Deep Learning and Human Intelligence – Part 1 of 2

Many people are under the impression that the new wave of data science, machine learning and/or digitalization is new, that it did not exist before. But its history is as long as the history of humanity and/or science itself.  The scientific discovery could hardly take place without the necessary data. Even the process of discovering the numbers included elements of machine learning: pattern recognition, comparison between different groups (ranking), clustering, etc. So what differentiates mathematical formulas from machine learning and how does it relate to artificial intelligence?

There is no difference between the two if seen from the perspective of formulas however, such a perspective limits the type of data to which they can be applied. Data stored via tables consist of structured data and are stored in so-called relational databases. The reason for such a data storage is the connection between different fields that assume a well-established structure in advance, such as a company’s sales or balance sheet. However, with the emergence of personal computers, many of the daily activities have been digitalized: music, pictures, movies, and so on. All this information is stored unrelated to other data and therefore called unstructured data.

IEEE International Conference on Computer Vision (ICCV), 2015, DOI: 10.1109/ICCV.2015.428

Copyright: IEEE International Conference on Computer Vision (ICCV), 2015, DOI: 10.1109/ICCV.2015.428

The essence of scientific discoveries was and will be structure. Not surprisingly, the mathematical formulas revolve around relations between variables – information, in general. For example, Galileo derived the law of falling balls from measuring the successive hight of a falling ball. The main difficulty was to obtain measurements at regular time intervals. What about if the data is not structured, which mathematical formula should be applied then? There is a distribution of people’s height, but no distribution for the pictures taken in all holidays for the last year, there is an amplitude for acoustic signals, but no function that detects the similarity between two songs. This is one of the reasons why machine learning focuses heavily on clustering and classification.

Roughly speaking, these simple examples are enough to categorize the difference between scientific discovery and machine learning. Science is about discovering relationships between different variables, Machine Learning tries to automatize processes. Every technical improvement is part of the automation, so why is everything different in this case? Because the current automation deals with human intelligence. The car automates the walking, the kitchen stove the fire, but Machine Learning parts of the human intelligence. There is a difference between the previous automation steps and those of human intelligence. All the previous ones are either outside the human body – such as Fire – or unconsciously executed (once learned) – walking, spinning, etc. The automation induced by Machine Learning affects a part of the human intelligence that we consciously perceive. Of course, today’s machine learning tools are unable to automate all human intelligence, but it is a fascinating step in that direction.

A breakthrough in Machine Learning tasks was achieved in 2012 when the first Deep Learning algorithm for detecting types of images, reached near-human accuracy. It could appreciate the likelihood that the image is a human face, a train, a ball or a fish without having “seen” the picture before. Such an algorithm can be used in various areas:  personally – facial recognition in pictures and/or social media – as tagging of images or videos, medicine – cancer detection, etc. For understanding such cutting-edge issues of classification, one cannot avoid understanding how Deep Learning works. To see the beauty of such algorithms and, at the same time, to be able to comprehend the difficulty of working with them, an example will be the best guide.

The building blocks of Deep Learning are neurons, operational units, which perform mathematical operations or logical operations like AND, OR, etc., and are modelled after the neurons in the brain. Already in the 1950’s two neuroscientist, Hubel and Wiesel, observed that not all neurons in the brain are responding in the same fashion to visual stimuli. Some responded only to horizontal lines, whereas others to vertical lines, with other words, the brain is constructed with specialized neurons. Groups of such neurons are called, in the Machine Learning community, layers. Like in the brain, neurons with different properties are clustered in different layers. This implies that layers have also specific properties and have to be arranged in a specific way, called architecture. It is this architecture which differentiates Deep Learning from Artificial Neuronal Networks (ANN are similar to a layer).

Unfortunately, scientists still haven’t figured out how the brain works, thus to discover how to train Deep Learning from data was not an easy task, and is also the reason why another example is used to explain the training of Deep Learning: the eye. One has always to remember: once it is known how Deep Learning works, it is simple to find example which illustrates the working mechanism.  For such an analogy, it is sufficient for someone without any knowledge about Deep Learning, to keep in mind only the elements that compose such architectures: input data, different layers of neurons, output layers, ReLu’s.

Input data are any type of information, in our example it is light. Of course, that Deep Learning is not limited only to images or videos, but also to sound and/or time series, which would imply that the example would be the ear and sound waves, or the brain and numbers.

Layers can be seen as cells in the eye. It is well known that the eye is formed of different layers connected to each other with each of them having different properties, functionalities. The same is true also for the layers of a Deep Learning architecture: one can see the neurons as cells of the layer as the tissue. While, mathematically, the neurons are nothing more than simple operations, usually linear weight functions, they can be seen as the properties of individual cells. Each layer has one weight matrix, which gives the neuron (and layer) specific properties depending on the data and the task at hand.

It is here that the architecture becomes very important. What Deep Learning offers is a default setting of the layers with unknown weights. One can see this as trying to build an eye knowing that there are different types of cells and different ways how tissues of such cells can be arranged, but not which cell exactly is needed (with what properties) and which arrangement of layers works best. Such an approach has the advantage that one is capable of building any type of organ desired, but the disadvantage is also very obvious: it is time consuming to find the appropriate cell properties and layers arrangements.

Still, the strategy of Deep Learning is a significant departure from the Machine Learning approaches. The performance of Machine Learning methods is as good as the features engineering performed by Data Scientists, and thus depending on the creativity of the Data Scientist. In the case of Deep Learning the engineers of the features is performed automatically as part of the model building. This is a huge improvement, as the only difficult task is to have enough data and computer power to find the right weights matrices. Such an endeavor was performed also by nature for the eye — and is also the reason why one can choose it as an example for Deep Learning — evolution. It is not surprising that Deep Learning is one of the best direction scientists have of Artificial Intelligence today.

The evolution of the eye can be seen, from the perspective of Data Scientists, as the continuous training of a Deep Learning architecture which enables to recognize and track one or more objects. The performance of the evolutional process can be summed up as the fine tuning of the cells which are getting more and more susceptible to light and the adaptation of layers to enable a better vision. Different animals in different environments and different targets — as the hawk and the fly — developed different eyes than humans, but they all work according to the same principle. The tasks that Deep Learning is performing today are similar, for example it can be used to drive cars but there is still a difference:  there is no connection to other organs. Deep Learning is not the approximation of an Artificial Organism, like an android, but a simplified Artificial Organ that can work on its own.

Returning to the working mechanism of the Deep Learning architecture, we can already follow the analogy of what happens if a ray of light is hitting the eye. Once the eye is fully adapted to the task, one can followed how the information enters the Deep Learning architecture (Artificial Eye) by penetrating the input layer. already here arises the question, what kind of eye is the best? One where a small source of light can reach as many neurons as possible, or the one where the light sources reaches only few neurons? In order to take such a decision, a last piece of the puzzle is required: ReLu. One can see them as synapses between neurons (cells) and/or similarly for tissue. By using continuous functions, such as the shape of the latter ‘S’ (called sigmoid), the information from one neuron will be distributed over a large number of other neurons. If one uses the maximum function, then only few neurons are updated with processed information from earlier layers.

Such sparse structures between neurons, was a major improvement in the development of the technique of training Deep Learning architectures. Again, it has a strong evolutionary analogy: energy efficiency. By needing less neurons, the tissues and architecture are both kept to a minimal size which enables flexibility in development and less energy. As the information is process by the different layers, the Artificial Eye is gathering more and more complex (non-linear) structures — the adapted features –, which help to decide, from past experience, what kind of object is detected.

This was part 1 of 2 of the article series. Part 2 will be published soon.

Machine Learning vs Deep Learning – Wo liegt der Unterschied?

Machine Learning gehört zu den Industrie-Trends dieser Jahre, da besteht kein Zweifel. Oder war es Deep Learning? Oder Artificial Intelligence? Worin liegt da eigentlich der Unterschied? Dies ist Artikel 1 von 5 der Artikelserie –Einstieg in Deep Learning.

Machine Learning

Maschinelles Lernen (ML) ist eine Sammlung von mathematischen Methoden der Mustererkennung. Diese Methoden erkennen Muster beispielsweise durch bestmögliche, auf eine bestmögliche Entropie gerichtete, Zerlegung von Datenbeständen in hierarchische Strukturen (Entscheidungsbäume). Oder über Vektoren werden Ähnlichkeiten zwischen Datensätzen ermittelt und daraus trainiert (z. B. k-nearest-Neighbour, nachfolgend einfach kurz: k-nN) oder untrainiert (z.B. k-Means) Muster erschlossen.

Algorithmen des maschinellen Lernens sind tatsächlich dazu in der Lage, viele alltägliche oder auch sehr spezielle Probleme zu lösen. In der Praxis eines Entwicklers für Machine Learning stellen sich jedoch häufig Probleme, wenn es entweder zu wenige Daten gibt oder wenn es zu viele Dimensionen der Daten gibt. Entropie-getriebene Lern-Algorithmen wie Entscheidungsbäume werden bei vielen Dimensionen zu komplex, und auf Vektorräumen basierende Algorithmen wie der k-nächste-Nachbarn-Algorithmus sind durch den Fluch der Dimensionalität in ihrer Leistung eingeschränkt.


Der Fluch der Dimensionalität

Datenpunkte sind in einem zwei-dimensionalen Raum gut vorstellbar und auch ist es vorstellbar, das wir einen solchen Raum (z. B. ein DIN-A5-Papierblatt) mit vielen Datenpunkten vollschreiben. Belassen wir es bei der Anzahl an Datenpunkten, nehmen jedoch weitere Dimensionen hinzu (zumindest die 3. Dimension können wir uns noch gut vorstellen), werden die Abstände zwischen den Punkten größer. n-dimensionale Räume können gewaltig groß sein, so dass Algorithmen wie der k-nN nicht mehr gut funktionieren (der n-dimensionale Raum ist einfach zu leer).


Auch wenn es einige Konzepte zum besseren Umgang mit vielen Dimensionen gibt (z. B. einige Ideen des Ensemble Learnings)

Feature Engineering

Um die Anzahl an Dimensionen zu reduzieren, bedienen sich Machine Learning Entwickler statistischer Methoden, um viele Dimensionen auf die (wahrscheinlich) nützlichsten zu reduzieren: sogenannte Features. Dieser Auswahlprozess nennt sich Feature Engineering und bedingt den sicheren Umgang mit Statistik sowie idealerweise auch etwas Fachkenntnisse des zu untersuchenden Fachgebiets.
Bei der Entwicklung von Machine Learning für den produktiven Einsatz arbeiten Data Scientists den Großteil ihrer Arbeitszeit nicht an der Feinjustierung ihrer Algorithmen des maschinellen Lernens, sondern mit der Auswahl passender Features.

