach der Übergabe muss sich allerdings das Engineering-Team darum kümmern, dass das ML-Modell in eine für den Produktionsbetrieb akzeptierte Programmiersprache, z.B. in Java, neu implementiert werden muss, um dem IT-Unternehmensstandard (siehe Line of Governance in Bild 10) bzw. Anforderungen an Skalierbarkeit und Laufzeitverhalten zu genügen. Manchmal sind bei einem solchen Extraschritt Abweichungen beim ML-Modell-Output und in jedem Fall signifikante Zeitverluste beim Deployment zu befürchten.

Abbildung 10: Übergabe von Machine Learning-Resultaten zur Produktivsetzung im Echtbetrieb

Unterstützt das Data Science-Team aktiv bei dem Deployment, dann wäre die Einbettung des neu entwickelten ML-Modells in eine Web-Applikation eine beliebte Variante, bei der typischerweise Flask, Tornado (beides Micro-Frameworks für Python) und Shiny (ein auf R basierendes HTML5/CSS/JavaScript Framework) als Technologiekomponenten zum Zuge kommen. Bei diesem Vorgehen müssen ML-Modell, Daten und verwendete ML-Pakete/Abhängigkeiten in einem Format verpackt werden, das sowohl in der Data Science Sandbox als auch auf Produktionsservern lauffähig ist. Für große Unternehmen kann dies einen langwierigen, komplexen Softwareauslieferungsprozess bedeuten, der ggf. erst noch zu etablieren ist. In dem Zusammenhang stellt sich die Frage, wie weit die Erfahrung des Data Science-Teams bei der Entwicklung von Webanwendungen reicht und Aspekte wie Loadbalancing und Netzwerkverkehr ausreichend berücksichtigt? Container-Virtualisierung, z.B. mit Docker, zur Isolierung einzelner Anwendungen und elastische Cloud-Lösungen, die on-Demand benötigte Rechenleistung bereitstellen, können hier Abhilfe schaffen und Teil der Lösungsarchitektur sein. Je nach analytischer Aufgabenstellung ist das passende technische Design [15] zu wählen: Soll das ML-Modell im Batch- oder Near Realtime-Modus arbeiten? Ist ein Caching für wiederkehrende Modell-Anfragen vorzusehen? Wie wird das Modell-Deployment umgesetzt, In-Memory, Code-unabhängig durch Austauschformate wie PMML, serialisiert via R- oder Python-Objekte (Pickle) oder durch generierten Code? Zusätzlich muss für den Produktiveinsatz von ML-Modellen auch an unterstützenden Konzepten zur Bereitstellung, Routing, Versions­management und Betrieb im industriellen Maßstab gearbeitet werden, damit zuverlässige Machine Learning-Produkte bzw. -Services zur internen und externen Nutzung entstehen können (siehe dazu Bild 11)

Abbildung 11: Unterstützende Funktionen für produktive Machine Learning-Lösungen

Die Deployment-Variante „Machine Learning Code-Generierung“ lässt sich gut an dem bereits mit H2O Flow besprochenen Beispiel veranschaulichen. Während Bild 9 hierzu die Schritte für Modellaufbau, -training und -test illustriert, zeigt Bild 12 den Download-Vorgang für den zuvor generierten Java-Code zum Aufbau eines ML-Modells zur Vorhersage kalifornischer Hauspreise. In dem generierten Java-Code sind die in H2O Flow vorgenommene Datenaufbereitung sowie alle Konfigurationen für den Gradient Boosting Machine (GBM)-Algorithmus gut nachvollziehbar, Bild 13 gibt mit den ersten Programmzeilen einen ersten Eindruck dazu und erinnert gleichzeitig an den ähnlichen Ansatz der oben mit dem Snowflake Cloud Data Warehouse und dem Tool Xpanse AI bereits beschrieben wurde.

Abbildung 12: H2O Flow Benutzeroberfläche – Java-Code Generierung und Download eines trainierten Models

Abbildung 13: Generierter Java-Code eines Gradient Boosted Machine – Modells zur Vorhersage kaliforn. Hauspreise

Nach Abschluss der Machine Learning-Entwicklung kann der Java-Code des neuen ML-Modells, z.B. unter Verwendung der Apache Kafka Streams API, zu einer Streaming-Applikation hinzugefügt und publiziert werden [16]. Vorteil dabei: Die Kafka Streams-Applikation ist selbst eine Java-Applikation, in die der generierte Code des ML-Modells eingebettet werden kann (siehe Bild 14). Alle zukünftigen Events, die neue Immobilien-Datensätze zu Häusern aus Kalifornien mit (denselben) Features wie Geoposition, Alter des Gebäudes, Anzahl Zimmer etc. enthalten und als ML-Modell-Input über Kafka Streams hereinkommen, werden mit einer Vorhersage des voraussichtlichen Gebäudepreises von dem auf historischen Daten trainierten ML-Algorithmus beantwortet. Ein Vorteil dabei: Weil die Kafka Streams-Applikation unter der Haube alle Funktionen von Apache Kafka nutzt, ist diese neue Anwendung bereits für den skalierbaren und geschäftskritischen Einsatz ausgelegt.

Abbildung 14: Deployment des generierten Java-Codes eines H2O ML-Models in einer Kafka Streams-Applikation

Machine Learning as a Service – “API-first” Ansatz

In den vorherigen Abschnitten kam bereits die Herausforderung zur Sprache, wenn es um die Überführung der Ergebnisse eines Datenexperiments in eine Produktivumgebung geht. Während die Mehrheit der Mitglieder eines Data Science Teams bevorzugt R, Python (und vermehrt Julia) als Programmiersprache einsetzen, gibt es auf der Abnehmerseite das Team der Softwareingenieure, die für technische Implementierungen in der Produktionsumgebung zuständig sind, womöglich einen völlig anderen Technologie-Stack verwenden (müssen). Im Extremfall droht das Neuimplementieren eines Machine Learning-Modells, im besseren Fall kann Code oder die ML-Modellspezifikation transferiert und mit wenig Aufwand eingebettet (vgl. das Beispiel H2O und Apache Kafka Streams Applikation) bzw. direkt in einer neuen Laufzeitumgebung ausführbar gemacht werden. Alternativ wählt man einen „API-first“-Ansatz und entkoppelt das Zusammenwirken von unterschiedlich implementierten Applikationen bzw. -Applikationsteilen via Web-API’s. Data Science-Teams machen hierzu z.B. die URL Endpunkte ihrer testbereiten Algorithmen bekannt, die von anderen Softwareentwicklern für eigene „smarte“ Applikationen konsumiert werden. Durch den Aufbau von REST-API‘s kann das Data Science-Team den Code ihrer ML-Modelle getrennt von den anderen Teams weiterentwickeln und damit eine Arbeitsteilung mit klaren Verantwortlichkeiten herbeiführen, ohne Teamkollegen, die nicht am Machine Learning-Aspekt des eines Projekts beteiligt sind, bei ihrer Arbeit zu blockieren.

