Interview: Does Business Intelligence benefit from Cloud Data Warehousing?

Interview with Ross Perez, Senior Director, Marketing EMEA at Snowflake

Does Business Intelligence benefit from Cloud Data Warehousing?

Ross Perez is the Senior Director, Marketing EMEA at Snowflake. He leads the Snowflake marketing team in EMEA and is charged with starting the discussion about analytics, data, and cloud data warehousing across EMEA. Before Snowflake, Ross was a product marketer at Tableau Software where he founded the Iron Viz Championship, the world’s largest and longest running data visualization competition.

Data Science Blog: Ross, Business Intelligence (BI) is not really a new trend. In 2019/2020, making data available for the whole company should not be a big thing anymore. Would you agree?

BI is definitely an old trend, reporting has been around for 50 years. People are accustomed to seeing statistics and data for the company at large, and even their business units. However, using BI to deliver analytics to everyone in the organization and encouraging them to make decisions based on data for their specific area is relatively new. In a lot of the companies Snowflake works with, there is a huge new group of people who have recently received access to self-service BI and visualization tools like Tableau, Looker and Sigma, and they are just starting to find answers to their questions.

Data Science Blog: Up until today, BI was just about delivering dashboards for reporting to the business. The data warehouse (DWH) was something like the backend. Today we have increased demand for data transparency. How should companies deal with this demand?

Because more people in more departments are wanting access to data more frequently, the demand on backend systems like the data warehouse is skyrocketing. In many cases, companies have data warehouses that weren’t built to cope with this concurrent demand and that means that the experience is slow. End users have to wait a long time for their reports. That is where Snowflake comes in: since we can use the power of the cloud to spin up resources on demand, we can serve any number of concurrent users. Snowflake can also house unlimited amounts of data, of both structured and semi-structured formats.

Data Science Blog: Would you say the DWH is the key driver for becoming a data-driven organization? What else should be considered here?

Absolutely. Without having all of your data in a single, highly elastic, and flexible data warehouse, it can be a huge challenge to actually deliver insight to people in the organization.

Data Science Blog: So much for the theory, now let’s talk about specific use cases. In general, it matters a lot whether you are storing and analyzing e.g. financial data or machine data. What do we have to consider for both purposes?

Financial data and machine data do look very different, and often come in different formats. For instance, financial data is often in a standard relational format. Data like this needs to be able to be easily queried with standard SQL, something that many Hadoop and noSQL tools were unable to provide. Luckily, Snowflake is an ansi-standard SQL data warehouse so it can be used with this type of data quite seamlessly.

On the other hand, machine data is often semi-structured or even completely unstructured. This type of data is becoming significantly more common with the rise of IoT, but traditional data warehouses were very bad at dealing with it since they were optimized for relational data. Semi-structured data like JSON, Avro, XML, Orc and Parquet can be loaded into Snowflake for analysis quite seamlessly in its native format. This is important, because you don’t want to have to flatten the data to get any use from it.

Both types of data are important, and Snowflake is really the first data warehouse that can work with them both seamlessly.

Data Science Blog: Back to the common business use case: Creating sales or purchase reports for the business managers, based on data from ERP-systems such as Microsoft or SAP. Which architecture for the DWH could be the right one? How many and which database layers do you see as necessary?

The type of report largely does not matter, because in all cases you want a data warehouse that can support all of your data and serve all of your users. Ideally, you also want to be able to turn it off and on depending on demand. That means that you need a cloud-based architecture… and specifically Snowflake’s innovative architecture that separates storage and compute, making it possible to pay for exactly what you use.

Data Science Blog: Where would you implement the main part of the business logic for the report? In the DWH or in the reporting tool? Does it matter which reporting tool we choose?

The great thing is that you can choose either. Snowflake, as an ansi-Standard SQL data warehouse, can support a high degree of data modeling and business logic. But you can also utilize partners like Looker and Sigma who specialize in data modeling for BI. We think it’s best that the customer chooses what is right for them.

Data Science Blog: Snowflake enables organizations to store and manage their data in the cloud. Does it mean companies lose control over their storage and data management?

Customers have complete control over their data, and in fact Snowflake cannot see, alter or change any aspect of their data. The benefit of a cloud solution is that customers don’t have to manage the infrastructure or the tuning – they decide how they want to store and analyze their data and Snowflake takes care of the rest.

