Posts

Accelerate your AI Skills Today: A Million Dollar Job!

The skyrocketing salaries ($1m per year) of AI engineers is not a hype. It is the fact of current corporate world, where you will witness a shift that is inevitable.

We’ve already set our feet at the edge of the technological revolution. A revolution that is at the verge of altering the way we live and work. As the fact suggests, humanity has fundamentally developed human production in three revolutions, and we’re now entering the fourth revolution. In its scope, the fourth revolution projects a transformation that is unlike anything we humans have ever experienced.

  • The first revolution had the world transformed from rural to urban
  • the emergence of mass production in the second revolution
  • third introduced the digital revolution
  • The fourth industrial revolution is anxious to integrate technologies into our lives.

And all thanks to artificial intelligence (AI). An advanced technology that surrounds us, from virtual assistants to software that translates to self-driving cars.

The rise of AI at an exponential rate has disrupted almost every industry. So much so that AI is being rated as one-million-dollar profession.

Did this grab your attention? It did?

Now, what if we were to tell you that the salary compensation for AI experts has grown dramatically. AI and machine learning are fields that have a mountain of demand in the tech industry today but has sparse supply.

AI field is growing at a quicker pace and salaries are skyrocketing! Read it for yourself to know what AI experts, AI researchers and any other AI talent are commanding today.

  • A top-class AI research laboratory, OpenAI says that techies in the AI field are projected to earn a salary compensation ranging between $300 to $500k for fresh graduates. However, expert professionals could earn anywhere up to $1m.
  • Whopping salary package of above 100 million yen that amounts to $1m is being offered to AI geniuses by a Japanese firm, Start Today. A firm that operates a fashion shopping website named Zozotown.

Does this leave you with a question – Is this a right opportunity for you to jump in the field and make hay while the sun is shining? 

And the answer to this question is – yes, it is the right opportunity for any developer seeking a role in the AI industry. It can be your chance to bridge the skill shortage in the AI field either by upskilling or reskilling yourself in the field of AI.

There are a wide varieties of roles available for an AI enthusiast like you. And certain areas are like AI Engineers and AI Researchers are high in demand, as there are not many professionals who have robust AI knowledge.

According to a job report, “The Future of Jobs 2018,” a prediction was made suggesting that machines and algorithms will create around 133 million new job roles by 2022.

AI and machine learning will dominate the tech world. The World Economic Forum says that several sectors have started embracing AI and machine learning to tackle challenges in certain fields such as advertising, supply chain, manufacturing, smart cities, drones, and cybersecurity.

Unraveling the AI realm

From chatbots to financial planners, AI is impacting the way businesses function on a day-today basis. AI makes the work simpler, as it provides variables, which makes the work more streamlined.

Alright! You know that

  • the demand for AI professionals is rising exponentially and that there is just a trickle of supply
  • the AI professionals are demanding skyrocketing salaries

However, beyond that how much more do you know about AI?

Considering the fact that our lives have already been touched by AI (think Alexa, and Siri), it is just a matter of time when AI will become an indispensable part of our lives.

As Gartner predicts that 2020 will be an important year for business growth in AI. Thus, it is possible to witness significant sparks for employment growth. Though AI predicts to diminish 1.8 million jobs, it is also said to replace it with 2.3 million jobs that will be created. As we look forward to stepping into 2020, AI-related job roles are set to make positive progress of achieving 2 million net-new employments by 2025.

With AI promising to score fat paychecks that would reach millions, AI experts are struggling to find new ways to pick up nouveau skills. However, one of the biggest impacts that affect the job market today is the scarcity of talent in this field.

The best way to stay relevant and employable in AI is probably by “reskilling,” and “upskilling.” And  AI certifications is considered ideal for those in the current workforce.

Looking to upskill yourself – here’s how you can become an AI engineer today.

Top three ways to enhance your artificial intelligence career:

  1. Acquire skills in Statistics and Machine Learning: If you’re getting into the field of machine learning, it is crucial that you have in-depth knowledge of statistics. Statistics is considered a prerequisite to the ML field. Both the fields are tightly related. Machine learning models are created to make accurate predictions while statistical models do the job of interpreting the relationship between variables. Many ML techniques heavily rely on the theory obtained through statistics. Thus, having extensive knowledge in statistics help initiate the first step towards an AI career.
  2. Online certification programs in AI skills: Opting for AI certifications will boost your credibility amongst potential employers. Certifications will also enhance your earning potential and increase your marketability. If you’re looking for a change and to be a part of something impactful; join the AI bandwagon. The IT industry is growing at breakneck speed; it is now that businesses are realizing how important it is to hire professionals with certain skillsets. Specifically, those who are certified in AI are becoming sought after in the job market.
  3. Hands-on experience: There’s a vast difference in theory and practical knowledge. One needs to familiarize themselves with the latest tools and technologies used by the industry. This is possible only if the individual is willing to work on projects and build things from scratch.

Despite all the promises, AI does prove to be a threat to job holders, if they don’t upskill or reskill themselves. The upcoming AI revolution will definitely disrupt the way we work, however, it will leave room for humans to perform more creative jobs in the future corporate world.

So a word of advice is to be prepared and stay future ready.

Visual Question Answering with Keras – Part 1

This is Part I of II of the Article Series Visual Question Answering with Keras

Making Computers Intelligent to answer from images

If we look closer in the history of Artificial Intelligence (AI), the Deep Learning has gained more popularity in the recent years and has achieved the human-level performance in the tasks such as Speech Recognition, Image Classification, Object Detection, Machine Translation and so on. However, as humans, not only we but also a five-year child can normally perform these tasks without much inconvenience. But the development of such systems with these capabilities has always considered an ambitious goal for the researchers as well as for developers.

In this series of blog posts, I will cover an introduction to something called VQA (Visual Question Answering), its available datasets, the Neural Network approach for VQA and its implementation in Keras and the applications of this challenging problem in real life. 

Table of Contents:

1 Introduction

2 What is exactly Visual Question Answering?

3 Prerequisites

4 Datasets available for VQA

4.1 DAQUAR Dataset

4.2 CLEVR Dataset

4.3 FigureQA Dataset

4.4 VQA Dataset

5 Real-life applications of VQA

6 Conclusion

 

  1. Introduction:

Let’s say you are given a below picture along with one question. Can you answer it?

I expect confidently you all say it is the Kitchen without much inconvenience which is also the right answer. Even a five-year child who just started to learn things might answer this question correctly.

Alright, but can you write a computer program for such type of task that takes image and question about the image as an input and gives us answer as output?

