Data Analytics and Mining for Dummies

Data Analytics and Mining is often perceived as an extremely tricky task cut out for Data Analysts and Data Scientists having a thorough knowledge encompassing several different domains such as mathematics, statistics, computer algorithms and programming. However, there are several tools available today that make it possible for novice programmers or people with no absolutely no algorithmic or programming expertise to carry out Data Analytics and Mining. One such tool which is very powerful and provides a graphical user interface and an assembly of nodes for ETL: Extraction, Transformation, Loading, for modeling, data analysis and visualization without, or with only slight programming is the KNIME Analytics Platform.

KNIME, or the Konstanz Information Miner, was developed by the University of Konstanz and is now popular with a large international community of developers. Initially KNIME was originally made for commercial use but now it is available as an open source software and has been used extensively in pharmaceutical research since 2006 and also a powerful data mining tool for the financial data sector. It is also frequently used in the Business Intelligence (BI) sector.

KNIME as a Data Mining Tool

KNIME is also one of the most well-organized tools which enables various methods of machine learning and data mining to be integrated. It is very effective when we are pre-processing data i.e. extracting, transforming, and loading data.

KNIME has a number of good features like quick deployment and scaling efficiency. It employs an assembly of nodes to pre-process data for analytics and visualization. It is also used for discovering patterns among large volumes of data and transforming data into more polished/actionable information.

Some Features of KNIME:

  • Free and open source
  • Graphical and logically designed
  • Very rich in analytics capabilities
  • No limitations on data size, memory usage, or functionalities
  • Compatible with Windows ,OS and Linux
  • Written in Java and edited with Eclipse.

A node is the smallest design unit in KNIME and each node serves a dedicated task. KNIME contains graphical, drag-drop nodes that require no coding. Nodes are connected with one’s output being another’s input, as a workflow. Therefore end-to-end pipelines can be built requiring no coding effort. This makes KNIME stand out, makes it user-friendly and make it accessible for dummies not from a computer science background.

KNIME workflow designed for graduate admission prediction

KNIME workflow designed for graduate admission prediction

KNIME has nodes to carry out Univariate Statistics, Multivariate Statistics, Data Mining, Time Series Analysis, Image Processing, Web Analytics, Text Mining, Network Analysis and Social Media Analysis. The KNIME node repository has a node for every functionality you can possibly think of and need while building a data mining model. One can execute different algorithms such as clustering and classification on a dataset and visualize the results inside the framework itself. It is a framework capable of giving insights on data and the phenomenon that the data represent.

Some commonly used KNIME node groups include:

  • Input-Output or I/O:  Nodes in this group retrieve data from or to write data to external files or data bases.
  • Data Manipulation: Used for data pre-processing tasks. Contains nodes to filter, group, pivot, bin, normalize, aggregate, join, sample, partition, etc.
  • Views: This set of nodes permit users to inspect data and analysis results using multiple views. This gives a means for truly interactive exploration of a data set.
  • Data Mining: In this group, there are nodes that implement certain algorithms (like K-means clustering, Decision Trees, etc.)

Comparison with other tools 

The first version of the KNIME Analytics Platform was released in 2006 whereas Weka and R studio were released in 1997 and 1993 respectively. KNIME is a proper data mining tool whereas Weka and R studio are Machine Learning tools which can also do data mining. KNIME integrates with Weka to add machine learning algorithms to the system. The R project adds statistical functionalities as well. Furthermore, KNIME’s range of functions is impressive, with more than 1,000 modules and ready-made application packages. The modules can be further expanded by additional commercial features.

Simple RNN

Simple RNN: the first foothold for understanding LSTM

*In this article “Densely Connected Layers” is written as “DCL,” and “Convolutional Neural Network” as “CNN.”

In the last article, I mentioned “When it comes to the structure of RNN, many study materials try to avoid showing that RNNs are also connections of neurons, as well as DCL or CNN.” Even if you manage to understand DCL and CNN, you can be suddenly left behind once you try to understand RNN because it looks like a different field. In the second section of this article, I am going to provide a some helps for more abstract understandings of DCL/CNN , which you need when you read most other study materials.

My explanation on this simple RNN is based on a chapter in a textbook published by Massachusetts Institute of Technology, which is also recommended in some deep learning courses of Stanford University.

First of all, you should keep it in mind that simple RNN are not useful in many cases, mainly because of vanishing/exploding gradient problem, which I am going to explain in the next article. LSTM is one major type of RNN used for tackling those problems. But without clear understanding forward/back propagation of RNN, I think many people would get stuck when they try to understand how LSTM works, especially during its back propagation stage. If you have tried climbing the mountain of understanding LSTM, but found yourself having to retreat back to the foot, I suggest that you read through this article on simple RNNs. It should help you to gain a solid foothold, and you would be ready for trying to climb the mountain again.

*This article is the second article of “A gentle introduction to the tiresome part of understanding RNN.”

1, A brief review on back propagation of DCL.

Simple RNNs are straightforward applications of DCL, but if you do not even have any ideas on DCL forward/back propagation, you will not be able to understand this article. If you more or less understand how back propagation of DCL works, you can skip this first section.

Deep learning is a part of machine learning. And most importantly, whether it is classical machine learning or deep learning, adjusting parameters is what machine learning is all about. Parameters mean elements of functions except for variants. For example when you get a very simple function f(x)=a + bx + cx^2 + dx^3, then x is a variant, and a, b, c, d are parameters. In case of classical machine learning algorithms, the number of those parameters are very limited because they were originally designed manually. Such functions for classical machine learning is useful for features found by humans, after trial and errors(feature engineering is a field of finding such effective features, manually). You adjust those parameters based on how different the outputs(estimated outcome of classification/regression) are from supervising vectors(the data prepared to show ideal answers).

In the last article I said neural networks are just mappings, whose inputs are vectors, matrices, or sequence data. In case of DCLs, inputs are vectors. Then what’s the number of parameters ? The answer depends on the the number of neurons and layers. In the example of DCL at the right side, the number of the connections of the neurons is the number of parameters(Would you like to try to count them? At least I would say “No.”). Unlike classical machine learning you no longer need to do feature engineering, but instead you need to design networks effective for each task and adjust a lot of parameters.

*I think the hype of AI comes from the fact that neural networks find features automatically. But the reality is difficulty of feature engineering was just replaced by difficulty of designing proper neural networks.

It is easy to imagine that you need an efficient way to adjust those parameters, and the method is called back propagation (or just backprop). As long as it is about DCL backprop, you can find a lot of well-made study materials on that, so I am not going to cover that topic precisely in this article series. Simply putting, during back propagation, in order to adjust parameters of a layer you need errors in the next layer. And in order calculate the errors of the next layer, you need errors in the next next layer.

*You should not think too much about what the “errors” exactly mean. Such “errors” are defined in this context, and you will see why you need them if you actually write down all the mathematical equations behind backprops of DCL.

The red arrows in the figure shows how errors of all the neurons in a layer propagate backward to a neuron in last layer. The figure shows only some sets of such errors propagating backward, but in practice you have to think about all the combinations of such red arrows in the whole back propagation(this link would give you some ideas on how DCLs work).

These points are minimum prerequisites for continuing reading this  RNN this article. But if you are planning to understand RNN forward/back propagation at  an abstract/mathematical level that you can read academic papers,  I highly recommend you to actually write down all the equations of DCL backprop. And if possible you should try to implement backprop of three-layer DCL.

2, Forward propagation of simple RNN

*For better understandings of the second and third section, I recommend you to download an animated PowerPoint slide which I prepared. It should help you understand simple RNNs.

In fact the simple RNN which we are going to look at in this article has only three layers. From now on imagine that inputs of RNN come from the bottom and outputs go up. But RNNs have to keep information of earlier times steps during upcoming several time steps because as I mentioned in the last article RNNs are used for sequence data, the order of whose elements is important. In order to do that, information of the neurons in the middle layer of RNN propagate forward to the middle layer itself. Therefore in one time step of forward propagation of RNN, the input at the time step propagates forward as normal DCL, and the RNN gives out an output at the time step. And information of one neuron in the middle layer propagate forward to the other neurons like yellow arrows in the figure. And the information in the next neuron propagate forward to the other neurons, and this process is repeated. This is called recurrent connections of RNN.

*To be exact we are just looking at a type of recurrent connections. For example Elman RNNs have simpler recurrent connections. And recurrent connections of LSTM are more complicated.

Whether it is a simple one or not, basically RNN repeats this process of getting an input at every time step, giving out an output, and making recurrent connections to the RNN itself. But you need to keep the values of activated neurons at every time step, so virtually you need to consider the same RNNs duplicated for several time steps like the figure below. This is the idea of unfolding RNN. Depending on contexts, the whole unfolded DCLs with recurrent connections is also called an RNN.

In many situations, RNNs are simplified as below. If you have read through this article until this point, I bet you gained some better understanding of RNNs, so you should little by little get used to this more abstract, blackboxed  way of showing RNN.

You have seen that you can unfold an RNN, per time step. From now on I am going to show the simple RNN in a simpler way,  based on the MIT textbook which I recomment. The figure below shows how RNN propagate forward during two time steps (t-1), (t).

The input \boldsymbol{x}^{(t-1)}at time step(t-1) propagate forward as a normal DCL, and gives out the output \hat{\boldsymbol{y}} ^{(t)} (The notation on the \boldsymbol{y} ^{(t)} is called “hat,” and it means that the value is an estimated value. Whatever machine learning tasks you work on, the outputs of the functions are just estimations of ideal outcomes. You need to adjust parameters for better estimations. You should always be careful whether it is an actual value or an estimated value in the context of machine learning or statistics). But the most important parts are the middle layers.

*To be exact I should have drawn the middle layers as connections of two layers of neurons like the figure at the right side. But I made my figure closer to the chart in the MIT textbook, and also most other study materials show the combinations of the two neurons before/after activation as one neuron.