Data Science Blog: How big is the effort for smaller and medium sized companies to set up a DWH in the cloud? Does this have to be an expensive long-term project in every case?

The nice thing about Snowflake is that you can get started with a free trial in a few minutes. Now, moving from a traditional data warehouse to Snowflake can take some time, depending on the legacy technology that you are using. But Snowflake itself is quite easy to set up and very much compatible with historical tools making it relatively easy to move over.

Cross-industry standard process for data mining

Introduced in 1996, the cross-industry standard process for data mining (CRISP-DM) became the most
common procedure for all data mining projects. This method consists of six phases: Business
understanding, Data understanding, Data preparation, Modeling, Evaluation and Deployment (see
Figure 1). It is being used not just as a reference manual but as a user guide as it explains every phase
in detail (Hipp, 2000). The six phases of this model are explained below:

Figure 1: Different phases of CRISP-DM

Business Understanding

It includes understanding the business problem and determining the
objective of the business as well as of the project. It is also important to understand the previous work
done on the project (if any) to achieve the business goals and to examine if the scope of the project has changed.

The job of a Data Scientist is not limited to coding or just make a machine learning model and I guess that’s why this whole lifecycle was developed.  The key points a project owner should take care in this process are:

– Identify stakeholders  and involve them to define the scope your project
– Describe your product (your machine learning model)
– Identify how your product ties into the client’s business processes
– Identify metrics / KPIs for measuring success

Evaluating a model is a different thing as it can only tell you how good are your predictions but identifying the success metric is really important for any data science project because when your model is deployed in production this measure will tell you if your model actually works or not. Now, let’s discuss what is this success metric
Consider that you are working in an e-commerce company where Head of finance ask you to create a machine learning model to predict if a specific product will return or not. The problem is not hard to understand, its a binary classification problem and you know you can do the job. But before you start working with the data you should define a metric to measure the success. What do you think your success metric could be? I would go with the return rate, in other words, calculate the rate for how many orders are actually coming back and if this measure is getting decrease you would know your model works and if not then FIX IT !!

Data understanding

The initial step in this phase is to gather all the data from different sources. It is
then important to describe the data, generate graphs for distribution in order to get familiar with the
data. This phase is important as without enough data or without understanding about the data analysis
cannot be performed. In data mining terms this can be compared to Exploratory data analysis (EDA)
where techniques from descriptive statistics are used to have an insight into the data. For instance, if it is
a time series data it makes sense to know from when until when the data is available before diving deep into
the data.

Data preparation

This phase takes most of the time in data mining project as a lot of methods from
data cleaning, feature subset, feature engineering, the transformation of data etc. are used before the final
dataset is trained for modeling purpose. The single dataset can also be prepared in different forms as some
algorithms can learn more with a certain type of data, some algorithms can deal with imbalance dataset
and for some algorithms, the target variable must be balanced. This phase also requires sometimes to
calculate new KPI’s according to the business need or sometimes to reduce the dimension of the dataset.

Modeling and Evaluation

Various models are selected and build in this process and appropriate hyperparameters are
selected after an intensive grid search.  Once all the models are built it is now time to evaluate and compare performances of all the models.

Deployment

A model is of no use if it is not deployed into production. Until now you have been doing the job of a data scientist but for deployment, you need some software engineering

skills. There are several ways to deploy a machine learning model or python code. Few of them are:

  • Re-implement your python code in C++, Java etc. (LOL)
  • Save the coefficients and use them to get predictions
  • Serialized objects (REST API with flask, Django)

To understand the concept of deploying an ML model using REST API this post is highly recommended.

Einstieg in Natural Language Processing – Teil 2: Preprocessing von Rohtext mit Python

Dies ist der zweite Artikel der Artikelserie Einstieg in Natural Language Processing.

In diesem Artikel wird das so genannte Preprocessing von Texten behandelt, also Schritte die im Bereich des NLP in der Regel vor eigentlichen Textanalyse durchgeführt werden.

Tokenizing

Um eingelesenen Rohtext in ein Format zu überführen, welches in der späteren Analyse einfacher ausgewertet werden kann, sind eine ganze Reihe von Schritten notwendig. Ganz allgemein besteht der erste Schritt darin, den auszuwertenden Text in einzelne kurze Abschnitte – so genannte Tokens – zu zerlegen (außer man bastelt sich völlig eigene Analyseansätze, wie zum Beispiel eine Spracherkennung anhand von Buchstabenhäufigkeiten ect.).

