Operational Data Store vs. Data Warehouse

One of the main problems with large amounts of data, especially in this age of data-driven tools and near-instant results, is how to store the data. With proper storage also comes the challenge of keeping the data updated, and this is the reason why organizations focus on solutions that will help make data processing faster and more efficient. For many, a digital transformation is in their roadmap, thanks in large part to the changes brought about by the global COVID-19 pandemic. The problem is that organizations often assume that it’s similar to traditional change initiatives, which can’t be any further from the truth. There are a number of challenges to prepare for in digital transformations, however, and without proper planning, non-unified data storage systems and systems of record implemented through the years can slow down or even hinder the process.

Businesses have relied on two main solutions for data storage for many years: traditional data warehouses and operational data stores (ODS). These key data structures provide assistance when it comes to boosting business intelligence so that the business can make sound corporate decisions based on data. Before considering which one will work for your business, it’s important to understand the main differences between the two.

What is a Data Warehouse?

Data warehousing is a common practice because a data warehouse is designed to support business intelligence tools and activities. It’s subject-oriented so data is centered on customers, products, sales, or other subjects that contribute to the business bottom line. Because data comes from a multitude of sources, a data warehouse is also designed to consolidate large amounts of data in a variety of formats, including flat files, legacy database management systems, and relational database management systems. It’s considered an organization’s single source of truth because it houses historical records built through time, which could become invaluable as a source of actionable insights.

One of the main disadvantages of a data warehouse is its non-volatile nature. Non-volatile data is read-only and, therefore, not frequently updated or deleted over time. This leads to some time variance, which means that a data warehouse only stores a time series of periodic data snapshots that show the state of data during specific periods. As such, data loading and data retrieval are the most vital operations for a data warehouse.

What is an Operational Data Store?

Forward-thinking companies turn to an operational data store to resolve the issues with data warehousing, primarily, the issue of always keeping data up-to-date. Similar to a data warehouse, an ODS can aggregate data from multiple sources and report across multiple systems of record to provide a more comprehensive view of the data. It’s essentially a staging area that can receive operational data from transactional sources and can be queried directly. This allows data analytics tools to query ODS data as it’s received from the respective source systems. This offloads the burden from the transactional systems by only providing access to current data that’s queried in an integrated manner. This makes an ODS the ideal solution for those looking for near-real time data that’s processed quickly and efficiently.

Traditional ODS solutions, however, typically suffer from high latency because they are based on either relational databases or disk-based NoSQL databases. These systems simply can’t handle large amounts of data and provide high performance at the same time, which is a common requirement of most modern applications. The limited scalability of traditional systems also leads to performance issues when multiple users access the data store all at the same time. As such, traditional ODS solutions are incapable of providing real-time API services for accessing systems of record.

A Paradigm Shift

As modern real-time digital applications replace previously offline services, companies are going through a paradigm shift and venturing beyond what traditional data storage systems can offer. This has led to the rise of a new breed of ODS solutions that Gartner refers to as digital integration hubs. It’s a cost-effective solution because it doesn’t require a rip-and-replace if you already have a traditional ODS in place. Adopting a digital integration hub can be as simple as augmenting your current system with the missing layers, including the microservices API, smart cache, and event-driven architecture.

While sticking with a data warehouse or traditional ODS may not necessarily hurt your business, the benefits of modernization via a digital integration hub are too great to ignore. Significant improvements in throughput, availability, and scalability will help organizations become more agile so they can drive innovation quicker, helping their industry and pushing the limits of technology further to open up possibilities never before discovered.

Turbocharge Business Analytics With In-memory Computing

One of the customer traits that’s been gradually diminishing through the years is patience; if a customer-facing website or application doesn’t deliver real-time or near-instant results, it can be a reason for a customer to look elsewhere. This trend has pushed companies to turn to in-memory computing to get the speed needed to address customer demands in real-time. It simplifies access to multiple data sources to provide super-fast performance that’s thousands of times faster than disk-based storage systems. By storing data in RAM and processing in parallel against the full dataset, in-memory computing solutions allow for real-time insights that lead to informed business decisions and improved performance.

The in-memory computing solutions market has been on the rise in recent years because it has been heralded as the platform that will accelerate IT modernization. In-memory data grids, in particular, show great promise because it addresses the main limitation of an in-memory relational database. While the latter is designed to scale up, the former is designed to scale out. This scalability is one of the main draws of an in-memory data grid, since a scale-up architecture is not sustainable in the long term and will always have a breaking point. In-memory data grids on the other hand, benefit from horizontal scalability and computing elasticity. Scaling an in-memory data grid is as simple as adding nodes to a cluster and removing it when it’s no longer needed. This is especially useful for businesses that demand speed in the management of hundreds of terabytes of data across multiple networked computers in geographically distributed data centers.

Since big data is complex and fast-moving, keeping data synchronized across data centers is vital to preserve data integrity. Keeping data in memory removes the bottleneck caused by constant access to disk -based storage and allows applications and their data to collocate in the same memory space. This allows for optimization that allows the amount of data to exceed the amount of available memory. Speed and efficiency is also improved by keeping frequently accessed data in memory and the rest on disk, consequently allowing data to reside both in memory and on disk.

Future-proofing Businesses With In-memory Computing

Data analytics is as much a part of every business as other marketing and business intelligence tools. Because data constantly grows at an exponential rate, in-memory computing serves as the enabler of data analytics because it provides speed, high availability, and straightforward scalability. Speeds more than 100 times faster than other solutions enable in-memory computing solutions to provide real-time insights that are applicable in a host of industries and use cases.

Location-based Marketing

A report from 2019 shows that location-based marketing helped 89% of marketers increase sales, 86% grow their customer base, and 84% improve customer engagement. Location data can be leveraged to identify patterns of behavior by analyzing frequently visited locations. By understanding why certain customers frequent specific locations and knowing when they are there, you can better target your marketing messages and make more strategic customer acquisitions. Location data can also be used as a demographic identifier to help you segment your customers and tailor your offers and messaging accordingly.