\boldsymbol{a}^{(t)} is just linear summations of \boldsymbol{x}^{(t)} (If you do not know what “linear summations” mean, please scroll this page a bit), and \boldsymbol{h}^{(t)} is a combination of activated values of \boldsymbol{a}^{(t)} and linear summations of \boldsymbol{h}^{(t-1)} from the last time step, with recurrent connections. The values of \boldsymbol{h}^{(t)} propagate forward in two ways. One is normal DCL forward propagation to \hat{\boldsymbol{y}} ^{(t)} and \boldsymbol{o}^{(t)}, and the other is recurrent connections to \boldsymbol{h}^{(t+1)} .

These are equations for each step of forward propagation.

  • \boldsymbol{a}^{(t)} = \boldsymbol{b} + \boldsymbol{W} \cdot \boldsymbol{h}^{(t-1)} + \boldsymbol{U} \cdot \boldsymbol{x}^{(t)}
  • \boldsymbol{h}^{(t)}= g(\boldsymbol{a}^{(t)})
  • \boldsymbol{o}^{(t)} = \boldsymbol{c} + \boldsymbol{V} \cdot \boldsymbol{h}^{(t)}
  • \hat{\boldsymbol{y}} ^{(t)} = f(\boldsymbol{o}^{(t)})

*Please forgive me for adding some mathematical equations on this article even though I pledged not to in the first article. You can skip the them, but for some people it is on the contrary more confusing if there are no equations. In case you are allergic to mathematics, I prescribed some treatments below.

*Linear summation is a type of weighted summation of some elements. Concretely, when you have a vector \boldsymbol{x}=(x_0, x_1, x_2), and weights \boldsymbol{w}=(w_0,w_1, w_2), then \boldsymbol{w}^T \cdot \boldsymbol{x} = w_0 \cdot x_0 + w_1 \cdot x_1 +w_2 \cdot x_2 is a linear summation of \boldsymbol{x}, and its weights are \boldsymbol{w}.

*When you see a product of a matrix and a vector, for example a product of \boldsymbol{W} and \boldsymbol{v}, you should clearly make an image of connections between two layers of a neural network. You can also say each element of \boldsymbol{u}} is a linear summations all the elements of \boldsymbol{v}} , and \boldsymbol{W} gives the weights for the summations.

A very important point is that you share the same parameters, in this case \boldsymbol{\theta \in \{\boldsymbol{U}, \boldsymbol{W}, \boldsymbol{b}, \boldsymbol{V}, \boldsymbol{c} \}}, at every time step. 

And you are likely to see this RNN in this blackboxed form.

3, The steps of back propagation of simple RNN

In the last article, I said “I have to say backprop of RNN, especially LSTM (a useful and mainstream type or RNN), is a monster of chain rules.” I did my best to make my PowerPoint on LSTM backprop straightforward. But looking at it again, the LSTM backprop part still looks like an electronic circuit, and it requires some patience from you to understand it. If you want to understand LSTM at a more mathematical level, understanding the flow of simple RNN backprop is indispensable, so I would like you to be patient while understanding this step (and you have to be even more patient while understanding LSTM backprop).

This might be a matter of my literacy, but explanations on RNN backprop are very frustrating for me in the points below.

  • Most explanations just show how to calculate gradients at each time step.
  • Most study materials are visually very poor.
  • Most explanations just emphasize that “errors are back propagating through time,” using tons of arrows, but they lack concrete instructions on how actually you renew parameters with those errors.

If you can relate to the feelings I mentioned above, the instructions from now on could somewhat help you. And with the animated PowerPoint slide I prepared, you would have clear understandings on this topic at a more mathematical level.

Backprop of RNN , as long as you are thinking about simple RNNs, is not so different from that of DCLs. But you have to be careful about the meaning of errors in the context of RNN backprop. Back propagation through time (BPTT) is one of the major methods for RNN backprop, and I am sure most textbooks explain BPTT. But most study materials just emphasize that you need errors from all the time steps, and I think that is very misleading and confusing.

You need all the gradients to adjust parameters, but you do not necessarily need all the errors to calculate those gradients. Gradients in the context of machine learning mean partial derivatives of error functions (in this case J) with respect to certain parameters, and mathematically a gradient of J with respect to \boldsymbol{\theta \in \{\boldsymbol{U}, \boldsymbol{W}, \boldsymbol{b}^{(t)}, \boldsymbol{V}, \boldsymbol{c} \}}is denoted as ( \frac{\partial J}{\partial \boldsymbol{\theta}}  ). And another confusing point in many textbooks, including the MIT one, is that they give an impression that parameters depend on time steps. For example some study materials use notations like \frac{\partial J}{\partial \boldsymbol{\theta}^{(t)}}, and I think this gives an impression that this is a gradient with respect to the parameters at time step (t). In my opinion this gradient rather should be written as ( \frac{\partial J}{\partial \boldsymbol{\theta}} )^{(t)} . But many study materials denote gradients of those errors in the former way, so from now on let me use the notations which you can see in the figures in this article.

In order to calculate the gradient \frac{\partial J}{\partial \boldsymbol{x}^{(t)}} you need errors from time steps s (s \geq t) \quad (as you can see in the figure, in order to calculate a gradient in a colored frame, you need all the errors in the same color).

*To be exact, in the figure above I am supposed prepare much more arrows in \tau + 1 different colors  to show the whole process of RNN backprop, but that is not realistic. In the figure I displayed only the flows of errors necessary for calculating each gradient at time step 0, t, \tau.

*Another confusing point is that the \frac{\partial J}{\partial \boldsymbol{\ast ^{(t)}}}, \boldsymbol{\ast} \in \{\boldsymbol{a}^{(t)}, \boldsymbol{h}^{(t)}, \boldsymbol{o}^{(t)}, \dots \} are correct notations, because \boldsymbol{\ast} are values of neurons after forward propagation. They depend on time steps, and these are very values which I have been calling “errors.” That is why parameters do not depend on time steps, whereas errors depend on time steps.

As I mentioned before, you share the same parameters at every time step. Again, please do not assume that parameters are different from time step to time step. It is gradients/errors (you need errors to calculate gradients) which depend on time step. And after calculating errors at every time step, you can finally adjust parameters one time, and that’s why this is called “back propagation through time.” (It is easy to imagine that this method can be very inefficient. If the input is the whole text on a Wikipedia link, you need to input all the sentences in the Wikipedia text to renew parameters one time. To solve this problem there is a backprop method named “truncated BPTT,” with which you renew parameters based on a part of a text. )

And after calculating those gradients \frac{\partial J}{\partial \boldsymbol{\theta}^{(t)}} you can take a summation of them: \frac{\partial J}{\partial \boldsymbol{\theta}}=\sum_{t=0}^{t=\tau}{\frac{\partial J}{\partial \boldsymbol{\theta}^{(t)}}}. With this gradient \frac{\partial J}{\partial \boldsymbol{\theta}} , you can finally renew the value of \boldsymbol{\theta} one time.

At the beginning of this article I mentioned that simple RNNs are no longer for practical uses, and that comes from exploding/vanishing problem of RNN. This problem was one of the reasons for the AI winter which lasted for some 20 years. In the next article I am going to write about LSTM, a fancier type of RNN, in the context of a history of neural network history.

* I make study materials on machine learning, sponsored by DATANOMIQ. I do my best to make my content as straightforward but as precise as possible. I include all of my reference sources. If you notice any mistakes in my materials, including grammatical errors, please let me know (email: yasuto.tamura@datanomiq.de). And if you have any advice for making my materials more understandable to learners, I would appreciate hearing it.

Simple RNN

Prerequisites for understanding RNN at a more mathematical level

Writing the A gentle introduction to the tiresome part of understanding RNN Article Series on recurrent neural network (RNN) is nothing like a creative or ingenious idea. It is quite an ordinary topic. But still I am going to write my own new article on this ordinary topic because I have been frustrated by lack of sufficient explanations on RNN for slow learners like me.

I think many of readers of articles on this website at least know that RNN is a type of neural network used for AI tasks, such as time series prediction, machine translation, and voice recognition. But if you do not understand how RNNs work, especially during its back propagation, this blog series is for you.

After reading this articles series, I think you will be able to understand RNN in more mathematical and abstract ways. But in case some of the readers are allergic or intolerant to mathematics, I tried to use as little mathematics as possible.

Ideal prerequisite knowledge:

  • Some understanding on densely connected layers (or fully connected layers, multilayer perception) and how their forward/back propagation work.
  •  Some understanding on structure of Convolutional Neural Network.

*In this article “Densely Connected Layers” is written as “DCL,” and “Convolutional Neural Network” as “CNN.”

1, Difficulty of Understanding RNN

I bet a part of difficulty of understanding RNN comes from the variety of its structures. If you search “recurrent neural network” on Google Image or something, you will see what I mean. But that cannot be helped because RNN enables a variety of tasks.

Another major difficulty of understanding RNN is understanding its back propagation algorithm. I think some of you found it hard to understand chain rules in calculating back propagation of densely connected layers, where you have to make the most of linear algebra. And I have to say backprop of RNN, especially LSTM, is a monster of chain rules. I am planing to upload not only a blog post on RNN backprop, but also a presentation slides with animations to make it more understandable, in some external links.

In order to avoid such confusions, I am going to introduce a very simplified type of RNN, which I call a “simple RNN.” The RNN displayed as the head image of this article is a simple RNN.

2, How Neurons are Connected

How to connect neurons and how to activate them is what neural networks are all about. Structures of those neurons are easy to grasp as long as that is about DCL or CNN. But when it comes to the structure of RNN, many study materials try to avoid showing that RNNs are also connections of neurons, as well as DCL or CNN(*If you are not sure how neurons are connected in CNN, this link should be helpful. Draw a random digit in the square at the corner.). In fact the structure of RNN is also the same, and as long as it is a simple RNN, and it is not hard to visualize its structure.

Even though RNN is also connections of neurons, usually most RNN charts are simplified, using blackboxes. In case of simple RNN, most study material would display it as the chart below.

But that also cannot be helped because fancier RNN have more complicated connections of neurons, and there are no longer advantages of displaying RNN as connections of neurons, and you would need to understand RNN in more abstract way, I mean, as you see in most of textbooks.

I am going to explain details of simple RNN in the next article of this series.