Bild 15 zeigt ein einfaches Szenario, bei dem die Gegenstandserkennung von beliebigen Bildern mit einem Deep Learning-Verfahren umgesetzt ist. Einzelne Fotos können dabei via Kommandozeileneditor als Input für die Bildanalyse an ein vortrainiertes Machine Learning-Modell übermittelt werden. Die Information zu den erkannten Gegenständen inkl. Wahrscheinlichkeitswerten kommt dafür im Gegenzug als JSON-Ausgabe zurück. Für die Umsetzung dieses Beispiels wurde in Python auf Basis der Open Source Deep-Learning-Bibliothek Keras, ein vortrainiertes ML-Modell mit Hilfe des Micro Webframeworks Flask über eine REST-API aufrufbar gemacht. Die in [17] beschriebene Applikation kümmert sich außerdem darum, dass beliebige Bilder via cURL geladen, vorverarbeitet (ggf. Wandlung in RGB, Standardisierung der Bildgröße auf 224 x 224 Pixel) und dann zur Klassifizierung der darauf abgebildeten Gegenstände an das ML-Modell übergeben wird. Das ML-Modell selbst verwendet eine sog. ResNet50-Architektur (die Abkürzung steht für 50 Layer Residual Network) und wurde auf Grundlage der öffentlichen ImageNet Bilddatenbank [18] vortrainiert. Zu dem ML-Modell-Input (in Bild 15: Fußballspieler in Aktion) meldet das System für den Tester nachvollziehbare Gegenstände wie Fußball, Volleyball und Trikot zurück, fragliche Klassifikationen sind dagegen Taschenlampe (Torch) und Schubkarre (Barrow).

Abbildung 15: Gegenstandserkennung mit Machine Learning und vorgegebenen Bildern via REST-Service

Bei Aufbau und Bereitstellung von Machine Learning-Funktionen mittels REST-API’s bedenken IT-Architekten und beteiligte Teams, ob der Einsatzzweck eher Rapid Prototyping ist oder eine weitreichende Nutzung unterstützt werden muss. Während das oben beschriebene Szenario mit Python, Keras und Flask auf einem Laptop realisierbar ist, benötigen skalierbare Deep Learning Lösungen mehr Aufmerksamkeit hinsichtlich der Deployment-Architektur [19], in dem zusätzlich ein Message Broker mit In-Memory Datastore eingehende bzw. zu analysierende Bilder puffert und dann erst zur Batch-Verarbeitung weiterleitet usw. Der Einsatz eines vorgeschalteten Webservers, Load Balancers, Verwendung von Grafikprozessoren (GPUs) sind weitere denkbare Komponenten für eine produktive ML-Architektur.

Als abschließendes Beispiel für einen leistungsstarken (und kostenpflichtigen) Machine Learning Service soll die Bildanalyse von Google Cloud Vision [20] dienen. Stellt man dasselbe Bild mit der Fußballspielszene von Bild 15 und Bild 16 bereit, so erkennt der Google ML-Service neben den Gegenständen weit mehr Informationen: Kontext (Teamsport, Bundesliga), anhand der Gesichtserkennung den Spieler selbst  und aktuelle bzw. vorherige Mannschaftszugehörigkeiten usw. Damit zeigt sich am Beispiel des Tech-Giganten auch ganz klar: Es kommt vorallem auf die verfügbaren Trainingsdaten an, inwieweit dann mit Algorithmen und einer dazu passenden Automatisierung (neue) Erkenntnisse ohne langwierigen und teuren manuellen Aufwand gewinnen kann. Einige Unternehmen werden feststellen, dass ihr eigener – vielleicht einzigartige – Datenschatz einen echten monetären Wert hat?

Abbildung 16: Machine Learning Bezahlprodukt (Google Vision)

Fazit

Machine Learning ist eine interessante “Challenge” für Architekten. Folgende Punkte sollte man bei künftigen Initativen berücksichtigen:

  • Finden Sie das richtige Geschäftsproblem bzw geeignete Use Cases
  • Identifizieren und definieren Sie die Einschränkungen (Sind z.B. genug Daten vorhanden?) für die zu lösende Aufgabenstellung
  • Nehmen Sie sich Zeit für das Design von Komponenten und Schnittstellen
  • Berücksichtigen Sie frühzeitig mögliche organisatorische Gegebenheiten und Einschränkungen
  • Denken Sie nicht erst zum Schluss an die Produktivsetzung Ihrer analytischen Modelle oder Machine Learning-Produkte
  • Der Prozess ist insgesamt eine Menge Arbeit, aber es ist keine Raketenwissenschaft.

Quellenverzeichnis

[1] Bill Schmarzo: “What’s the Difference Between Data Integration and Data Engineering?”, LinkedIn Pulse -> Link, 2018
[2] William Vorhies: “CRISP-DM – a Standard Methodology to Ensure a Good Outcome”, Data Science Central -> Link, 2016
[3] Bill Schmarzo: “A Winning Game Plan For Building Your Data Science Team”, LinkedIn Pulse -> Link, 2018
[4] D. Sculley, G. Holt, D. Golovin, E. Davydov, T. Phillips, D. Ebner, V. Chaudhary, M. Young, J.-F. Crespo, D. Dennison: “Hidden technical debt in Machine learning systems”. In NIPS’15 Proceedings of the 28th International Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems – Volume 2, 2015
[5] K. Bollhöfer: „Data Science – the what, the why and the how!“, Präsentation von The unbelievable Machine Company, 2015
[6] Carlton E. Sapp: “Preparing and Architecting for Machine Learning”, Gartner, 2017
[7] A. Geron: “California Housing” Dataset, Jupyter Notebook. GitHub.com -> Link, 2018
[8] R. Fehrmann: “Connecting a Jupyter Notebook to Snowflake via Spark” -> Link, 2018
[9] E. Ma, T. Grabs: „Snowflake and Spark: Pushing Spark Query Processing to Snowflake“ -> Link, 2017
[10] Dr. D. James: „Entscheidungsmatrix „Machine Learning“, it-novum.com ->  Link, 2018
[11] Oracle Analytics@YouTube: “Oracle DV – ML Model Comparison Example”, Video -> Link
[12] J. Weakley: Machine Learning in Snowflake, Towards Data Science Blog -> Link, 2019
[13] Dr. S. Sayad: An Introduction to Data Science, Website -> Link, 2019
[14] U. Bethke: Build a Predictive Model on Snowflake in 1 day with Xpanse AI, Blog à Link, 2019
[15] Sergei Izrailev: Design Patterns for Machine Learning in Production, Präsentation H2O World, 2017
[16] K. Wähner: How to Build and Deploy Scalable Machine Learning in Production with Apache Kafka, Confluent Blog -> Link, 2017
[17] A. Rosebrock: “Building a simple Keras + deep learning REST API”, The Keras Blog -> Link, 2018
[18] Stanford Vision Lab, Stanford University, Princeton University: Image database, Website -> Link
[19] A. Rosebrock: “A scalable Keras + deep learning REST API”, Blog -> Link, 2018
[20] Google Cloud Vision API (Beta Version) -> Link, abgerufen 2018

 

 

 

 

Simple Linear Regression: Mathematics explained with implementation in numpy

Simple Linear Regression

Being in the field of data science, we all are familiar with at least some of the measures shown in figure 1.1 (generated in python using statsmodels). But do we really understand how these measures are being calculated? or what is the math behind these measures? In this article, I hope that I can answer these questions for you. This article will start from the fundamentals of simple linear regression but by the end of this article, you will get an idea of how to program this in numpy (python library).