Was genau ein Token ist, hängt vom verwendeten Tokenizer ab. So bringt NLTK bereits standardmäßig unter anderem BlankLine-, Line-, Sentence-, Word-, Wordpunkt- und SpaceTokenizer mit, welche Text entsprechend in Paragraphen, Zeilen, Sätze, Worte usw. aufsplitten. Weiterhin ist mit dem RegexTokenizer ein Tool vorhanden, mit welchem durch Wahl eines entsprechenden Regulären Ausdrucks beliebig komplexe eigene Tokenizer erstellt werden können.

Üblicherweise wird ein Text (evtl. nach vorherigem Aufsplitten in Paragraphen oder Sätze) schließlich in einzelne Worte und Interpunktionen (Satzzeichen) aufgeteilt. Hierfür kann, wie im folgenden Beispiel z. B. der WordTokenizer oder die diesem entsprechende Funktion word_tokenize() verwendet werden.

Stemming & Lemmatizing

Andere häufig durchgeführte Schritte sind Stemming sowie Lemmatizing. Hierbei werden die Suffixe der einzelnen Tokens des Textes mit Hilfe eines Stemmers in eine Form überführt, welche nur den Wortstamm zurücklässt. Dies hat den Zweck verschiedene grammatikalische Formen des selben Wortes (welche sich oft in ihrer Endung unterscheiden (ich gehe, du gehst, er geht, wir gehen, …) ununterscheidbar zu machen. Diese würden sonst als mehrere unabhängige Worte in die darauf folgende Analyse eingehen.

Neben bereits fertigen Stemmern bietet NLTK auch für diesen Schritt die Möglichkeit sich eigene Stemmer zu programmieren. Da verschiedene Stemmer Suffixe nach unterschiedlichen Regeln entfernen, sind nur die Wortstämme miteinander vergleichbar, welche mit dem selben Stemmer generiert wurden!

Im forlgenden Beispiel werden verschiedene vordefinierte Stemmer aus dem Paket NLTK auf den bereits oben verwendeten Beispielsatz angewendet und die Ergebnisse der gestemmten Tokens in einer Art einfachen Tabelle ausgegeben:

Sehr ähnlich den Stemmern arbeiten Lemmatizer: Auch ihre Aufgabe ist es aus verschiedenen Formen eines Wortes die jeweilige Grundform zu bilden. Im Unterschied zu den Stemmern ist das Lemma eines Wortes jedoch klar als dessen Grundform definiert.

Vokabular

Auch das Vokabular, also die Menge aller verschiedenen Worte eines Textes, ist eine informative Kennzahl. Bezieht man die Größe des Vokabulars eines Textes auf seine gesamte Anzahl verwendeter Worte, so lassen sich hiermit Aussagen zu der Diversität des Textes machen.

Außerdem kann das auftreten bestimmter Worte später bei der automatischen Einordnung in Kategorien wichtig werden: Will man beispielsweise Nachrichtenmeldungen nach Themen kategorisieren und in einem Text tritt das Wort „DAX“ auf, so ist es deutlich wahrscheinlicher, dass es sich bei diesem Text um eine Meldung aus dem Finanzbereich handelt, als z. B. um das „Kochrezept des Tages“.

Dies mag auf den ersten Blick trivial erscheinen, allerdings können auch mit einfachen Modellen, wie dem so genannten „Bag-of-Words-Modell“, welches nur die Anzahl des Auftretens von Worten prüft, bereits eine Vielzahl von Informationen aus Texten gewonnen werden.

Das reine Vokabular eines Textes, welcher in der Variable “rawtext” gespeichert ist, kann wie folgt in der Variable “vocab” gespeichert werden. Auf die Ausgabe wurde in diesem Fall verzichtet, da diese im Falle des oben als Beispiel gewählten Satzes den einzelnen Tokens entspricht, da kein Wort öfter als ein Mal vorkommt.

Stopwords

Unter Stopwords werden Worte verstanden, welche zwar sehr häufig vorkommen, jedoch nur wenig Information zu einem Text beitragen. Beispiele in der beutschen Sprache sind: der, und, aber, mit, …

Sowohl NLTK als auch cpaCy bringen vorgefertigte Stopwordsets mit. 