Before the development of the Deep Neural Network, this problem was considered as one of the difficult, inconceivable and challenging problem for the AI researcher’s community. However, due to the recent advancement of Deep Learning the systems are capable of answering these questions with the promising result if we have a required dataset.

Now I hope you have got at least some intuition of a problem that we are going to discuss in this series of blog posts. Let’s try to formalize the problem in the below section.

  1. What is exactly Visual Question Answering?:

We can define, “Visual Question Answering(VQA) is a system that takes an image and natural language question about the image as an input and generates natural language answer as an output.”

VQA is a research area that requires an understanding of vision(Computer Vision)  as well as text(NLP). The main beauty of VQA is that the reasoning part is performed in the context of the image. So if we have an image with the corresponding question then the system must able to understand the image well in order to generate an appropriate answer. For example, if the question is the number of persons then the system must able to detect faces of the persons. To answer the color of the horse the system need to detect the objects in the image. Many of these common problems such as face detection, object detection, binary object classification(yes or no), etc. have been solved in the field of Computer Vision with good results.

To summarize a good VQA system must be able to address the typical problems of CV as well as NLP.

To get a better feel of VQA you can try online VQA demo by CloudCV. You just go to this link and try uploading the picture you want and ask the related question to the picture, the system will generate the answer to it.

 

  1. Prerequisites:

In the next post, I will walk you through the code for this problem using Keras. So I assume that you are familiar with:

  1. Fundamental concepts of Machine Learning
  2. Multi-Layered Perceptron
  3. Convolutional Neural Network
  4. Recurrent Neural Network (especially LSTM)
  5. Gradient Descent and Backpropagation
  6. Transfer Learning
  7. Hyperparameter Optimization
  8. Python and Keras syntax
  1. Datasets available for VQA:

As you know problems related to the CV or NLP the availability of the dataset is the key to solve the problem. The complex problems like VQA, the dataset must cover all possibilities of questions answers in real-world scenarios. In this section, I will cover some of the datasets available for VQA.

4.1 DAQUAR Dataset:

The DAQUAR dataset is the first dataset for VQA that contains only indoor scenes. It shows the accuracy of 50.2% on the human baseline. It contains images from the NYU_Depth dataset.

Example of DAQUAR dataset

Example of DAQUAR dataset

The main disadvantage of DAQUAR is the size of the dataset is very small to capture all possible indoor scenes.

4.2 CLEVR Dataset:

The CLEVR Dataset from Stanford contains the questions about the object of a different type, colors, shapes, sizes, and material.

It has

  • A training set of 70,000 images and 699,989 questions
  • A validation set of 15,000 images and 149,991 questions
  • A test set of 15,000 images and 14,988 questions

Image Source: https://cs.stanford.edu/people/jcjohns/clevr/?source=post_page

 

4.3 FigureQA Dataset:

FigureQA Dataset contains questions about the bar graphs, line plots, and pie charts. It has 1,327,368 questions for 100,000 images in the training set.

4.4 VQA Dataset:

As comapred to all datasets that we have seen so far VQA dataset is relatively larger. The VQA dataset contains open ended as well as multiple choice questions. VQA v2 dataset contains:

  • 82,783 training images from COCO (common objects in context) dataset
  • 40, 504 validation images and 81,434 validation images
  • 443,757 question-answer pairs for training images
  • 214,354 question-answer pairs for validation images.

As you might expect this dataset is very huge and contains 12.6 GB of training images only. I have used this dataset in the next post but a very small subset of it.

This dataset also contains abstract cartoon images. Each image has 3 questions and each question has 10 multiple choice answers.

  1. Real-life applications of VQA:

There are many applications of VQA. One of the famous applications is to help visually impaired people and blind peoples. In 2016, Microsoft has released the “Seeing AI” app for visually impaired people to describe the surrounding environment around them. You can watch this video for the prototype of the Seeing AI app.

Another application could be on social media or e-commerce sites. VQA can be also used for educational purposes.

  1. Conclusion:

I hope this explanation will give you a good idea of Visual Question Answering. In the next blog post, I will walk you through the code in Keras.

If you like my explanations, do provide some feedback, comments, etc. and stay tuned for the next post.

Understanding Dropout and implementing it on MNIST dataset

Over-fitting is a major problem in deep learning and a plethora of techniques have been introduced to prevent it. One of the most effective one is called “dropout”.  Let’s use the analogy of a person going to gym for understanding this. Let’s say the person going to gym mostly uses his dominant arm, say his right arm to pick up weights. After some time, he notices that his dominant arm is developing a large muscle, but not the other arm. So, what can he do? Obviously, he needs to involve both his arms while training. Sometimes he should stop using his right arm, and use the left arm to lift weights and vice versa.

Something like this happens commonly in neural networks. Sometime one part of the network has very large weights and ends up dominating the training. While other part of the network remains weak and does not really play a role in the training. So, what dropout does to solve this problem, is it randomly shuts off some nodes and stop the gradients flowing through it. So, our forward and back propagation happen without those nodes. In that case the rest of the nodes need to pick up the slack and be more active in the training. We define a probability of the nodes getting dropped. For example, P=0.5 means there is a 50% chance a node will be dropped.

Figure 1 demonstrates the dropout technique, taken from the original research paper.

Dropout in a neuronal Net

Our network can never rely on any given node because it can be squashed at any given time. Hence the network is forced to learn redundant representation for everything to make sure at least some of the information remains. Redundant representation leads our network to be more robust. It also acts as ensemble of many networks, since at every epoch random nodes are dropped, each time our network will be different. Ensemble of different networks perform better than a single network since they capture more randomness. Please note, only non-output nodes are dropped.

Let’s, look at the python code to implement dropout in a neural network:

 

Künstliche Intelligenz und Vorurteil

Kaum ein anderes technologisches Thema heutzutage wird hinsichtlich gesellschaftlicher Auswirkungen so kontrovers diskutiert wie das der Künstlichen Intelligenz (KI). Während das Wörtchen „KI“ bei den einen Zukunftsvisionen hervorruft, in welchen technologischer Fortschritt menschliche Probleme wie Hunger, Krankheit und Klimawandel reduziert hat, zeichnen andere düstere Bilder von Orwell‘schen Überwachungsstaaten und technologischen Apokalypsen.

Starke, schwache KI

Es ist die Unschärfe des Begriffes „KI“, welcher eine derart große Bandbreite an Zukunftsszenarien ermöglicht. Für diejenigen, welche sich an solch spekulativen Debatten beteiligen, beutet KI „starke KI“ – eine künstliche Intelligenz, deren intellektuellen Fähigkeiten die eines Menschen erreichen oder gar übertreffen. Und so spannend die Diskussion über starke KI auch ist – sie ist reine Spekulation. Heute existierende KI ist weit, sehr weit von starker KI entfernt. Worüber wir heutzutage verfügen ist die sogenannte „schwache KI“ – Algorithmen, die spezifische Anwendungsprobleme (z.B. Bilderkennung, Spracherkennung, Übersetzung, Go spielen) lösen können. Und das mitunter sehr viel besser als Menschen.