Fraud Detection

In-memory computing helps improve operational intelligence by detecting anomalies in transaction data immediately. Through high-speed analysis of large amounts of data, potential risks are detected early on and addressed as soon as possible. Transaction data is fast-moving and changes frequently, and in-memory computing is equipped to handle data as it changes. This is why it’s an ideal platform for payment processing; it helps make comparisons of current transactions with the history of all transactions on record in a matter of seconds. Companies typically have several fraud detection measures in place, and in-memory computing allows running these algorithms concurrently without compromising overall system performance. This ensures responsiveness of systems despite peak volume levels and avoids interruptions to customer service.

Tailored Customer Experiences

The real-time insights delivered by in-memory computing helps personalize experiences based on customer data. Because customer experiences are time-sensitive, processing and analyzing data at super-fast speeds is vital in capturing real-time event data that can be used to craft the best experience possible for each customer. Without in-memory computing, getting real-time data and other necessary information that ensures a seamless customer experience would have been near impossible.

Real-time data analytics helps provide personalized recommendations based on both existing and new customer data. By looking at historical data like previously visited pages and comparing them with newer data from the stream, businesses can craft the proper messaging and plan the next course of action. The anticipation and forecasting of customers’ future actions and behavior is the key to improving conversion rates and customer satisfaction—ultimately leading to higher revenues and more loyal customers.

Conclusion

Big data is the future, and companies that don’t use it to their advantage would find it hard to compete in this ever-connected world that demands results in an instant. Processing and analyzing data can only become more complex and challenging through time, and for this reason, in-memory computing should be a solution that companies should consider. Aside from improving their business from within, it will also help drive customer acquisition and revenue, while also providing a viable low-latency, high throughput platform for high-speed data analytics.

Web Scraping Using R..!

In this blog, I’ll show you, How to Web Scrape using R..?

What is R..?

R is a programming language and its environment built for statistical analysis, graphical representation & reporting. R programming is mostly preferred by statisticians, data miners, and software programmers who want to develop statistical software.

R is also available as Free Software under the terms of the Free Software Foundation’s GNU General Public License in source code form.

Reasons to choose R

Reasons to choose R

Let’s begin our topic of Web Scraping using R.

Step 1- Select the website & the data you want to scrape.

I picked this website “https://www.alexa.com/topsites/countries/IN” and want to scrape data of Top 50 sites in India.

Data we want to scrape

Data we want to scrape

Step 2- Get to know the HTML tags using SelectorGadget.

In my previous blog, I already discussed how to inspect & find the proper HTML tags. So, now I’ll explain an easier way to get the HTML tags.

You have to go to Google chrome extension (chrome://extensions) & search SelectorGadget. Add it to your browser, it’s a quite good CSS selector.

Step 3- R Code

Evoking Important Libraries or Packages

I’m using RVEST package to scrape the data from the webpage; it is inspired by libraries like Beautiful Soup. If you didn’t install the package yet, then follow the code in the snippet below.

Step 4- Set the url of the website

Step 5- Find the HTML tags using SelectorGadget

It’s quite easy to find the proper HTML tags in which your data is present.

Firstly, I have to click on data using SelectorGadget which I want to scrape, it automatically selects the data which are similar to selected HTML tags. Before going forward, cross-check the selected values, are they correct or some junk data is also gets selected..? If you noticed our page has only 50 values, but you can see 156 values are selected.

Selection by SelectorGadget

Selection by SelectorGadget

So I need to remove unwanted values who get selected, once you click on them to deselect it, it turns red and others will turn yellow except our primary selection which turn to green. Now you can see only 50 values are selected as per our primary requirement but it’s not enough. I have to again cross-check that some required values are not exchanged with junk values.

If we satisfy with our selection then copy the HTML tag & include it into the code, else repeat this exercise.

Modified Selection by SelectorGadget

Step 6- Include the tag in our Code

After including the tags, our code is like this.

Code Snippet

If I run the code, values in each list object will be 50.

Data Stored in List Objects

Step 7- Creating DataFrame

Now, we create a dataframe with our list-objects. So for creating a dataframe, we always need to remember one thumb rule that is the number of rows (length of all the lists) should be equal, else we get an error.

Error appears when number of rows differs

Finally, Our DataFrame will look like this:

Our Final Data

Step 8- Writing our DataFrame to CSV file

We need our scraped data to be available locally for further analysis & model building or other purposes.

Our final piece of code to write it in CSV file is:

Writing to CSV file

Step 9- Check the CSV file

Data written in CSV file

Conclusion-

I tried to explain Web Scraping using R in a simple way, Hope this will help you in understanding it better.

Find full code on

https://github.com/vgyaan/Alexa/blob/master/webscrap.R

If you have any questions about the code or web scraping in general, reach out to me on LinkedIn!

Okay, we will meet again with the new exposer.

Till then,

Happy Coding..!

Determining Your Data Pipeline Architecture and Its Efficacy

Data analytics has become a central part of how many businesses operate. If you hope to stay competitive in today’s market, you need to take advantage of all your available data. For that, you’ll need an efficient data pipeline, which is often easier said than done.

If your pipeline is too slow, your data will be all but useless by the time it’s usable. Successful analytics require an optimized pipeline, and that looks different for every company. No matter your specific circumstances, though, a traditional approach will result in inefficiencies.

Creating the most efficient pipeline architecture will require you to change how you look at the process. By understanding each stage’s role and how they serve your goals, you can optimize your data analytics.

Understanding Your Data Needs

You can’t build an optimal data pipeline if you don’t know what you need from your data. If you spend too much time collecting and organizing information you won’t use, you’ll take time away from what you need. Similarly, if you only work to meet one team’s needs, you’ll have to go back and start over to help others.