Vorsicht: NLTK besitzt eine Stopwordliste, welche erst in ein Set umgewandelt werden sollte um die lookup-Zeiten kurz zu halten – schließlich muss jedes einzelne Token des Textes auf das vorhanden sein in der Stopworditerable getestet werden!

POS-Tagging

POS-Tagging steht für „Part of Speech Tagging“ und entspricht ungefähr den Aufgaben, die man noch aus dem Deutschunterricht kennt: „Unterstreiche alle Subjekte rot, alle Objekte blau…“. Wichtig ist diese Art von Tagging insbesondere, wenn man später tatsächlich strukturiert Informationen aus dem Text extrahieren möchte, da man hierfür wissen muss wer oder was als Subjekt mit wem oder was als Objekt interagiert.

Obwohl genau die selben Worte vorkommen, bedeutet der Satz „Die Katze frisst die Maus.“ etwas anderes als „Die Maus frisst die Katze.“, da hier Subjekt und Objekt aufgrund ihrer Reihenfolge vertauscht sind (Stichwort: Subjekt – Prädikat – Objekt ).

Weniger wichtig ist dieser Schritt bei der Kategorisierung von Dokumenten. Insbesondere bei dem bereits oben erwähnten Bag-of-Words-Modell, fließen POS-Tags überhaupt nicht mit ein.

Und weil es so schön einfach ist: Die obigen Schritte mit spaCy

Die obigen Methoden und Arbeitsschritte, welche Texte die in natürlicher Sprache geschrieben sind, allgemein computerzugänglicher und einfacher auswertbar machen, können beliebig genau den eigenen Wünschen angepasst, einzeln mit dem Paket NLTK durchgeführt werden. Dies zumindest einmal gemacht zu haben, erweitert das Verständnis für die funktionsweise einzelnen Schritte und insbesondere deren manchmal etwas versteckten Komplexität. (Wie muss beispielsweise ein Tokenizer funktionieren der den Satz “Schwierig ist z. B. dieser Satz.” korrekt in nur einen Satz aufspaltet, anstatt ihn an jedem Punkt welcher an einem Wortende auftritt in insgesamt vier Sätze aufzuspalten, von denen einer nur aus einem Leerzeichen besteht?) Hier soll nun aber, weil es so schön einfach ist, auch das analoge Vorgehen mit dem Paket spaCy beschrieben werden:

Dieser kurze Codeabschnitt liest den an spaCy übergebenen Rohtext in ein spaCy Doc-Object ein und führt dabei automatisch bereits alle oben beschriebenen sowie noch eine Reihe weitere Operationen aus. So stehen neben dem immer noch vollständig gespeicherten Originaltext, die einzelnen Sätze, Worte, Lemmas, Noun-Chunks, Named Entities, Part-of-Speech-Tags, ect. direkt zur Verfügung und können.über die Methoden des Doc-Objektes erreicht werden. Des weiteren liegen auch verschiedene weitere Objekte wie beispielsweise Vektoren zur Bestimmung von Dokumentenähnlichkeiten bereits fertig vor.

Die Folgende Übersicht soll eine kurze (aber noch lange nicht vollständige) Übersicht über die automatisch von spaCy generierten Objekte und Methoden zur Textanalyse geben:

Diese „Vollautomatisierung“ der Vorabschritte zur Textanalyse hat jedoch auch seinen Preis: spaCy geht nicht gerade sparsam mit Ressourcen wie Rechenleistung und Arbeitsspeicher um. Will man einen oder einige Texte untersuchen so ist spaCy oft die einfachste und schnellste Lösung für das Preprocessing. Anders sieht es aber beispielsweise aus, wenn eine bestimmte Analyse wie zum Beispiel die Einteilung in verschiedene Textkategorien auf eine sehr große Anzahl von Texten angewendet werden soll. In diesem Fall, sollte man in Erwägung ziehen auf ressourcenschonendere Alternativen wie zum Beispiel gensim auszuweichen.

Wer beim lesen genau aufgepasst hat, wird festgestellt haben, dass ich im Abschnitt POS-Tagging im Gegensatz zu den anderen Abschnitten auf ein kurzes Codebeispiel verzichtet habe. Dies möchte ich an dieser Stelle nachholen und dabei gleich eine Erweiterung des Pakets spaCy vorstellen: displaCy.