 

Fig. 1.1

Simple linear regression is a very simple approach for supervised learning where we are trying to predict a quantitative response Y based on the basis of only one variable x. Here x is an independent variable and Y is our dependent variable. Assuming that there is a linear relationship between our independent and dependent variable we can represent this relationship as:

 

Y = mx+c

 

where m and c are two unknown constants that represent the slope and the intercept of our linear model. Together, these constants are also known as parameters or coefficients. If you want to visualize these parameters see figure 1.2.

Fig. 1.2

Please note that we can only calculate the estimates of these parameters thus we have to rewrite our linear equation like:

 

\widehat{y} = \widehat{m}x + \widehat{c}

 

 

here y-hat represents a prediction of Y (actual value) based on x. Once we have found the estimates of these parameters, the equation can be used to predict the future value of Y provided a new/test value of x.

How to find the estimate of these parameters?

Let’s assume we have ‘n’ observations and for each independent variable value we have a value for dependent variable like this:

(x1,y1), (x2,y2),……,(xn,yn). Our goal is to find the best values of these parameters so the line in fig 1.1 should be as close as possible to the data points and we will be using the most common approach of Ordinary least squares to do that.  This best fit is found by minimizing the residual sum of squared errors which can be calculated as below:

 

RSS = {(y_1-\widehat{y1}})^2+{(y_2-\widehat{y2}})^2 +…..+{(y_n-\widehat{yn}})^2

 

 

or

RSS = {(y_1-\widehat{c}-{\widehat m_1x_1})}^2+ {(y_2-\widehat{c}-{\widehat m_1x_2})}^2 +…..+{(y_n-\widehat{c}-{\widehat m_1x_n})}^2

 

 

where

m_1 = \frac{\sum_i^n (x_i-\bar x)(y_i-\bar y)}{\sum_i^n (x_i-\bar x)^{2}}

 

 

and

\widehat{c} = \bar y - \widehat{m_1} \bar x

 

 

Measures to evaluate our regression model

We can use two measures to evaluate our simple linear regression model:

Residual Standard Error (RSE)

According to the book An Introduction to Statistical Learning with Applications in R (James, et al., 2013, pp. 68-71) explains RSE as an estimate of the standard deviation of the error ϵ and can be calculated as:

 

RSE = \sqrt{\frac{1}{n-2}\sum_i^n(y_i-\widehat y_i)^2}

 

 

R square

It is not always clear what is a good score for RSE so we use R square as an alternative to measuring the performance of our model. Please note that there are other measures also which we will discuss in my next article about multiple linear regression. We will also cover the difference between the R square and adjusted R square. The formula for R square can be seen below.

 

R^2 =1- \frac{\sum_i^n(y_i-\widehat y_i)^2}{(y_i-\bar y)^2}

 

Now that we have covered the theoretical part of simple linear regression, let’s write these formulas in python (numpy).

 

Python implementation

To implement this in python first we need a dataset on which we can work on. The dataset that we are going to use in this article is Advertising data and can be downloaded from here. Before we start the analysis we will use pandas library to load the dataset as a dataframe (see code below).

**Please check your path of the advertising file.

To show the first five rows of the dataset use df.head() and you will see output like this:

 

Let me try to explain what are we have to do here, we have the dataset of an ad company which has three different advertising channels TV, radio and newspaper. This company regularly invests in these channels and track their sales over time. However, the time variable is not present in this csv file. Anyway, this company wants to know how much sales will be impacted if they spent a certain amount on any of their advertising channels. As this is the case for simple linear regression we will be using only one predictor TV to fit our model. From here we will go step by step.

Step 1: Define the dependent and independent variable

Step 2: Define a function to find the slope (m)

So, when we applied the function in our current dataset we got a slope of 0.0475.

Step 3: Define a function to find the intercept (c)

and an intercept of 7.0325

Once we have the values for slope and intercept, it is now time to define functions to calculate the residual sum of squares (RSS) and the metrics we will use to evaluate our linear model i.e. residual standard error (RSE) and R-square.

Step 4: Define a function to find residual sum of squares (RSS)

As we discussed in the theory section that it is very hard to evaluate a model based on RSS as we can never generalize the thresholds for RSS and hence we need to settle for other measures.

Step 5: Define a function to calculate residual standard error (RSE)

Step 6: Define a function to find R-square

Here, we see that R-square offers an advantage over RSE as it always lies between 0 and 1, which makes it easier to evaluate our linear model. If you want to understand more about what constitutes a good measure of R-square you can read the explanation given in the book An introduction to statistical learning (mentioned this above also).

The final step now would be to define a function which can be used to predict our sales on the amount of budget spend on TV.

Now, let’s say if the advertising budget for TV is 1500 USD, what would be their sales?

Our linear model predicted that if the ad company would spend 1500 USD they will see an increase of 78 units. If you want to go through the whole code you can find the jupyter notebook here. In this notebook, I have also made a class wrapper at the end of this linear model. It will be really hard to explain the whole logic why I did it here, so I will keep that for another post.In the next article, I will explain the mathematics behind Multiple Linear Regression and how we can implement that in python. Please let me know if you have any question in the comments section. Thank you for reading !!

Marketing Attribution Models

Why do we need attribution?

Attributionis the process of distributing the value of a purchase between the various channels, used in the funnel chain. It allows you to determine the role of each channel in profit. It is used to assess the effectiveness of campaigns, to identify more priority sources. The competent choice of the model makes it possible to optimally distribute the advertising budget. As a result, the business gets more profit and less expenses.

What models of attribution exist

The choice of the appropriate model is an important issue, because depending on the business objectives, it is better to fit something different. For example, for companies that have long been present in the industry, the priority is to know which sources contribute to the purchase. Recognition is the importance for brands entering the market. Thus, incorrect prioritization of sources may cause a decrease in efficiency. Below are the models that are widely used in the market. Each of them is guided by its own logic, it is better suited for different businesses.

First Interaction (First Click)

The value is given to the first touch. It is suitable only for several purposes and does not make it possible to evaluate the role of each component in making a purchase. It is chosen by brands who want to increase awareness and reach.

Advantages

It does not require knowledge of programming, so the introduction of a business is not difficult. A great option that effectively assesses campaigns, aimed at creating awareness and demand for new products.

Disadvantages

It limits the ability to analyze comprehensively all channels that is used to promote a brand. It gives value to the first interaction channel, ignoring the rest.

Who is suitable for?

Suitable for those who use the promotion to increase awareness, the formation of a positive image. Also allows you to find the most effective source.

Last Interaction (Last Click)

It gives value to the last channel with which the consumer interacted before making the purchase. It does not take into account the actions that the user has done up to this point, what marketing activities he encountered on the way to conversion.

Advantages

The tool is widely used in the market, it is not difficult. It solves the problem of small advertising campaigns, where is no more than 3 sources.

Disadvantages

There is no way to track how other channels have affected the acquisition.

Who is suitable for?

It is suitable for business models that have a short purchase cycle. This may be souvenirs, seasonal offers, etc.