Data analytics involves multiple stakeholders, all with individual needs and expectations that you should consider. Your data engineers need your pipeline to be accessible and scalable, while analysts require visual, relevant datasets. If you consider these aspects from the beginning, you can build a pipeline that works for everyone.

Start at the earliest stage — collection. You may be collecting data from every channel you can, which could result in an information overload. Focus instead on gathering things from the most relevant sources. At the same time, ensure you can add more channels if necessary in the future.

As you reorganize your pipeline, remember that analytics are only as good as your datasets. If you put more effort into organizing and scrubbing data, helpful analytics will follow. Focus on preparing data well, and the last few stages will be smoother.

Creating a Collaborative Pipeline

When structuring your pipeline, it’s easy to focus too much on the individual stages. While seeing things as rigid steps can help you visualize them, you need something more fluid in practice. If you want the process to run as smoothly as possible, it needs to be collaborative.

Look at the software development practice of DevOps, which doubles a team’s likelihood of exceeding productivity goals. This strategy focuses on collaboration across separate teams instead of passing things back and forth between them. You can do the same thing with your data pipeline.

Instead of dividing steps between engineers and analysts, make it a single, cohesive process. Teams will still focus on different areas according to their expertise, but they’ll reduce disruption by working together instead of independently. If workers can collaborate along every step, they don’t have to go back and forth.

Simultaneously, everyone should have clearly defined responsibilities. Collaboration doesn’t mean overstepping your areas of expertise. The goal here isn’t to make everyone handle everything but to ensure they understand each other’s needs.

Eliminating the time between steps also applies to your platform. Look for or build software that integrates both refinement and data preparation. If you have to export data to various programs, it will cause unnecessary bottlenecks.

Enabling Continuous Improvement

Finally, understand that restructuring your data pipeline isn’t a one-and-done job. Another principle you can adopt from DevOps is continuous development across all sides of the process. Your engineers should keep looking for better ways to structure data as your analysts search for new applications for this information.

Make sure you always measure your throughput and efficiency. If you tweak something and you notice the process starts to slow, revert to the older method. If your changes improve the pipeline, try something similar in another area.

Optimize Your Data Pipeline

Remember to start slow when optimizing your data pipeline. Changing too much at once can cause more disruptions than it avoids, so start small with an emphasis on scalability.

The specifics of your pipeline will vary depending on your needs and circumstances. No matter what these are, though, you can benefit from collaboration and continuous development. When you start breaking down barriers between different steps and teams, you unclog your pipeline.

Process Mining Tools – Artikelserie

Process Mining ist nicht länger nur ein Buzzword, sondern ein relevanter Teil der Business Intelligence. Process Mining umfasst die Analyse von Prozessen und lässt sich auf alle Branchen und Fachbereiche anwenden, die operative Prozesse haben, die wiederum über operative IT-Systeme erfasst werden. Um die zunehmende Bedeutung dieser Data-Disziplin zu verstehen, reicht ein Blick auf die Entwicklung der weltweiten Datengenerierung an. Waren es 2010 noch 2 Zettabytes (ZB), sind laut Statista für das Jahr 2020 mehr als 50 ZB an Daten zu erwarten. Für 2025 wird gar mit einem Bestand von 175 ZB gerechnet.

Hier wird das Datenvolumen nach Jahren angezeit

Abbildung 1 zeigt die Entwicklung des weltweiten Datenvolumen (Stand 2018). Quelle: https://www.statista.com/statistics/871513/worldwide-data-created/

Warum jetzt eigentlich Process Mining?

Warum aber profitiert insbesondere Process Mining von dieser Entwicklung? Der Grund liegt in der Unordnung dieser Datenmenge. Die Herausforderung der sich viele Unternehmen gegenübersehen, liegt eben genau in der Analyse dieser unstrukturierten Daten. Hinzu kommt, dass nahezu jeder Prozess Datenspuren in Informationssystemen hinterlässt. Die Betrachtung von Prozessen auf Datenebene birgt somit ein enormes Potential, welches in Anbetracht der Entwicklung zunehmend an Bedeutung gewinnt.

Was war nochmal Process Mining?

Process Mining ist eine Analysemethodik, welche dazu befähigt, aus den abgespeicherten Datenspuren der Informationssysteme eine Rekonstruktion der realen Prozesse zu schaffen. Diese Prozesse können anschließend als Prozessflussdiagramm dargestellt und ausgewertet werden. Die klassischen Anwendungsfälle reichen von dem Aufspüren (Discovery) unbekannter Prozesse, über einen Soll-Ist-Vergleich (Conformance) bis hin zur Anpassung/Verbesserung (Enhancement) bestehender Prozesse. Mittlerweile setzen viele Firmen darüber hinaus auf eine Integration von RPA und Data Science im Process Mining. Und die Analyse-Tiefe wird zunehmen und bis zur Analyse einzelner Klicks reichen, was gegenwärtig als sogenanntes „Task Mining“ bezeichnet wird.

Hier wird ein typischer Process Mining Workflow dargestellt

Abbildung 2 zeigt den typischen Workflow eines Process Mining Projektes. Oftmals dient das ERP-System als zentrale Datenquelle. Die herausgearbeiteten Event-Logs werden anschließend mittels Process Mining Tool visualisiert.

In jedem Fall liegt meistens das Gros der Arbeit auf die Bereitstellung und Vorbereitung der Daten und der Transformation dieser in sogenannte „Event-Logs“, die den Input für die Process Mining Tools darstellen. Deshalb arbeiten viele Anbieter von Process Mining Tools schon länger an Lösungen, um die mit der Datenvorbereitung verbundenen zeit -und arbeitsaufwendigen Schritte zu erleichtern. Während fast alle Tool-Anbieter vorgefertigte Protokolle für Standardprozesse anbieten, gehen manche noch weiter und bieten vollumfängliche Plattform Lösungen an, welche eine effiziente Integration der aufwendigen ETL-Prozesse versprechen. Der Funktionsumfang der Process Mining Tools geht daher mittlerweile deutlich über eine reine Darstellungsfunktion hinaus und deckt ggf. neue Trends sowie optimierte Einsteigerbarrieren mit ab.