3, Neural Networks as Mappings

If you still think that neural networks are something like magical spider webs or models of brain tissues, forget that. They are just ordinary mappings.

If you have been allergic to mathematics in your life, you might have never heard of the word “mapping.” If so, at least please keep it in mind that the equation y=f(x), which most people would have seen in compulsory education, is a part of mapping. If you get a value x, you get a value y corresponding to the x.

But in case of deep learning, x is a vector or a tensor, and it is denoted in bold like \boldsymbol{x} . If you have never studied linear algebra , imagine that a vector is a column of Excel data (only one column), a matrix is a sheet of Excel data (with some rows and columns), and a tensor is some sheets of Excel data (each sheet does not necessarily contain only one column.)

CNNs are mainly used for image processing, so their inputs are usually image data. Image data are in many cases (3, hight, width) tensors because usually an image has red, blue, green channels, and the image in each channel can be expressed as a height*width matrix (the “height” and the “width” are number of pixels, so they are discrete numbers).

The convolutional part of CNN (which I call “feature extraction part”) maps the tensors to a vector, and the last part is usually DCL, which works as classifier/regressor. At the end of the feature extraction part, you get a vector. I call it a “semantic vector” because the vector has information of “meaning” of the input image. In this link you can see maps of pictures plotted depending on the semantic vector. You can see that even if the pictures are not necessarily close pixelwise, they are close in terms of the “meanings” of the images.

In the example of a dog/cat classifier introduced by François Chollet, the developer of Keras, the CNN maps (3, 150, 150) tensors to 2-dimensional vectors, (1, 0) or (0, 1) for (dog, cat).

Wrapping up the points above, at least you should keep two points in mind: first, DCL is a classifier or a regressor, and CNN is a feature extractor used for image processing. And another important thing is, feature extraction parts of CNNs map images to vectors which are more related to the “meaning” of the image.

Importantly, I would like you to understand RNN this way. An RNN is also just a mapping.

*I recommend you to at least take a look at the beautiful pictures in this link. These pictures give you some insight into how CNN perceive images.

4, Problems of DCL and CNN, and needs for RNN

Taking an example of RNN task should be helpful for this topic. Probably machine translation is the most famous application of RNN, and it is also a good example of showing why DCL and CNN are not proper for some tasks. Its algorithms is out of the scope of this article series, but it would give you a good insight of some features of RNN. I prepared three sentences in German, English, and Japanese, which have the same meaning. Assume that each sentence is divided into some parts as shown below and that each vector corresponds to each part. In machine translation we want to convert a set of the vectors into another set of vectors.

Then let’s see why DCL and CNN are not proper for such task.

  • The input size is fixed: In case of the dog/cat classifier I have mentioned, even though the sizes of the input images varies, they were first molded into (3, 150, 150) tensors. But in machine translation, usually the length of the input is supposed to be flexible.
  • The order of inputs does not mater: In case of the dog/cat classifier the last section, even if the input is “cat,” “cat,” “dog” or “dog,” “cat,” “cat” there’s no difference. And in case of DCL, the network is symmetric, so even if you shuffle inputs, as long as you shuffle all of the input data in the same way, the DCL give out the same outcome . And if you have learned at least one foreign language, it is easy to imagine that the orders of vectors in sequence data matter in machine translation.

*It is said English language has phrase structure grammar, on the other hand Japanese language has dependency grammar. In English, the orders of words are important, but in Japanese as long as the particles and conjugations are correct, the orders of words are very flexible. In my impression, German grammar is between them. As long as you put the verb at the second position and the cases of the words are correct, the orders are also relatively flexible.

5, Sequence Data

We can say DCL and CNN are not useful when you want to process sequence data. Sequence data are a type of data which are lists of vectors. And importantly, the orders of the vectors matter. The number of vectors in sequence data is usually called time steps. A simple example of sequence data is meteorological data measured at a spot every ten minutes, for instance temperature, air pressure, wind velocity, humidity. In this case the data is recorded as 4-dimensional vector every ten minutes.

But this “time step” does not necessarily mean “time.” In case of natural language processing (including machine translation), which you I mentioned in the last section, the numberings of each vector denoting each part of sentences are “time steps.”

And RNNs are mappings from a sequence data to another sequence data.

In case of the machine translation above, the each sentence in German, English, and German is expressed as sequence data \boldsymbol{G}=(\boldsymbol{g}_1,\dots ,\boldsymbol{g}_{12}), \boldsymbol{E}=(\boldsymbol{e}_1,\dots ,\boldsymbol{e}_{11}), \boldsymbol{J}=(\boldsymbol{j}_1,\dots ,\boldsymbol{j}_{14}), and machine translation is nothing but mappings between these sequence data.

 

*At least I found a paper on the RNN’s capability of universal approximation on many-to-one RNN task. But I have not found any papers on universal approximation of many-to-many RNN tasks. Please let me know if you find any clue on whether such approximation is possible. I am desperate to know that. 

6, Types of RNN Tasks

RNN tasks can be classified into some types depending on the lengths of input/output sequences (the “length” means the times steps of input/output sequence data).

If you want to predict the temperature in 24 hours, based on several time series data points in the last 96 hours, the task is many-to-one. If you sample data every ten minutes, the input size is 96*6=574 (the input data is a list of 574 vectors), and the output size is 1 (which is a value of temperature). Another example of many-to-one task is sentiment classification. If you want to judge whether a post on SNS is positive or negative, the input size is very flexible (the length of the post varies.) But the output size is one, which is (1, 0) or (0, 1), which denotes (positive, negative).

*The charts in this section are simplified model of RNN used for each task. Please keep it in mind that they are not 100% correct, but I tried to make them as exact as possible compared to those in other study materials.

Music/text generation can be one-to-many tasks. If you give the first sound/word you can generate a phrase.

Next, let’s look at many-to-many tasks. Machine translation and voice recognition are likely to be major examples of many-to-many tasks, but here name entity recognition seems to be a proper choice. Name entity recognition is task of finding proper noun in a sentence . For example if you got two sentences “He said, ‘Teddy bears on sale!’ ” and ‘He said, “Teddy Roosevelt was a great president!” ‘ judging whether the “Teddy” is a proper noun or a normal noun is name entity recognition.

Machine translation and voice recognition, which are more popular, are also many-to-many tasks, but they use more sophisticated models. In case of machine translation, the inputs are sentences in the original language, and the outputs are sentences in another language. When it comes to voice recognition, the input is data of air pressure at several time steps, and the output is the recognized word or sentence. Again, these are out of the scope of this article but I would like to introduce the models briefly.

Machine translation uses a type of RNN named sequence-to-sequence model (which is often called seq2seq model). This model is also very important for other natural language processes tasks in general, such as text summarization. A seq2seq model is divided into the encoder part and the decoder part. The encoder gives out a hidden state vector and it used as the input of the decoder part. And decoder part generates texts, using the output of the last time step as the input of next time step.

Voice recognition is also a famous application of RNN, but it also needs a special type of RNN.

*To be honest, I don’t know what is the state-of-the-art voice recognition algorithm. The example in this article is a combination of RNN and a collapsing function made using Connectionist Temporal Classification (CTC). In this model, the output of RNN is much longer than the recorded words or sentences, so a collapsing function reduces the output into next output with normal length.

You might have noticed that RNNs in the charts above are connected in both directions. Depending on the RNN tasks you need such bidirectional RNNs.  I think it is also easy to imagine that such networks are necessary. Again, machine translation is a good example.

And interestingly, image captioning, which enables a computer to describe a picture, is one-to-many-task. As the output is a sentence, it is easy to imagine that the output is “many.” If it is a one-to-many task, the input is supposed to be a vector.

Where does the input come from? I mentioned that the last some layers in of CNN are closely connected to how CNNs extract meanings of pictures. Surprisingly such vectors, which I call a “semantic vectors” is the inputs of image captioning task (after some transformations, depending on the network models).

I think this articles includes major things you need to know as prerequisites when you want to understand RNN at more mathematical level. In the next article, I would like to explain the structure of a simple RNN, and how it forward propagate.

* I make study materials on machine learning, sponsored by DATANOMIQ. I do my best to make my content as straightforward but as precise as possible. I include all of my reference sources. If you notice any mistakes in my materials, please let me know (email: yasuto.tamura@datanomiq.de). And if you have any advice for making my materials more understandable to learners, I would appreciate hearing it.

Simple RNN

A gentle introduction to the tiresome part of understanding RNN

Just as a normal conversation in a random pub or bar in Berlin, people often ask me “Which language do you use?” I always answer “LaTeX and PowerPoint.”

I have been doing an internship at DATANOMIQ and trying to make straightforward but precise study materials on deep learning. I myself started learning machine learning in April of 2019, and I have been self-studying during this one-year-vacation of mine in Berlin.

Many study materials give good explanations on densely connected layers or convolutional neural networks (CNNs). But when it comes to back propagation of CNN and recurrent neural networks (RNNs), I think there’s much room for improvement to make the topic understandable to learners.

Many study materials avoid the points I want to understand, and that was as frustrating to me as listening to answers to questions in the Japanese Diet, or listening to speeches from the current Japanese minister of the environment. With the slightest common sense, you would always get the feeling “How?” after reading an RNN chapter in any book.

This blog series focuses on the introductory level of recurrent neural networks. By “introductory”, I mean prerequisites for a better and more mathematical understanding of RNN algorithms.

I am going to keep these posts as visual as possible, avoiding equations, but I am also going to attach some links to check more precise mathematical explanations.

This blog series is composed of five contents.:

  1. Prerequisites for understanding RNN at a more mathematical level
  2. Simple RNN: the first foothold for understanding LSTM
  3. LSTM: “A New Hope in AI Winter” (to be published soon)
  4. LSTM and its forward propagation (to be published soon)
  5. LSTM and Its back propagation (to be published soon)

 

Einführung in die Welt der Autoencoder

An wen ist der Artikel gerichtet?