Last Non-Direct Click

It is the default in Google Analytics. 100% of the  conversion value gives the last channel that interacted with the buyer before the conversion. However, if this source is Direct, then assumptions are counted.

Suppose a person came from an email list, bookmarked a product, because at that time it was not possible to place an order. After a while he comes back and makes a purchase. In this case, email as a channel for attracting users would be underestimated without this model.

Who is suitable for?

It is perfect for beginners who are afraid of making a mistake in the assessment. Because it allows you to form a general idea of ​​the effectiveness of all the involved channels.

Linear model attribution (Linear model)

The value of the conversion is divided in equal parts between all available channels.

Linear model attribution (Linear model)

Advantages

More advanced model than previous ones, however, characterized by simplicity. It takes into account all the visits before the acquisition.

Disadvantages

Not suitable for reallocating the budget between the channels. This is due to the fact that the effectiveness of sources may differ significantly and evenly divide – it is not the best idea. 

Who is suitable for?

It is performing well for businesses operating in the B2B sector, which plays a great importance to maintain contact with the customer during the entire cycle of the funnel.

Taking into account the interaction duration (Time Decay)

A special feature of the model is the distribution of the value of the purchase between the available channels by increment. Thus, the source, that is at the beginning of the chain, is given the least value, the channel at the end deserves the greatest value.  

Advantages

Value is shared between all channel. The highest value is given to the source that pushed the user to make a purchase.

Disadvantages

There is no fair assessment of the effectiveness of the channels, that have made efforts to obtain the desired result.

Who is suitable for?

It is ideal for evaluating the effectiveness of advertising campaigns with a limited duration.

Position-Based or U-Shaped

40% receive 2 channels, which led the user and pushed him to purchase. 20% share among themselves the intermediate sources that participated in the chain.

Advantages

Most of the value is divided equally between the key channels – the fact that attracted the user and closed the deal..

Disadvantages

Underestimated intermediate channels.It happens that they make it possible to more effectively promote the user chain.. Because they allow you to subscribe to the newsletter or start following the visitor for price reduction, etc.

Who is suitable for?

Interesting for businesses that focus on attracting new audiences, as well as pushing existing customers to buy.

Cons of standard attribution models

According to statistics, only 44% of foreign experts use attribution on the last interaction. Speaking about the domestic market, we can announce the numbers are much higher. However, only 18% of marketers use more complex models. There is also evidence which demonstrates that 72.4% of those who use attribution based on the last interaction, they use it not because of efficiency, but because it is simple.

What leads to a similar state of affairs?

Experts do not understand the effectiveness. Ignorance of how more complex models work leads to a lack of understanding of the real benefits for the business.

Attribution management is distributed among several employees. In view of this, different models can be used simultaneously. This approach greatly distorts the data obtained, not allowing an objective assessment of the effect of channels.

No comprehensive data storage. Information is stored in different places and does not take into account other channels. Using the analytics of the advertising office, it is impossible to work with customers in retail outlets.

You may find ways to eliminate these moments and attribution will work for the benefit of the business.

What algorithmic attribution models exist

Using one channel, there is no need to enable complex models. Attribution will be enough for the last interaction. It has everything to evaluate the effectiveness of the campaign, determine the profitability, understand the benefits for the business.

Moreover, if the number of channels increases significantly, and goals are already far beyond recognition, it will be better to give preference to more complex models. They allow you to collect all the information in one place, open up limitless monitoring capabilities, make it clear how one channel affects the other and which bundles work better together.

Below are the well-known and widely used today algorithmic attribution models.

Data-Driven Attribution

A model that allows you to track all the way that the consumer has done before making a purchase. It objectively evaluates each channel and does not take into account the position of the source in the funnel. It demonstrates how a certain interaction affected the outcome. Data-Driven attribution model is used in Google Analytics 360.

With it, you can work efficiently with channels that are underestimated in simpler models. It gives the opportunity to distribute the advertising budget correctly.

Attribution based on Markov’s Chains (Markov Chains)

Markov’s chain has been used for a long time to predict weather, matches, etc. The model allows you to find out, how the lack of a channel will affect sales. Its advantage is the ability to assess the impact of the source on the conversion, to find out which channel brings the best results.

A great option for companies that store data in one service. To implement requires knowledge of programming. It has one drawback in the form of underestimating the first channel in the chain. 

OWOX BI Attribution

OWOX BI Attribution helps you assess the mutual influence of channels on encouraging a customer through the funnel and achieving a conversion.

What information can be processed:

  • Upload user data from Google Analytics using flexible built-in tools.
  • Process information from various advertising services.
  • Integrate the model with CRM systems.

This approach makes it possible not to lose sight of any channel. Analyze the complex impact of marketing tools, correctly distributing the advertising budget.

The model uses CRM information, which makes it possible to do end-to-end analytics. Each user is assigned an identifier, so no matter what device he came from, you can track the chain of actions and understand that it is him. This allows you to see the overall effect of each channel on the conversion.

Advantages

Provides an integrated approach to assessing the effectiveness of channels, allows you to identify consumers, even with different devices, view all visits. It helps to determine where the user came from, what prompted him to do so. With it, you can control the execution of orders in CRM, to estimate the margin. To evaluate in combination with other models in order to determine the highest priority advertising campaigns that bring the most profit.

Disadvantages

It is impossible to objectively evaluate the first step of the chain.

Who is suitable for?

Suitable for all businesses that aim to account for each step of the chain and the qualitative assessment of all advertising channels.

Conclusion

The above-mentioned Ad Roll study shows that 70% of marketing managers find it difficult to use the results obtained from attribution. Moreover, there will be no result without it.

To obtain a realistic assessment of the effectiveness of marketing activities, do the following:

  • Determine priority KPIs.
  • Appoint a person responsible for evaluating advertising campaigns.
  • Define a user funnel chain.
  • Keep track of all data, online and offline. 
  • Make a diagnosis of incoming data.
  • Find the best attribution model for your business.
  • Use the data to make decisions.

Visual Question Answering with Keras – Part 1

This is Part I of II of the Article Series Visual Question Answering with Keras

Making Computers Intelligent to answer from images

If we look closer in the history of Artificial Intelligence (AI), the Deep Learning has gained more popularity in the recent years and has achieved the human-level performance in the tasks such as Speech Recognition, Image Classification, Object Detection, Machine Translation and so on. However, as humans, not only we but also a five-year child can normally perform these tasks without much inconvenience. But the development of such systems with these capabilities has always considered an ambitious goal for the researchers as well as for developers.

In this series of blog posts, I will cover an introduction to something called VQA (Visual Question Answering), its available datasets, the Neural Network approach for VQA and its implementation in Keras and the applications of this challenging problem in real life. 

Table of Contents:

1 Introduction

2 What is exactly Visual Question Answering?

3 Prerequisites

4 Datasets available for VQA

4.1 DAQUAR Dataset

4.2 CLEVR Dataset

4.3 FigureQA Dataset

4.4 VQA Dataset

5 Real-life applications of VQA

6 Conclusion

 

  1. Introduction:

Let’s say you are given a below picture along with one question. Can you answer it?

I expect confidently you all say it is the Kitchen without much inconvenience which is also the right answer. Even a five-year child who just started to learn things might answer this question correctly.