Motivation dieser Artikelserie

Die Motivation diesen Artikel zu schreiben liegt nicht in der Erläuterung der Methode des Process Mining. Hierzu gibt es mittlerweile zahlreiche Informationsquellen. Eine besonders empfehlenswerte ist das Buch „Process Mining“ von Will van der Aalst, einem der Urväter des Process Mining. Die Motivation dieses Artikels liegt viel mehr in der Betrachtung der zahlreichen Process Mining Tools am Markt. Sehr oft erlebe ich als Data-Consultant, dass Process Mining Projekte im Vorfeld von der Frage nach dem „besten“ Tool dominiert werden. Diese Fragestellung ist in Ihrer Natur sicherlich immer individuell zu beantworten. Da individuelle Projekte auch einen individuellen Tool-Einsatz bedingen, beschäftige ich mich meist mit einem großen Spektrum von Process Mining Tools. Daher ist es mir in dieser Artikelserie ein Anliegen einen allgemeingültigen Überblick zu den üblichen Process Mining Tools zu erarbeiten. Dabei möchte ich mich nicht auf persönliche Erfahrungen stützen, sondern die Tools anhand von Testdaten einem praktischen Vergleich unterziehen, der für den Leser nachvollziehbar ist.

Um den Umfang der Artikelserie zu begrenzen, werden die verschiedenen Tools nur in Ihren Kernfunktionen angewendet und verglichen. Herausragende Funktionen oder Eigenschaften der jeweiligen Tools werden jedoch angemerkt und ggf. in anderen Artikeln vertieft. Das Ziel dieser Artikelserie soll sein, dem Leser einen ersten Einblick über die am Markt erhältlichen Tools zu geben. Daher spricht dieser Artikel insbesondere Einsteiger aber auch Fortgeschrittene im Process Mining an, welche einen Überblick über die Tools zu schätzen wissen und möglicherweise auch mal über den Tellerand hinweg schauen mögen.

Die Tools

Die Gruppe der zu betrachteten Tools besteht aus den folgenden namenhaften Anwendungen:

Die Auswahl der Tools orientiert sich an den „Market Guide for Process Mining 2019“ von Gartner. Aussortiert habe ich jene Tools, mit welchen ich bisher wenig bis gar keine Berührung hatte. Diese Auswahl an Tools verspricht meiner Meinung nach einen spannenden Einblick von verschiedene Process Mining Tools am Markt zu bekommen.

Die Anwendung in der Praxis

Um die Tools realistisch miteinander vergleichen zu können, werden alle Tools die gleichen Datengrundlage benutzen. Die Datenbasis wird folglich über die gesamte Artikelserie hinweg für die Darstellungen mit den Tools genutzt. Ich werde im nächsten Artikel explizit diese Datenbasis kurz erläutern.

Das Ziel der praktischen Untersuchung soll sein, die Beispieldaten in die verschiedenen Tools zu laden, um den enthaltenen Prozess zu visualisieren. Dabei möchte ich insbesondere darauf achten wie bedienbar und anpassungsfähig/flexibel die Tools mir erscheinen. An dieser Stelle möchte ich eindeutig darauf hinweisen, dass dieser Vergleich und seine Bewertung meine Meinung ist und keineswegs Anspruch auf Vollständigkeit beansprucht. Da der Markt in Bewegung ist, behalte ich mir ferner vor, diese Artikelserie regelmäßig anzupassen.

Die Kriterien

Neben der Bedienbarkeit und der Anpassungsfähigkeit der Tools möchte ich folgende zusätzliche Gesichtspunkte betrachten:

  • Bedienbarkeit: Wie leicht gehen die Analysen von der Hand? Wie einfach ist der Einstieg?
  • Anpassungsfähigkeit: Wie flexibel reagiert das Tool auf meine Daten und Analyse-Wünsche?
  • Integrationsfähigkeit: Welche Schnittstellen bringt das Tool mit? Läuft es auch oder nur in der Cloud?
  • Skalierbarkeit: Ist das Tool dazu in der Lage, auch große und heterogene Daten zu verarbeiten?
  • Zukunftsfähigkeit: Wie steht es um Machine Learning, ETL-Modeller oder Task Mining?
  • Preisgestaltung: Nach welchem Modell bestimmt sich der Preis?

Die Datengrundlage

Die Datenbasis bildet ein Demo-Datensatz der von Celonis für die gesamte Artikelserie netter Weise zur Verfügung gestellt wurde. Dieser Datensatz bildet einen Versand Prozess vom Zeitpunkt des Kaufes bis zur Auslieferung an den Kunden ab. In der folgenden Abbildung ist der Soll Prozess abgebildet.

Hier wird die Variante 1 der Demo Daten von Celonis als Grafik dargestellt

Abbildung 4 zeigt den gewünschten Versand Prozess der Datengrundlage von dem Kauf des Produktes bis zur Auslieferung.

Die Datengrundlage besteht aus einem 60 GB großen Event-Log, welcher lokal in einer Microsoft SQL Datenbank vorgehalten wird. Da diese Tabelle über 600 Mio. Events beinhaltet, wird die Datengrundlage für die Analyse der einzelnen Tools auf einen Ausschnitt von 60 Mio. Events begrenzt. Um die Performance der einzelnen Tools zu testen, wird jedoch auf die gesamte Datengrundlage zurückgegriffen. Der Ausschnitt der Event-Log Tabelle enthält 919 verschiedene Varianten und weisst somit eine ausreichende Komplexität auf, welche es mit den verschiednene Tools zu analysieren gilt.