Deep Learning

Deep Learning (DL) ist eine Disziplin des maschinellen Lernes unter Einsatz von künstlichen neuronalen Netzen. Während die Ideen für Entscheidungsbäume, k-nN oder k-Means aus einer gewissen mathematischen Logik heraus entwickelt wurden, gibt es für künstliche neuronale Netze ein Vorbild aus der Natur: Biologische neuronale Netze.

Prinzip-Darstellung eines künstlichen neuronalen Netzes mit zwei Hidden-Layern zwischen einer Eingabe- und Ausgabe-Schicht.

Wie künstliche neuronale Netze im Detail funktionieren, erläutern wir in den nächsten zwei Artikeln dieser Artikelserie, jedoch vorab schon mal so viel: Ein Eingabe-Vektor (eine Reihe von Dimensionen) stellt eine erste Schicht dar, die über weitere Schichten mit sogenannten Neuronen erweitert oder reduziert und über Gewichtungen abstrahiert wird, bis eine Ausgabeschicht erreicht wird, die einen Ausgabe-Vektor erzeugt (im Grunde ein Ergebnis-Schlüssel, der beispielsweise eine bestimmte Klasse ausweist: z. B. Katze oder Hund). Durch ein Training werden die Gewichte zwischen den Neuronen so angepasst, dass bestimmte Eingabe-Muster (z. B. Fotos von Haustieren) immer zu einem bestimmten Ausgabe-Muster führen (z. B. “Das Foto zeigt eine Katze”).

Der Vorteil von künstlichen neuronalen Netzen ist die sehr tiefgehende Abstraktion von Zusammenhängen zwischen Eingabe-Daten und zwischen den abstrahierten Neuronen-Werten mit den Ausgabe-Daten. Dies geschieht über mehrere Schichten (Layer) der Netze, die sehr spezielle Probleme lösen können. Aus diesen Tatsachen leitet sich der übergeordnete Name ab: Deep Learning

Deep Learning kommt dann zum Einsatz, wenn andere maschinelle Lernverfahren an Grenzen stoßen und auch dann, wenn auf ein separates Feature Engineering verzichtet werden muss, denn neuronale Netze können über mehrere Schichten viele Eingabe-Dimensionen von selbst auf die Features reduzieren, die für die korrekte Bestimmung der Ausgabe notwendig sind.

Convolutional Neuronal Network

Convolutional Neuronal Networks (CNN) sind neuronale Netze, die vor allem für die Klassifikation von Bilddaten verwendet werden. Sie sind im Kern klassische neuronale Netze, die jedoch eine Faltungs- und eine Pooling-Schicht vorgeschaltet haben. Die Faltungsschicht ließt den Daten-Input (z. B. ein Foto) mehrfach hintereinander, doch jeweils immer nur einen Ausschnitt daraus (bei Fotos dann einen Sektor des Fotos), die Pooling-Schicht reduzierte die Ausschnittsdaten (bei Fotos: Pixel) auf reduzierte Informationen. Daraufhin folgt das eigentliche neuronale Netz.

CNNs sind im Grunde eine spezialisierte Form von künstlichen neuronalen Netzen, die das Feature-Engineering noch geschickter handhaben.

Deep Autoencoder

Gegenwärtig sind die meisten künstlichen neuronalen Netze ein Algorithmen-Modell für das überwachte maschinelle Lernen (Klassifikation oder Regression), jedoch kommen sie auch zum unüberwachten Lernen (Clustering oder Dimensionsreduktion) zum Einsatz, die sogenannten Deep Autoencoder.

Deep Autoencoder sind neuronale Netze, die im ersten Schritt eine große Menge an Eingabe-Dimensionen auf vergleichsweise wenige Dimensionen reduzieren. Die Reduktion (Encoder) erfolgt nicht abrupt, sondern schrittweise über mehrere Schichten, die reduzierten Dimensionen werden zum Feature-Vektor. Daraufhin kommt der zweite Teil des neuronalen Netzes zum Einsatz: Die reduzierten Dimensionen werden über weitere Schichten wieder erweitert, die ursprünglichen Dimensionen als abstrakteres Modell wieder rekonstruiert (Decoder). Der Sinn von Deep Autoencodern sind abstrakte Ähnlichkeitsmodelle zu erstellen. Ein häufiges Einsatzgebiet sind beispielsweise das maschinelle Identifizieren von ähnlichen Bildern, Texten oder akkustischen Signalmustern.

Artificial Intelligence

Artificial Intelligence (AI) oder künstliche Intelligenz (KI) ist ein wissenschaftlicher Bereich, der das maschinelle Lernen beinhaltet, jedoch noch weitere Bereiche kennt, die für den Aufbau einer KI von Nöten sind. Eine künstliche Intelligenz muss nicht nur Lernen, sie muss auch Wissen effizient abspeichern, einordnen bzw. sortieren und abrufen können. Sie muss ferner über eine Logik verfügen, wie sie das Wissen und das Gelernte einsetzen muss. Denken wir an biologische Intelligenzen, ist es etwa nicht so, dass jegliche Fähigkeiten erlernt wurden, einige sind mit der Geburt bereits ausgebildet oder liegen als sogenannter Instinkt vor.

Ein einzelner Machine Learning Algorithmus würde wohl kaum einen Turing-Test bestehen oder einen Roboter komplexe Aufgaben bewältigen lassen. Daher muss eine künstliche Intelligenz weit mehr können, als bestimmte Dinge zu erlernen. Zum wissenschaftlichen Gebiet der künstlichen Intelligenz gehören zumindest:

  • Machine Learning (inkl. Deep Learning und Ensemble Learning)
  • Mathematische Logik
    • Aussagenlogik
    • Prädikatenlogik
    • Default-Logik
    • Modal-Logik
  • Wissensbasierte Systeme
    • relationale Algebra
    • Graphentheorie
  • Such- und Optimierungsverfahren:
    • Gradientenverfahren
    • Breitensuche & Tiefensuche

AI(ML(DL))

Buch-Empfehlungen

Grundkurs Künstliche Intelligenz: Eine praxisorientierte Einführung (Computational Intelligence) Praxiseinstieg Deep Learning: Mit Python, Caffe, TensorFlow und Spark eigene Deep-Learning-Anwendungen erstellen

Machine Learning: Online vs Offline

Das ist Artikel 4 von 4 aus der Artikelserie – Was ist eigentlich Machine Learning?

Die Begriffe online und offline sind mit vielen Bedeutungen versehen und so ist – wie bei vielen Unterscheidungsmöglichkeiten des maschinellen Lernens – die Verwirrung vorprogrammiert. Diese Unterscheidung betrifft die Trainingsphasen der parametrischen Verfahren des maschinellen Lernens.

Offline Learning

Mit Offline Learning ist nicht gemeint, dass der Algorithmus nicht ans Internet angebunden ist, sondern dass es sich bei der Trainingsprozedure um eine Stapelverarbeitung handelt. Daher wird manchmal auch vom Batch Learning gesprochen. Beim Batch Learning werden die Parameter bzw. das Modell erst angepasst, nachdem der gesamte Batch (Stapel an Datensätzen) das Training durchlaufen hat. Die gewöhnliche Gradientenmethode als ein Optimierungsverfahren ist das Gradientenabstiegsverfahren als Stapelverarbeitung. Dabei wird der Gradient, der die Richtung für die Anpassung der Gewichtungen der Funktionsparameter vorgibt, anhand der gesamten Trainingsdatenmenge berechnet.

Der Vorteil dieser Vorgehensweise ist, dass das Training als Prozess sehr schnell läuft und die Funktionsparameter direkt aus dem gesamten Datenbestand heraus bestimmt werden.

Demgegenüber steht der Nachteil, dass der ganze Stapel in den Arbeitsspeicher geladen werden muss, was eine entsprechend leistungsfähige Hardware voraussetzt. Soll das Lern-System für das Training live an einer Datenquelle (z. B. ein Data Stream aus dem Social Media) angebunden werden, müssen die Daten erstmal gespeichert werden (Bildung des Stapels), bevor sie verarbeitet und dann verworfen werden können, was den dafür nötigen Speicherplatz bedingt.

Online Learning

Beim Online-Learning wird nicht über einen Stapel (Batch) trainiert, sondern jeder einzelne Datensatz (aus einer großen Menge an Datensätzen oder live hinzugefügte Datensätze) wird dem Training einzeln hinzugefügt, trainiert und umgehend in eine Parameteranpassung (Modellanpassung) umgesetzt. Dies lässt sich beispielsweise mit der stochastischen Gradientenmethode realsieren, die iterativ arbeiten und den Gradienten zur Gewichtungsanpassung für jeden einzelnen Datensatz bestimmt, statt einen ganzen Batch zu verarbeiten und daraus einen Fehler zu berechnen. Online-Learning ist ein inkrementell arbeitendes Lernen, welches das Modell kontinuierlich – nämlich nach jedem Datensatz (Sample) – anpasst.

Die Optimierung läuft somit – wenn auf eine große Datenmenge angewendet wird – natürlich langsamer und ist eher nicht geeignet, wenn ein Training schnell verlaufen muss oder eine große Datenmenge die Hardware sowieso schon auslastet. Dafür wird das Modell beim Online-Learning in Echtzeit trainiert, wenn neue Daten zur Verfügung stehen. Neu hinzugefügte Daten fließen sofort ins Modell ein, so kann ein Lern-System als ein Live-System gleich auf Änderungen reagieren und die Trainingsdaten wieder verworfen werden (da sie bereits ins Training eingeflossen sind).

Mini-Batch-Verfahren

Während beim Online Learning alle Datensätze einzeln durchgegangen werden (dauert lange) und beim Offline Learning der gesamte Stapel an Datensätzen durchgearbeitet wird (viel Speicherplatzbedarf), ist der sogenannte Mini-Batch der Mittelweg. Wie der Name bereits andeutet, wird ein kleinerer Stapel (z. B. 50 Datensätze) gesammelt und verarbeitet.

Einstieg in Deep Learning – Artikelserie

Deep Learning gilt als ein Teilgebiet des maschinellen Lernens (Machine Learning), welches wiederum ein Teilgebiet der künstlichen Intelligenz (Artificial Intelligence) ist. Machine Learning umfasst alle (teilweise äußerst unterschiedliche) Methoden der Klassifikation oder Regression, die die Maschine über ein vom Menschen begleitetes Training selbst erlernt. Darüber hinaus umfasst Machine Learning auch unüberwachte Methoden zum Data Mining in besonders großen und vielfältigen Datenmengen.