In diesem Artikel wollen wir uns näher mit dem neuronalen Netz namens Autoencoder beschäftigen und wollen einen Einblick in die Grundprinzipien bekommen, die wir dann mit einem vereinfachten Programmierbeispiel festigen. Kenntnisse in Python, Tensorflow und neuronalen Netzen sind dabei sehr hilfreich.

Funktionsweise des Autoencoders

Ein Autoencoder ist ein neuronales Netz, welches versucht die Eingangsinformationen zu komprimieren und mit den reduzierten Informationen im Ausgang wieder korrekt nachzubilden.

Die Komprimierung und die Rekonstruktion der Eingangsinformationen laufen im Autoencoder nacheinander ab, weshalb wir das neuronale Netz auch in zwei Abschnitten betrachten können.

 

 

 

Der Encoder

Der Encoder oder auch Kodierer hat die Aufgabe, die Dimensionen der Eingangsinformationen zu reduzieren, man spricht auch von Dimensionsreduktion. Durch diese Reduktion werden die Informationen komprimiert und es werden nur die wichtigsten bzw. der Durchschnitt der Informationen weitergeleitet. Diese Methode hat wie viele andere Arten der Komprimierung auch einen Verlust.

In einem neuronalen Netz wird dies durch versteckte Schichten realisiert. Durch die Reduzierung von Knotenpunkten in den kommenden versteckten Schichten werden die Kodierung bewerkstelligt.

Der Decoder

Nachdem das Eingangssignal kodiert ist, kommt der Decoder bzw. Dekodierer zum Einsatz. Er hat die Aufgabe mit den komprimierten Informationen die ursprünglichen Daten zu rekonstruieren. Durch Fehlerrückführung werden die Gewichte des Netzes angepasst.

Ein bisschen Mathematik

Das Hauptziel des Autoencoders ist, dass das Ausgangssignal dem Eingangssignal gleicht, was bedeutet, dass wir eine Loss Funktion haben, die L(x , y) entspricht.

L(x, \hat{x})

Unser Eingang soll mit x gekennzeichnet werden. Unsere versteckte Schicht soll h sein. Damit hat unser Encoder folgenden Zusammenhang h = f(x).

Die Rekonstruktion im Decoder kann mit r = g(h) beschrieben werden. Bei unserem einfachen Autoencoder handelt es sich um ein Feed-Forward Netz ohne rückkoppelten Anteil und wird durch Backpropagation oder zu deutsch Fehlerrückführung optimiert.

Formelzeichen Bedeutung
\mathbf{x}, \hat{\mathbf{x}} Eingangs-, Ausgangssignal
\mathbf{W}, \hat{\mathbf{W}} Gewichte für En- und Decoder
\mathbf{B}, \hat{\mathbf{B}} Bias für En- und Decoder
\sigma, \hat{\sigma} Aktivierungsfunktion für En- und Decoder
L Verlustfunktion

Unsere versteckte Schicht soll mit \latex h gekennzeichnet werden. Damit besteht der Zusammenhang:

(1)   \begin{align*} \mathbf{h} &= f(\mathbf{x}) = \sigma(\mathbf{W}\mathbf{x} + \mathbf{B}) \\ \hat{\mathbf{x}} &= g(\mathbf{h}) = \hat{\sigma}(\hat{\mathbf{W}} \mathbf{h} + \hat{\mathbf{B}}) \\ \hat{\mathbf{x}} &= \hat{\sigma} \{ \hat{\mathbf{W}} \left[\sigma ( \mathbf{W}\mathbf{x} + \mathbf{B} )\right]  + \hat{\mathbf{B}} \}\\ \end{align*}

Für eine Optimierung mit der mittleren quadratischen Abweichung (MSE) könnte die Verlustfunktion wie folgt aussehen:

(2)   \begin{align*} L(\mathbf{x}, \hat{\mathbf{x}}) &= \mathbf{MSE}(\mathbf{x}, \hat{\mathbf{x}}) = \|  \mathbf{x} - \hat{\mathbf{x}} \| ^2 &=  \| \mathbf{x} - \hat{\sigma} \{ \hat{\mathbf{W}} \left[\sigma ( \mathbf{W}\mathbf{x} + \mathbf{B} )\right]  + \hat{\mathbf{B}} \} \| ^2 \end{align*}

 

Wir haben die Theorie und Mathematik eines Autoencoder in seiner Ursprungsform kennengelernt und wollen jetzt diese in einem (sehr) einfachen Beispiel anwenden, um zu schauen, ob der Autoencoder so funktioniert wie die Theorie es besagt.

Dazu nehmen wir einen One Hot (1 aus n) kodierten Datensatz, welcher die Zahlen von 0 bis 3 entspricht.

    \begin{align*} [1, 0, 0, 0] \ \widehat{=}  \ 0 \\ [0, 1, 0, 0] \ \widehat{=}  \ 1 \\ [0, 0, 1, 0] \ \widehat{=}  \ 2 \\ [0, 0, 0, 1] \ \widehat{=} \  3\\ \end{align*}

Diesen Datensatz könnte wie folgt kodiert werden:

    \begin{align*} [1, 0, 0, 0] \ \widehat{=}  \ 0 \ \widehat{=}  \ [0, 0] \\ [0, 1, 0, 0] \ \widehat{=}  \ 1 \ \widehat{=}  \  [0, 1] \\ [0, 0, 1, 0] \ \widehat{=}  \ 2 \ \widehat{=}  \ [1, 0] \\ [0, 0, 0, 1] \ \widehat{=} \  3 \ \widehat{=}  \ [1, 1] \\ \end{align*}

Damit hätten wir eine Dimensionsreduktion von vier auf zwei Merkmalen vorgenommen und genau diesen Vorgang wollen wir bei unserem Beispiel erreichen.

Programmierung eines einfachen Autoencoders

 

Typische Einsatzgebiete des Autoencoders sind neben der Dimensionsreduktion auch Bildaufarbeitung (z.B. Komprimierung, Entrauschen), Anomalie-Erkennung, Sequenz-to-Sequenz Analysen, etc.

Ausblick

Wir haben mit einem einfachen Beispiel die Funktionsweise des Autoencoders festigen können. Im nächsten Schritt wollen wir anhand realer Datensätze tiefer in gehen. Auch soll in kommenden Artikeln Variationen vom Autoencoder in verschiedenen Einsatzgebieten gezeigt werden.

CAPTCHAs lösen via Maschine Learning

Wie weit ist das maschinelle Lernen auf dem Gebiet der CAPTCHA-Lösung fortgeschritten?

Maschinelles Lernen ist mehr als ein Buzzword, denn unter der Haube stecken viele Algorithemen, die eine ganze Reihe von Problemen lösen können. Die Lösung von CAPTCHA ist dabei nur eine von vielen Aufgaben, die Machine Learning bewältigen kann. Durch die Arbeit an ein paar Problemen im Zusammenhang mit dem konvolutionellen neuronalen Netz haben wir festgestellt, dass es in diesem Bereich noch viel Verbesserungspotenzial gibt. Die Genauigkeit der Erkennung ist oftmals noch nicht gut genug. Schauen wir uns im Einzelnen an, welche Dienste wir haben, um dieses Problem anzugehen, und welche sich dabei als die besten erweisen.

Was ist CAPTCHA?

CAPTCHA ist kein fremder Begriff mehr für Web-Benutzer. Es handelt sich um die ärgerliche menschliche Validierungsprüfung, die auf vielen Websites hinzugefügt wird. Es ist ein Akronym für Completely Automated Public Turing test for tell Computer and Humans Apart. CAPTCHA kann als ein Computerprogramm bezeichnet werden, das dazu entwickelt wurde, Mensch und Maschine zu unterscheiden, um jede Art von illegaler Aktivität auf Websites zu verhindern. Der Sinn von CAPTCHA ist, dass nur ein Mensch diesen Test bestehen können sollte und Bots bzw. irgend eine Form automatisierter Skripte daran versagen. So entsteht ein Wettlauf zwischen CAPTCHA-Anbietern und Hacker-Lösungen, die auf den Einsatz von selbstlernenden Systemen setzen.

Warum müssen wir CAPTCHA lösen?

Heutzutage verwenden die Benutzer automatisierte CAPTCHA-Lösungen für verschiedene Anwendungsfälle. Und hier ein entscheidender Hinweis: Ähnlich wie Penetrationstesting ist der Einsatz gegen Dritte ohne vorherige Genehmigung illegal. Gegen eigene Anwendungen oder gegen Genehmigung (z. B. im Rahmen eines IT-Security-Tests) ist die Anwendung erlaubt. Hacker und Spammer verwenden die CAPTCHA-Bewältigung, um die E-Mail-Adressen der Benutzer zu erhalten, damit sie so viele Spams wie möglich erzeugen können oder um Bruteforce-Attacken durchführen zu können. Die legitimen Beispiele sind Fälle, in denen ein neuer Kunde oder Geschäftspartner zu Ihnen gekommen ist und Zugang zu Ihrer Programmierschnittstelle (API) benötigt, die noch nicht fertig ist oder nicht mit Ihnen geteilt werden kann, wegen eines Sicherheitsproblems oder Missbrauchs, den es verursachen könnte.

Für diese Anwendungsfälle sollen automatisierte Skripte CAPTCHA lösen. Es gibt verschiedene Arten von CAPTCHA: Textbasierte und bildbasierte CAPTCHA, reCAPTCHA und mathematisches CAPTCHA.

Es gibt einen Wettlauf zwischen CAPTCHA-Anbieter und automatisierten Lösungsversuchen. Die in CAPTCHA und reCAPTCHA verwendete Technologie werden deswegen immer intelligenter wird und Aktualisierungen der Zugangsmethoden häufiger. Das Aufrüsten hat begonnen.