Folgender Veröffentlichungsplan gilt für diese Artikelserie und wird mit jeder Veröffentlichung verlinkt:

  1. Celonis
  2. PAFnow
  3. MEHRWERK (erscheint demnächst)
  4. Lana Labs (erscheint demnächst)
  5. Signavio (erscheint demnächst)
  6. Process Gold (erscheint demnächst)
  7. Fluxicon Disco (erscheint demnächst)
  8. Aris Process Mining der Software AG (erscheint demnächst)

Interview: Operationalisierung von Data Science

Interview mit Herrn Dr. Frank Block von Roche Diagnostics über Operationalisierung von Data Science

Herr Dr. Frank Block ist Head of IT Data Science bei Roche Diagnostics mit Sitz in der Schweiz. Zuvor war er Chief Data Scientist bei der Ricardo AG nachdem er für andere Unternehmen die Datenanalytik verantwortet hatte und auch 20 Jahre mit mehreren eigenen Data Science Consulting Startups am Markt war. Heute tragen ca. 50 Mitarbeiter bei Roche Diagnostics zu Data Science Projekten bei, die in sein Aktivitätsportfolio fallen: 

Data Science Blog: Herr Dr. Block, Sie sind Leiter der IT Data Science bei Roche Diagnostics? Warum das „IT“ im Namen dieser Abteilung?

Roche ist ein großes Unternehmen mit einer großen Anzahl von Data Scientists in ganz verschiedenen Bereichen mit jeweils sehr verschiedenen Zielsetzungen und Themen, die sie bearbeiten. Ich selber befinde mich mit meinem Team im Bereich „Diagnostics“, d.h. der Teil von Roche, in dem Produkte auf den Markt gebracht werden, die die korrekte Diagnose von Krankheiten und Krankheitsrisiken ermöglichen. Innerhalb von Roche Diagnostics gibt es wiederum verschiedene Bereiche, die Data Science für ihre Zwecke nutzen. Mit meinem Team sind wir in der globalen IT-Organisation angesiedelt und kümmern uns dort insbesondere um Anwendungen von Data Science für die Optimierung der internen Wertschöpfungskette.

Data Science Blog: Sie sind längst über die ersten Data Science Experimente hinaus. Die Operationalisierung von Analysen bzw. analytischen Applikationen ist für Sie besonders wichtig. Welche Rolle spielt das Datenmanagement dabei? Und wo liegen die Knackpunkte?

Ja, richtig. Die Zeiten, in denen sich Data Science erlauben konnte „auf Vorrat“ an interessanten Themen zu arbeiten, weil sie eben super interessant sind, aber ohne jemals konkrete Wertschöpfung zu liefern, sind definitiv und ganz allgemein vorbei. Wir sind seit einigen Jahren dabei, den Übergang von Data Science Experimenten (wir nennen es auch gerne „proof-of-value“) in die Produktion voranzutreiben und zu optimieren. Ein ganz essentielles Element dabei stellen die Daten dar; diese werden oft auch als der „Treibstoff“ für Data Science basierte Prozesse bezeichnet. Der große Unterschied kommt jedoch daher, dass oft statt „Benzin“ nur „Rohöl“ zur Verfügung steht, das zunächst einmal aufwändig behandelt und vorprozessiert werden muss, bevor es derart veredelt ist, dass es für Data Science Anwendungen geeignet ist. In diesem Veredelungsprozess wird heute noch sehr viel Zeit aufgewendet. Je besser die Datenplattformen des Unternehmens, umso größer die Produktivität von Data Science (und vielen anderen Abnehmern dieser Daten im Unternehmen). Ein anderes zentrales Thema stellt der Übergang von Data Science Experiment zu Operationalisierung dar. Hier muss dafür gesorgt werden, dass eine reibungslose Übergabe von Data Science an das IT-Entwicklungsteam erfolgt. Die Teamzusammensetzung verändert sich an dieser Stelle und bei uns tritt der Data Scientist von einer anfänglich führenden Rolle in eine Beraterrolle ein, wenn das System in die produktive Entwicklung geht. Auch die Unterstützung der Operationalisierung durch eine durchgehende Data Science Plattform kann an dieser Stelle helfen.

Data Science Blog: Es heißt häufig, dass Data Scientists kaum zu finden sind. Ist Recruiting für Sie tatsächlich noch ein Thema?

Generell schon, obwohl mir scheint, dass dies nicht unser größtes Problem ist. Glücklicherweise übt Roche eine große Anziehung auf Talente aus, weil im Zentrum unseres Denkens und Handelns der Patient steht und wir somit durch unsere Arbeit einen sehr erstrebenswerten Zweck verfolgen. Ein zweiter Aspekt beim Aufbau eines Data Science Teams ist übrigens das Halten der Talente im Team oder Unternehmen. Data Scientists suchen vor allem spannenden und abwechselnden Herausforderungen. Und hier sind wir gut bedient, da die Palette an Data Science Anwendungen derart breit ist, dass es den Kollegen im Team niemals langweilig wird.

Data Science Blog: Sie haben bereits einige Analysen erfolgreich produktiv gebracht. Welche Herausforderungen mussten dabei überwunden werden? Und welche haben Sie heute noch vor sich?

Wir konnten bereits eine wachsende Zahl an Data Science Experimenten in die Produktion überführen und sind sehr stolz darauf, da dies der beste Weg ist, nachhaltig Geschäftsmehrwert zu generieren. Die gleichzeitige Einbettung von Data Science in IT und Business ist uns bislang gut gelungen, wir werden aber noch weiter daran arbeiten, denn je näher wir mit unseren Kollegen in den Geschäftsabteilungen arbeiten, umso besser wird sichergestellt, das Data Science sich auf die wirklich relevanten Themen fokussiert. Wir sehen auch guten Fortschritt aus der Datenperspektive, wo zunehmend Daten über „Silos“ hinweg integriert werden und so einfacher nutzbar sind.