Displacy bietet die Möglichkeit, sich Zusammenhänge und Eigenschaften von Texten wie Named Entities oder eben POS-Tagging graphisch im Browser anzeigen zu lassen.

Nach ausführen des obigen Codes erhält man eine Ausgabe die wie folgt aussieht:

Nun öffnet man einen Browser und ruft die URL ‘http://127.0.0.1:5000’ auf (Achtung: localhost anstatt der IP funktioniert – warum auch immer – mit displacy nicht). Im Browser sollte nun eine Seite mit einem SVG-Bild geladen werden, welches wie folgt aussieht

Die Abbildung macht deutlich was POS-Tagging genau ist und warum es von Nutzen sein kann wenn man Informationen aus einem Text extrahieren will. Jedem Word (Token) ist eine Wortart zugeordnet und die Beziehung der einzelnen Worte durch Pfeile dargestellt. Dies ermöglicht es dem Computer zum Beispiel in dem Satzteil “der grüne Apfel”, das Adjektiv “grün” auf das Nomen “Apfel” zu beziehen und diesem somit als Eigenschaft zuzuordnen.

Nachdem dieser Artikel wichtige Schritte des Preprocessing von Texten beschrieben hat, geht es im nächsten Artikel darum was man an Texten eigentlich analysieren kann und welche Analysemöglichkeiten die verschiedenen für Python vorhandenen Module bieten.

Bringing intelligence to where data lives: Python & R embedded in T-SQL

Introduction

Did you know that you can write R and Python code within your T-SQL statements? Machine Learning Services in SQL Server eliminates the need for data movement. Instead of transferring large and sensitive data over the network or losing accuracy with sample csv files, you can have your R/Python code execute within your database. Easily deploy your R/Python code with SQL stored procedures making them accessible in your ETL processes or to any application. Train and store machine learning models in your database bringing intelligence to where your data lives.

You can install and run any of the latest open source R/Python packages to build Deep Learning and AI applications on large amounts of data in SQL Server. We also offer leading edge, high-performance algorithms in Microsoft’s RevoScaleR and RevoScalePy APIs. Using these with the latest innovations in the open source world allows you to bring unparalleled selection, performance, and scale to your applications.

If you are excited to try out SQL Server Machine Learning Services, check out the hands on tutorial below. If you do not have Machine Learning Services installed in SQL Server,you will first want to follow the getting started tutorial I published here: 

How-To Tutorial

In this tutorial, I will cover the basics of how to Execute R and Python in T-SQL statements. If you prefer learning through videos, I also published the tutorial on YouTube.

Basics

Open up SQL Server Management Studio and make a connection to your server. Open a new query and paste this basic example: (While I use Python in these samples, you can do everything with R as well)

Sp_execute_external_script is a special system stored procedure that enables R and Python execution in SQL Server. There is a “language” parameter that allows us to choose between Python and R. There is a “script” parameter where we can paste R or Python code. If you do not see an output print 7, go back and review the setup steps in this article.

Parameter Introduction

Now that we discussed a basic example, let’s start adding more pieces:

Machine Learning Services provides more natural communications between SQL and R/Python with an input data parameter that accepts any SQL query. The input parameter name is called “input_data_1”.
You can see in the python code that there are default variables defined to pass data between Python and SQL. The default variable names are “OutputDataSet” and “InputDataSet” You can change these default names like this example:

As you executed these examples, you might have noticed that they each return a result with “(No column name)”? You can specify a name for the columns that are returned by adding the WITH RESULT SETS clause to the end of the statement which is a comma separated list of columns and their datatypes.

Input/Output Data Types

Alright, let’s discuss a little more about the input/output data types used between SQL and Python. Your input SQL SELECT statement passes a “Dataframe” to python relying on the Python Pandas package. Your output from Python back to SQL also needs to be in a Pandas Dataframe object. If you need to convert scalar values into a dataframe here is an example:

Variables c and d are both scalar values, which you can add to a pandas Series if you like, and then convert them to a pandas dataframe. This one shows a little bit more complicated example, go read up on the python pandas package documentation for more details and examples:

You now know the basics to execute Python in T-SQL!