Wo heutzutage „KI“ draufsteht, sind innen überwiegend Algorithmen aus dem Bereich des maschinellen Lernens (allen voran Deep Learning) am Werk. Diese Algorithmen können selbständig die Vorgehensweise erlernen, die zum Beispiel nötig ist, um einen gegebenen Input (z.B. ein Bild) auf einen gegebenen Output (z.B. eine Kategorie, welche den Bildinhalt beschreibt) abzubilden. Aber selbst diese „schwache KI“ birgt beträchtliches Potential – denken wir an mögliche Verbesserungen z.B. im Bereich der Medizin, Logistik, Verkehrssicherheit oder Energie- und Ressourcennutzung! Angesichts der Chancen, heutige Prozesse und Anwendungen zu verbessern, haben wir allen Grund, dem Einsatz von KI aufgeschlossen gegenüber zu stehen. Vorausgesetzt natürlich, dass KI verantwortungsvoll, „ethisch“ und sicher eingesetzt wird.

KI auf Abwegen

Ethische Herausforderungen von KI ergeben sich dabei zum einen durch die Zielsetzung. Wie ein Hammer für den Nagel an der Wand oder für den Hinterkopf eines Gegners verwendet werden kann, kann auch KI für böse Ziele missbraucht werden. Nur, dass KI im Zweifel deutlich größeren Schaden anrichten kann als ein einfacher Hammer. Und so sollten wir angesichts der Risiken dringend international diskutieren, wie wir uns hinsichtlich militärischer Anwendungen von KI verhalten wollen.

Zum anderen dringen besonders aus den USA, in denen KI Algorithmen schon heute in deutlich größerem Ausmaß eingesetzt werden als in Deutschland, immer wieder beunruhigende Nachrichten über voreingenommene KI Algorithmen. Zum ersten fand eine Studie kürzlich heraus, dass kommerziell erhältliche Gesichtserkennungsalgorithmen für Frauen bzw. dunkelhäutige Menschen schlechter funktionieren als für Männer bzw. hellhäutige Menschen. Mit der unschönen Konsequenz, dass es z.B. bei einem Abgleich mit Verbrecherfotos bei Menschen mit dunkler Hautfarbe deutlich häufiger zu falschen Übereinstimmungen kommen kann als bei Menschen heller Hautfarbe. Zum zweiten wurde vor kurzem bekannt, dass eine experimentell von einem großen Technologiekonzern zur Bewertung von Bewerbungen verwendete KI von Frauen stammende Bewerbungen systematisch schlechter bewertete als von Männern stammende Bewerbungen.

Wie KI zu Vorurteilen kommt

Um die Ursachen für vorurteilsbehaftete KI besser zu verstehen, lohnt es sich, einen Blick hinter die Kulissen zu werfen. Denn wie jede Technologie existiert auch KI nicht im luftleeren Raum. Dies lässt sich leicht anhand der Faktoren verdeutlichen, welche zum Erfolg heutiger KI beigetragen haben: bessere Hardware, cleverere Algorithmen und größere Datenmengen. Und gerade diese Daten sind es, durch welche Vorurteile in KI Einzug halten können.

Die Vorstellung von „neutralen Daten“ ist nämlich eine Wunschvorstellung. Im besten Fall spiegeln Daten die Welt wider, in der wir leben.       Eine Welt zum Beispiel, in der in Technologiekonzernen typischerweise deutlich mehr Männer beschäftigt sind als Frauen – was eine auf dem Personalbestand eines Technologiekonzerns trainierte KI dazu veranlassen kann, zu „schlussfolgern“, dass männliche Bewerber im Auswahlverfahren zu bevorzugen sind. Oder eine Welt, in der Länder bzw. gesellschaftliche Schichten innerhalb eines Landes unterschiedlichen Zugang zu modernen Technologien oder auch Bildung haben. Eine Ungleichheit, die sich als Dominanz westlicher Industrienationen in der geografischen Zusammensetzung von zum Training von KI-Algorithmen verwendeter Datensätze auswirken kann. Eine Dominanz, die wiederum zur Folge haben kann, dass derart trainierte KI-Algorithmen besonders gut für Menschen aus westlichen Industrienationen funktionieren. Ganz zu schweigen von der Voreingenommenheit der menschlichen Wahrnehmung, welche die Zusammensetzung von Daten beeinflusst – denken wir an das begrenzte Spektrum der Bilder, welche uns zuerst zu dem Begriff „Genie“ in den Sinn kommen.

Aber nicht nur die verwendeten Trainingsdaten, sondern auch bei der Entwicklung von KI getroffenen Design-Entscheidungen können negative Auswirkungen haben. Wenn bei einem nicht perfekt funktionierenden Bilderkennungsalgorithmus potentiell abwertende Kategorien zur Klassifikation zur Verfügung stehen, kann dies dazu führen, dass – wie in der Vergangenheit geschehen – dunkelhäutige Menschen als Gorillas klassifiziert werden. Wenn bei der Evaluation eines z.B. für die Gesichtserkennung eingesetzten KI-Algorithmus nur die Genauigkeit über alle Bevölkerungsgruppen hinweg berücksichtigt wird, können Ungleichheiten in der Genauigkeit nicht entdeckt werden, was zu Problemen bei der Anwendung führen kann. Denn Nutzer von KI-Algorithmen vermuten zumeist, dass die Algorithmen für alle denkbaren Anwendungszwecke geeignet sind.

Werte statt Wegsehen

Entgegen der verbreiteten Auffassung sind KI Algorithmen also nicht notwendigerweise vorurteilsfrei – sie können menschliche Voreingenommenheit bzw. gesellschaftliche Ungleichheit widerspiegeln. Da Algorithmen anders und in anderem Maß als Menschen eingesetzt werden, kann das bei blauäugiger Verwendung dazu führen, dass bestehende Ungleichheiten nicht nur bestärkt, sondern sogar vergrößert werden. Richtig angewendet können Algorithmen jedoch helfen, implizite und explizite Vorurteile menschlicher Entscheider zu mindern. Denn wie wir durch viele Studien wissen, ist die Liste der kognitiven Verzerrungen, die wir Menschen aufweisen, lang.