Populäre Methoden für die CAPTCHA-Lösung

Die folgenden CAPTCHA-Lösungsmethoden stehen den Benutzern zur Lösung von CAPTCHA und reCAPTCHA zur Verfügung:

  1. OCR (optische Zeichenerkennung) via aktivierte Bots – Dieser spezielle Ansatz löst CAPTCHAs automatisch mit Hilfe der OCR-Technik (Optical Character Recognition). Werkzeuge wie Ocrad, tesseract lösen CAPTCHAs, aber mit sehr geringer Genauigkeit.
  2. Maschinenlernen — Unter Verwendung von Computer Vision, konvolutionalem neuronalem Netzwerk und Python-Frameworks und Bibliotheken wie Keras mit Tensorflow. Wir können tiefe neuronale Konvolutionsnetzmodelle trainieren, um die Buchstaben und Ziffern im CAPTCHA-Bild zu finden.
  3. Online-CAPTCHA-Lösungsdienstleistungen — Diese Dienste verfügen teilweise über menschliche Mitarbeiter, die ständig online verfügbar sind, um CAPTCHAs zu lösen. Wenn Sie Ihre CAPTCHA-Lösungsanfrage senden, übermittelt der Dienst sie an die Lösungsanbieter, die sie lösen und die Lösungen zurückschicken.

Leistungsanalyse der OCR-basierten Lösung

OCR Die OCR ist zwar eine kostengünstige Lösung, wenn es darum geht, eine große Anzahl von trivialen CAPTCHAs zu lösen, aber dennoch liefert sie nicht die erforderliche Genauigkeit. OCR-basierte Lösungen sind nach der Veröffentlichung von ReCaptcha V3 durch Google selten geworden. OCR-fähige Bots sind daher nicht dazu geeignet, CAPTCHA zu umgehen, die von Titanen wie Google, Facebook oder Twitter eingesetzt werden. Hierfür müsste ein besser ausgestattetes CAPTCHA-Lösungssystem eingesetzt werden.

OCR-basierte Lösungen lösen 1 aus 3 trivialen CAPTCHAs korrekt.

Leistungsanalyse der ML-basierten Methode

Schauen wir uns an, wie Lösungen auf dem Prinzip des Maschinenlernens funktionieren:

Die ML-basierte Verfahren verwenden OpenCV, um Konturen in einem Bild zu finden, das die durchgehenden Gebiete feststellt. Die Bilder werden mit der Technik der Schwellenwertbildung vorverarbeitet. Alle Bilder werden in Schwarzweiß konvertiert. Wir teilen das CAPTCHA-Bild mit der OpenCV-Funktion findContour() in verschiedene Buchstaben auf. Die verarbeiteten Bilder sind jetzt nur noch einzelne Buchstaben und Ziffern. Diese werden dann dem CNN-Modell zugeführt, um es zu trainieren. Und das trainierte CNN-Modell ist bereit, die richtige Captchas zu lösen.

Die Präzision einer solchen Lösung ist für alle textbasierten CAPTCHAs weitaus besser als die OCR-Lösung. Es gibt auch viele Nachteile dieser Lösung, denn sie löst nur eine bestimmte Art von CAPTCHAs und Google aktualisiert ständig seinen reCAPTCHA-Generierungsalgorithmus. Die letzte Aktualisierung schien die beste ReCaptcha-Aktualisierung zu sein, die disen Dienst bisher beeinflusst hat: Die regelmäßigen Nutzer hatten dabei kaum eine Veränderung der Schwierigkeit gespürt, während automatisierte Lösungen entweder gar nicht oder nur sehr langsam bzw. inakkurat funktionierten.

Das Modell wurde mit 1⁰⁴ Iterationen mit korrekten und zufälligen Stichproben und 1⁰⁵ Testbildern trainiert, und so wurde eine mittlere Genauigkeit von ~60% erreicht.

Bild-Quelle: “CAPTCHA Recognition with Active Deep Learning” @ TU München https://www.researchgate.net/publication/301620459_CAPTCHA_Recognition_with_Active_Deep_Learning

Wenn Ihr Anwendungsfall also darin besteht, eine Art von CAPTCHA mit ziemlich einfacher Komplexität zu lösen, können Sie ein solches trainiertes ML-Modell hervorragend nutzen. Eine bessere Captcha-Lösungslösung als OCR, muss aber noch eine ganze Menge Bereiche umfassen, um die Genauigkeit der Lösung zu gewährleisten.

Online-Captcha-Lösungsdienst

Online-CAPTCHA-Lösungsdienste sind bisher die bestmögliche Lösung für dieses Problem. Sie verfolgen alle Aktualisierungen von reCAPTCHA durch Google und bieten eine tadellose Genauigkeit von 99%.

Warum sind Online-Anti-Captcha-Dienste leistungsfähiger als andere Methoden?

Die OCR-basierten und ML-Lösungen weisen nach den bisherigen Forschungsarbeiten und Weiterentwicklungen viele Nachteile auf. Sie können nur triviale CAPTCHAs ohne wesentliche Genauigkeit lösen. Hier sind einige Punkte, die in diesem Zusammenhang zu berücksichtigen sind:

– Ein höherer Prozentsatz an korrekten Lösungen (OCR gibt bei wirklich komplizierten CAPTCHAs ein extrem hohes Maß an falschen Antworten; ganz zu schweigen davon, dass einige Arten von CAPTCHA überhaupt nicht mit OCR gelöst werden können, zumindest vorerst).

– Kontinuierlich fehlerfreie Arbeit ohne Unterbrechungen mit schneller Anpassung an die neu hinzugekommene Komplexität.

– Kostengünstig mit begrenzten Ressourcen und geringen Wartungskosten, da es keine Software- oder Hardwareprobleme gibt; alles, was Sie benötigen, ist eine Internetverbindung, um einfache Aufträge über die API des Anti-Captcha-Dienstes zu senden.

Die großen Anbieter von Online-Lösungsdiensten

Jetzt, nachdem wir die bessere Technik zur Lösung Ihrer CAPTCHAs geklärt haben, wollen wir unter allen Anti-Captcha-Diensten den besten auswählen. Einige Dienste bieten eine hohe Genauigkeit der Lösungen, API-Unterstützung für die Automatisierung und schnelle Antworten auf unsere Anfragen. Dazu gehören Dienste wie 2captcha, Imagetyperz, CaptchaSniper, etc.

2CAPTCHA ist einer der Dienste, die auf die Kombination von Machine Learning und echten Menschen setzen, um CAPTCHA zuverlässig zu lösen. Dabei versprechen Dienste wie 2captcha:

  • Schnelle Lösung mit 17 Sekunden für grafische und textuelle Captchas und ~23 Sekunden für ReCaptcha
  • Unterstützt alle populären Programmiersprachen mit einer umfassenden Dokumentation der fertigen Bibliotheken.
  • Hohe Genauigkeit (bis zu 99% je nach dem CAPTCHA-Typ).
  • Das Geld wird bei falschen Antworten zurückerstattet.
  • Fähigkeit, eine große Anzahl von Captchas zu lösen (mehr als 10.000 pro Minute)

Schlussfolgerung

Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN) wissen, wie die einfachsten Arten von Captcha zu bewältigen sind und werden auch mit der weiteren Enwicklung schritthalten können. Wir haben es mit einem Wettlauf um verkomplizierte CAPTCHAs und immer fähigeren Lösungen der automatisierten Erkennung zutun. Zur Zeit werden Online-Anti-Captcha-Dienste, die auf einen Mix aus maschinellem Lernen und menschlicher Intelligenz setzen, diesen Lösungen vorerst voraus sein.

Visual Question Answering with Keras – Part 1

This is Part I of II of the Article Series Visual Question Answering with Keras

Making Computers Intelligent to answer from images

If we look closer in the history of Artificial Intelligence (AI), the Deep Learning has gained more popularity in the recent years and has achieved the human-level performance in the tasks such as Speech Recognition, Image Classification, Object Detection, Machine Translation and so on. However, as humans, not only we but also a five-year child can normally perform these tasks without much inconvenience. But the development of such systems with these capabilities has always considered an ambitious goal for the researchers as well as for developers.

In this series of blog posts, I will cover an introduction to something called VQA (Visual Question Answering), its available datasets, the Neural Network approach for VQA and its implementation in Keras and the applications of this challenging problem in real life. 

Table of Contents:

1 Introduction

2 What is exactly Visual Question Answering?

3 Prerequisites

4 Datasets available for VQA

4.1 DAQUAR Dataset

4.2 CLEVR Dataset

4.3 FigureQA Dataset

4.4 VQA Dataset

5 Real-life applications of VQA

6 Conclusion

 

  1. Introduction:

Let’s say you are given a below picture along with one question. Can you answer it?

I expect confidently you all say it is the Kitchen without much inconvenience which is also the right answer. Even a five-year child who just started to learn things might answer this question correctly.

Alright, but can you write a computer program for such type of task that takes image and question about the image as an input and gives us answer as output?

Before the development of the Deep Neural Network, this problem was considered as one of the difficult, inconceivable and challenging problem for the AI researcher’s community. However, due to the recent advancement of Deep Learning the systems are capable of answering these questions with the promising result if we have a required dataset.

Now I hope you have got at least some intuition of a problem that we are going to discuss in this series of blog posts. Let’s try to formalize the problem in the below section.

  1. What is exactly Visual Question Answering?:

We can define, “Visual Question Answering(VQA) is a system that takes an image and natural language question about the image as an input and generates natural language answer as an output.”

VQA is a research area that requires an understanding of vision(Computer Vision)  as well as text(NLP). The main beauty of VQA is that the reasoning part is performed in the context of the image. So if we have an image with the corresponding question then the system must able to understand the image well in order to generate an appropriate answer. For example, if the question is the number of persons then the system must able to detect faces of the persons. To answer the color of the horse the system need to detect the objects in the image. Many of these common problems such as face detection, object detection, binary object classification(yes or no), etc. have been solved in the field of Computer Vision with good results.

To summarize a good VQA system must be able to address the typical problems of CV as well as NLP.

To get a better feel of VQA you can try online VQA demo by CloudCV. You just go to this link and try uploading the picture you want and ask the related question to the picture, the system will generate the answer to it.