Did you know you can also write your R and Python code in your favorite IDE like RStudio and Jupyter Notebooks and then remotely send the execution of that code to SQL Server? Check out these documentation links to learn more: https://aka.ms/R-RemoteSQLExecution https://aka.ms/PythonRemoteSQLExecution

Check out the SQL Server Machine Learning Services documentation page for more documentation, samples, and solutions. Check out these E2E tutorials on github as well.

Would love to hear from you! Leave a comment below to ask a question, or start a discussion!

Data Science Modeling and Featurization

Overview

Data modeling is an essential part of the data science pipeline. This, combined with the fact that it is a very rewarding process, makes it the one that often receives the most attention among data science learners. However, things are not as simple as they may seem, since there is much more to it than applying a function from a particular class of a package and applying it on the data available.

A big part of data science modeling involves evaluating a model, for example, making sure that it is robust and therefore reliable. Also, data science modeling is closely linked to creating an information rich feature set. Moreover, it entails a variety of other processes that ensure that the data at hand is harnessed as much as possible.

What Is a Robust Data Model?

When it comes to robust models, worthy of making it to production, these need to tick several boxes. First of all, they need to have a good performance, based on various metrics. Oftentimes a single metric can be misleading, as how well a model performs has many aspects, especially for classification problems.

In addition, a robust model has good generalization. This means that the model performs well for various datasets, not just the one it has been trained on.

Sensitivity analysis is another aspect of a data science modeling, something essential for thoroughly testing a model to ensure it is robust enough. Sensitivity is a condition whereby a model’s output is bound to change significantly if the inputs change even slightly. This is quite undesirable and needs to be checked since a robust model ought to be stable.

Finally, interpretability is an important aspect too, though it’s not always possible. This has to do with how easy it is to interpret a model’s results. Many modern models, however, are more like black boxes, making it particularly difficult to interpret them. Nevertheless, it is often preferable to opt for an interpretable model, especially if we need to defend its outputs to others.

How Is Featurization Accomplished?

In order for a model to maximize its potential, it needs an information rich set of features. The latter can be created in various ways. Whatever the case, cleaning up the data is a prerequisite. This involves removing or correcting problematic data points, filling in missing values wherever possible, and in some cases removing noisy variables.

Before you can use variables in a model, you need to perform normalization on them. This is usually accomplished through a linear transformation ensuring that the variable’s values are around a certain range. Oftentimes, normalization is sufficient for turning your variables into features, once they are cleaned.

Binning is another process that can aid in featurization. This entails creating nominal (discreet) variables, which can in turn be broken down into binary features, to be used in a data model.

Finally, some dimensionality reduction method (e.g. PCA) can be instrumental in shaping up your feature-set. This has to do with creating linear combinations of features, aka meta-features, which express the same information in fewer dimensions.

Some Useful Considerations

Beyond these basic attributes of data science modeling there several more that every data scientist has in mind in order to create something of value from the available data. Things like in-depth testing using sensitivity analysis, specialized sampling, and various aspects of model performance (as well as tweaking the model to optimize for a particular performance metric) are parts of data science modeling that require meticulous study and ample practice. After all, even though this part of data science is fairly easy to pick up, it takes a while to master, while performing well in it is something that every organization can benefit from.

Resources

To delve more into all this, there are various relevant resources you can leverage, helping you in not just the methodologies involved but also in the mindset behind them. Here are two of the most useful ones.

  1. Data Science Modeling Tutorial on the Safari platform
  2. Data Science Mindset, Methodologies and Misconceptions book (Technics Publications)

Stichwort Datenkompetenz: Von Big Data zu Big Insights

Anzeige – Artikel des Data Science Blog Sponsors Qlik.com

Wer in einer Organisation mit Daten arbeiten möchte, sollte dazu befähigt werden – sonst bleiben wertvolle Einblicke unter Umständen verborgen.