Data Science Blog: Data Driven Thinking wird heute sowohl von Mitarbeitern in den Fachbereichen als auch vom Management verlangt. Sind wir schon so weit? Wie könnten wir diese Denkweise im Unternehmen fördern?

Ich glaube wir stecken mitten im Wandel, Data-Driven Decisions sind im Kommen, aber das braucht auch seine Zeit. Indem wir zeigen, welches Potenzial ganz konkrete Daten und Advanced Analytics basierte Entscheidungsprozesse innehaben, helfen wir, diesen Wandel voranzutreiben. Spezifische Weiterbildungsangebote stellen eine andere Komponente dar, die diesen Transformationszrozess unterstützt. Ich bin überzeugt, dass wenn wir in 10-20 Jahren zurückblicken, wir uns fragen, wie wir überhaupt ohne Data-Driven Thinking leben konnten…

Simplify Vendor Onboarding with Automated Data Integration

Vendor onboarding is a key business process that involves collecting and processing large data volumes from one or multiple vendors. Business users need vendor information in a standardized format to use it for subsequent data processes. However, consolidating and standardizing data for each new vendor requires IT teams to write code for custom integration flows, which can be a time-consuming and challenging task.

In this blog post, we will talk about automated vendor onboarding and how it is far more efficient and quicker than manually updating integration flows.

Problems with Manual Integration for Vendor Onboarding

During the onboarding process, vendor data needs to be extracted, validated, standardized, transformed, and loaded into the target system for further processing. An integration task like this involves coding, updating, and debugging manual ETL pipelines that can take days and even weeks on end.

Every time a vendor comes on board, this process is repeated and executed to load the information for that vendor into the unified business system. Not just this, but because vendor data is often received from disparate sources in a variety of formats (CSV, Text, Excel), these ETL pipelines frequently break and require manual fixes.

All this effort is not suitable, particularly for large-scale businesses that onboard hundreds of vendors each month. Luckily, there is a faster alternative available that involves no code-writing.

Automated Data Integration

The manual onboarding process can be automated using purpose-built data integration tools.

To help you better understand the advantages, here is a step-by-step guide on how automated data integration for vendor onboarding works:

  1. Vendor data is retrieved from heterogeneous sources such as databases, FTP servers, and web APIs through built-in connectors available in the solution.
  2. The data from each file is validated by passing it through a set of predefined quality rules – this step helps in eliminating records with missing, duplicate, or incorrect data.
  3. Transformations are applied to convert input data into the desired output format or screen vendors based on business criteria. For example, if the vendor data is stored in Excel sheets and the business uses SQL Server for data storage, then the data has to be mapped to the relevant fields in the SQL Server database, which is the destination.
  4. The standardized, validated data is then loaded into a unified enterprise database that you can use as the source of information for business processes. In some cases, this can be a staging database where you can perform further filtering and aggregation to build a consolidated vendor database.
  5. This entire ETL pipeline (Step 1 through Step 4) can then be automated through event-based or time-based triggers in a workflow. For instance, you may want to run the pipeline once every day, or once a new file/data point is available in your FTP server.

Why Build a Consolidated Database for Vendors?

Once the ETL pipeline runs, you will end up with a consolidated database with complete vendor information. The main benefit of having a unified database is that it would have filtered information regarding vendors.

Most businesses have a strict process for screening vendors that follows a set of predefined rules. For example, you may want to reject vendors that have a poor credit history automatically. With manual data integration, you would need to perform this filtering by writing code. Automated data integration allows you to apply pre-built filters directly within your ETL pipeline to flag or remove vendors with a credit score lower than the specified threshold.

This is just one example; you can perform a wide range of tasks at this level in your ETL pipeline including vendor scoring (calculated based on multiple fields in your data), filtering (based on rules applied to your data), and data aggregation (to add measures to your data) to build a robust vendor database for decision-making and subsequent processes.

Conclusion

Automated vendor onboarding offers cost-and-time benefits to your organization. Making use of enterprise-grade data integration tools ensures a seamless business-to-vendor data exchange without the need for reworking and upgrading your ETL pipelines.

Integrate Unstructured Data into Your Enterprise to Drive Actionable Insights

In an ideal world, all enterprise data is structured – classified neatly into columns, rows, and tables, easily integrated and shared across the organization.

The reality is far from it! Datamation estimates that unstructured data accounts for more than 80% of enterprise data, and it is growing at a rate of 55 – 65 percent annually. This includes information stored in images, emails, spreadsheets, etc., that cannot fit into databases.

Therefore, it becomes imperative for a data-driven organization to leverage their non-traditional information assets to derive business value. We have outlined a simple 3-step process that can help organizations integrate unstructured sources into their data eco-system:

1. Determine the Challenge

The primary step is narrowing down the challenges you want to solve through the unstructured data flowing in and out of your organization. Financial organizations, for instance, use call reports, sales notes, or other text documents to get real-time insights from the data and make decisions based on the trends. Marketers make use of social media data to evaluate their customers’ needs and shape their marketing strategy.

Figuring out which process your organization is trying to optimize through unstructured data can help you reach your goal faster.

2. Map Out the Unstructured Data Sources Within the Enterprise

An actionable plan starts with identifying the range of data sources that are essential to creating a truly integrated environment. This enables organizations to align the sources with business objectives and streamline their data initiatives.

Deciding which data should be extracted, analyzed, and stored should be a primary concern in this regard. Even if you can ingest data from any source, it doesn’t mean that you should.

Collecting a large volume of unstructured data is not enough to generate insights. It needs to be properly organized and validated for quality before integration. Full, incremental, online, and offline extraction methods are generally used to mine valuable information from unstructured data sources.

3. Transform Unstructured Assets into Decision-Ready Insights

Now that you have all the puzzle pieces, the next step is to create a complete picture. This may require making changes in your organization’s infrastructure to derive meaning from your unstructured assets and get a 360-degree business view.