Es ist für den verantwortlichen Einsatz von KI in einem sensiblen Kontext somit essenziell, zu wissen, welche „ethischen“ Kriterien KI für den konkreten Anwendungsfall erfüllen muss. So kann sichergestellt werden, dass die KI den Anforderungen entspricht, bevor sie angewendet wird – oder aber, dass sie solange nicht angewendet wird, wie sie den Anforderungen nicht entspricht. Und mittels Transparenz, Überwachung und Feedback-Möglichkeiten lässt sich vermeiden, dass ein selbst-verbessernder KI-Algorithmus im Laufe der Zeit das ihm gesteckte Ziel verfehlt.

Für viele Anwendungsfälle sind derartige ethische Fragen jedoch vernachlässigbar, denken wir zum Beispiel an die Vorhersage von Maschinenausfällen oder die Extraktion strukturierter Daten aus unstrukturierten Dokumenten. Aber es ist nichtsdestotrotz gut und wichtig, Ethik und KI zusammen zu denken. Denn dies ermöglicht es uns, sicherzustellen, dass wir KI auf die bestmögliche Weise einsetzen. Denn das enorme Potential von KI gibt uns die Chance, den Status quo nachhaltig positiv zu verändern – technologisch wie ethisch.

Sentiment Analysis of IMDB reviews

Sentiment Analysis of IMDB reviews

This article shows you how to build a Neural Network from scratch(no libraries) for the purpose of detecting whether a movie review on IMDB is negative or positive.

Outline:

  • Curating a dataset and developing a "Predictive Theory"

  • Transforming Text to Numbers Creating the Input/Output Data

  • Building our Neural Network

  • Making Learning Faster by Reducing "Neural Noise"

  • Reducing Noise by strategically reducing the vocabulary

Curating the Dataset

In [3]:
def pretty_print_review_and_label(i):
    print(labels[i] + "\t:\t" + reviews[i][:80] + "...")

g = open('reviews.txt','r') # features of our dataset
reviews = list(map(lambda x:x[:-1],g.readlines()))
g.close()

g = open('labels.txt','r') # labels
labels = list(map(lambda x:x[:-1].upper(),g.readlines()))
g.close()

Note: The data in reviews.txt we're contains only lower case characters. That's so we treat different variations of the same word, like The, the, and THE, all the same way.

It's always a good idea to get check out your dataset before you proceed.

In [2]:
len(reviews) #No. of reviews
Out[2]:
25000
In [3]:
reviews[0] #first review
Out[3]:
'bromwell high is a cartoon comedy . it ran at the same time as some other programs about school life  such as  teachers  . my   years in the teaching profession lead me to believe that bromwell high  s satire is much closer to reality than is  teachers  . the scramble to survive financially  the insightful students who can see right through their pathetic teachers  pomp  the pettiness of the whole situation  all remind me of the schools i knew and their students . when i saw the episode in which a student repeatedly tried to burn down the school  i immediately recalled . . . . . . . . . at . . . . . . . . . . high . a classic line inspector i  m here to sack one of your teachers . student welcome to bromwell high . i expect that many adults of my age think that bromwell high is far fetched . what a pity that it isn  t   '
In [4]:
labels[0] #first label
Out[4]:
'POSITIVE'

Developing a Predictive Theory

Analysing how you would go about predicting whether its a positive or a negative review.

In [5]:
print("labels.txt \t : \t reviews.txt\n")
pretty_print_review_and_label(2137)
pretty_print_review_and_label(12816)
pretty_print_review_and_label(6267)
pretty_print_review_and_label(21934)
pretty_print_review_and_label(5297)
pretty_print_review_and_label(4998)
labels.txt 	 : 	 reviews.txt

NEGATIVE	:	this movie is terrible but it has some good effects .  ...
POSITIVE	:	adrian pasdar is excellent is this film . he makes a fascinating woman .  ...
NEGATIVE	:	comment this movie is impossible . is terrible  very improbable  bad interpretat...
POSITIVE	:	excellent episode movie ala pulp fiction .  days   suicides . it doesnt get more...
NEGATIVE	:	if you haven  t seen this  it  s terrible . it is pure trash . i saw this about ...
POSITIVE	:	this schiffer guy is a real genius  the movie is of excellent quality and both e...
In [41]:
from collections import Counter
import numpy as np

We'll create three Counter objects, one for words from postive reviews, one for words from negative reviews, and one for all the words.

In [56]:
# Create three Counter objects to store positive, negative and total counts
positive_counts = Counter()
negative_counts = Counter()
total_counts = Counter()

Examine all the reviews. For each word in a positive review, increase the count for that word in both your positive counter and the total words counter; likewise, for each word in a negative review, increase the count for that word in both your negative counter and the total words counter. You should use split(' ') to divide a piece of text (such as a review) into individual words.

In [57]:
# Loop over all the words in all the reviews and increment the counts in the appropriate counter objects
for i in range(len(reviews)):
    if(labels[i] == 'POSITIVE'):
        for word in reviews[i].split(" "):
            positive_counts[word] += 1
            total_counts[word] += 1
    else:
        for word in reviews[i].split(" "):
            negative_counts[word] += 1
            total_counts[word] += 1

Most common positive & negative words

In [ ]:
positive_counts.most_common()

The above statement retrieves alot of words, the top 3 being : ('the', 173324), ('.', 159654), ('and', 89722),

In [ ]:
negative_counts.most_common()

The above statement retrieves alot of words, the top 3 being : ('', 561462), ('.', 167538), ('the', 163389),

As you can see, common words like "the" appear very often in both positive and negative reviews. Instead of finding the most common words in positive or negative reviews, what you really want are the words found in positive reviews more often than in negative reviews, and vice versa. To accomplish this, you'll need to calculate the ratios of word usage between positive and negative reviews.

The positive-to-negative ratio for a given word can be calculated with positive_counts[word] / float(negative_counts[word]+1). Notice the +1 in the denominator – that ensures we don't divide by zero for words that are only seen in positive reviews.