Deep Learning ist eine Unterform des maschinellen Lernens und macht im Grunde nichts anderes: Es geht um antrainierte Klassifikation oder Regression. Seltener werden Deep Learning Algorithmen auch als unüberwachter Lernenmechanismus verwendet, zum Lernen von Rauschen zur Erkennung von Mustern (Data Mining). Deep Learning bezeichnet den Einsatz von künstlichen neuronalen Netzen, die gegenüber anderen Verfahren des maschinellen Lernens häufig überlegen sind und diesen gegenüber auch andere Vor- und Nachteile besitzen.

Im Rahmen dieser Artikelserie erscheinen im Laufe der kommenden Monate folgende Artikel:

  1. Machine Learning vs Deep Learning – Wo liegt der Unterschied?
  2. Funktionsweise künstlicher neuronaler Netze (erscheint demnächst)
  3. Training von künstlichen neuronalen Netzen (erscheint demnächst)
  4. Künstliches neuronales Netz in Python (erscheint demnächst)
  5. Künstliches neuronales Netz mit dem TensorFlow-Framework (erscheint demnächst)

Buchempfehlungen

Seit 2016 arbeite ich mich in Deep Learning ein und biete auch Seminare und Workshops zu Machine Learning und Deep Learning an, dafür habe ich eine ausführliche Einarbeitung und ein immer wieder neu auflebendes Literaturstudium hinter mir. Unter Anderen habe ich folgende Bücher für mein Selbststudium verwendet und nutze ich auch Auszugsweise für meine Lehre:


Praxiseinstieg Machine Learning mit Scikit-Learn und TensorFlow: Konzepte, Tools und Techniken für intelligente Systeme (Animals)

Neuronale Netze selbst programmieren: Ein verständlicher Einstieg mit Python

Praxiseinstieg Deep Learning: Mit Python, Caffe, TensorFlow und Spark eigene Deep-Learning-Anwendungen erstellen

Machine Learning mit Python und Scikit-Learn und TensorFlow: Das umfassende Praxis-Handbuch für Data Science, Predictive Analytics und Deep Learning (mitp Professional)

 

Maschinelles Lernen: Klassifikation vs Regression

Das ist Artikel 2 von 4 aus der Artikelserie – Was ist eigentlich Machine Learning? Die Unterscheidung zwischen Klassifikation und Regression ist ein wichtiger Schritt für das Verständnis von Predictive Analytics. Nun möchte ich eine Erklärung liefern, die den Unterschied (hoffentlich) deutlich macht.

Regression – Die Vorhersage von stetigen Werten

Wir suchen bei der Regression demnach eine Funktion y = \alpha \cdot x + \beta, die unsere Punktwolke – mit der wir uns zutrauen, Vorhersagen über die abhängige Variable vornehmen zu können – möglichst gut beschreibt. Dabei ist y der Zielwert (abhängige Variable) und x der Eingabewert. Wir arbeiten also in einer zwei-dimensionalen Welt. Variablen, die die Funktion mathematisch definieren, werden oft als griechische Buchstaben darsgestellt. Die Variable \alpha (Alpha) ist der y-Achsenschnitt bei x = 0. Dieser wird als Bias, selten auch als Default-Wert, bezeichnet. Der Bias ist also der Wert, wenn die x-Eingabe gleich Null ist. Eine weitere Variable \beta (Beta) beschreibt die Steigung.

Ferner ist zu beachten, dass sich eine Punktwolke durch eine Gerade nie perfekt beschreiben lässt, und daher für jedes x_{i} ein Fehler \varepsilon_{i} existiert. Diesen Fehler wollen wir in diesem Artikel ignorieren.

In einem zwei-dimensionalen System (eine Eingabe und eine Ausgabe) sprechen wir von einer einfachen Regression. Generalisieren wir die Regressionsmethode auf ein multivariates System (mehr als eine Eingabe-Variable), werden die Variablen in der Regel nicht mehr als griechische Buchstaben (denn auch das griechische Alphabet ist endlich) dargestellt, sondern wir nehmen eines abstrahierende Darstellung über Gewichtungen (weights). Dies ist eine sehr treffende Symbolisierungen, denn sowohl der Bias (w_{0} statt \alpha) als auch die Steigungen (w_{1\ldots n}) sind nichts anderes als Gewichtungen zwischen den Eingaben.

    \[y = w_{0} \cdot x_{0} + w_{1} \cdot x_{1} + \ldots + w_{n} \cdot x_{n}\]

y ist eine Summe aus den jeweiligen Produkten aus x_{i} und w_{i}. Verkürzt ausgedrückt:

    \[y = \sum_{i=0}^n w_{i} \cdot x_{i}\]

Noch kürzer ausgedrückt:

    \[y = w^T \cdot x\]

Anmerkung: Das hochgestellte T steht für Transponieren, eine Notation aus der linearen Algebra, die im Ergebnis nichts anderes bewirkt als y = \sum_{i=0}^n w_{i} \cdot x_{i}.

Diese mathematische lineare Funktion kann wie folgt abgebildet werden:

Der Output ist gleich y bzw. die Ausgabe der Nettoeingabe (Net Sum) w^T \cdot x. Auf der linken Seite finden wir alle Eingabewerte, wobei der erste Wert statisch mit 1.0 belegt ist, nur für den Zweck, den Bias (w_{0}) in der Nettoeingabe aufrecht zu erhalten. Im Falle einer einfachen linearen Regression hätten wir also eine Funktion mit zwei Gewichten: y = 1 \cdot w_{0} + x \cdot w_{1}

Das Modell beschreibt, wie aus einer Reihe von Eingabewerten (n = Anzahl an x-Dimensionen) und einer Reihe von Gewichtungen (n + 1) eine Funktion entsteht, die einen y-Wert berechnet. Diese Berechnung wird auch als Forward-Propagation bezeichnet.
Doch welche Werte brauchen wir für die Gewichtungen, damit bei gegebenen x-Werten ein (mehr oder weniger) korrekter y-Wert berechnet wird? Anders gefragt, wie schaffen wir es, dass die Forward-Propagation die richtigen Werte ausspuckt?

Mit einem Training via Backpropagation!


Einfache Erklärung der Backpropagation

Die Backpropagation ist ein Optimierungsverfahren, unter Einsatz der Gradientenmethode, den Fehler einer Forward-Propagation zu berechnen und die Gewichtungen in Gegenrichtung des Fehlers anzupassen. Optimiert wird in der Form, dass der Fehler minimiert wird. Es ist ein iteratives Verfahren, bei dem mit jedem Iterationsschritt wieder eine Forward-Propagation auf Basis von Trainingsdaten durchgeführt wird und die Prädiktionsergebnisse mit den vorgegebenen Ergebnissen (der gekennzeichneten Trainingsdaten) verglichen und damit die Fehler berechnet werden. Die resultierende Fehlerfunktion ist konvex, ableitbar und hat ein zentrales globales Minimum. Dieses Minimum finden wir durch diese iterative Vorgehensweise.


Die Backpropagation zu erklären, erfordert einen separaten Artikel. Merken wir uns einfach: Die Backpropagation nutzt eine Fehlerfunktion, um die Werte der Gewichtungen schrittweise entgegen des Fehlers (bei jeder Forward-Propagation) bis zu einem Punkt anzupassen, bis keine wesentliche Verbesserung (Reduzierung des Fehlers) mehr eintritt. Nach dem Vollzug der Backpropagation erhalten wir die “richtigen” Gewichtungen und haben eine Funktion zur Vorhersage von y-Werten bei Eingabe neuer x-Werte.

Klassifikation – Die Vorhersage von Gruppenzugehörigkeiten

Bei der Klassifikation möchten wir jedoch keine Gerade oder Kurve vorhersagen, die sich durch eine Punktwolke legt, sondern wie möchten Punktwolken voneinander als Klassen unterscheiden, um später hinzukommende Punkte ihren richtigen Klassen zuweisen zu können (Klassifikation). Wir können jedoch auf dem vorherigen Modell der Prädiktion von stetigen Werten aufbauen und auch die Backpropagation zum Training einsetzen, möchten das Training dann jedoch auf die Trennung der Punktwolken ausrichten.

Hinweis: Regressions- und Klassifikationsherausforderungen werden in den Dimensionen unterschiedlich dargestellt. Zur Veranschaulichung: Während wir bei der einfachen Regression eine x-Eingabe als unabhängige Variable und eine y-Ausgabe als abhängige Variable haben, haben wir bei einer zwei-dimensionalen Klassifikation zwei x-Dimensionen als Eingabe. Die Klassen sind die y-Ausgabe (hier als Farben visualisiert).

Ergänzen wir das Modell nun um eine Aktivierungsfunktion, dass die stetigen Werte der Nettosumme über eine Funktion in Klassen unterteilt, erhalten wir einen Klassifikator: Den Perceptron-Klassifikator. Das Perzeptron gilt als der einfachste Klassifikator und ist bereits die kleinste Form eines künstlichen neuronalen Netzes. Es funktioniert nur bei linearer Trennbarkeit der Klassen.

Was soll die Aktivierungsfunktion bewirken? Wir berechnen wieder eine Nettoeingabe w^T \cdot x, die uns stetige Werte ausgiebt. Wir haben also immer noch unsere Gewichtungen, die wir trainieren können. Nun trainieren wir nur nicht auf eine “korrekte” stetige Ausgabe der Nettoeingabe hin, sondern auf eine korrekte Ausgabe der Aktivierungsfunktion \phi (Phi), die uns die stetigen Werte der Nettoeingabe in einen binären Wert (z. B. 0 oder 1) umwandelt. Das Perzeptron ist die kleinste Form des künstlichen neuronalen Netzes und funktioniert wie der lineare Regressor, jedoch ergänzt um eine Aktivierungsfunktion die bewirken soll, dass ein Neuron (hier: der einzelne Output) “feuert” oder nicht “feuert”.  Es ist ein binärer Klassifikator, der beispielsweise die Wertebereiche -1 oder +1 annehmen kann.

Das Perceptron verwendet die einfachste Form der Aktivierungsfunktion: Eine Sprungfunktion, die einer einfachen if… else… Anweisung gleich kommt.

    \[ y = \phi(w^T \cdot x) = \left\{ \begin{array}{12} 1  &  w^T \cdot x > 0\\ -1 & \text{otherwise} \end{array} \]

Fazit – Unterschied zwischen Klassifikation und Regression

Mathematisch müssen sich Regression und Klassifikation gar nicht all zu sehr voneinander unterscheiden. Viele Verfahren der Klassifikation lassen sich mit nur wenig Anpassung auch zur Regression anwenden, oder umgekehrt. Künstliche neuronale Netze, k-nächste-Nachbarn und Entscheidungsbäume sind gute Beispiele, die in der Praxis sowohl für Klassifkation als auch für Regression eingesetzt werden, natürlich mit unterschiedlichen Stärken und Schwächen.