Alright, but can you write a computer program for such type of task that takes image and question about the image as an input and gives us answer as output?

Before the development of the Deep Neural Network, this problem was considered as one of the difficult, inconceivable and challenging problem for the AI researcher’s community. However, due to the recent advancement of Deep Learning the systems are capable of answering these questions with the promising result if we have a required dataset.

Now I hope you have got at least some intuition of a problem that we are going to discuss in this series of blog posts. Let’s try to formalize the problem in the below section.

  1. What is exactly Visual Question Answering?:

We can define, “Visual Question Answering(VQA) is a system that takes an image and natural language question about the image as an input and generates natural language answer as an output.”

VQA is a research area that requires an understanding of vision(Computer Vision)  as well as text(NLP). The main beauty of VQA is that the reasoning part is performed in the context of the image. So if we have an image with the corresponding question then the system must able to understand the image well in order to generate an appropriate answer. For example, if the question is the number of persons then the system must able to detect faces of the persons. To answer the color of the horse the system need to detect the objects in the image. Many of these common problems such as face detection, object detection, binary object classification(yes or no), etc. have been solved in the field of Computer Vision with good results.

To summarize a good VQA system must be able to address the typical problems of CV as well as NLP.

To get a better feel of VQA you can try online VQA demo by CloudCV. You just go to this link and try uploading the picture you want and ask the related question to the picture, the system will generate the answer to it.

 

  1. Prerequisites:

In the next post, I will walk you through the code for this problem using Keras. So I assume that you are familiar with:

  1. Fundamental concepts of Machine Learning
  2. Multi-Layered Perceptron
  3. Convolutional Neural Network
  4. Recurrent Neural Network (especially LSTM)
  5. Gradient Descent and Backpropagation
  6. Transfer Learning
  7. Hyperparameter Optimization
  8. Python and Keras syntax
  1. Datasets available for VQA:

As you know problems related to the CV or NLP the availability of the dataset is the key to solve the problem. The complex problems like VQA, the dataset must cover all possibilities of questions answers in real-world scenarios. In this section, I will cover some of the datasets available for VQA.

4.1 DAQUAR Dataset:

The DAQUAR dataset is the first dataset for VQA that contains only indoor scenes. It shows the accuracy of 50.2% on the human baseline. It contains images from the NYU_Depth dataset.

Example of DAQUAR dataset

Example of DAQUAR dataset

The main disadvantage of DAQUAR is the size of the dataset is very small to capture all possible indoor scenes.

4.2 CLEVR Dataset:

The CLEVR Dataset from Stanford contains the questions about the object of a different type, colors, shapes, sizes, and material.

It has

  • A training set of 70,000 images and 699,989 questions
  • A validation set of 15,000 images and 149,991 questions
  • A test set of 15,000 images and 14,988 questions

Image Source: https://cs.stanford.edu/people/jcjohns/clevr/?source=post_page

 

4.3 FigureQA Dataset:

FigureQA Dataset contains questions about the bar graphs, line plots, and pie charts. It has 1,327,368 questions for 100,000 images in the training set.

4.4 VQA Dataset:

As comapred to all datasets that we have seen so far VQA dataset is relatively larger. The VQA dataset contains open ended as well as multiple choice questions. VQA v2 dataset contains:

  • 82,783 training images from COCO (common objects in context) dataset
  • 40, 504 validation images and 81,434 validation images
  • 443,757 question-answer pairs for training images
  • 214,354 question-answer pairs for validation images.

As you might expect this dataset is very huge and contains 12.6 GB of training images only. I have used this dataset in the next post but a very small subset of it.

This dataset also contains abstract cartoon images. Each image has 3 questions and each question has 10 multiple choice answers.

  1. Real-life applications of VQA:

There are many applications of VQA. One of the famous applications is to help visually impaired people and blind peoples. In 2016, Microsoft has released the “Seeing AI” app for visually impaired people to describe the surrounding environment around them. You can watch this video for the prototype of the Seeing AI app.

Another application could be on social media or e-commerce sites. VQA can be also used for educational purposes.

  1. Conclusion:

I hope this explanation will give you a good idea of Visual Question Answering. In the next blog post, I will walk you through the code in Keras.

If you like my explanations, do provide some feedback, comments, etc. and stay tuned for the next post.

Erstellen und benutzen einer Geodatenbank

In diesem Artikel soll es im Gegensatz zum vorherigen Artikel Alles über Geodaten weniger darum gehen, was man denn alles mit Geodaten machen kann, dafür aber mehr darum wie man dies anstellt. Es wird gezeigt, wie man aus dem öffentlich verfügbaren Datensatz des OpenStreetMap-Projekts eine Geodatenbank erstellt und einige Beispiele dafür gegeben, wie man diese abfragen und benutzen kann.

Wahl der Datenbank

Prinzipiell gibt es zwei große “geo-kompatible” OpenSource-Datenbanken bzw. “Datenbank-AddOn’s”: Spatialite, welches auf SQLite aufbaut, und PostGIS, das PostgreSQL verwendet.

PostGIS bietet zum Teil eine einfachere Syntax, welche manchmal weniger Tipparbeit verursacht. So kann man zum Beispiel um die Entfernung zwischen zwei Orten zu ermitteln einfach schreiben:

während dies in Spatialite “nur” mit einer normalen Funktion möglich ist:

Trotztdem wird in diesem Artikel Spatialite (also SQLite) verwendet, da dessen Einrichtung deutlich einfacher ist (schließlich sollen interessierte sich alle Ergebnisse des Artikels problemlos nachbauen können, ohne hierfür einen eigenen Datenbankserver aufsetzen zu müssen).

Der Hauptunterschied zwischen PostgreSQL und SQLite (eigentlich der Unterschied zwischen SQLite und den meissten anderen Datenbanken) ist, dass für PostgreSQL im Hintergrund ein Server laufen muss, an welchen die entsprechenden Queries gesendet werden, während SQLite ein “normales” Programm (also kein Client-Server-System) ist welches die Queries selber auswertet.

Hierdurch fällt beim Aufsetzen der Datenbank eine ganze Menge an Konfigurationsarbeit weg: Welche Benutzer gibt es bzw. akzeptiert der Server? Welcher Benutzer bekommt welche Rechte? Über welche Verbindung wird auf den Server zugegriffen? Wie wird die Sicherheit dieser Verbindung sichergestellt? …

Während all dies bei SQLite (und damit auch Spatialite) wegfällt und die Einrichtung der Datenbank eigentlich nur “installieren und fertig” ist, muss auf der anderen Seite aber auch gesagt werden dass SQLite nicht gut für Szenarien geeignet ist, in welchen viele Benutzer gleichzeitig (insbesondere schreibenden) Zugriff auf die Datenbank benötigen.

Benötigte Software und ein Beispieldatensatz

Was wird für diesen Artikel an Software benötigt?

SQLite3 als Datenbank

libspatialite als “Geoplugin” für SQLite

spatialite-tools zum erstellen der Datenbank aus dem OpenStreetMaps (*.osm.pbf) Format

python3, die beiden GeoModule spatialite, folium und cartopy, sowie die Module pandas und matplotlib (letztere gehören im Bereich der Datenauswertung mit Python sowieso zum Standart). Für pandas gibt es noch die Erweiterung geopandas sowie eine praktisch unüberschaubare Anzahl weiterer geographischer Module aber bereits mit den genannten lassen sich eine Menge interessanter Dinge herausfinden.