Aus der reinen Technologie-Perspektive ist Big Data nahezu grenzenlos: Prozessoren arbeiten immer schneller, die Kosten für Speicherplatz sinken kontinuierlich, Cloud-Dienste stellen ad hoc und flexibel auch riesige Speichervolumen zur Verfügung. Beste Voraussetzungen also für Big-Data-Enthusiasten? Könnte man meinen. Doch Big Data hat nicht von Haus aus Wert, Sinn oder Geschäftsnutzen. Der stellt sich erst ein, wenn die vielen verfügbaren Daten assoziativ und ohne Denk- oder Infrastruktur-Hürden neu kombiniert, analysiert und visualisiert – also wirklich smart – werden. Der Schlüssel dazu liegt in moderner Data Analytics Software, die unterschiedlichste Datenquellen und -formate verarbeiten und in Beziehung setzen kann – und so wertvolle neue Einsichten offenbart, die ohne Data Analytics im (Big-)Data-Lake abtauchen würden.

Reich an Daten – arm an Einsichten?

Entscheidend für den Erfolg von Big-Data-Projekten ist es, aus der Datenfülle die wirklich relevanten Zusammenhänge zu evaluieren – und nicht um des Sammelns willen Daten zu horten, die neue Einsichten eher zu- als aufdecken. Viele Organisationen befinden sich leider nach wie vor an diesem Punkt. Sie sind reich an Daten, aber nicht in der Lage, neue Informationen daraus zu extrahieren, die gute Ideen anstoßen, Innovation fördern und das Unternehmen nachhaltig weiterbringen. Es herrscht weitgehende Überforderung mit dem eigenen Datenschatz.

Wer in Big-Data-Technologien investiert, fragt früher oder später nach dem ROI seiner Investitionen. Dieser wird umso günstiger ausfallen, je leichter und passgenauer der Datennutzen an möglichst vielen Stellen im Unternehmen verfügbar ist. Hier gilt es zu erkennen, dass fast jeder im Unternehmen Daten gut nutzen kann und sich im Umgang mit ihnen sicher fühlen möchte, um seine Arbeit noch erfolgreicher zu machen – eine neue Untersuchung des Business-Intelligence-Experten Qlik beweist das.

88 Prozent sind überzeugt: Mit Daten läuft es besser

Demnach würden 66 Prozent der Befragten gerne mehr Zeit und Energie in ihre Datenkompetenz investieren – wenn es die Gelegenheit dazu gäbe. 88 Prozent der befragten Sachbearbeiter und ausführenden Kräfte sind überzeugt davon, dass sie mit adäquatem Datenzugang sowie mit den nötigen Befugnissen und Kompetenzen bessere Resultate im Job erreichen könnten. Doch nur 55 Prozent fühlen sich tatsächlich demensprechend ausgestattet und befähigt. Ganz anders das Bild unter Führungskräften: Unter diesen sind zwar 83 Prozent überzeugt davon, guten Zugang zu Daten zu haben – allerdings haben nur 26 Prozent der Chefs wirklich einen Ansatz gefunden, wie sie nutzbringend mit den Daten arbeiten können.

Das bedeutet: Zur datengetriebenen Arbeit sowie zur Unternehmenssteuerung und -entwicklung auf der Basis von Daten braucht nicht jeder im Unternehmen die gleichen Daten und Dashboards. Jedoch braucht jeder Mitarbeiter in der Organisation gleichermaßen die Möglichkeiten und Fähigkeiten, unkompliziert in den Daten zu forschen, die ihm persönlich helfen, seine Arbeit zu verbessern. Welche Ideen und Anschlussfragen die assoziative Data Discovery im Selfservice auslöst, ist vorher schwer zu sagen – Assoziation ist spontan. Daher gilt: Die Erkenntnis kommt beim Tun.

Aus diesem Grund verlangt wirkliche Innovation nach schrankenloser und intuitiver Datenarbeit, die Platz lässt für Ideen, für ungewöhnliche Datenkombinationen und für ein erfindungsreiches „Um-die-Ecke-Denken“. Lineare SQL-Abfragen können das nicht leisten – und entsprechen in ihren vordefinierten Pfaden nicht der wertvollen Kombinationskompetenz, die das menschliche Gehirn von Natur aus mitbringt.

Zukunftsweisende Data Analytics und Advanced Analytics versucht nicht, das Denken und Assoziieren zu ersetzen – sondern die kognitiven Prozesse des Anwenders zu unterstützen, sie zu erweitern und in ihren Möglichkeiten zu vervollständigen. So entsteht Augmented Intelligence: die intelligente Verknüpfung von menschlicher Ratio und technologischer Schnelligkeit, bzw. Vollständigkeit.