Unterschiedlich ist jedoch der Zweck der Anwendung: Bei der Regression möchten wir stetige Werte vorhersagen (z. B. Temperatur der Maschine), bei der Klassifikation hingegen Klassen unterscheiden (z. B. Maschine überhitzt oder überhitzt nicht).

Unterschiede zwischen linearer und nicht-linearer Klassifikation und linearer und nicht-linearer Regression. Für Einsteiger in diese Thematik ist beachten, dass jede maschinell erlernte Klassifikation und Regression einen gewissen Fehler hat, der unter Betrachtung der Trainings- und Testdaten zu minimieren ist, jedoch nie ganz verschwindet.

Und Clustering?

Clustering ist eine Disziplin des unüberwachten Lernens, um Gruppen von Klassen bzw. Grenzen dieser Klassen innerhalb von unbekannten Daten zu finden. Es ist im Prinzip eine untrainierte Klassifikation zum Zwecke des Data Minings. Clustering gehört auch zum maschinellen Lernen, ist aber kein Predictive Analytics. Da keine – mit dem gewünschten Ergebnis vorliegende – Trainingsdaten vorliegen, kann auch kein Training über eine Backpropagation erfolgen. Clustering ist folglich eine schwache Klassifikation, die mit den trainingsbasierten Klassifikationsverfahren nicht funktioniert.

Ensemble Learning

Stellen Sie sich vor, Sie haben die Frage Ihres Lebens vor sich. Die korrekte Beantwortung dieser Frage wird Ihr Leben positiv beeinflussen, andernfalls negativ. Aber Sie haben Glück: Sie dürfen einen Experten, den Sie auswählen dürfen, um Rat fragen oder Sie dürfen eine annonyme Gruppe, sagen wir 1.000 Personen, um Rat fragen. Welchen Rat würden Sie sich einholen? Die einzelne Experten-Meinung oder die aggriegierte Antwort einer ganzen Gruppe von Menschen?
Oder wie wäre es mit einer Gruppe von Experten?

Ensemble Learning

Beim Einsatz eines maschinellen Lernalgorithmus auf ein bestimmtes Problem kann durchaus eine angemessene Präzision (Accuracy, eine Quote an Prädiktionsergebnissen, die als korrekt einzustufen sind) erzielt werden, doch oftmals reicht die Verlässlichkeit eines einzelnen Algorithmus nicht aus. Algorithmen können mit unterschiedlichen Parametern verwendet werden, die sich bei bestimmten Daten-Situationen verschieden auswirken. Bestimmte Algorithmen neigen zur Unteranpassung (Underfitting), andere zur Überanpassung (Overfitting).

Soll Machine Learning für den produktiven Einsatz mit bestmöglicher Zuverlässigkeit entwickelt und eingesetzt werden, kommt sinnvollerweise Ensemble Learning zum Einsatz. Beim Ensemble Learning wird ein Ensemble (Kollektiv von Prädiktoren) gebildet um ein Ensemble Average (Kollektivmittelwert) zu bilden. Sollte also beispielsweise einige Klassifizierer bei bestimmten Daten-Eingaben in ihren Ergebnissen ausreißen, steuern andere Klassifizierer dagegen. Ensemble Learning kommt somit in der Hoffnung zum Einsatz, dass eine Gruppe von Algorithmen ein besseres Ergebnis im Mittel erzeugen als es ein einzelner Algorithmus könnte.

Ich spreche nachfolgend bevorzugt von Klassifizierern, jedoch kommt Ensemble Learning auch bei der Regression zum Einsatz.

Voting Classifiers (bzw. Voting Regressors)

Eine häufige Form – und i.d.R. auch als erstes Beispiel eines Ensemble Learners – ist das Prinzip der Voting Classifiers. Das Prinzip der Voting Classifiers ist eine äußerst leicht nachvollziehbare Idee des Ensemble Learnings und daher vermutlich auch eine der bekanntesten Form der Kollektivmittelwert-Bildung. Gleich vorweg: Ja, es gibt auch Voting Regressors, jedoch ist dies ein Konzept, das nicht ganz ohne umfassendere Aggregation auf oberster Ebene auskommen wird, daher wäre für die Zwecke der akkurateren Regression eher das Stacking (siehe unten) sinnvoll.

Eine häufige Frage im Data Science ist, welcher Klassifizierer für bestimmte Zwecke die besseren sind: Entscheidungsbäume, Support-Vector-Machines, k-nächste-Nachbarn oder logistische Regressionen?

Warum nicht einfach alle nutzen? In der Tat wird genau das nicht selten praktiziert. Das Ziel dieser Form des Ensemble Learnings ist leicht zu erkennen: Die unterschiedlichen Schwächen aller Algorithmen sollen sich – so die Hoffnung – gegenseitig aufheben. Alle Algorithmen (dabei können auch mehrere gleiche Algorithmen mit jedoch jeweils unterschiedlichen Paramtern gemeint sein, z. B. mehrere knN-Klassifizierer mit unterschiedlichen k-Werten und Dimensionsgewichtungen) werden auf dasselbe Problem hin trainiert.

Stacking

Bei der Prädiktion werden entweder alle Klassifizierer gleich behandelt oder unterschiedlich gewichtet (wobei größere Unterschiede der Gewichtungen unüblich, und vermutlich auch nicht sinnvoll, sind). Entsprechend einer Ensemble-Regel werden die Ergebnisse aller Klassifizierer aggregiert, bei Klassifikation durch eine Mehrheitsentscheidung, bei Regression meistens durch Durchschnittsbildung oder (beim Stacking) durch einen weiteren Regressor.

Abgesehen davon, dass wir mit dem Ensemble-Klassifizierer bzw. Regressoren vermutlich bessere Ergebnisse haben werden, haben wir nun auch eine weitere Information hinzubekommen: Eine Entropie über die Wahrscheinlichkeit. Bestenfalls haben alle Klassifizierer die gleiche Vorhersage berechnet, schlechtestensfalls haben wir ein Unentschieden. So können wir Vorhersagen in ihrer Aussagekraft bewerten. Analog kann bei Regressionen die Varianz der Ergebnisse herangezogen werden, um das Ergebnis in seiner Aussagekraft zu bewerten.

Betrachtung im Kontext von: Eine Kette ist nur so stark, wie ihr schwächstes Glied

Oft heißt es, dass Ensemble Learning zwar bessere Ergebnisse hervorbringt, als der schwächste Klassifizier in der Gruppe, aber auch schlechtere als der beste Klassifizierer. Ist Ensemble Learning also nur ein Akt der Ratlosigkeit, welcher Klassifizierer eigentlich der bessere wäre?

Ja und nein. Ensemble Learning wird tatsächlich in der Praxis dazu verwendet, einzelne Schwächen abzufangen und auch Ausreißer-Verhalten auf bisher andersartiger Daten abzuschwächen. Es ist ferner jedoch so, dass Ensemble Learner mit vielen Klassifizieren sogar bessere Vorhersagen liefern kann, als der beste Klassifizierer im Programm.

Das liegt an dem Gesetz der großen Zahlen, dass anhand eines Beispiels verdeutlicht werden kann: Bei einem (ausbalanzierten) Münzwurf liegt die Wahrscheinlichkeit bei genau 50,00% dafür, Kopf oder Zahl zu erhalten. Werfe ich die Münze beispielsweise zehn Mal, erhalte ich aber vielleicht drei Mal Kopf und sieben mal Zahl. Werfe ich sie 100 Mal, erhalte ich vielleicht 61 Mal Kopf und 39 Mal Zahl. Selbst nur 20 Mal die Zahl zu erhalten, wäre bei nur 100 Würfen gar nicht weit weg von unwahrscheinlich. Würde ich die Münze jedoch 10.000 Male werfen, würde ich den 50% schon sehr annähern, bei 10 Millionen Würfen wird sich die Verteilung ganz sicher als Gleichverteilung mit 50,0x% für Kopf oder Zahl einpendeln.

Nun stellt man sich (etwas überspitzt, da analog zu den Wünzwürfen) nun einen Ensemble Learner mit einer Gruppe von 10.000 Klassifiziern vor. Und angenommen, jeder einzelne Klassifizierer ist enorm schwach, denn eine richtige Vorhersage trifft nur mit einer Präzision von 51% zu (also kaum mehr als Glücksspiel), dann würde jedoch die Mehrheit der 10.000 Klassifizierer (nämlich 51%) richtig liegen und die Mehrheitsentscheidung in den absolut überwiegenden Fällen die korrekte Vorhersage treffen.

Was hingehen in diesem Kontext zutrifft: Prädiktionen via Ensemble Learning sind zwangsläufig langsam. Durch Parallelisierung der Klassifikation kann natürlich viel Zeit eingespart werden, dann ist das Ensemble Learning jedoch mindestens immer noch so langsam, wie der langsamste Klassifizierer.

Bagging

Ein Argument gegen den Einsatz von gänzlich verschiedenen Algortihmen ist, dass ein solcher Ensemble Learner nur schwer zu verstehen und einzuschätzen ist (übrigens ein generelles Problem im maschinellen Lernen). Bereits ein einzelner Algorithmus (z. B. Support Vector Machine) kann nach jedem Training alleine auf Basis der jeweils ausgewählten Daten (zum Training und zum Testen) recht unterschiedlich in seiner Vorhersage ausfallen.

Bagging (kurze Form von Bootstrap Aggregation) ist ein Ensemble Learning Prinzip, bei dem grundsätzlich der gleiche Algorithmus parallel mit unterschiedlichen Aufteilungen der Daten trainiert (und natürlich getestet) wird. Die Aufteilung der Daten kann dabei komplett (der vollständige Datensatz wird verteilt und verwendet) oder auch nur über Stichproben erfolgen (dann gibt es mehrfach verwendete Datenpunkte, aber auch solche, die überhaupt nicht verwendet werden). Das Ziel ist dabei insbesondere, im Endergebnis Unter- und Überanpassung zu vermeiden. Gibt es viele Dichte-Cluster und Ausreißer in den Daten, wird nicht jeder Klassifizierer sich diesen angepasst haben können. Jede Instanz der Klassifizierer erhält weitgehend unterschiedliche Daten mit eigenen Ausreißern und Dichte-Clustern, dabei darf es durchaus Überschneidungen bei der Datenaufteilung geben.