– und natürlich einen Geodatensatz: Zum Beispiel sind aus dem OpenStreetMap-Projekt extrahierte Datensätze hier zu finden.

Es ist ratsam, sich hier erst einmal einen kleinen Datensatz herunterzuladen (wie zum Beispiel einen der Stadtstaaten Bremen, Hamburg oder Berlin). Zum einen dauert die Konvertierung des .osm.pbf-Formats in eine Spatialite-Datenbank bei größeren Datensätzen unter Umständen sehr lange, zum anderen ist die fertige Datenbank um ein vielfaches größer als die stark gepackte Originaldatei (für “nur” Deutschland ist die fertige Datenbank bereits ca. 30 GB groß und man lässt die Konvertierung (zumindest am eigenen Laptop) am besten über Nacht laufen – willkommen im Bereich “BigData”).

Erstellen eine Geodatenbank aus OpenStreetMap-Daten

Nach dem Herunterladen eines Datensatzes der Wahl im *.osm.pbf-Format kann hieraus recht einfach mit folgendem Befehl aus dem Paket spatialite-tools die Datenbank erstellt werden:

Erkunden der erstellten Geodatenbank

Nach Ausführen des obigen Befehls sollte nun eine Datei mit dem gewählten Namen (im Beispiel bremen-latest.sqlite) im aktuellen Ordner vorhanden sein – dies ist bereits die fertige Datenbank. Zunächst sollte man mit dieser Datenbank erst einmal dasselbe machen, wie mit jeder anderen Datenbank auch: Sich erst einmal eine Weile hinsetzen und schauen was alles an Daten in der Datenbank vorhanden und vor allem wo diese Daten in der erstellten Tabellenstruktur zu finden sind. Auch wenn dieses Umschauen prinzipiell auch vollständig über die Shell oder in Python möglich ist, sind hier Programme mit graphischer Benutzeroberfläche (z. B. spatialite-gui oder QGIS) sehr hilfreich und sparen nicht nur eine Menge Zeit sondern vor allem auch Tipparbeit. Wer dies tut, wird feststellen, dass sich in der generierten Datenbank einige dutzend Tabellen mit Namen wie pt_addresses, ln_highway und pg_boundary befinden.

Die Benennung der Tabellen folgt dem Prinzip, dass pt_*-Tabellen Punkte im Geokoordinatensystem wie z. B. Adressen, Shops, Bäckereien und ähnliches enthalten. ln_*-Tabellen enthalten hingegen geographische Entitäten, welche sich als Linien darstellen lassen, wie beispielsweise Straßen, Hochspannungsleitungen, Schienen, ect. Zuletzt gibt es die pg_*-Tabellen welche Polygone – also Flächen einer bestimmten Form enthalten. Dazu zählen Landesgrenzen, Bundesländer, Inseln, Postleitzahlengebiete, Landnutzung, aber auch Gebäude, da auch diese jeweils eine Grundfläche besitzen. In dem genannten Datensatz sind die Grundflächen von Gebäuden – zumindest in Europa – nahezu vollständig. Aber auch der Rest der Welt ist für ein “Wikipedia der Kartographie” insbesondere in halbwegs besiedelten Gebieten bemerkenswert gut erfasst, auch wenn nicht unbedingt davon ausgegangen werden kann, dass abgelegenere Gegenden (z. B. irgendwo auf dem Land in Südamerika) jedes Gebäude eingezeichnet ist.

Verwenden der Erstellten Datenbank

Auf diese Datenbank kann nun entweder direkt aus der Shell über den Befehl

zugegriffen werden oder man nutzt das gleichnamige Python-Paket:

Nach Eingabe der obigen Befehle in eine Python-Konsole, ein Jupyter-Notebook oder ein anderes Programm, welches die Anbindung an den Python-Interpreter ermöglicht, können die von der Datenbank ausgegebenen Ergebnisse nun direkt in ein Pandas Data Frame hineingeladen und verwendet/ausgewertet/analysiert werden.

Im Grunde wird hierfür “normales SQL” verwendet, wie in anderen Datenbanken auch. Der folgende Beispiel gibt einfach die fünf ersten von der Datenbank gefundenen Adressen aus der Tabelle pt_addresses aus:

Link zur Ausgabe

Es wird dem Leser sicherlich aufgefallen sein, dass die Spalte “Geometry” (zumindest für das menschliche Auge) nicht besonders ansprechend sowie auch nicht informativ aussieht: Der Grund hierfür ist, dass diese Spalte die entsprechende Position im geographischen Koordinatensystem aus Gründen wie dem deutlich kleineren Speicherplatzbedarf sowie der damit einhergehenden Optimierung der Geschwindigkeit der Datenbank selber, in binärer Form gespeichert und ohne weitere Verarbeitung auch als solche ausgegeben wird.

Glücklicherweise stellt spatialite eine ganze Reihe von Funktionen zur Verarbeitung dieser geographischen Informationen bereit, von denen im folgenden einige beispielsweise vorgestellt werden:

Für einzelne Punkte im Koordinatensystem gibt es beispielsweise die Funktionen X(geometry) und Y(geometry), welche aus diesem “binären Wirrwarr” den Längen- bzw. Breitengrad des jeweiligen Punktes als lesbare Zahlen ausgibt.

Ändert man also das obige Query nun entsprechend ab, erhält man als Ausgabe folgendes Ergebnis in welchem die Geometry-Spalte der ausgegebenen Adressen in den zwei neuen Spalten Longitude und Latitude in lesbarer Form zu finden ist:

Link zur Tabelle

Eine weitere häufig verwendete Funktion von Spatialite ist die Distance-Funktion, welche die Distanz zwischen zwei Orten berechnet.

Das folgende Beispiel sucht in der Datenbank die 10 nächstgelegenen Bäckereien zu einer frei wählbaren Position aus der Datenbank und listet diese nach zunehmender Entfernung auf (Achtung – die frei wählbare Position im Beispiel liegt in München, wer die selbe Position z. B. mit dem Bremen-Datensatz verwendet, wird vermutlich etwas weiter laufen müssen…):

Link zur Ausgabe

Ein Anwendungsfall für eine solche Liste können zum Beispiel Programme/Apps wie maps.me oder Google-Maps sein, in denen User nach Bäckereien, Geldautomaten, Supermärkten oder Apotheken “in der Nähe” suchen können sollen.

Diese Liste enthält nun alle Informationen die grundsätzlich gebraucht werden, ist soweit auch informativ und wird in den meißten Fällen der Datenauswertung auch genau so gebraucht, jedoch ist diese für das Auge nicht besonders ansprechend.

Viel besser wäre es doch, die gefundenen Positionen auf einer interaktiven Karte einzuzeichnen:

Was kann man sonst interessantes mit der erstellten Datenbank und etwas Python machen? Wer in Deutschland ein wenig herumgekommen ist, dem ist eventuell aufgefallen, dass sich die Endungen von Ortsnamen stark unterscheiden: Um München gibt es Stadteile und Dörfer namens Garching, Freising, Aubing, ect., rund um Stuttgart enden alle möglichen Namen auf “ingen” (Plieningen, Vaihningen, Echterdingen …) und in Berlin gibt es Orte wie Pankow, Virchow sowie eine bunte Auswahl weiterer *ow’s.