IDC recommends creating a company culture that promotes the collection, use, and sharing of both unstructured and structured business assets. Therefore, finding an enterprise-grade integration solution that offers enhanced connectivity to a range of data sources, ideally structured, unstructured, and semi-structured, can help organizations generate the most value out of their data assets.

Automation is another feature that can help speed up integration processes, minimize error probability, and generate time-and-cost savings. Features like job scheduling, auto-mapping, and workflow automation can optimize the process of extracting information from XML, JSON, Excel or audio files, and storing it into a relational database or generating insights.

The push to become a data-forward organization has enterprises re-evaluating the way to leverage unstructured data assets for decision-making. With an actionable plan in place to integrate these sources with the rest of the data, organizations can take advantage of the opportunities offered by analytics and stand out from the competition.

Process Paradise by the Dashboard Light

The right questions drive business success. Questions like, “How can I make sure my product is the best of its kind?” “How can I get the edge over my competitors?” and “How can I keep growing my organization?” Modern businesses take their questions further, focusing on the details of how they actually function. At this level, the questions become, “How can I make my business as efficient as possible?” “How can I improve the way my company does business?” and even, “Why aren’t my company’s processes working as they should?”


Read this article in German:

Mit Dashboards zur Prozessoptimierung


To discover the answers to these questions (and many others!), more and more businesses are turning to process mining. Process mining helps organizations unlock hidden value by automatically collecting information on process models from across the different IT systems operating within a business. This allows for continuous monitoring of an organization’s end-to-end process landscape, meaning managers and staff gain specific operational insights into potential risks—as well as ongoing improvement opportunities.

However, process mining is not a silver bullet that turns data into insights at the push of a button. Process mining software is simply a tool that produces information, which then must be analyzed and acted upon by real people. For this to happen, the information produced must be available to decision-makers in an understandable format.

For most process mining tools, the emphasis remains on the sophistication of analysis capabilities, with the resulting data needing to be interpreted by a select group of experts or specialists within an organization. This necessarily creates a delay between the data being produced, the analysis completed, and actions taken in response.

Process mining software that supports a more collaborative approach by reducing the need for specific expertise can help bridge this gap. Only if hypotheses, analysis, and discoveries are shared, discussed, and agreed upon with a wide range of people can really meaningful insights be generated.

Of course, process mining software is currently capable of generating standardized reports and readouts, but in a business environment where the pace of change is constantly increasing, this may not be sufficient for very much longer. For truly effective process mining, the secret to success will be anticipating challenges and opportunities, then dealing with them as they arise in real time.

Dashboards of the future

To think about how process mining could improve, let’s consider an analog example. Technology evolves to make things easier—think of the difference between keeping track of expenditure using a written ledger vs. an electronic spreadsheet. Now imagine the spreadsheet could tell you exactly when you needed to read it, and where to start, as well as alerting you to errors and omissions before you were even aware you’d made them.

Advances in process mining make this sort of enhanced assistance possible for businesses seeking to improve the way they work. With the right process mining software, companies can build tailored operational cockpits that unite real-time operational data with process management. This allows for the usual continuous monitoring of individual processes and outcomes, but it also offers even clearer insights into an organization’s overall process health.

Combining process mining with an organization’s existing process models in the right way turns these models from static representations of the way a particular process operates, into dynamic dashboards that inform, guide and warn managers and staff about problems in real time. And remember, dynamic doesn’t have to mean distracting—the right process mining software cuts into your processes to reveal an all-new analytical layer of process transparency, making things easier to understand, not harder.

As a result, business transformation initiatives and other improvement plans and can be adapted and restructured on the go, while decision-makers can create automated messages to immediately be advised of problems and guided to where the issues are occurring, allowing corrective action to be completed faster than ever. This rapid evaluation and response across any process inefficiencies will help organizations save time and money by improving wasted cycle times, locating bottlenecks, and uncovering non-compliance across their entire process landscape.

Dynamic dashboards with Signavio

To see for yourself how the most modern and advanced process mining software can help you reveal actionable insights into the way your business works, give Signavio Process Intelligence a try. With Signavio’s Live Insights, all your process information can be visualized in one place, represented through a traffic light system. Simply decide which processes and which activities within them you want to monitor or understand, place the indicators, choose the thresholds, and let Signavio Process Intelligence connect your process models to the data.

Banish multiple tabs and confusing layouts, amaze your colleagues and managers with fact-based insights to support your business transformation, and reduce the time it takes to deliver value from your process management initiatives. To find out more about Signavio Process Intelligence, or sign up for a free 30-day trial, visit www.signavio.com/try.

Process mining is a powerful analysis tool, giving you the visibility, quantifiable numbers, and information you need to improve your business processes. Would you like to read more? With this guide to managing successful process mining initiatives, you will learn that how to get started, how to get the right people on board, and the right project approach.

Mit Dashboards zur Prozessoptimierung

Geschäftlicher Erfolg ergibt sich oft aus den richtigen Fragen – zum Beispiel: „Wie kann ich sicherstellen, dass mein Produkt das beste ist?“, „Wie hebe ich mich von meinen Mitbewerbern ab?“ und „Wie baue ich mein Unternehmen weiter aus?“ Moderne Unternehmen gehen über derartige Fragen hinaus und stellen vielmehr die Funktionsweise ihrer Organisation in den Fokus. Fragen auf dieser Ebene lauten dann: „Wie kann ich meine Geschäftsprozesse so effizient wie möglich gestalten?“, „Wie kann ich Zusammenarbeit meiner Mitarbeiter verbessern?“ oder auch „Warum funktionieren die Prozesse meines Unternehmens nicht so, wie sie sollten?“


Read this article in English: 
“Process Paradise by the Dashboard Light”


Um die Antworten auf diese (und viele andere!) Fragen zu erhalten, setzen immer mehr Unternehmen auf Process Mining. Process Mining hilft Unternehmen dabei, den versteckten Mehrwert in ihren Prozessen aufzudecken, indem Informationen zu Prozessmodellen aus den verschiedenen IT-Systemen eines Unternehmens automatisch erfasst werden. Auf diese Weise kann die End-to-End-Prozesslandschaft eines Unternehmens kontinuierlich überwacht werden. Manager und Mitarbeiter profitieren so von operativen Erkenntnissen und können potenzielle Risiken ebenso erkennen wie Möglichkeiten zur Verbesserung.