 

  1. Prerequisites:

In the next post, I will walk you through the code for this problem using Keras. So I assume that you are familiar with:

  1. Fundamental concepts of Machine Learning
  2. Multi-Layered Perceptron
  3. Convolutional Neural Network
  4. Recurrent Neural Network (especially LSTM)
  5. Gradient Descent and Backpropagation
  6. Transfer Learning
  7. Hyperparameter Optimization
  8. Python and Keras syntax
  1. Datasets available for VQA:

As you know problems related to the CV or NLP the availability of the dataset is the key to solve the problem. The complex problems like VQA, the dataset must cover all possibilities of questions answers in real-world scenarios. In this section, I will cover some of the datasets available for VQA.

4.1 DAQUAR Dataset:

The DAQUAR dataset is the first dataset for VQA that contains only indoor scenes. It shows the accuracy of 50.2% on the human baseline. It contains images from the NYU_Depth dataset.

Example of DAQUAR dataset

Example of DAQUAR dataset

The main disadvantage of DAQUAR is the size of the dataset is very small to capture all possible indoor scenes.

4.2 CLEVR Dataset:

The CLEVR Dataset from Stanford contains the questions about the object of a different type, colors, shapes, sizes, and material.

It has

  • A training set of 70,000 images and 699,989 questions
  • A validation set of 15,000 images and 149,991 questions
  • A test set of 15,000 images and 14,988 questions

Image Source: https://cs.stanford.edu/people/jcjohns/clevr/?source=post_page

 

4.3 FigureQA Dataset:

FigureQA Dataset contains questions about the bar graphs, line plots, and pie charts. It has 1,327,368 questions for 100,000 images in the training set.

4.4 VQA Dataset:

As comapred to all datasets that we have seen so far VQA dataset is relatively larger. The VQA dataset contains open ended as well as multiple choice questions. VQA v2 dataset contains:

  • 82,783 training images from COCO (common objects in context) dataset
  • 40, 504 validation images and 81,434 validation images
  • 443,757 question-answer pairs for training images
  • 214,354 question-answer pairs for validation images.

As you might expect this dataset is very huge and contains 12.6 GB of training images only. I have used this dataset in the next post but a very small subset of it.

This dataset also contains abstract cartoon images. Each image has 3 questions and each question has 10 multiple choice answers.

  1. Real-life applications of VQA:

There are many applications of VQA. One of the famous applications is to help visually impaired people and blind peoples. In 2016, Microsoft has released the “Seeing AI” app for visually impaired people to describe the surrounding environment around them. You can watch this video for the prototype of the Seeing AI app.

Another application could be on social media or e-commerce sites. VQA can be also used for educational purposes.

  1. Conclusion:

I hope this explanation will give you a good idea of Visual Question Answering. In the next blog post, I will walk you through the code in Keras.

If you like my explanations, do provide some feedback, comments, etc. and stay tuned for the next post.

Introduction to ROC Curve

The abbreviation ROC stands for Receiver Operating Characteristic. Its main purpose is to illustrate the diagnostic ability of classifier as the discrimination threshold is varied. It was developed during World War II when Radar operators had to decide if the blip on the screen is an enemy target, a friendly ship or just a noise.  For these purposes they measured the ability of a radar receiver operator to make these important distinctions, which was called the Receiver Operating Characteristic.

Later it was found useful in interpreting medical test results and then in Machine learning classification problems. In order to get an introduction to binary classification and terms like ‘precision’ and ‘recall’ one can look into my earlier blog  here.

True positive rate and false positive rate

Let’s imagine a situation where a fire alarm is installed in a kitchen. The alarm is supposed to emit a sound in case fire smoke is detected in the room. Unfortunately, there is a lot of cooking done in the kitchen and the alarm may trigger the sound too often. Thus, instead of serving a purpose the alarm becomes a nuisance due to a large number of false alarms. In statistical terms these types of errors are called type 1 errors, or false positives.

One way to deal with this problem is to simply decrease sensitivity of the device. We do this by increasing the trigger threshold at the alarm setting. But then, not every alarm should have the same threshold setting. Consider the same type of device but kept in a bedroom. With high threshold, the device might miss smoke from a real short-circuit in the wires which poses a real danger of fire. This kind of failure is called Type 2 error or a false negative. Although the two devices are the same, different types of threshold settings are optimal for different circumstances.

To specify this more formally, let us describe the performance of a binary classifier at a particular threshold by the following parameters:

 

These parameters take different values at different thresholds. Hence, they define the performance of the classifier at particular threshold. But we want to examine in overall how good a classifier is. Fortunately, there is a way to do that. We plot the True Positive Rate (TPR) and False Positive rate (FPR) at different thresholds and this plot is called ROC curve.

Let’s try to understand this with an example.

A case with a distinct population distribution

Let’s suppose there is a disease which can be identified with deficiency of some parameter (maybe a certain vitamin). The distribution of population with this disease has a mean vitamin concentration sharply distinct from the mean of a healthy population, as shown below.

This is result of dummy data simulating population of 2000 people,the link to the code is given  in the end of this blog.  As the two populations are distinctly separated (there is no  overlap between the two distributions), we can expect that a classifier would have an easy job distinquishing healthy from sick people. We can run a logistic regression classifier with a threshold of .5 and be 100% succesful in detecting the decease.

The confusion matrix may look something like this.

In this ideal case with a threshold  of  .5 we do not make a single wrong classification. The True positive rate and False positive rate are 1 and 0, respectively. But we can shift the threshold. In that case, we will  get different confusion matrices. First we plot threshold vs. TPR.

We see for most values of threshold the TPR is close to 1 which again proves data is easy to classify and the classifier is returning high probabilities  for the most of positives .

Similarly Let’s plot threshold vs. FPR.

For most of the data points FPR is close to zero. This is also good. Now its time to plot the ROC curve using these results (TPR vs FPR).

Let’s try to interpret  the results,  all the points lie on line x=0 and y=1, it means for all the points FPR is zero or TPR is one, making  the curve a square. which means the classifier does perfectly well.

Case with overlapping  population distribution

The above example was about a perfect classifer. However, life is often not so easy. Now let us consider another more realistic situation in which the parameter distribution of the population is not as distinct as in the previous case. Rather, the mean of the parameter with healthy and not healthy datapoints are close and the distributions overlap, as shown in the next figure.

If we set the threshold to 0.5, the confusion matrix may look like this.

Now, any new choice of threshold location will affect both false positives and false negatives. In fact, there is a trade-off. If we shift the threshold with the goal to reduce false negatives, false positives will increase. If we move the threshold to the other direction and reduce false positive, false negatives will increase.

The plots (TPR vs Threshold) , (FPR vs Threshold) are shown below

If we plot the ROC curve from these results, it looks like this:

From the curve we see the classifier does not perform as well as the earlier one.

What else can be infered from this curve? We first need to understand what the diagonal in this plot represent. The diagonal represents ‘Line of no discrimination’, which we obtain if we randomly guess. This is the ROC curve for the worst possible classifier. Therefore, by comparing the obtained ROC curve with the diagonal, we see how much better our classifer is from random guessing.

The further away ROC curve from the diagonal is (the closest it is to the top left corner) , better the classifier is.

Area Under the curve

The overall performance of the classifier is given by the area under the ROC curve and is usually denoted as AUC. Since TPR and FPR lie within the range of 0 to 1, the AUC also assumes values between 0 and 1. The higher the value of AUC, the better is the overall performance of the classifier.

Let’s see this for the two different distributions which we saw earlier.

As we know the classifier had worked perfectly in the first case with points at (0,1) the area under the curve is 1 which is perfect. In the latter case the classifier was not able to perform as good, the ROC curve is between the diagonal and left hand corner. The AUC as we can see is less than 1.

Some other general characteristics

There are still few points that needs to be discussed on a General ROC curve

  • The ROC curve does not provide information about the actual values of thresholds used for the classifier.
  • Performance of different classifiers can be compared using the AUC of different Classifier. The larger the AUC, the better the classifier.
  • The vertical distance of the ROC curve from the no discrimination line gives a measure of ‘INFORMEDNESS’. This is known as Youden’s J satistic. This statistics can take values between 0 and 1.

Youden’s  J statistic is defined for every point on the ROC curve . The point at which Youden’s  J satistics reaches its maximum for a given ROC curve can be used to guide the selection of the threshold to be used for that classifier.

I hope this post does the job of providing an understanding of ROC curves  and AUC. The  Python program for simulating the example given earlier can be found here .

Please feel free to adjust the mean of the distributions and see the changes in the plot.

Fehler-Rückführung mit der Backpropagation

Dies ist Artikel 4 von 6 der Artikelserie –Einstieg in Deep Learning.

Das Gradienten(abstiegs)verfahren ist der Schlüssel zum Training einzelner Neuronen bzw. deren Gewichtungen zu den Neuronen der vorherigen Schicht. Wer dieses Prinzip verstanden hat, hat bereits die halbe Miete zum Verständnis des Trainings von künstlichen neuronalen Netzen.

Der Gradientenabstieg wird häufig fälschlicherweise mit der Backpropagation gleichgesetzt, jedoch ist das nicht ganz richtig, denn die Backpropagation ist mehr als die Anwendung des Gradientenabstiegs.

Bevor wir die Backpropagation erläutern, nochmal kurz zurück zur Forward-Propagation, die die eigentliche Prädiktion über ein künstliches neuronales Netz darstellt:

Forward-Propagation

Abbildung 1: Ein simples kleines künstliches neuronales Netz mit zwei Schichten (+ Eingabeschicht) und zwei Neuronen pro Schicht.

In einem kleinen künstlichen neuronalen Netz, wie es in der Abbildung 1 dargestellt ist, und das alle Neuronen über die Sigmoid-Funktion aktiviert, wird jedes Neuron eine Nettoeingabe z berechnen…

z = w^{T} \cdot x

… und diese Nettoeingabe in die Sigmoid-Funktion einspeisen…

\phi(z) = sigmoid(z) = \frac{1}{1 + e^{-z}}

… die dann das einzelne Neuron aktiviert. Die Aktivierung erfolgt also in der mittleren Schicht (N-Schicht) wie folgt:

N_{j} = \frac{1}{1 + e^{- \sum (w_{ij} \cdot x_{i}) }}

Die beiden Aktivierungsausgaben N werden dann als Berechnungsgrundlage für die Ausgaben der Ausgabeschicht o verwendet. Auch die Ausgabe-Neuronen berechnen ihre jeweilige Nettoeingabe z und aktivieren über Sigmoid(z).