Zentral gemanagte Governance

Natürlich soll assoziatives und individuelles Daten-Handling nicht zum digitalen Selbstbedienungsladen führen. Um dennoch assoziative Analysen und freies Forschen in relevanten Daten zu gewährleisten, bewährt sich in der Selfservice-Datenanalyse zentral gesteuerte Governance mit rollenbasierter Datenverfügbarkeit und individuellen Zugriffsrechten als ideale Lösung.

Data Science vs Data Engineering

The job of the Data Scientist is actually a fairly new trend, and yet other job titles are coming to us. “Is this really necessary?”, Some will ask. But the answer is clear: yes!

There are situations, every Data Scientist know: a recruiter calls, speaks about a great new challenge for a Data Scientist as you obviously claim on your LinkedIn profile, but in the discussion of the vacancy it quickly becomes clear that you have almost none of the required skills. This mismatch is mainly due to the fact that under the job of the Data Scientist all possible activity profiles, method and tool knowledge are summarized, which a single person can hardly learn in his life. Many open jobs, which are to be called under the name Data Science, describe rather the professional image of the Data Engineer.


Read this article in German:
“Data Science vs Data Engineering – Wo liegen die Unterschiede?“


What is a Data Engineer?

Data engineering is primarily about collecting or generating data, storing, historicalizing, processing, adapting and submitting data to subsequent instances. A Data Engineer, often also named as Big Data Engineer or Big Data Architect, models scalable database and data flow architectures, develops and improves the IT infrastructure on the hardware and software side, deals with topics such as IT Security , Data Security and Data Protection. A Data Engineer is, as required, a partial administrator of the IT systems and also a software developer, since he or she extends the software landscape with his own components. In addition to the tasks in the field of ETL / Data Warehousing, he also carries out analyzes, for example, to investigate data quality or user access. A Data Engineer mainly works with databases and data warehousing tools.

A Data Engineer is talented as an educated engineer or computer scientist and rather far away from the actual core business of the company. The Data Engineer’s career stages are usually something like:

  1. (Big) Data Architect
  2. BI Architect
  3. Senior Data Engineer
  4. Data Engineer

What makes a Data Scientist?

Although there may be many intersections with the Data Engineer’s field of activity, the Data Scientist can be distinguished by using his working time as much as possible to analyze the available data in an exploratory and targeted manner, to visualize the analysis results and to convert them into a red thread (storytelling). Unlike the Data Engineer, a data scientist rarely sees into a data center, because he picks up data via interfaces provided by the Data Engineer or provides by other resources.

A Data Scientist deals with mathematical models, works mainly with statistical procedures, and applies them to the data to generate knowledge. Common methods of Data Mining, Machine Learning and Predictive Modeling should be known to a Data Scientist. Data Scientists basically work close to the department and need appropriate expertise. Data Scientists use proprietary tools (e.g. Tools by IBM, SAS or Qlik) and program their own analyzes, for example, in Scala, Java, Python, Julia, or R. Using such programming languages and data science libraries (e.g. Mahout, MLlib, Scikit-Learn or TensorFlow) is often considered as advanced data science.

Data Scientists can have diverse academic backgrounds, some are computer scientists or engineers for electrical engineering, others are physicists or mathematicians, not a few have economical backgrounds. Common career levels could be:

  1. Chief Data Scientist
  2. Senior Data Scientist
  3. Data Scientist
  4. Data Analyst oder Junior Data Scientist

Data Scientist vs Data Analyst

I am often asked what the difference between a Data Scientist and a Data Analyst would be, or whether there would be a distinction criterion at all:

In my experience, the term Data Scientist stands for the new challenges for the classical concept of Data Analysts. A Data Analyst performs data analysis like a Data Scientist. More complex topics such as predictive analytics, machine learning or artificial intelligence are topics for a Data Scientist. In other words, a Data Scientist is a Data Analyst++ (one step above the Data Analyst).

And how about being a Business Analyst?

Business Analysts can (but need not) be Data Analysts. In any case, they have a very strong relationship with the core business of the company. Business Analytics is about analyzing business models and business successes. The analysis of business success is usually carried out by IT, and many business analysts are starting a career as Data Analyst now. Dashboards, KPIs and SQL are the tools of a good business analyst, but there might be a lot business analysts, who are just analysing business models by reading the newspaper…