Pasting

Pasting ist fast genau wie Bagging, nur mit dem kleinen aber feinen Unterschied, dass sich die Datenaufteilung nicht überschneiden darf. Wird ein Datenpunkt durch Zufallsauswahl einem Klassifizierer zugewiesen, wird er nicht mehr für einen anderen Klassifizierer verwendet. Über die Trainingsdaten des einen Klassifizierers verfügt demnach kein anderer Klassifizierer. Die Klassifizierer sind somit völlig unabhängig voneinander trainiert, was manchmal explizit gewollt sein kann. Pasting setzt natürlich voraus, dass genug Daten vorhanden sind. Diese Voraussetzung ist gleichermaßen auch eine Antwort auf viele Probleme: Wie können große Datenmengen schnell verarbeitet werden? Durch die Aufteilung ohne Überschneidung auf parallele Knoten.

Random Forest

Random Forests sollten an dieser Stelle im Text eigentlich nicht stehen, denn sie sind ein Beispiel des parallelen Ensembles bzw. des Voting Classifiers mit Entscheidungsbäumen (Decision Trees). Random Forests möchte ich an dieser Stelle dennoch ansprechen, denn sie sind eine äußerst gängige Anwendung des Baggings oder (seltener) auch des Pastings für Entscheidungsbaumverfahren. Die Datenmenge wird durch Zufall aufgeteilt und aus jeder Aufteilung heraus wird ein Entscheidungsbaum erstellt. Eine Mehrheitsentscheidung der Klassifikationen aller Bäume ist das Ensemble Learning des Random Forests.

Random Forest ist ein Verfahren der Klassifikation oder Regression, das bereits so üblich ist, dass es mittlerweile längst in (fast) allen Machine Learning Bibliotheken implemeniert ist und – dank dieser Implementierung – in der Anwendung nicht komplizierter, als ein einzelner Entscheidungsbaum.

Stacking

Stacking ist eine Erweiterung des Voting Classifiers oder Voting Regressors um eine höhere Ebene (Blending-Level), die die beste Aggregation der Einzel-Ergebnisse erlernt. An der Spitze steht beim Stacking (mindestens) ein weiterer Klassifikator oder Regressor

Stacking ist insbesondere dann sinnvoll, wenn die Ergebnisse der einzelnen Algorithmen sehr unterschiedlich ausfallen können, was bei der Regression – da stetige Werte statt wenige Klassen – nahezu immer der Fall ist. Stacking-Algorithmen können sogar mehrere Schichten umfassen, was ihr Training wesentlich schwieriger gestaltet.

Boosting (Sequential Ensemble Learning)

Bagging, Pasting und Stacking sind parallele Verfahren des Ensemble Learning (was nicht bedeutet, dass die parallel dargestellten Algorithmen in der Praxis nicht doch sequenziell abgearbeitet werden). Zwangsweise sequenziell durchgeführt wird hingegen das Boosting, bei dem wir schwache Klassifizierer bzw. Regressoren durch Iteration in ihrem Training verstärken wollen. Boosting kann somit als eine Alternative zum Deep Learning gesehen werden. Während beim Deep Learning ein starker Algorithmus durch ein mehrschichtiges künstliches neuronales Netz dafür entworfen und trainiert wird, um ein komplexes Problem zu lösen (beispielsweise Testerkennung [OCR]), können derartige Herausforderungen auch mit schwächeren Klassifikatoren unter Einsatz von Boosting realisiert werden.

Boosting bezieht sich allein auf das Training und ist aus einer Not heraus entstanden: Wie bekommen wir bessere Prädiktionen mit einem eigentlich schwachen Lernalgorithmus, der tendenziell Unteranpassung erzeugt? Boosting ist eine Antwort auf Herausforderungen der Klassifikation oder Regression, bei der ein Algorithmus iterativ, also in mehreren Durchläufen, durch Anpassung von Gewichten trainiert wird.

Eines der bekanntesten Boosting-Verfahren ist AdaBoost. Der erste Schritt ist ein normales Training. Beim darauffolgenden Testen zeigen sich Klassifikations-/Regressionsfehler. Die fehlerhaft vorhergesagten Datenpunkte werden dann für einen nächsten Durchlauf höher gewichtet. Diese Iteration läuft einige Male, bis die Fehlerquote sich nicht mehr verbessert.

Bei AdaBoost werden falsch vorhergesagte Datensätze im jeweils nächsten Durchlauf höher gewichtet. Bei einem alternativen Boosing-Verfahren, dem Gradient Boosting (auf Basis der Gradientenmethode), werden Gewichtungen explizit in Gegenrichtung des Prädiktionsfehlers angepasst.

Was beispielsweise beim Voting Classifier der Random Forest ist, bei dem mehrere Entscheidungsbäume parallel arbeiten, sind das Äquvivalent beim Boosting die Gradient Boosted Trees, bei denen jeder Baum nur einen Teil der Daten akkurat beschreiben kann, die sequentielle Verschachtelung der Bäume jedoch auch herausfordernde Klassifikationen meistert.

Um bei dem Beispiel der Entscheidungsbäume zu bleiben: Sowohl Random Forests als auch Gradient Boosted Trees arbeiten grundsätzlich mit flachen Bäumen (schwache Klassifikatoren). Gradient Boosted Trees können durch die iterative Verstärkung generell eine höhere Präzision der Prädiktion erreichen als Random Forests, wenn die Feature- und Parameter-Auswahl bereits zu Anfang sinnvoll ist. Random Forests sind hingegen wiederum robuster bei der Feature- und Parameter-Auswahl, verstärken sich jedoch nicht gegenseitig, sondern sind in ihrem Endergebnis so gut, wie die Mehrheit der Bäume.

Buchempfehlungen

Mehr zum Thema Machine Learning und Ensemble Learning gewünscht? Folgende zwei Buchempfehlungen bieten nicht nur Erklärungen, sondern demonstrieren Ensemble Learning auch mit Beispiel-Code mit Python Scikit-Learn.

Hands-On Machine Learning with Scikit-Learn and TensorFlow: Concepts, Tools, and Techniques for Building Intelligent Systems Machine Learning mit Python: Das Praxis-Handbuch für Data Science, Predictive Analytics und Deep Learning (mitp Professional)

Aika: Ein semantisches neuronales Netzwerk

Wenn es darum geht Informationen aus natürlichsprachigen Texten zu extrahieren, stehen einem verschiedene Möglichkeiten zur Verfügung. Eine der ältesten und wohl auch am häufigsten genutzten Möglichkeiten ist die der regulären Ausdrücke. Hier werden exakte Muster definiert und in einem Textstring gematcht. Probleme bereiten diese allerdings, wenn kompliziertere semantische Muster gefunden werden sollen oder wenn verschiedene Muster aufeinander aufbauen oder miteinander interagieren sollen. Gerade das ist aber der Normalfall bei der Verarbeitung von natürlichem Text. Muster hängen voneinander ab, verstärken oder unterdrücken sich gegenseitig.
Prädestiniert um solche Beziehungen abzubilden wären eigentlich künstliche neuronale Netze. Diese haben nur das große Manko, dass sie keine strukturierten Informationen verarbeiten können. Neuronale Netze bringen von sich aus keine Möglichkeit mit, die relationalen Beziehungen zwischen Worten oder Phrasen zu verarbeiten. Ein weiteres Problem neuronaler Netze ist die Verarbeitung von Feedback-Schleifen, bei denen einzelne Neuronen von sich selbst abhängig sind. Genau diese Probleme versucht der Aika Algorithmus (www.aika-software.org) zu lösen.

Der Aika Algorithmus ist als Open Source Java-Bibliothek implementiert und dient dazu semantische Informationen in Texten zu erkennen und zu verarbeiten. Da semantische Informationen sehr häufig mehrdeutig sind, erzeugt die Bibliothek für jede dieser Bedeutungen eine eigene Interpretation und wählt zum Schluss die am höchsten gewichtete aus. Aika kombiniert dazu aktuelle Ideen und Konzepte aus den Bereichen des maschinellen Lernens und der künstlichen Intelligenz, wie etwa künstliche neuronale Netze, Frequent Pattern Mining und die auf formaler Logik basierenden Expertensysteme. Aika basiert auf der heute gängigen Architektur eines künstlichen neuronalen Netzwerks (KNN) und nutzt diese, um sprachliche Regeln und semantische Beziehungen abzubilden.

Die Knackpunkte: relationale Struktur und zyklische Abhängigkeiten

Das erste Problem: Texte haben eine von Grund auf relationale Struktur. Die einzelnen Worte stehen über ihre Reihenfolge in einer ganz bestimmten Beziehung zueinander. Gängige Methoden, um Texte für die Eingabe in ein KNN auszuflachen, sind beispielsweise Bag-of-Words oder Sliding-Window. Mittlerweile haben sich auch rekurrente neuronale Netze etabliert, die das gesamte Netz in einer Schleife für jedes Wort des Textes mehrfach hintereinander schalten. Aika geht hier allerdings einen anderen Weg. Aika propagiert die relationalen Informationen, also den Textbereich und die Wortposition, gemeinsam mit den Aktivierungen durch das Netzwerk. Die gesamte relationale Struktur des Textes bleibt also erhalten und lässt sich jederzeit zur weiteren Verarbeitung nutzen.

Das zweite Problem ist, dass bei der Verarbeitung von Text häufig nicht klar ist, in welcher Reihenfolge einzelne Informationen verarbeitet werden müssen. Wenn wir beispielsweise den Namen „August Schneider“ betrachten, können sowohl der Vor- als auch der Nachname in einem anderen Zusammenhang eine völlig andere Bedeutung annehmen. August könnte sich auch auf den Monat beziehen. Und genauso könnte Schneider eben auch den Beruf des Schneiders meinen. Einfache Regeln, um hier dennoch den Vor- und den Nachnamen zu erkennen, wären: „Wenn das nachfolgende Wort ein Nachname ist, handelt es sich bei August um einen Vornamen“ und „Wenn das vorherige Wort ein Vorname ist, dann handelt es sich bei Schneider um einen Nachnamen“. Das Problem dabei ist nur, dass unsere Regeln nun eine zyklische Abhängigkeit beinhalten. Aber ist das wirklich so schlimm? Aika erlaubt es, genau solche Feedback-Schleifen abzubilden. Wobei die Schleifen sowohl positive, als auch negative Gewichte haben können. Negative rekurrente Synapsen führen dazu, dass zwei sich gegenseitig ausschließende Interpretationen entstehen. Der Trick ist nun zunächst nur Annahmen zu treffen, also etwa dass es sich bei dem Wort „Schneider“ um den Beruf handelt und zu schauen wie das Netzwerk auf diese Annahme reagiert. Es bedarf also einer Evaluationsfunktion und einer Suche, die die Annahmen immer weiter variiert, bis schließlich eine optimale Interpretation des Textes gefunden ist. Genau wie schon der Textbereich und die Wortposition werden nun auch die Annahmen gemeinsam mit den Aktivierungen durch das Netzwerk propagiert.