Das folgende Query spuckt gibt alle “village’s”, “town’s” und “city’s” aus der Tabelle pt_place, also Dörfer und Städte, aus:

Link zur Ausgabe

Graphisch mit matplotlib und cartopy in ein Koordinatensystem eingetragen sieht diese Verteilung folgendermassen aus:

Die Grafik zeigt, dass stark unterschiedliche Vorkommen der verschiedenen Ortsendungen in Deutschland (Clustering). Über das genaue Zustandekommen dieser Verteilung kann ich hier nur spekulieren, jedoch wird diese vermutlich ähnlichen Prozessen unterliegen wie beispielsweise die Entwicklung von Dialekten.

Wer sich die Karte etwas genauer anschaut wird merken, dass die eingezeichneten Landesgrenzen und Küstenlinien nicht besonders genau sind. Hieran wird ein interessanter Effekt von häufig verwendeten geographischen Entitäten, nämlich Linien und Polygonen deutlich. Im Beispiel werden durch die beiden Zeilen

die bereits im Modul cartopy hinterlegten Daten verwendet. Genaue Verläufe von Küstenlinien und Landesgrenzen benötigen mit wachsender Genauigkeit hingegen sehr viel Speicherplatz, da mehr und mehr zu speichernde Punkte benötigt werden (genaueres siehe hier).

Schlussfolgerung

Man kann also bereits mit einigen Grundmodulen und öffentlich verfügbaren Datensätzen eine ganze Menge im Bereich der Geodaten erkunden und entdecken. Gleichzeitig steht, insbesondere für spezielle Probleme, eine große Bandbreite weiterer Software zur Verfügung, für welche dieser Artikel zwar einen Grundsätzlichen Einstieg geben kann, die jedoch den Rahmen dieses Artikels sprengen würden.

A Bird’s Eye View: How Machine Learning Can Help You Charge Your E-Scooters

Bird scooters in Columbus, Ohio

Bird scooters in Columbus, Ohio

Ever since I started using bike-sharing to get around in Seattle, I have become fascinated with geolocation data and the transportation sharing economy. When I saw this project leveraging the mobility data RESTful API from the Los Angeles Department of Transportation, I was eager to dive in and get my hands dirty building a data product utilizing a company’s mobility data API.

Unfortunately, the major bike and scooter providers (Bird, JUMP, Lime) don’t have publicly accessible APIs. However, some folks have seemingly been able to reverse-engineer the Bird API used to populate the maps in their Android and iOS applications.

One interesting feature of this data is the nest_id, which indicates if the Bird scooter is in a “nest” — a centralized drop-off spot for charged Birds to be released back into circulation.

I set out to ask the following questions:

  1. Can real-time predictions be made to determine if a scooter is currently in a nest?
  2. For non-nest scooters, can new nest location recommendations be generated from geospatial clustering?

To answer these questions, I built a full-stack machine learning web application, NestGenerator, which provides an automated recommendation engine for new nest locations. This application can help power Bird’s internal nest location generation that runs within their Android and iOS applications. NestGenerator also provides real-time strategic insight for Bird chargers who are enticed to optimize their scooter collection and drop-off route based on proximity to scooters and nest locations in their area.

Bird

The electric scooter market has seen substantial growth with Bird’s recent billion dollar valuation  and their $300 million Series C round in the summer of 2018. Bird offers electric scooters that top out at 15 mph, cost $1 to unlock and 15 cents per minute of use. Bird scooters are in over 100 cities globally and they announced in late 2018 that they eclipsed 10 million scooter rides since their launch in 2017.

Bird scooters in Tel Aviv, Israel

Bird scooters in Tel Aviv, Israel

With all of these scooters populating cities, there’s much-needed demand for people to charge them. Since they are electric, someone needs to charge them! A charger can earn additional income for charging the scooters at their home and releasing them back into circulation at nest locations. The base price for charging each Bird is $5.00. It goes up from there when the Birds are harder to capture.

Data Collection and Machine Learning Pipeline

The full data pipeline for building “NestGenerator”

Data

From the details here, I was able to write a Python script that returned a list of Bird scooters within a specified area, their geolocation, unique ID, battery level and a nest ID.

I collected scooter data from four cities (Atlanta, Austin, Santa Monica, and Washington D.C.) across varying times of day over the course of four weeks. Collecting data from different cities was critical to the goal of training a machine learning model that would generalize well across cities.

Once equipped with the scooter’s latitude and longitude coordinates, I was able to leverage additional APIs and municipal data sources to get granular geolocation data to create an original scooter attribute and city feature dataset.

Data Sources:

  • Walk Score API: returns a walk score, transit score and bike score for any location.
  • Google Elevation API: returns elevation data for all locations on the surface of the earth.
  • Google Places API: returns information about places. Places are defined within this API as establishments, geographic locations, or prominent points of interest.
  • Google Reverse Geocoding API: reverse geocoding is the process of converting geographic coordinates into a human-readable address.
  • Weather Company Data: returns the current weather conditions for a geolocation.
  • LocationIQ: Nearby Points of Interest (PoI) API returns specified PoIs or places around a given coordinate.
  • OSMnx: Python package that lets you download spatial geometries and model, project, visualize, and analyze street networks from OpenStreetMap’s APIs.

Feature Engineering

After extensive API wrangling, which included a four-week prolonged data collection phase, I was finally able to put together a diverse feature set to train machine learning models. I engineered 38 features to classify if a scooter is currently in a nest.

Full Feature Set

Full Feature Set

The features boiled down into four categories:

  • Amenity-based: parks within a given radius, gas stations within a given radius, walk score, bike score
  • City Network Structure: intersection count, average circuity, street length average, average streets per node, elevation level
  • Distance-based: proximity to closest highway, primary road, secondary road, residential road
  • Scooter-specific attributes: battery level, proximity to closest scooter, high battery level (> 90%) scooters within a given radius, total scooters within a given radius

 

Log-Scale Transformation

For each feature, I plotted the distribution to explore the data for feature engineering opportunities. For features with a right-skewed distribution, where the mean is typically greater than the median, I applied these log transformations to normalize the distribution and reduce the variability of outlier observations. This approach was used to generate a log feature for proximity to closest scooter, closest highway, primary road, secondary road, and residential road.

An example of a log transformation

Statistical Analysis: A Systematic Approach

Next, I wanted to ensure that the features I included in my model displayed significant differences when broken up by nest classification. My thinking was that any features that did not significantly differ when stratified by nest classification would not have a meaningful predictive impact on whether a scooter was in a nest or not.

Distributions of a feature stratified by their nest classification can be tested for statistically significant differences. I used an unpaired samples t-test with a 0.01% significance level to compute a p-value and confidence interval to determine if there was a statistically significant difference in means for a feature stratified by nest classification. I rejected the null hypothesis if a p-value was smaller than the 0.01% threshold and if the 99.9% confidence interval did not straddle zero. By rejecting the null-hypothesis in favor of the alternative hypothesis, it’s deemed there is a significant difference in means of a feature by nest classification.