Ausgabe eines Ausgabeknotens als Funktion der Eingänge und der Verknüpfungsgewichte für ein dreischichtiges neuronales Netz, mit nur zwei Knoten je Schicht, kann also wie folgt zusammen gefasst werden:

O_{k} = \frac{1}{1 + e^{- \sum (w_{jk} \cdot \frac{1}{1 + e^{- \sum (w_{ij} \cdot x_{i}) }}) }}

Abbildung 2: Forward-Propagation. Aktivierung via Sigmoid-Funktion.

Sollte dies die erste Forward-Propagation gewesen sein, wird der Output noch nicht auf den Input abgestimmt sein. Diese Abstimmung erfolgt in Form der Gewichtsanpassung im Training des neuronalen Netzes, über die zuvor erwähnte Gradientenmethode. Die Gradientenmethode ist jedoch von einem Fehler abhängig. Diesen Fehler zu bestimmen und durch das Netz zurück zu führen, das ist die Backpropagation.

Back-Propagation

Um die Gewichte entgegen des Fehlers anpassen zu können, benötigen wir einen möglichst exakten Fehler als Eingabe. Der Fehler berechnet sich an der Ausgabeschicht über eine Fehlerfunktion (Loss Function), beispielsweise über den MSE (Mean Squared Error) oder über die sogenannte Kreuzentropie (Cross Entropy). Lassen wir es in diesem Beispiel einfach bei einem simplen Vergleich zwischen dem realen Wert (Sollwert o_{real}) und der Prädiktion (Ausgabe o) bleiben:

e_{o} = o_{real} - o

Der Fehler e ist also einfach der Unterschied zwischen dem Ziel-Wert und der Prädiktion. Jedes Training ist eine Wiederholung von Prädiktion (Forward) und Gewichtsanpassung (Back). Im ersten Schritt werden üblicherweise die Gewichtungen zufällig gesetzt, jede Gewichtung unterschiedlich nach Zufallszahl. So ist die Wahrscheinlichkeit, gleich zu Beginn die “richtigen” Gewichtungen gefunden zu haben auch bei kleinen neuronalen Netzen verschwindend gering. Der Fehler wird also groß sein und kann über den Gradientenabstieg durch Gewichtsanpassung verkleinert werden.

In diesem Beispiel berechnen wir die Fehler e_{1} und e_{2} und passen danach die Gewichte w_{j,k} (w_{1,1} & w_{2,1} und w_{1,2} & w_{2,2}) der Schicht zwischen dem Hidden-Layer N und dem Output-Layer o an.

Abbildung 3: Anpassung der Gewichtungen basierend auf dem Fehler in der Ausgabe-Schicht.

Die Frage ist nun, wie die Gewichte zwischen dem Input-Layer X und dem Hidden-Layer N anzupassen sind. Es stellt sich die Frage, welchen Einfluss diese auf die Fehler in der Ausgabe-Schicht haben?

Um diese Gewichtungen anpassen zu können, benötigen wir den Fehler-Anteil der beiden Neuronen N_{1} und N_{2}. Dieser Anteil am Fehler der jeweiligen Neuronen ergibt sich direkt aus den Gewichtungen w_{j,k} zum Output-Layer:

e_{N_{1}} = e_{o1} \cdot \frac{w_{1,1}}{w_{1,1} + w_{1,2}} + e_{o2} \cdot \frac{w_{1,2}}{w_{1,1} + w_{1,2}}

e_{N_{2}} = e_{o1} \cdot \frac{w_{2,1}}{w_{2,1} + w_{2,2}} + e_{o2} \cdot \frac{w_{2,2}}{w_{2,1} + w_{2,2}}

Wenn man das nun generalisiert:

    \[ e_{N} = \left(\begin{array}{rr} \frac{w_{1,1}}{w_{1,1} + w_{1,2}} & \frac{w_{1,2}}{w_{1,1} + w_{1,2}} \\ \frac{w_{2,1}}{w_{2,1} + w_{2,2}} & \frac{w_{2,2}}{w_{2,1} + w_{2,2}} \end{array}\right) \cdot \left(\begin{array}{c} e_{1} \\ e_{2} \end{array}\right) \qquad \]

Dabei ist es recht aufwändig, die Gewichtungen stets ins Verhältnis zu setzen. Diese Berechnung können wir verkürzen, indem ganz einfach direkt nur die Gewichtungen ohne Relativierung zur Kalkulation des Fehleranteils benutzt werden. Die Relationen bleiben dabei erhalten!

    \[ e_{N} = \left(\begin{array}{rr} w_{1,1} & w_{1,2} \\ w_{2,1} & w_{2,2} \end{array}\right) \cdot \left(\begin{array}{c} e_{1} \\ e_{2} \end{array}\right) \qquad \]

Oder folglich in Kurzform: e_{N} = w^{T} \cdot e_{o}

Abbildung 4: Vollständige Gewichtsanpassung auf Basis der Fehler in der Ausgabeschicht und der Fehleranteile in der verborgenden Schicht.

Und nun können, basierend auf den Fehleranteilen der verborgenden Schicht N, die Gewichtungen w_{i,j} zwischen der Eingabe-Schicht I und der verborgenden Schicht N angepasst werden, entgegen dieser Fehler e_{N}.

Die Backpropagation besteht demnach aus zwei Schritten:

  1. Fehler-Berechnung durch Abgleich der Soll-Werte mit den Prädiktionen in der Ausgabeschicht und durch Fehler-Rückführung zu den Neuronen der verborgenden Schichten (Hidden-Layer)
  2. Anpassung der Gewichte entgegen des Gradientenanstiegs der Fehlerfunktion (Loss Function)

Buchempfehlungen

Die folgenden zwei Bücher haben mir sehr beim Verständnis und beim Verständlichmachen der Backpropagation in künstlichen neuronalen Netzen geholfen.

Neuronale Netze selbst programmieren: Ein verständlicher Einstieg mit Python Deep Learning. Das umfassende Handbuch: Grundlagen, aktuelle Verfahren und Algorithmen, neue Forschungsansätze (mitp Professional)

Training eines Neurons mit dem Gradientenverfahren

Dies ist Artikel 3 von 6 der Artikelserie –Einstieg in Deep Learning.

Das Training von neuronalen Netzen erfolgt nach der Forward-Propagation über zwei Schritte:

  1. Fehler-Rückführung über aller aktiver Neuronen aller Netz-Schichten, so dass jedes Neuron “seinen” Einfluss auf den Ausgabefehler kennt.
  2. Anpassung der Gewichte entgegen den Gradienten der Fehlerfunktion

Beide Schritte werden in der Regel zusammen als Backpropagation bezeichnet. Machen wir erstmal einen Schritt vor und betrachten wir, wie ein Neuron seine Gewichtsverbindungen zu seinen Vorgängern anpasst.

Gradientenabstiegsverfahren

Der Gradientenabstieg ist ein generalisierbarer Algorithmus zur Optimierung, der in vielen Verfahren des maschinellen Lernens zur Anwendung kommt, jedoch ganz besonders als sogenannte Backpropagation im Deep Learning den Erfolg der künstlichen neuronalen Netze erst möglich machen konnte.

Der Gradientenabstieg lässt sich vom Prinzip her leicht erklären: Angenommen, man stünde im Gebirge im dichten Nebel. Das Tal, und somit der Weg nach Hause, ist vom Nebel verdeckt. Wohin laufen wir? Wir können das Ziel zwar nicht sehen, tasten uns jedoch so heran, dass unser Gehirn den Gradienten (den Unterschied der Höhen beider Füße) berechnet, somit die Steigung des Bodens kennt und sich entgegen dieser Steigung unser Weg fortsetzt.

Konkret funktioniert der Gradientenabstieg so: Wir starten bei einem zufälligen Theta \theta (Random Initialization). Wir berechnen die Ausgabe (Forwardpropogation) und vergleichen sie über eine Verlustfunktion (z. B. über die Funktion Mean Squared Error) mit dem tatsächlich korrekten Wert. Auf Grund der zufälligen Initialisierung haben wir eine nahe zu garantierte Falschheit der Ergebnisse und somit einen Verlust. Für die Verlustfunktion berechnen wir den Gradienten für gegebene Eingabewerte. Voraussetzung dafür ist, dass die Funktion ableitbar ist. Wir bewegen uns entgegen des Gradienten in Richtung Minimum der Verlustfunktion. Ist dieses Minimum (fast) gefunden, spricht man auch davon, dass der Lernalgorithmus konvergiert.

Das Gradientenabstiegsverfahren ist eine Möglichkeit der Gradientenverfahren, denn wollten wir maximieren, würden wir uns entlang des Gradienten bewegen, was in anderen Anwendungen sinnvoll ist.

Ob als “Cost Function” oder als “Loss Function” bezeichnet, in jedem Fall ist es eine “Error Function”, aber auf die Benennung kommen wir später zu sprechen. Jedenfalls versuchen wir die Fehlerrate zu senken! Leider sind diese Funktionen in der Praxis selten so einfach konvex (zwei Berge mit einem Tal dazwischen).

 

Aber Achtung: Denn befinden wir uns nur zwischen zwei Bergen, finden wir das Tal mit Sicherheit über den Gradienten. Befinden wir uns jedoch in einem richtigen Gebirge mit vielen Bergen und Tälern, gilt es, das richtige Tal zu finden. Bei der Optimierung der Gewichtungen von künstlichen neuronalen Netzen wollen wir die besten Gewichtungen finden, die uns zu den geringsten Ausgaben der Verlustfunktion führen. Wir suchen also das globale Minimum unter den vielen (lokalen) Minima.