Die zwei Ebenen des Aika Algorithmus

Aber wie lassen sich diese Informationen mit den Aktivierungen durch das Netzwerk propagieren, wo doch der Aktivierungswert eines Neurons für gewöhnlich nur eine Fließkommazahl ist? Genau hier liegt der Grund, weshalb Aika unter der neuronalen Ebene mit ihren Neuronen und kontinuierlich gewichteten Synapsen noch eine diskrete Ebene besitzt, in der es eine Darstellung aller Neuronen in boolscher Logik gibt. Aika verwendet als Aktivierungsfunktion die obere Hälfte der Tanh-Funktion. Alle negativen Werte werden auf 0 gesetzt und führen zu keiner Aktivierung des Neurons. Es gibt also einen klaren Schwellenwert, der zwischen aktiven und inaktiven Neuronen unterscheidet. Anhand dieses Schwellenwertes lassen sich die Gewichte der einzelnen Synapsen in boolsche Logik übersetzen und entlang der Gatter dieser Logik kann nun ein Aktivierungsobjekt mit den Informationen durch das Netzwerk propagiert werden. So verbindet Aika seine diskrete bzw. symbolische Ebene mit seiner subsymbolischen Ebene aus kontinuierlichen Synapsen-Gewichten.

Die Logik Ebene in Aika erlaubt außerdem einen enormen Effizienzgewinn im Vergleich zu einem herkömmlichen KNN, da die gewichtete Summe von Neuronen nur noch für solche Neuronen berechnet werden muss, die vorher durch die Logikebene aktiviert wurden. Im Falle eines UND-verknüpfenden Neurons bedeutet das, dass das Aktivierungsobjekt zunächst mehrere Ebenen einer Lattice-Datenstruktur aus UND-Knoten durchlaufen muss, bevor das eigentliche Neuron berechnet und aktiviert werden kann. Diese Lattice-Datenstruktur stammt aus dem Bereich des Frequent Pattern Mining und enthält in einem gerichteten azyklischen Graphen alle Teilmuster eines beliebigen größeren Musters. Ein solches Frequent Pattern Lattice kann in zwei Richtungen betrieben werden. Zum Einen können damit bereits bekannte Muster gematcht werden, und zum Anderen können auch völlig neue Muster damit erzeugt werden.

Da es schwierig ist Netze mit Millionen von Neuronen im Speicher zu halten, nutzt Aika das Provider Architekturpattern um selten verwendete Neuronen oder Logikknoten in einen externen Datenspeicher (z.B. eine Mongo DB) auszulagern, und bei Bedarf nachzuladen.

Ein Beispielneuron

Hier soll nun noch beispielhaft gezeigt werden wie ein Neuron innerhalb des semantischen Netzes angelegt werden kann. Zu beachten ist, dass Neuronen sowohl UND- als auch ODER-Verknüpfungen abbilden können. Das Verhalten hängt dabei alleine vom gewählten Bias ab. Liegt der Bias bei 0.0 oder einem nur schwach negativen Wert reicht schon die Aktivierung eines positiven Inputs aus um auch das aktuelle Neuron zu aktivieren. Es handelt sich dann um eine ODER-Verknüpfung. Liegt der Bias hingegen tiefer im negativen Bereich dann müssen mitunter mehrere positive Inputs gleichzeitig aktiviert werden damit das aktuelle Neuron dann auch aktiv wird. Jetzt handelt es sich dann um eine UND-Verknüpfung. Der Bias Wert kann der initNeuron einfach als Parameter übergeben werden. Um jedoch die Berechnung des Bias zu erleichtern bietet Aika bei den Inputs noch den Parameter BiasDelta an. Der Parameter BiasDelta nimmt einen Wert zwischen 0.0 und 1.0 entgegen. Bei 0.0 wirkt sich der Parameter gar nicht aus. Bei einem höheren Wert hingegen wird er mit dem Betrag des Synapsengewichts multipliziert und von dem Bias abgezogen. Der Gesamtbias lautet in diesem Beispiel also -55.0. Die beiden positiven Eingabesynapsen müssen also aktiviert werden und die negative Eingabesynapse darf nicht aktiviert werden, damit dieses Neuron selber aktiv werden kann. Das Zusammenspiel von Bias und Synpasengewichten ist aber nicht nur für die Aktivierung eines Neurons wichtig, sondern auch für die spätere Auswahl der finalen Interpretation. Je stärker die Aktivierungen innerhalb einer Interpretation aktiv sind, desto höher wird diese Interpretation gewichtet.
Um eine beliebige Graphstruktur abbilden zu können, trennt Aika das Anlegen der Neuronen von der Verknüpfung mit anderen Neuronen. Mit createNeuron(“E-Schneider (Nachname)”) wird also zunächst einmal ein unverknüpftes Neuron erzeugt, das dann über die initNeuron Funktion mit den Eingabeneuronen wortSchneiderNeuron, kategorieVornameNeuron und unterdrueckendesNeuron verknüpft wird. Über den Parameter RelativeRid wird hier angegeben auf welche relative Wortposition sich die Eingabesynapse bezieht. Die Eingabesynpase zu der Kategorie Vorname bezieht sich also mit -1 auf die vorherige Wortposition. Der Parameter Recurrent gibt an ob es sich bei dieser Synpase um eine Feedback-Schleife handelt. Über den Parameter RangeMatch wird angegeben wie sich der Textbereich, also die Start- und die Endposition zwischen der Eingabe- und der Ausgabeaktivierung verhält. Bei EQUALS sollen die Bereiche also genau übereinstimmen, bei CONTAINED_IN reicht es hingegen wenn der Bereich der Eingabeaktivierung innerhalb des Bereichs der Ausgabeaktivierung liegt. Dann kann noch über den Parameter RangeOutput angegeben werden, dass der Bereich der Eingabeaktivierung an die Ausgabeaktivierung weiterpropagiert werden soll.

Fazit

Mit Aika können sehr flexibel umfangreiche semantische Modelle erzeugt und verarbeitet werden. Aus Begriffslisten verschiedener Kategorien, wie etwa: Vor- und Nachnamen, Orten, Berufen, Strassen, grammatikalischen Worttypen usw. können automatisch Neuronen generiert werden. Diese können dann dazu genutzt werden, Worte und Phrasen zu erkennen, einzelnen Begriffen eine Bedeutung zuzuordnen oder die Kategorie eines Begriffs zu bestimmen. Falls in dem zu verarbeitenden Text mehrdeutige Begriffe oder Phrasen auftauchen, kann Aika für diese jeweils eigene Interpretationen erzeugen und gewichten. Die sinnvollste Interpretation wird dann als Ergebnis zurück geliefert.

Ways AI & ML Are Changing How We Live

From Amazon’s Alexa, a personal assistant that can do anything from making your to-do list to giving a wide range of real-time information about the world around you, to Google’s DeepMind that has very recently made headlines for possibly being able to predict the future, AI and ML are the biggest development in human history.

Machine Learning Used by Hospitals

We hear a lot about Artificial Intelligence (AI) in the realm of insurance Big Data, but there isn’t much buzz around how AI and ML are revolutionising hospitals. The national health expenditures were around $3.4 trillion and estimated to increase from 17.8 percent of GDP to 19.9 percent between 2015 and 2025. By 2021, industry analysts have predicted that the AI health market will reach $6.6 billion. By 2026, such increases in AI technology in the healthcare sector will save the economy around $150 billion annually.

Some of the most popular Artificial Intelligence applications used in hospitals now are:

  • Predictive Health Trackers – Technology that has the ability to monitor patients’ health status using real-time data collection. One such technology is the Health and Environmental Tracker (HET) which can predict if someone is about to have an asthma attack.
  • Chatbots – It isn’t only retail customer service that uses chatbots to deal with consumers. Now hospitals have automated physicians that inquire and route clinicians to the right specialists.
  • Predictive AnalyticsCleveland Clinics have partnered with Microsoft (Cortana) while John Hopkins has partnered up with GE in order to create Machine Learning technology that has the ability to monitor patients and prevent patient emergencies before they happen. It does this by analysing data for primary indicators of potential risks.

Cognitive Marketing – Content Marketing on Steroids

Customer experience and content marketing are terms often tossed around in the world of business and advertising these days. Why do we bring them up now, you ask? Well, things are about to be kicked into sixth gear, thanks to Cognitive Marketing. To explain what that is, let’s go back a bit: remember when Google’s DeepMind AlphaGo bested the top human player at the game? This wasn’t some computer beating a bored office clerk at the game of Solitaire. In order to achieve that victory, Google’s AI had to “actually show its cognitive capability to ‘think’ like humans, because to win the game, ‘intuition’ was needed rather than just ‘logical reasoning’.” Similar algorithm-powered AI’s are enabling machines to learn and grow on their own. Soon, they’ll reach the potential to create content for marketeers at a massive scale. Not only that, but they’ll always deliver the right content, to the right kind of audience, at just the right time.

More Ways Than One: How Retail Is Harnessing AI & ML

  1. Developing Store That Don’t Need Checkout Lines

Tech companies and online retail giants such as Amazon want to create cashier-free stores, at least they are trying to. Last year Amazon launched its Amazon Go which uses sensors and hundreds of cameras to track what customers pick up and then charge the amount to an application on their smart phone, put simply. But only months into the experiment Amazon has said they need to work out some kinks in the system. As of now, Amazon Go’s system can only handle 20 or so customers at a time.

Among other issues, The Guardian, citing an unnamed source, wrote in an article, stated “…if an item has been moved from its specific spot on the shelf.”  Located in Seattle, Washington, Amazon Go is now running in “beta mode” only for Amazon employees as it tests its systems. And these tests are showing that Amazon’s attempt at a cashier-free brick-and-mortar convenience store is far from ready for the real world. A Journal report stated, “For now, the technology functions flawlessly only if there are a small number of customers present, or when their movements are slow.”

  1. Could Drones Be Delivering Goods to Your Home One Day?

Imagine ordering something online from, let’s say, Amazon, and it arrives at your door in 30 minutes or so via drone. Does that sound like something out of the movie The Fifth Element? Maybe, but this technology is already is already here.

Amazon Prime Air made its first delivery to a customer via a GPS-guided flying drone on December 7th, 2016. It only took 13 minutes for the drone to deliver the merchandise to the customer. This sort of technology will be a huge game changer for retail. The supply chain industry is headed for a revolution – drone delivery is coming, and retailers who want to keep up really should adopt such technologies.