Process Mining ist jedoch keine „Wunderwaffe“, die Daten auf Knopfdruck in Erkenntnisse umwandelt. Eine Process-Mining-Software ist vielmehr als Werkzeug zu betrachten, das Informationen erzeugt, die anschließend analysiert und in Maßnahmen umgesetzt werden. Hierfür müssen die generierten Informationen den Entscheidungsträgern jedoch auch in einem verständlichen Format zur Verfügung stehen.

Bei den meisten Process-Mining-Tools steht nach wie vor die Verbesserung der Analysefunktionen im Fokus und die generierten Daten müssen von Experten oder Spezialisten innerhalb einer Organisation bewertet werden. Dies führt zwangsläufig dazu, dass es zwischen den einzelnen Schritten zu Verzögerungen kommt und die Abläufe bis zur Ergreifung von Maßnahmen ins Stocken geraten.

Process-Mining-Software, die einen kooperativeren Ansatz verfolgt und dadurch das erforderliche spezifische Fachwissen verringert, kann diese Lücke schließen. Denn nur wenn Informationen, Hypothesen und Analysen mit einer Vielzahl von Personen geteilt und erörtert werden, können am Ende aussagekräftige Erkenntnisse gewonnen werden.

Aktuelle Process-Mining-Software kann natürlich standardisierte Berichte und Informationen generieren. In einem sich immer schneller ändernden Geschäftsumfeld reicht dies jedoch möglicherweise nicht mehr aus. Das Erfolgsgeheimnis eines wirklich effektiven Process Minings besteht darin, Herausforderungen und geschäftliche Möglichkeiten vorherzusehen und dann in Echtzeit auf sie zu reagieren.

Dashboards der Zukunft

Nehmen wir ein analoges Beispiel, um aufzuzeigen, wie sich das Process Mining verbessern lässt. Der technologische Fortschritt soll die Dinge einfacher machen: Denken Sie beispielsweise an den Unterschied zwischen der handschriftlichen Erfassung von Ausgaben und einem Tabellenkalkulator. Stellen Sie sich nun vor, die Tabelle könnte Ihnen genau sagen, wann Sie sie lesen und wo Sie beginnen müssen, und würde Sie auf Fehler und Auslassungen aufmerksam machen, bevor Sie überhaupt bemerkt haben, dass sie Ihnen passiert sind.

Fortschrittliche Process-Mining-Tools bieten Unternehmen, die ihre Arbeitsweise optimieren möchten, genau diese Art der Unterstützung. Denn mit der richtigen Process-Mining-Software können individuelle operative Cockpits erstellt werden, die geschäftliche Daten in Echtzeit mit dem Prozessmanagement verbinden. Der Vorteil: Es werden nicht nur einzelne Prozesse und Ergebnisse kontinuierlich überwacht, sondern auch klare Einblicke in den Gesamtzustand eines Unternehmens geboten.

Durch die richtige Kombination von Process Mining mit den vorhandenen Prozessmodellen eines Unternehmens werden statisch dargestellte Funktionsweisen eines bestimmten Prozesses in dynamische Dashboards umgewandelt. Manager und Mitarbeiter erhalten so Warnungen über potenzielle Probleme und Schwachstellen in Ihren Prozessen. Und denken Sie daran, dynamisch heißt nicht zwingend störend: Die richtige Process-Mining-Software setzt an der richtigen Stelle in Ihren Prozessen an und bietet ein völlig neues Maß an Prozesstransparenz und damit an Prozessverständnis.

Infolgedessen können Transformationsinitiativen und andere Verbesserungspläne jederzeit angepasst und umstrukturiert werden und Entscheidungsträger mittels automatisierter Nachrichten sofort über Probleme informiert werden, sodass sich Korrekturmaßnahmen schneller als je zuvor umsetzen lassen. Der Vorteil: Unternehmen sparen Zeit und Geld, da Zykluszeiten verkürzt, Engpässe lokalisiert und nicht konforme Prozesse in der Prozesslandschaft der Organisation aufgedeckt werden.

Dynamische Dashboards von Signavio

 Testen Sie Signavio Process Intelligence und erleben Sie selbst, wie die modernste und fortschrittlichste Process-Mining-Software Ihnen dabei hilft, umsetzbare Einblicke in die Funktionsweise Ihres Unternehmens zu erhalten. Mit Signavios Live Insights profitieren Sie von einer zentralen Ansicht Ihrer Prozesse und Informationen, die in Form eines Ampelsystems dargestellt werden. Entscheiden Sie einfach, welche Prozesse und Aktivitäten Sie innerhalb eines Prozesses überwachen möchten, platzieren Sie Indikatoren und wählen Sie Grenzwerte aus. Alles Weitere übernimmt Signavio Process Intelligence, das Ihre Prozessmodelle mit den Daten verbindet.

Lassen Sie veraltete Arbeitsweisen hinter sich. Setzen Sie stattdessen auf faktenbasierte Erkenntnisse, um Ihre Geschäftstransformation zu unterstützen und Ihre Prozessmanagementinitiativen schneller zum Erfolg zu führen. Erfahren Sie mehr über Signavio Process Intelligence oder registrieren Sie sich für eine kostenlose 30-Tage-Testversion über www.signavio.com/try.

Erfahren Sie in unserem kostenlosen Whitepaper mehr über erfolgreiches Process Mining mit Signavio Process Intelligence.