In [58]:
pos_neg_ratios = Counter()

# Calculate the ratios of positive and negative uses of the most common words
# Consider words to be "common" if they've been used at least 100 times
for term,cnt in list(total_counts.most_common()):
    if(cnt > 100):
        pos_neg_ratio = positive_counts[term] / float(negative_counts[term]+1)
        pos_neg_ratios[term] = pos_neg_ratio

Examine the ratios

In [12]:
print("Pos-to-neg ratio for 'the' = {}".format(pos_neg_ratios["the"]))
print("Pos-to-neg ratio for 'amazing' = {}".format(pos_neg_ratios["amazing"]))
print("Pos-to-neg ratio for 'terrible' = {}".format(pos_neg_ratios["terrible"]))
Pos-to-neg ratio for 'the' = 1.0607993145235326
Pos-to-neg ratio for 'amazing' = 4.022813688212928
Pos-to-neg ratio for 'terrible' = 0.17744252873563218

We see the following:

  • Words that you would expect to see more often in positive reviews – like "amazing" – have a ratio greater than 1. The more skewed a word is toward postive, the farther from 1 its positive-to-negative ratio will be.
  • Words that you would expect to see more often in negative reviews – like "terrible" – have positive values that are less than 1. The more skewed a word is toward negative, the closer to zero its positive-to-negative ratio will be.
  • Neutral words, which don't really convey any sentiment because you would expect to see them in all sorts of reviews – like "the" – have values very close to 1. A perfectly neutral word – one that was used in exactly the same number of positive reviews as negative reviews – would be almost exactly 1.

Ok, the ratios tell us which words are used more often in postive or negative reviews, but the specific values we've calculated are a bit difficult to work with. A very positive word like "amazing" has a value above 4, whereas a very negative word like "terrible" has a value around 0.18. Those values aren't easy to compare for a couple of reasons:

  • Right now, 1 is considered neutral, but the absolute value of the postive-to-negative rations of very postive words is larger than the absolute value of the ratios for the very negative words. So there is no way to directly compare two numbers and see if one word conveys the same magnitude of positive sentiment as another word conveys negative sentiment. So we should center all the values around netural so the absolute value fro neutral of the postive-to-negative ratio for a word would indicate how much sentiment (positive or negative) that word conveys.
  • When comparing absolute values it's easier to do that around zero than one.

To fix these issues, we'll convert all of our ratios to new values using logarithms (i.e. use np.log(ratio))

In the end, extremely positive and extremely negative words will have positive-to-negative ratios with similar magnitudes but opposite signs.

In [59]:
# Convert ratios to logs
for word,ratio in pos_neg_ratios.most_common():
    pos_neg_ratios[word] = np.log(ratio)

Examine the new ratios

In [14]:
print("Pos-to-neg ratio for 'the' = {}".format(pos_neg_ratios["the"]))
print("Pos-to-neg ratio for 'amazing' = {}".format(pos_neg_ratios["amazing"]))
print("Pos-to-neg ratio for 'terrible' = {}".format(pos_neg_ratios["terrible"]))
Pos-to-neg ratio for 'the' = 0.05902269426102881
Pos-to-neg ratio for 'amazing' = 1.3919815802404802
Pos-to-neg ratio for 'terrible' = -1.7291085042663878

If everything worked, now you should see neutral words with values close to zero. In this case, "the" is near zero but slightly positive, so it was probably used in more positive reviews than negative reviews. But look at "amazing"'s ratio - it's above 1, showing it is clearly a word with positive sentiment. And "terrible" has a similar score, but in the opposite direction, so it's below -1. It's now clear that both of these words are associated with specific, opposing sentiments.

Run the below code to see more ratios.

It displays all the words, ordered by how associated they are with postive reviews.

In [ ]:
pos_neg_ratios.most_common()

The top most common words for the above code : ('edie', 4.6913478822291435), ('paulie', 4.0775374439057197), ('felix', 3.1527360223636558), ('polanski', 2.8233610476132043), ('matthau', 2.8067217286092401), ('victoria', 2.6810215287142909), ('mildred', 2.6026896854443837), ('gandhi', 2.5389738710582761), ('flawless', 2.451005098112319), ('superbly', 2.2600254785752498), ('perfection', 2.1594842493533721), ('astaire', 2.1400661634962708), ('captures', 2.0386195471595809), ('voight', 2.0301704926730531), ('wonderfully', 2.0218960560332353), ('powell', 1.9783454248084671), ('brosnan', 1.9547990964725592)

Transforming Text into Numbers

Creating the Input/Output Data

Create a set named vocab that contains every word in the vocabulary.

In [19]:
vocab = set(total_counts.keys())

Check vocabulary size

In [20]:
vocab_size = len(vocab)
print(vocab_size)
74074

Th following image rpresents the layers of the neural network you'll be building throughout this notebook. layer_0 is the input layer, layer_1 is a hidden layer, and layer_2 is the output layer.

In [1]:
 
Out[1]:

TODO: Create a numpy array called layer_0 and initialize it to all zeros. Create layer_0 as a 2-dimensional matrix with 1 row and vocab_size columns.

In [21]:
layer_0 = np.zeros((1,vocab_size))

layer_0 contains one entry for every word in the vocabulary, as shown in the above image. We need to make sure we know the index of each word, so run the following cell to create a lookup table that stores the index of every word.

TODO: Complete the implementation of update_input_layer. It should count how many times each word is used in the given review, and then store those counts at the appropriate indices inside layer_0.

In [ ]:
# Create a dictionary of words in the vocabulary mapped to index positions 
# (to be used in layer_0)
word2index = {}
for i,word in enumerate(vocab):
    word2index[word] = i

It stores the indexes like this: 'antony': 22, 'pinjar': 23, 'helsig': 24, 'dances': 25, 'good': 26, 'willard': 71500, 'faridany': 27, 'foment': 28, 'matts': 12313,

Lets implement some functions for simplifying our inputs to the neural network.

In [25]:
def update_input_layer(review):
    """
    The element at a given index of layer_0 should represent
    how many times the given word occurs in the review.
    """
     
    global layer_0
    
    # clear out previous state, reset the layer to be all 0s
    layer_0 *= 0
    
    # count how many times each word is used in the given review and store the results in layer_0 
    for word in review.split(" "):
        layer_0[0][word2index[word]] += 1

Run the following cell to test updating the input layer with the first review. The indices assigned may not be the same as in the solution, but hopefully you'll see some non-zero values in layer_0.

In [26]:
update_input_layer(reviews[0])
layer_0
Out[26]:
array([[ 18.,   0.,   0., ...,   0.,   0.,   0.]])

get_target_for_labels should return 0 or 1, depending on whether the given label is NEGATIVE or POSITIVE, respectively.