Even in 2016, consumers were totally ready to accept drone delivery. The Walk Sands Future of Retail 2016 Study showed that 79 percent of US consumers said they would be “very likely” or “somewhat likely” to choose drone delivery if their product could be delivered within an hour. For me, I’d choose it just to see how cool it was. I think it would be pretty rad to have a drone land in my yard with my package, don’t you? Furthermore, other consumers stated they would pay up to $10 for a drone delivery. Lastly, 26 percent of consumers are already expecting to have their packages delivered to them in the next two years or so.

Driverless Delivery Vehicles Already Here as Well

There was a movie I watched some months ago – you most likely heard of it or even watched it. It was the latest movie about Wolverine titled Logan. There was a certain scene that never left my memory (basically because I found it awesome) where Logan and his companions were driving along a freeway full of driverless tractor trailers that had no tractor.

In an article written for pastemagazine.com, Carlos Alvarez of Getty wrote: “… Logan’s writer and director James Mangold’s inclusion of the self-driving trucking machines make it clear that the filmmaker understands the writing on the wall about the future of shipping. It’s a future without truck drivers.” He continues to explain that the movie takes place a little over 10 years from now in 2029.

“The change may well be here long before 2029. It’s only 2017, and already we’re seeing the beginnings of automated trucking taking over the industry. At the 2017 Consumer Electronics Show this January, Peloton Technology demonstrated “platooning,” where trucks are kept in a row on the highway to reduce wind resistance and save fuel. The trucks are controlled by computers on a “Level One” of autonomous driving,” Alvarez continued in his article.

Now in Germany, Mercedes-Benz is has been developing and testing their Actros truck which is fitted with a ‘highway pilot’ system, which acts like an auto-pilot and includes a radar and stereo camera system. So far, German carmaker Daimler has restricted testing on a German autobahn. The autobahn is generally safer than testing in city conditions since the curves are not as steep. Since the tests have started, this autonomous truck has already driven over 20,000 kilometres.

Did I Say Flying Taxis? Huh, Yeah I Did!

But, if you are still not amazed, then I am about to blow your socks off. Dubai has promised to build a fully autonomous public transportation system by 2030, including autonomous flying drone taxis! Now that is really something. And it isn’t a matter of when they’ll be produced and in use because they already are.

Manufactured in China by the drone-making firm EHang, these really freaking cool quad drones on steroids can carry one person weighing up to 100 kilogrammes (I weigh over that, guess I’m walking) plus maybe a backpack or suitcase. They can fly about 30 kilometres (or 19 miles), at a speed of 60 miles per hour, give or take. And, if that isn’t the cool part, you won’t need any lessons on how to fly it. Simply push a button and it flies you from point A to point B. Whether or not you have to give it directions, don’t know. Either way, this is mostly likely the coolest piece of tech out there right now.

Copyright @ CBS Interactive Inc.

Was ist eigentlich Machine Learning? Artikelserie

Machine Learning ist Technik und Mythos zugleich. Nachfolgend der Versuch einer verständlichen Erklärung, mit folgenden Artikeln:

Machine Learning ist nicht neu, aber innovativ!

Machine Learning oder maschinelles Lernen ist eine Bezeichnung, die dank industrieller Trends wie der Industrie 4.0, Smart Grid oder dem autonomen Fahrzeug zur neuen Blüte verhilft. Machine Learning ist nichts Neues und die Algorithmen sind teilweise mehrere Jahrzehnte alt. Dennoch ist Machine Learning ein Innovationsinstrument, denn während früher nur abstrakte Anwendungen, mit vornehmlich wissenschaftlichen Hintergrund, auf maschinellem Lernen setzten, finden entsprechende Algorithmen Einzug in alltägliche industrielle bzw. geschäftliche, medizinische und gesellschaftsorientierte Anwendungen. Machine Learning erhöht demnach sowohl unseren Lebensstandard als auch unsere Lebenserwartung!

Maschinelles Lernen vs künstliche Intelligenz

Künstliche Intelligenz (Artificial Intelligence) ist eine Bezeichnung, die in der Wissenschaft immer noch viel diskutiert wird. Wo beginnt künstliche Intelligenz, wann entsteht natürliche Intelligenz und was ist Intelligenz überhaupt? Wenn diese Wortkombination künstliche Intelligenz fällt, denken die meisten Zuhörer an Filme wie Terminator von James Cameron oder AI von Steven Spielberg. Diese Filme wecken Erwartungen (und Ängste), denen wir mir unseren selbstlernenden Systemen noch lange nicht gerecht werden können. Von künstlicher Intelligenz sollte als mit Bedacht gesprochen werden.

Maschinelles Lernen ist Teilgebiet der künstlichen Intelligenz und eine Sammlung von mathematischen Verfahren zur Mustererkennung, die entweder über generelle Prinzipien (das Finden von Gemeinsamkeiten oder relativen Abgrenzungen) funktioniert [unüberwachtes Lernen] oder durch das Bilden eines Algorithmus als Bindeglied zwischen Input und gewünschten Output aus Trainingsdaten heraus.

Machine Learning vs Deep Learning

Deep Learning ist eine spezielle Form des maschinellen Lernens, die vermutlich in den kommenden Jahren zum Standard werden wird. Gemeint sind damit künstliche neuronale Netze, manchmal auch verschachtelte “herkömmliche” Verfahren, die zum einen mehrere Ebenen bilden (verborgene Schichten eines neuronalen Netzes) zum anderen viel komplexere Zusammenhänge erlernen können, was den Begriff Deep Learning rechtfertigt.

Machine Learning vs Data Mining

Data Mining bezeichnet die Erkenntnisgewinnung aus bisher nicht oder nicht hinreichend erforschter Daten. Unüberwachte Verfahren des maschinellen Lernens, dazu gehören einige Verfahren aus dem Clustering und der Dimensionsreduktion, dienen explizit dem Zweck des Data Minings. Es sind Verfahren, die uns Menschen dabei helfen, vielfältige und große Datenmengen leichter interpretieren zu können. Machine Learning ermöglicht jedoch noch weit mehr als Data Mining.

Scikit-Learn Machine Learning Roadmap

Darstellung der vier Gebiete des Machine Learning: Die scikit-learn-Roadmap. Die Darstellung ist nicht vollständig, sondern umfasst nur die in scikit-learn implementierten Verfahren. Das Original-Bild ist interaktiv und zu finden auf scikit-learn.org

Geht mit Künstlicher Intelligenz nur „Malen nach Zahlen“?

Mit diesem Beitrag möchte ich darlegen, welche Grenzen uns in komplexen Umfeldern im Kontext Steuerung und Regelung auferlegt sind. Auf dieser Basis strebe ich dann nachgelagert eine Differenzierung in Bezug des Einsatzes von Data Science und Big Data, ab sofort mit Big Data Analytics bezeichnet, an. Aus meiner Sicht wird oft zu unreflektiert über Data Science und Künstliche Intelligenz diskutiert, was nicht zuletzt die Angst vor Maschinen schürt.

Basis meiner Ausführungen im ersten Part meines Beitrages ist der Kategorienfehler, der von uns Menschen immer wieder in Bezug auf Kompliziertheit und Komplexität vollführt wird. Deshalb werde ich am Anfang einige Worte über Kompliziertheit und Komplexität verlieren und dabei vor allem auf die markanten Unterschiede eingehen.

Kompliziertheit und Komplexität – der Versuch einer Versöhnung

Ich benutze oft die Begriffe „tot“ und „lebendig“ im Kontext von Kompliziertheit und Komplexität. Themenstellungen in „lebendigen“ Kontexten können niemals kompliziert sein. Sie sind immer komplex. Themenstellungen in „toten“ Kontexten sind stets kompliziert. Das möchte ich am Beispiel eines Uhrmachers erläutern, um zu verdeutlichen, dass auch Menschen in „toten“ Kontexten involviert sein können, obwohl sie selber lebendig sind. Deshalb die Begriffe „tot“ und „lebendig“ auch in Anführungszeichen.

Ein Uhrmacher baut eine Uhr zusammen. Dafür gibt es ein ganz klar vorgegebenes Rezept, welches vielleicht 300 Schritte beinhaltet, die in einer ganz bestimmten Reihenfolge abgearbeitet werden müssen. Werden diese Schritte befolgt, wird definitiv eine funktionierende Uhr heraus kommen. Ist der Uhrmacher geübt, hat er also genügend praktisches Wissen, ist diese Aufgabe für ihn einfach. Für mich als Ungelernten wird diese Übung schwierig sein, niemals komplex, denn ich kann ja einen Plan befolgen. Mit Übung bin ich vielleicht irgendwann so weit, dass ich diese Uhr zusammen gesetzt bekomme. Der Bauplan ist fix und ändert sich nicht. Man spricht hier von Monokontexturalität. Solche Tätigkeiten könnte man auch von Maschinen ausführen lassen, da klar definierte Abfolgen von Schritten programmierbar sind.

Nun stellen wir uns aber mal vor, dass eine Schraube fehlt. Ein Zahnrad kann nicht befestigt werden. Hier würde die Maschine einen Fehler melden, weil jetzt der Kontext verlassen wird. Das Fehlen der Schraube ist nicht Bestandteil des Kontextes, da es nicht Bestandteil des Planes und damit auch nicht Bestandteil des Programmcodes ist. Die Maschine weiß deshalb nicht, was zu tun ist. Der Uhrmacher ist in der Lage den Kontext zu wechseln. Er könnte nach anderen Möglichkeiten der Befestigung suchen oder theoretisch probieren, ob die Uhr auch ohne Zahnrad funktioniert oder er könnte ganz einfach eine Schraube bestellen und später den Vorgang fortsetzen. Der Uhrmacher kann polykontextural denken und handeln. In diesem Fall wird dann der komplizierte Kontext ein komplexer. Der Bauplan ist nicht mehr gültig, denn Bestellung einer Schraube war in diesem nicht enthalten. Deshalb meldet die Maschine einen Fehler. Der Bestellvorgang müsste von einem Menschen in Form von Programmcode voraus gedacht werden, so dass die Maschine diesen anstoßen könnte. Damit wäre diese Option dann wieder Bestandteil des monokontexturalen Bereiches, in dem die Maschine agieren kann.