Programmier-Beispiel in Python

Nachfolgend ein Beispiel des Gradientenverfahrens zur Berechnung einer Regression. Wir importieren numpy und matplotlib.pyplot und erzeugen uns künstliche Datenpunkte:

Nun wollen wir einen Lernalgorithmus über das Gradientenverfahren erstellen. Im Grunde haben wir hier es bereits mit einem linear aktivierten Neuron zutun:

Bei der linearen Regression, die wir durchführen wollen, nehmen wir zwei-dimensionale Daten (wobei wir die Regression prinzipiell auch mit x-Dimensionen durchführen können, dann hätte unser Neuron weitere Eingänge). Wir empfangen einen Bias (w_0) der stets mit einer Eingangskonstante multipliziert und somit als Wert erhalten bleibt. Der Bias ist das Alpha \alpha in einer Schulmathe-tauglichen Formel wie y = \beta \cdot x + \alpha.

Beta \beta ist die Steigung, der Gradient, der Funktion.

Sowohl \alpha als auch \beta sind uns unbekannt, versuchen wir jedoch über die Betrachtung unserer Prädiktion durch Berechnung der Formel \^y = \beta \cdot x + \alpha und den darauffolgenden Abgleich mit dem tatsächlichen y herauszufinden. Anfangs behaupten wir beispielsweise einfach, sowohl \beta als auch \alpha seien 0.00. Folglich wird \^y = \beta \cdot x + \alpha ebenfalls gleich 0.00 sein und die Fehlerfunktion (Loss Function) wird maximal sein. Dies war der erste Durchlauf des Trainings, die sogenannte erste Epoche!

Die Epochen (Durchläufe) und dazugehörige Fehlergrößen. Wenn die Fehler sinken und mit weiteren Epochen nicht mehr wesentlich besser werden, heißt es, das der Lernalogorithmus konvergiert.

Als Fehlerfunktion verwenden wir bei der Regression die MSE-Funktion (Mean Squared Error):

MSE = \sum(\^y_i - y_i)^2

Um diese Funktion wird sich nun alles drehen, denn diese beschreibt den Fehler und gibt uns auch die Auskunft darüber, ob wie stark und in welche Richtung sie ansteigt, so dass wir uns entgegen der Steigung bewegen können. Wer die Regeln der Ableitung im Kopf hat, weiß, dass die Ableitung der Formel leichter wird, wenn wir sie vorher auf halbe Werte runterskalieren. Da die Proportionen dabei erhalten bleiben und uns quadrierte Fehlerwerte unserem menschlichen Verstand sowieso nicht so viel sagen (unser Gehirn denkt nunmal nicht exponential), stört das nicht:

MSE = \frac{\frac{1}{2} \cdot \sum(\^y_i - y_i)^2}{n}

MSE = \frac{\frac{1}{2} \cdot \sum(w^T \cdot x_i - y_i)^2}{n}

Wenn die Mathematik der partiellen Ableitung (Ableitung einer Funktion nach jedem Gradienten) abhanden gekommen ist, bitte nochmal folgende Regeln nachschlagen, um die nachfolgende Ableitung verstehen zu können:

  • Allgemeine partielle Ableitung
  • Kettenregel

Ableitung der MSD-Funktion nach dem einen Gewicht w bzw. partiell nach jedem vorhandenen w_j:

\frac{\partial}{\partial w_j}MSE = \frac{\partial}{\partial w} \frac{1}{2} \cdot \sum(\^y - y_i)^2

\frac{\partial}{\partial w_j}MSE = \frac{\partial}{\partial w} \frac{1}{2} \cdot \sum(w^T \cdot x_i - y_i)^2

\frac{\partial}{\partial w_j}MSE = \frac{2}{n} \cdot \sum(w^T \cdot x_i - y_i) \cdot x_{ij}

Woher wir das x_{ij} am Ende her haben? Das ergibt sie aus der Kettenregel: Die äußere Funktion wurde abgeleitet, so wurde aus \frac{1}{2} \cdot \sum(w^T \cdot x_i - y_i)^2 dann \frac{2}{n} \cdot \sum(w^T \cdot x_i - y_i). Jedoch muss im Sinne eben dieser Kettenregel auch die innere Funktion abgeleitet werden. Da wir nach w_j ableiten, bleibt nur x_ij erhalten.

Damit können wir arbeiten! So kompliziert ist die Formel nun auch wieder nicht: \frac{2}{n} \cdot \sum(w^T \cdot x_i - y_i) \cdot x_{ij}

Mit dieser Formel können wir unsere Gewichte an den Fehler anpassen: (f\nabla ist der Gradient der Funktion!)

w_j = w_j - \nabla MSE(w_j)

Initialisieren der Gewichtungen

Die Gewichtungen \alpha und \beta müssen anfänglich mit Werten initialisiert werden. In der Regression bietet es sich an, die Gewichte anfänglich mit 0.00 zu initialisieren.

Bei vielen neuronalen Netzen, mit nicht-linearen Aktivierungsfunktionen, ist das jedoch eher ungünstig und zufällige Werte sind initial besser. Gut erprobt sind normal-verteilte Zufallswerte.

Lernrate

Nur eine Kleinigkeit haben wir bisher vergessen: Wir brauchen einen Faktor, mit dem wir anpassen. Hier wäre der Faktor 1. Das ist in der Regel viel zu groß. Dieser Faktor wird geläufig als Lernrate (Learning Rate) \eta (eta) bezeichnet:

w_j = w_j - \eta \cdot \nabla MSE(w_j)

Die Lernrate \eta ist ein Knackpunkt und der erste Parameter des Lernalgorithmus, den es anzupassen gilt, wenn das Training nicht konvergiert.

Die Lernrate \eta darf nicht zu groß klein gewählt werden, da das Training sonst zu viele Epochen benötigt. Ungeduldige erhöhen die Lernrate möglicherweise aber so sehr, dass der Lernalgorithmus im Minimum der Fehlerfunktion vorbeiläuft und diesen stets überspringt. Hier würde der Algorithmus also sozusagen konvergieren, weil nicht mehr besser werden, aber das resultierende Modell wäre weit vom Optimum entfernt.

Beginnen wir mit der Implementierung als Python-Klasse:

Die Klasse sollte so funktionieren, bevor wir sie verwenden, sollten wir die Input-Werte standardisieren:

Bei diesem Beispiel mit künstlich erzeugten Werten ist das Standardisieren bzw. das Fehlen des Standardisierens zwar nicht kritisch, aber man sollte es sich zur Gewohnheit machen. Testweise es einfach mal weglassen 🙂

Kommen wir nun zum Einsatz der Klasse, die die Regression via Gradientenabstieg absolvieren soll:

Was tut diese Instanz der Klasse LinearRegressionGD nun eigentlich?

Bildlich gesprochen, legt sie eine Gerade auf den Boden des Koordinatensystems, denn die Gewichtungen werden mit 0.00 initialisiert, y ist also gleich 0.00, egal welche Werte in x enthalten sind. Der Fehler ist dann aber sehr groß (sollte maximal sein, im Vergleich zu zukünftigen Epochen). Die Gewichte werden also angepasst, die Gerade somit besser in die Punktwolke platziert. Mit jeder Epoche wird die Gerade erneut in die Punktwolke gelegt, der Gesamtfehler (über alle x, da wir es hier mit dem Batch-Verfahren zutun haben) berechnet, die Werte angepasst… bis die vorgegebene Zahl an Epochen abgelaufen ist.

Schauen wir uns das Ergebnis des Trainings an:

Die Linie sieht passend aus, oder? Da wir hier nicht zu sehr in die Theorie der Regressionsanalyse abdriften möchten, lassen wir das testen und prüfen der Akkuratesse mal aus, hier möchte ich auf meinen Artikel Regressionsanalyse in Python mit Scikit-Learn verweisen.

Prüfen sollten wir hingegen mal, wie schnell der Lernalgorithmus mit der vorgegebenen Lernrate eta konvergiert:

Hier die Verlaufskurve der Cost Function:

Die Kurve zeigt uns, dass spätestens nach 40 Epochen kaum noch Verbesserung (im Sinne der Gesamtfehler-Minimierung) erreicht wird.

Wichtige Hinweise

Natürlich war das nun nur ein erster kleiner Einstieg und wer es verstanden hat, hat viel gewonnen. Denn erst dann kann man sich vorstellen, wie ein einzelnen Neuron eines künstlichen neuronalen Netzes grundsätzlich trainiert werden kann.

Folgendes sollte noch beachtet werden:

  • Lernrate \eta:
    Die Lernrate ist ein wichtiger Parameter. Wer das Programmier-Beispiel bei sich zum Laufen gebracht hat, einfach mal die Lernrate auf Werte zwischen 10.00 und 0.00000001 setzen, schauen was passiert 🙂
  • Globale Minima vs lokale Minima:
    Diese lineare zwei-dimensionale Regression ist ziemlich einfach. Neuronale Netze sind hingegen komplexer und haben nicht einfach nur eine simple konvexe Fehlerfunktion. Hier gibt es mehrere Hügel und Täler in der Fehlerfunktion und die Gefahr ist groß, in einem lokalen, nicht aber in einem globalen Minimum zu landen.
  • Stochastisches Gradientenverfahren:
    Wir haben hier das sogenannte Batch-Verfahren verwendet. Dieses ist grundsätzlich besser als die stochastische Methode. Denn beim Batch verwenden wir den gesamten Stapel an x-Werten für die Fehlerbestimmung. Allerdings ist dies bei großen Daten zu rechen- und speicherintensiv. Dann werden kleinere Unter-Stapel (Sub-Batches) zufällig aus den x-Werten ausgewählt, der Fehler daraus bestimmt (was nicht ganz so akkurat ist, wie als würden wir den Fehler über alle x berechnen) und der Gradient bestimmt. Dies ist schon Rechen- und Speicherkapazität, erfordert aber meistens mehr Epochen.

Buchempfehlung

Die folgenden zwei Bücher haben mir bei der Erstellung dieses Beispiels geholfen und kann ich als hilfreiche und deutlich weiterführende Lektüre empfehlen:

 

Machine Learning mit Python und Scikit-Learn und TensorFlow: Das umfassende Praxis-Handbuch für Data Science, Predictive Analytics und Deep Learning (mitp Professional) Hands-On Machine Learning with Scikit-Learn and TensorFlow: Concepts, Tools, and Techniques for Building Intelligent Systems