In [27]:
def get_target_for_label(label):
    if(label == 'POSITIVE'):
        return 1
    else:
        return 0

Building a Neural Network

In [32]:
import time
import sys
import numpy as np

# Encapsulate our neural network in a class
class SentimentNetwork:
    def __init__(self, reviews,labels,hidden_nodes = 10, learning_rate = 0.1):
        """
        Args:
            reviews(list) - List of reviews used for training
            labels(list) - List of POSITIVE/NEGATIVE labels
            hidden_nodes(int) - Number of nodes to create in the hidden layer
            learning_rate(float) - Learning rate to use while training
        
        """
        # Assign a seed to our random number generator to ensure we get
        # reproducable results
        np.random.seed(1)

        # process the reviews and their associated labels so that everything
        # is ready for training
        self.pre_process_data(reviews, labels)
        
        # Build the network to have the number of hidden nodes and the learning rate that
        # were passed into this initializer. Make the same number of input nodes as
        # there are vocabulary words and create a single output node.
        self.init_network(len(self.review_vocab),hidden_nodes, 1, learning_rate)

    def pre_process_data(self, reviews, labels):
        
        # populate review_vocab with all of the words in the given reviews
        review_vocab = set()
        for review in reviews:
            for word in review.split(" "):
                review_vocab.add(word)

        # Convert the vocabulary set to a list so we can access words via indices
        self.review_vocab = list(review_vocab)
        
        # populate label_vocab with all of the words in the given labels.
        label_vocab = set()
        for label in labels:
            label_vocab.add(label)
        
        # Convert the label vocabulary set to a list so we can access labels via indices
        self.label_vocab = list(label_vocab)
        
        # Store the sizes of the review and label vocabularies.
        self.review_vocab_size = len(self.review_vocab)
        self.label_vocab_size = len(self.label_vocab)
        
        # Create a dictionary of words in the vocabulary mapped to index positions
        self.word2index = {}
        for i, word in enumerate(self.review_vocab):
            self.word2index[word] = i
        
        # Create a dictionary of labels mapped to index positions
        self.label2index = {}
        for i, label in enumerate(self.label_vocab):
            self.label2index[label] = i
        
    def init_network(self, input_nodes, hidden_nodes, output_nodes, learning_rate):
        # Set number of nodes in input, hidden and output layers.
        self.input_nodes = input_nodes
        self.hidden_nodes = hidden_nodes
        self.output_nodes = output_nodes

        # Store the learning rate
        self.learning_rate = learning_rate

        # Initialize weights

        # These are the weights between the input layer and the hidden layer.
        self.weights_0_1 = np.zeros((self.input_nodes,self.hidden_nodes))
    
        # These are the weights between the hidden layer and the output layer.
        self.weights_1_2 = np.random.normal(0.0, self.output_nodes**-0.5, 
                                                (self.hidden_nodes, self.output_nodes))
        
        # The input layer, a two-dimensional matrix with shape 1 x input_nodes
        self.layer_0 = np.zeros((1,input_nodes))
    
    def update_input_layer(self,review):

        # clear out previous state, reset the layer to be all 0s
        self.layer_0 *= 0
        
        for word in review.split(" "):
            if(word in self.word2index.keys()):
                self.layer_0[0][self.word2index[word]] += 1
                
    def get_target_for_label(self,label):
        if(label == 'POSITIVE'):
            return 1
        else:
            return 0
        
    def sigmoid(self,x):
        return 1 / (1 + np.exp(-x))
    
    def sigmoid_output_2_derivative(self,output):
        return output * (1 - output)
    
    def train(self, training_reviews, training_labels):
        
        # make sure out we have a matching number of reviews and labels
        assert(len(training_reviews) == len(training_labels))
        
        # Keep track of correct predictions to display accuracy during training 
        correct_so_far = 0

        # Remember when we started for printing time statistics
        start = time.time()
        
        # loop through all the given reviews and run a forward and backward pass,
        # updating weights for every item
        for i in range(len(training_reviews)):
            
            # Get the next review and its correct label
            review = training_reviews[i]
            label = training_labels[i]
            
            ### Forward pass ###

            # Input Layer
            self.update_input_layer(review)

            # Hidden layer
            layer_1 = self.layer_0.dot(self.weights_0_1)

            # Output layer
            layer_2 = self.sigmoid(layer_1.dot(self.weights_1_2))
            
            ### Backward pass ###

            # Output error
            layer_2_error = layer_2 - self.get_target_for_label(label) # Output layer error is the difference between desired target and actual output.
            layer_2_delta = layer_2_error * self.sigmoid_output_2_derivative(layer_2)

            # Backpropagated error
            layer_1_error = layer_2_delta.dot(self.weights_1_2.T) # errors propagated to the hidden layer
            layer_1_delta = layer_1_error # hidden layer gradients - no nonlinearity so it's the same as the error

            # Update the weights
            self.weights_1_2 -= layer_1.T.dot(layer_2_delta) * self.learning_rate # update hidden-to-output weights with gradient descent step
            self.weights_0_1 -= self.layer_0.T.dot(layer_1_delta) * self.learning_rate # update input-to-hidden weights with gradient descent step

            # Keep track of correct predictions.
            if(layer_2 >= 0.5 and label == 'POSITIVE'):
                correct_so_far += 1
            elif(layer_2 < 0.5 and label == 'NEGATIVE'):
                correct_so_far += 1
            
            sys.stdout.write(" #Correct:" + str(correct_so_far) + " #Trained:" + str(i+1) \
                             + " Training Accuracy:" + str(correct_so_far * 100 / float(i+1))[:4] + "%")
    
    def test(self, testing_reviews, testing_labels):
        """
        Attempts to predict the labels for the given testing_reviews,
        and uses the test_labels to calculate the accuracy of those predictions.
        """
        
        # keep track of how many correct predictions we make
        correct = 0

        # Loop through each of the given reviews and call run to predict
        # its label. 
        for i in range(len(testing_reviews)):
            pred = self.run(testing_reviews[i])
            if(pred == testing_labels[i]):
                correct += 1
            
            sys.stdout.write(" #Correct:" + str(correct) + " #Tested:" + str(i+1) \
                             + " Testing Accuracy:" + str(correct * 100 / float(i+1))[:4] + "%")
    
    def run(self, review):
        """
        Returns a POSITIVE or NEGATIVE prediction for the given review.
        """
        # Run a forward pass through the network, like in the "train" function.
        
        # Input Layer
        self.update_input_layer(review.lower())

        # Hidden layer
        layer_1 = self.layer_0.dot(self.weights_0_1)

        # Output layer
        layer_2 = self.sigmoid(layer_1.dot(self.weights_1_2))
        
        # Return POSITIVE for values above greater-than-or-equal-to 0.5 in the output layer;
        # return NEGATIVE for other values
        if(layer_2[0] >= 0.5):
            return "POSITIVE"
        else:
            return "NEGATIVE"
        

Run the following code to create the network with a small learning rate, 0.001, and then train the new network. Using learning rate larger than this, for example 0.1 or even 0.01 would result in poor performance.