Kommen wir in diesem Zusammenhang zum Messen und Wahrnehmen. Maschinen können messen. Messen passiert in monokontexturalen Umgebungen. Die Maschine kann messen, ob die Schraube festgezogen ist, die das Zahnrad hält: Die Schraube ist „fest“ oder „lose“. Im Falle des Fehlens der Schraube verlässt man die Ebene des Messens und geht in die Ebene der Wahrnehmung über. Die Maschine kann nicht wahrnehmen, der Uhrmacher schon. Beim Wahrnehmen muss man den Kontext erst einmal bestimmen, da dieser nicht per se gegeben sein kann. „Die Schraube fehlt“ setzt die Maschine in den Kontext „ENTWEDER fest ODER lose“ und dann ist Schluss. Die Maschine würde stetig zwischen „fest“ und „lose“ iterieren und niemals zum Ende gelangen. Eine endlose Schleife, die mit einem Fehler abgebrochen werden muss. Der Uhrmacher kann nach weiteren Möglichkeiten suchen, was gleichbedeutend mit dem Suchen nach einem weiteren Kontext ist. Er kann vielleicht eine neue Schraube suchen oder versuchen das Zahnrad irgendwie anders geartet zu befestigen.

In „toten“ Umgebungen ist der Mensch mit der Umwelt eins geworden. Er ist trivialisiert. Das ist nicht despektierlich gemeint. Diese Trivialisierung ist ausreichend, da ein Rezept in Form eines Algorithmus vorliegt, welcher zielführend ist. Wahrnehmen ist also nicht notwendig, da kein Kontextwechsel vorgenommen werden muss. Messen reicht aus.

In einer komplexen und damit „lebendigen“ Welt gilt das Motto „Sowohl-Als-Auch“, da hier stetig der Kontext gewechselt wird. Das bedeutet Widersprüchlichkeiten handhaben zu müssen. Komplizierte Umgebungen kennen ausschließlich ein „Entweder-Oder“. Damit existieren in komplizierten Umgebungen auch keine Widersprüche. Komplizierte Sachverhalte können vollständig in Programmcode oder Algorithmen geschrieben und damit vollständig formallogisch kontrolliert werden. Bei komplexen Umgebungen funktioniert das nicht, da unsere Zweiwertige Logik, auf die jeder Programmcode basieren muss, Widersprüche und damit Polykontexturalität ausschließen. Komplexität ist nicht kontrollier-, sondern bestenfalls handhabbar.

Diese Erkenntnisse möchte ich nun nutzen, um das bekannte Cynefin Modell von Dave Snowden zu erweitern, da dieses in der ursprünglichen Form zu Kategorienfehler zwischen Kompliziertheit und Komplexität verleitet. Nach dem Cynefin Modell werden die Kategorien „einfach“, „kompliziert“ und „komplex“ auf einer Ebene platziert. Das ist aus meiner Sicht nicht passfähig. Die Einstufung „einfach“ und damit auch „schwierig“, die es im Modell nicht gibt, existiert eine Ebene höher in beiden Kategorien, „kompliziert“ und „komplex“. „Einfach“ ist also nicht gleich „einfach“.

„Einfach“ in der Kategorie „kompliziert“ bedeutet, dass das ausreichende Wissen, sowohl praktisch als auch theoretisch, gegeben ist, um eine komplizierte Fragestellung zu lösen. Grundsätzlich ist ein Lösungsweg vorhanden, den man theoretisch kennen und praktisch anwenden muss. Wird eine komplizierte Fragestellung als „schwierig“ eingestuft, ist der vorliegende Lösungsweg nicht bekannt, aber grundsätzlich vorhanden. Er muss erlernt werden, sowohl praktisch als auch theoretisch. In der Kategorie „kompliziert“ rede ich also von Methoden oder Algorithmen, die an den bekannten Lösungsweg an-gelehnt sind.

Für „komplexe“ Fragestellungen kann per Definition kein Wissen existieren, welches in Form eines Rezeptes zu einem Lösungsweg geformt werden kann. Hier sind Erfahrung, Talent und Können essentiell, die Agilität im jeweiligen Kontext erhöhen. Je größer oder kleiner Erfahrung und Talent sind, spreche ich dann von den Wertungen „einfach“, „schwierig“ oder „chaotisch“. Da kein Rezept gegeben ist, kann man Lösungswege auch nicht vorweg in Form von Algorithmen programmieren. Hier sind Frameworks und Heuristiken angebracht, die genügend Freiraum für das eigene Denken und Fühlen lassen.

Die untere Abbildung stellt die Abhängigkeiten und damit die Erweiterung des Cynefin Modells dar.

Data Science und „lebendige“ Kontexte – der Versuch einer Versöhnung

Gerade beim Einsatz von Big Data Analytics sind wir dem im ersten Part angesprochenen Kategorienfehler erlegen, was mich letztlich zu einer differenzierten Sichtweise auf Big Data Analytics verleitet. Darauf komme ich nun zu sprechen.

In vielen Artikeln, Berichten und Büchern wird Big Data Analytics glorifiziert. Es gibt wenige Autoren, die eine differenzierte Betrachtung anstreben. Damit meine ich, klare Grenzen von Big Data Analytics, insbesondere in Bezug zum Einsatz auf Menschen, aufzuzeigen, um damit einen erfolgreichen Einsatz erst zu ermöglichen. Auch viele unserer Hirnforscher tragen einen erheblichen Anteil zum Manifestieren des Kategorienfehlers bei, da sie glauben, Wirkmechanismen zwischen der materiellen und der seelischen Welt erkundet zu haben. Unser Gehirn erzeugt aus dem Feuern von Neuronen, also aus Quantitäten, Qualitäten, wie „Ich liebe“ oder „Ich hasse“. Wie das funktioniert ist bislang unbekannt. Man kann nicht mit Algorithmen aus der komplizierten Welt Sachverhalte der komplexen Welt erklären. Die Algorithmen setzen auf der Zweiwertigen Logik auf und diese lässt keine Kontextwechsel zu. Ich habe diesen Fakt ja im ersten Teil eingehend an der Unterscheidung zwischen Kompliziertheit und Komplexität dargelegt.

Es gibt aber auch erfreulicherweise, leider noch zu wenige, Menschen, die diesen Fakt erkennen und thematisieren. Ich spreche hier stellvertretend Prof. Harald Walach an und zitiere aus seinem Artikel »Sowohl als auch« statt »Entweder-oder« – oder: wie man Kategorienfehler vermeidet.

„Die Wirklichkeit als Ganzes ist komplexer und lässt sich genau nicht mit solchen logischen Instrumenten komplett analysieren. … Weil unser Überleben als Art davon abhängig war, dass wir diesen logischen Operator so gut ausgeprägt haben ist die Gefahr groß dass wir nun alles so behandeln. … Mit Logik können wir nicht alle Probleme des Lebens lösen. … Geist und neuronale Entladungen sind Prozesse, die unterschiedlichen kategorialen Ebenen angehören, so ähnlich wie „blau“ und „laut“.

Aus diesen Überlegungen habe ich eine Big Data Analytics Matrix angefertigt, mit welcher man einen Einsatz von Big Data Analytics auf Menschen, also in „lebendige“ Kontexte, verorten kann.

Die Matrix hat zwei Achsen. Die x-Achse stellt dar, auf welcher Basis, einzelne oder viele Menschen, Erkenntnisse direkt aus Daten und den darauf aufsetzenden Algorithmen gezogen werden sollen. Die y-Achse bildet ab, auf welcher Basis, einzelne oder viele Menschen, diese gewonnenen Erkenntnisse dann angewendet werden sollen. Um diese Unterteilung anschaulicher zu gestalten, habe ich in den jeweiligen Quadranten Beispiele eines möglichen Einsatzes von Big Data Analytics im Kontext Handel zugefügt.

An der Matrix erkennen wir, dass wir auf Basis von einzelnen Individuen keine Erkenntnisse maschinell über Algorithmen errechnen können. Tun wir das, begehen wir den von mir angesprochenen Kategorienfehler zwischen Kompliziertheit und Komplexität. In diesem Fall kennzeichne ich den gesamten linken roten Bereich der Matrix. Anwendungsfälle, die man gerne in diesen Bereich platzieren möchte, muss man über die anderen beiden gelben Quadranten der Matrix lösen.

Für das Lösen von Anwendungsfällen innerhalb der beiden gelben Quadranten kann man sich den Fakt zu Nutze machen, dass sich komplexe Vorgänge oft durch einfache Handlungsvorschriften beschreiben lassen. Achtung! Hier bitte nicht dem Versuch erlegen sein, „einfach“ und „einfach“ zu verwechseln. Ich habe im ersten Teil bereits ausgeführt, dass es sowohl in der Kategorie „kompliziert“, als auch in der Kategorie „komplex“, einfache Sachverhalte gibt, die aber nicht miteinander ob ihrer Schwierigkeitsstufe verglichen werden dürfen. Tut man es, dann, ja sie wissen schon: Kategorienfehler. Es ist ähnlich zu der Fragestellung: “Welche Farbe ist größer, blau oder rot?” Für Details hierzu verweise ich Sie gerne auf meinen Beitrag Komplexitäten entstehen aus Einfachheiten, sind aber schwer zu handhaben.

Möchten sie mehr zu der Big Data Analytics Matrix und den möglichen Einsätzen er-fahren, muss ich sie hier ebenfalls auf einen Beitrag von mir verweisen, da diese Ausführungen diesen Beitrag im Inhalt sprengen würden.

Mensch und Maschine – der Versuch einer Versöhnung

Wie Ihnen sicherlich bereits aufgefallen ist, enthält die Big Data Analytics Matrix keinen grünen Bereich. Den Grund dafür habe ich versucht, in diesem Beitrag aus meiner Sicht zu untermauern. Algorithmen, die stets monokontextural aufgebaut sein müssen, können nur mit größter Vorsicht im „lebendigen“ Kontext angewendet werden.

Erste Berührungspunkte in diesem Thema habe ich im Jahre 1999 mit dem Schreiben meiner Diplomarbeit erlangt. Die Firma, in welcher ich meine Arbeit verfasst habe, hat eine Maschine entwickelt, die aufgenommene Bilder aus Blitzgeräten im Straßenverkehr automatisch durchzieht, archiviert und daraus Mahnschreiben generiert. Ein Problem dabei war das Erkennen der Nummernschilder, vor allem wenn diese verschmutzt waren. Hier kam ich ins Spiel. Ich habe im Rahmen meiner Diplomarbeit ein Lernverfahren für ein Künstlich Neuronales Netz (KNN) programmiert, welches genau für diese Bilderkennung eingesetzt wurde. Dieses Lernverfahren setzte auf der Backpropagation auf und funktionierte auch sehr gut. Das Modell lag im grünen Bereich, da nichts in Bezug auf den Menschen optimiert werden sollte. Es ging einzig und allein um Bilderkennung, also einem „toten“ Kontext.

Diese Begebenheit war der Startpunkt für mich, kritisch die Strömungen rund um die Künstliche Intelligenz, vor allem im Kontext der Modellierung von Lebendigkeit, zu erforschen. Einige Erkenntnisse habe ich in diesem Beitrag formuliert.