Battery Level Distribution Stratified by Nest Classification to run a t-test

Battery Level Distribution Stratified by Nest Classification to run a t-test

Log of Closest Scooter Distribution Stratified by Nest Classification to run a t-test

Throwing Away Features

Using the approach above, I removed ten features that did not display statistically significant results.

Statistically Insignificant Features Removed Before Model Development

Model Development

I trained two models, a random forest classifier and an extreme gradient boosting classifier since tree-based models can handle skewed data, capture important feature interactions, and provide a feature importance calculation. I trained the models on 70% of the data collected for all four cities and reserved the remaining 30% for testing.

After hyper-parameter tuning the models for performance on cross-validation data it was time to run the models on the 30% of test data set aside from the initial data collection.

I also collected additional test data from other cities (Columbus, Fort Lauderdale, San Diego) not involved in training the models. I took this step to ensure the selection of a machine learning model that would generalize well across cities. The performance of each model on the additional test data determined which model would be integrated into the application development.

Performance on Additional Cities Test Data

The Random Forest Classifier displayed superior performance across the board

The Random Forest Classifier displayed superior performance across the board

I opted to move forward with the random forest model because of its superior performance on AUC score and accuracy metrics on the additional cities test data. AUC is the Area under the ROC Curve, and it provides an aggregate measure of model performance across all possible classification thresholds.

AUC Score on Test Data for each Model

AUC Score on Test Data for each Model

Feature Importance

Battery level dominated as the most important feature. Additional important model features were proximity to high level battery scooters, proximity to closest scooter, and average distance to high level battery scooters.

Feature Importance for the Random Forest Classifier

Feature Importance for the Random Forest Classifier

The Trade-off Space

Once I had a working machine learning model for nest classification, I started to build out the application using the Flask web framework written in Python. After spending a few days of writing code for the application and incorporating the trained random forest model, I had enough to test out the basic functionality. I could finally run the application locally to call the Bird API and classify scooter’s into nests in real-time! There was one huge problem, though. It took more than seven minutes to generate the predictions and populate in the application. That just wasn’t going to cut it.

The question remained: will this model deliver in a production grade environment with the goal of making real-time classifications? This is a key trade-off in production grade machine learning applications where on one end of the spectrum we’re optimizing for model performance and on the other end we’re optimizing for low latency application performance.

As I continued to test out the application’s performance, I still faced the challenge of relying on so many APIs for real-time feature generation. Due to rate-limiting constraints and daily request limits across so many external APIs, the current machine learning classifier was not feasible to incorporate into the final application.

Run-Time Compliant Application Model

After going back to the drawing board, I trained a random forest model that relied primarily on scooter-specific features which were generated directly from the Bird API.

Through a process called vectorization, I was able to transform the geolocation distance calculations utilizing NumPy arrays which enabled batch operations on the data without writing any “for” loops. The distance calculations were applied simultaneously on the entire array of geolocations instead of looping through each individual element. The vectorization implementation optimized real-time feature engineering for distance related calculations which improved the application response time by a factor of ten.

Feature Importance for the Run-time Compliant Random Forest Classifier

Feature Importance for the Run-time Compliant Random Forest Classifier

This random forest model generalized well on test-data with an AUC score of 0.95 and an accuracy rate of 91%. The model retained its prediction accuracy compared to the former feature-rich model, but it gained 60x in application performance. This was a necessary trade-off for building a functional application with real-time prediction capabilities.

Geospatial Clustering

Now that I finally had a working machine learning model for classifying nests in a production grade environment, I could generate new nest locations for the non-nest scooters. The goal was to generate geospatial clusters based on the number of non-nest scooters in a given location.

The k-means algorithm is likely the most common clustering algorithm. However, k-means is not an optimal solution for widespread geolocation data because it minimizes variance, not geodetic distance. This can create suboptimal clustering from distortion in distance calculations at latitudes far from the equator. With this in mind, I initially set out to use the DBSCAN algorithm which clusters spatial data based on two parameters: a minimum cluster size and a physical distance from each point. There were a few issues that prevented me from moving forward with the DBSCAN algorithm.

  1. The DBSCAN algorithm does not allow for specifying the number of clusters, which was problematic as the goal was to generate a number of clusters as a function of non-nest scooters.
  2. I was unable to hone in on an optimal physical distance parameter that would dynamically change based on the Bird API data. This led to suboptimal nest locations due to a distortion in how the physical distance point was used in clustering. For example, Santa Monica, where there are ~15,000 scooters, has a higher concentration of scooters in a given area whereas Brookline, MA has a sparser set of scooter locations.

An example of how sparse scooter locations vs. highly concentrated scooter locations for a given Bird API call can create cluster distortion based on a static physical distance parameter in the DBSCAN algorithm. Left:Bird scooters in Brookline, MA. Right:Bird scooters in Santa Monica, CA.

An example of how sparse scooter locations vs. highly concentrated scooter locations for a given Bird API call can create cluster distortion based on a static physical distance parameter in the DBSCAN algorithm. Left:Bird scooters in Brookline, MA. Right:Bird scooters in Santa Monica, CA.

Given the granularity of geolocation scooter data I was working with, geospatial distortion was not an issue and the k-means algorithm would work well for generating clusters. Additionally, the k-means algorithm parameters allowed for dynamically customizing the number of clusters based on the number of non-nest scooters in a given location.

Once clusters were formed with the k-means algorithm, I derived a centroid from all of the observations within a given cluster. In this case, the centroids are the mean latitude and mean longitude for the scooters within a given cluster. The centroids coordinates are then projected as the new nest recommendations.

NestGenerator showcasing non-nest scooters and new nest recommendations utilizing the K-Means algorithm

NestGenerator showcasing non-nest scooters and new nest recommendations utilizing the K-Means algorithm.

NestGenerator Application

After wrapping up the machine learning components, I shifted to building out the remaining functionality of the application. The final iteration of the application is deployed to Heroku’s cloud platform.

In the NestGenerator app, a user specifies a location of their choosing. This will then call the Bird API for scooters within that given location and generate all of the model features for predicting nest classification using the trained random forest model. This forms the foundation for map filtering based on nest classification. In the app, a user has the ability to filter the map based on nest classification.

Drop-Down Map View filtering based on Nest Classification

Drop-Down Map View filtering based on Nest Classification

Nearest Generated Nest

To see the generated nest recommendations, a user selects the “Current Non-Nest Scooters & Predicted Nest Locations” filter which will then populate the application with these nest locations. Based on the user’s specified search location, a table is provided with the proximity of the five closest nests and an address of the Nest location to help inform a Bird charger in their decision-making.

NestGenerator web-layout with nest addresses and proximity to nearest generated nests

NestGenerator web-layout with nest addresses and proximity to nearest generated nests

Conclusion

By accurately predicting nest classification and clustering non-nest scooters, NestGenerator provides an automated recommendation engine for new nest locations. For Bird, this application can help power their nest location generation that runs within their Android and iOS applications. NestGenerator also provides real-time strategic insight for Bird chargers who are enticed to optimize their scooter collection and drop-off route based on scooters and nest locations in their area.

Code

The code for this project can be found on my GitHub

Comments or Questions? Please email me an E-Mail!