In [ ]:
mlp = SentimentNetwork(reviews[:-1000],labels[:-1000], learning_rate=0.001)
mlp.train(reviews[:-1000],labels[:-1000])

Running the above code would have given an accuracy around 62.2%

Reducing Noise in Our Input Data

Counting how many times each word occured in our review might not be the most efficient way. Instead just including whether a word was there or not will improve our training time and accuracy. Hence we update our update_input_layer() function.

In [ ]:
def update_input_layer(self,review):
    self.layer_0 *= 0
        
    for word in review.split(" "):
        if(word in self.word2index.keys()):
            self.layer_0[0][self.word2index[word]] =1

Creating and running our neural network again, even with a higher learning rate of 0.1 gave us a training accuracy of 83.8% and testing accuracy(testing on last 1000 reviews) of 85.7%.

Reducing Noise by Strategically Reducing the Vocabulary

Let us put the pos to neg ratio's that we found were much more effective at detecting a positive or negative label. We could do that by a few change:

  • Modify pre_process_data:
    • Add two additional parameters: min_count and polarity_cutoff
    • Calculate the positive-to-negative ratios of words used in the reviews.
    • Change so words are only added to the vocabulary if they occur in the vocabulary more than min_count times.
    • Change so words are only added to the vocabulary if the absolute value of their postive-to-negative ratio is at least polarity_cutoff
In [ ]:
def pre_process_data(self, reviews, labels, polarity_cutoff, min_count):
        
        positive_counts = Counter()
        negative_counts = Counter()
        total_counts = Counter()

        for i in range(len(reviews)):
            if(labels[i] == 'POSITIVE'):
                for word in reviews[i].split(" "):
                    positive_counts[word] += 1
                    total_counts[word] += 1
            else:
                for word in reviews[i].split(" "):
                    negative_counts[word] += 1
                    total_counts[word] += 1

        pos_neg_ratios = Counter()

        for term,cnt in list(total_counts.most_common()):
            if(cnt >= 50):
                pos_neg_ratio = positive_counts[term] / float(negative_counts[term]+1)
                pos_neg_ratios[term] = pos_neg_ratio

        for word,ratio in pos_neg_ratios.most_common():
            if(ratio > 1):
                pos_neg_ratios[word] = np.log(ratio)
            else:
                pos_neg_ratios[word] = -np.log((1 / (ratio + 0.01)))

        # populate review_vocab with all of the words in the given reviews
        review_vocab = set()
        for review in reviews:
            for word in review.split(" "):
                if(total_counts[word] > min_count):
                    if(word in pos_neg_ratios.keys()):
                        if((pos_neg_ratios[word] >= polarity_cutoff) or (pos_neg_ratios[word] <= -polarity_cutoff)):
                            review_vocab.add(word)
                    else:
                        review_vocab.add(word)

        # Convert the vocabulary set to a list so we can access words via indices
        self.review_vocab = list(review_vocab)
        
        # populate label_vocab with all of the words in the given labels.
        label_vocab = set()
        for label in labels:
            label_vocab.add(label)
        
        # Convert the label vocabulary set to a list so we can access labels via indices
        self.label_vocab = list(label_vocab)
        
        # Store the sizes of the review and label vocabularies.
        self.review_vocab_size = len(self.review_vocab)
        self.label_vocab_size = len(self.label_vocab)
        
        # Create a dictionary of words in the vocabulary mapped to index positions
        self.word2index = {}
        for i, word in enumerate(self.review_vocab):
            self.word2index[word] = i
        
        # Create a dictionary of labels mapped to index positions
        self.label2index = {}
        for i, label in enumerate(self.label_vocab):
            self.label2index[label] = i

Our training accuracy increased to 85.6% after this change. As we can see our accuracy saw a huge jump by making minor changes based on our intuition. We can keep making such changes and increase the accuracy even further.

 

Download the Data Sources

The data sources used in this article can be downloaded here:

Kiano – visuelle Exploration mit Deep Learning

Kiano – eine iOS-App zur visuellen Exploration und Suche der eigenen Fotos.

Menschen haben kein Problem, komplexe Bilder zu verstehen, es fällt ihnen aber schwer, gezielt Bilder in großen Bildersammlungen (wieder) zu finden. Da die Anzahl von Bildern, insbesondere auch auf Smartphones zusehends zunimmt – mehrere tausend Bilder pro Gerät sind keine Seltenheit, wird die Suche nach bestimmten Bildern immer schwieriger. Ist bei einem gesuchten Foto dessen Aufnahmedatum unbekannt, so kann es sehr lange dauern, bis es gefunden ist. Werden dem Nutzer zu viele Bilder auf einmal präsentiert, so geht der Überblick schnell verloren. Aus diesem Grund besteht eine typische Bildsuche heutzutage meist im endlosen Scrollen über viele Bildschirmseiten mit langen Bilderlisten.

Dieser Artikel stellt das Prinzip und die Funktionsweise der neuen iOS-App “Kiano” vor, die es Nutzern ermöglicht, alle ihre Bilder explorativ mittels visuellem Browsen zu erkunden. Der Name “Kiano” steht hierbei für “Keep Images Arranged & Neatly Organized”. Mit der App ist es außerdem möglich, zu einem Beispielbild gezielt nach ähnlichen Fotos auf dem Gerät zu suchen.

Um Bilder visuell durchsuch- und sortierbar zu machen, werden sogenannte Merkmalsvektoren bzw. Featurevektoren verwendet, die Aussehen und Inhalt von Bildern kompakt repräsentieren können. Zu einem Bild lassen sich ähnliche Bilder finden, indem die Bilder bestimmt werden, deren Featurevektoren eine geringe Distanz zum Featurevektor des Suchbildes haben.

Werden Bilder zweidimensional so angeordnet, dass die Featurevektoren benachbarter Bilder sehr ähnlich sind, so erhält man eine visuell sortierte Bilderlandkarte. Bei einer visuell sortierten Anordnung der Bilder fällt es Menschen deutlich leichter, mehr Bilder gleichzeitig zu erfassen, als dies im unsortierten Fall möglich wäre. Durch die graduelle Veränderung der Bildinhalte wird es möglich, über diese Karte visuell zu navigieren.

Generierung von Featurevektoren zur Bildbeschreibung

Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) sind nicht nur in der Lage, Bilder mit hoher Genauigkeit zu klassifizieren, d.h. zu erkennen, welches Objekt – entsprechend einer Menge von gelernten Objektkategorien auf einem Bild zu sehen ist, die Aktivierungen der Netzwerkschichten lassen sich auch als universelle Featurevektoren zur Bildbeschreibung nutzen. Während die vorderen Netzwerkschichten von CNNs einfache visuelle Bildmerkmale wie Farben und einfache Muster detektieren, repräsentieren die Ausgangsschichten des Netzwerks die semantischen Informationen bezüglich der gelernten Objektkategorien. Die Zwischenschichten des Netzwerks sind weniger von den Objektkategorien abhängig und können somit als generelle abstrakte Repräsentationen des Inhalts der Bilder angesehen werden. Hierbei ist es möglich, bereits fertig trainierte Klassifikationsnetzwerke für die Featureextraktion wiederzuverwenden. In der Visual Computing Gruppe der HTW Berlin wurden umfangreiche Evaluierungen durchgeführt, um zu bestimmen, welche Netzwerkschichten von welchen CNNs mit welchen zusätzlichen Transformationen zu verwenden sind, um aus Netzwerkaktivierungen Feature-Vektoren zu erzeugen, die sehr gut für die Suche nach beliebigen Bildern geeignet sind.

Beste Ergebnisse hinsichtlich der Suchgenauigkeit (der Mean Average Precision) wurden mit einem Deep Residual Learning Network (ResNet-200) erzielt. Die 2048 Aktivierungen vor dem vollvernetzten letzten Layer werden als initiale Featurevektoren verwendet, wobei sich die Suchgenauigkeit durch eine L1-Normierung, gefolgt von einer PCA-Transformation (Principal Component Analysis) sogar noch verbessern lässt. Hierdurch ist es möglich, die Featurevektoren auf eine Größe von nur 64 Bytes zu reduzieren. Leider ist die rechnerische Komplexität der Bestimmung dieser hochwertigen Featurevektoren zu groß, um sie auf mobilen Geräten verwenden zu können. Eine gute Alternative stellen die Mobilenets dar, die sich durch eine erheblich reduzierte Komplexität auszeichnen. Als Kompromiss zwischen Klassifikationsgenauigkeit und Komplexität wurde für die Kiano-App das Mobilenet_v2_0.5_128 verwendet. Die mit diesem Netzwerk bestimmten Featurevektoren wurden ebenfalls auf eine Größe von 64 Bytes reduziert.

Die aus CNNs erzeugten Featurevektoren sind gut für die Suche nach Bildern mit ähnlichem Inhalt geeignet. Für die Suche nach Bilder, mit ähnlichen visuellen Eigenschaften (z.B. die auftretenden Farben oder deren örtlichen Verteilung) sind diese Featurevektoren nur bedingt geeignet. Hierfür eignen sich klassische sogenannte “Low-Level”-Featurevektoren besser. Da für eine ansprechende und leicht erfassbare Bildsortierung auch eine Übereinstimmung dieser visuellen Bildattribute wichtig ist, kommt bei Kiano ein weiterer Featurevektor zum Einsatz, mit dem sich diese “primitiven” visuellen Bildattribute beschreiben lassen. Dieser Featurevektor hat eine Größe von 50 Bytes. Bei Kiano kann der Nutzer in den Einstellungen wählen, ob bei der visuellen Sortierung und Bildsuche größerer Wert auf den Bildinhalt oder die visuelle Erscheinung eines Bildes gelegt werden soll.

Visuelle Bildsortierung

Werden Bilder entsprechend ihrer Ähnlichkeiten sortiert angeordnet, so können mehrere hundert Bilder gleichzeitig wahrgenommen bzw. erfasst werden. Dies hilft, Regionen interessanter Bildern leichter zu erkennen und gesuchte Bilder schneller zu entdecken. Die Möglichkeit, viele Bilder gleichzeitig präsentieren zu können, ist neben Bildverwaltungssystemen besonders auch für E-Commerce-Anwendungen interessant.

Herkömmliche Dimensionsreduktionsverfahren, die hochdimensionale Featurevektoren auf zwei Dimensionen projizieren, sind für die Bildsortierung ungeeignet, da sie die Bilder so anordnen, dass Lücken und Bildüberlappungen entstehen. Sollen Bilder sortiert auf einem dichten regelmäßigen 2D-Raster angeordnet werden, kommen als Verfahren nur selbstorganisierende Karten oder selbstsortierende Karten in Frage.

Eine selbstorganisierende Karte (Self Organizing Map / SOM) ist ein künstliches neuronales Netzwerk, das durch unbeaufsichtigtes Lernen trainiert wird, um eine niedrigdimensionale, diskrete Darstellung der Daten des Eingangsraums als sogenannte Karte (Map) zu erzeugen. Im Gegensatz zu anderen künstlichen neuronalen Netzen, werden SOMs nicht durch Fehlerkorrektur, sondern durch ein Wettbewerbsverfahren trainiert, wobei eine Nachbarschaftsfunktion verwendet wird, um die lokalen Ähnlichkeiten der Eingangsdaten zu bewahren.

Eine selbstorganisierende Karte besteht aus Knoten, denen einerseits ein Gewichtsvektor der gleichen Dimensionalität wie die Eingangsdaten und anderseits eine Position auf der 2D-Karte zugeordnet sind. Die SOM-Knoten sind als zweidimensionales Rechteckgitter angeordnet. Das vom der SOM erzeugte Mapping ist diskret, da jeder Eingangsvektor einem bestimmten Knoten zugeordnet wird. Zu Beginn werden die Gewichtsvektoren aller Knoten mit Zufallswerten initialisiert. Wird ein hochdimensionaler Eingangsvektor in das Netz eingespeist, so wird dessen euklidischer Abstand zu allen Gewichtsvektoren berechnet. Der Knoten, dessen Gewichtsvektor dem Eingangsvektor am ähnlichsten ist, wird als Best Matching Unit (BMU) bezeichnet. Die Gewichte des BMU und seiner auf der Karte örtlich benachbarten Knoten werden an den Eingangsvektor angepasst. Dieser Vorgang wird iterativ wiederholt. Das Ausmaß dieser Anpassung nimmt im Laufe der Iterationen und der örtlichen Entfernung zum BMU-Knoten ab.

Um SOMs an die Bildsortierung anzupassen, sind zwei Modifikationen notwendig. Jeder Knoten darf nicht von mehr als einem Featurevektor (der ein Bild repräsentiert) ausgewählt werden. Eine Mehrfachauswahl würde zu einer Überlappung der Bilder führen. Aus diesem Grund muss die Anzahl der SOM-Knoten mindestens so groß wie die Anzahl der Bilder sein. Eine sinnvolle Erweiterung einer SOM verwendet ein Gitter, bei dem gegenüberliegende Kanten verbunden sind. Werden diese Torus-förmigen Karten für große SOMs verwendet, kann der Eindruck einer endlosen Karte erzeugt werden, wie es in Kiano umgesetzt ist. Ein Problem der SOMs ist ihre hohe rechnerische Komplexität, die quadratisch mit der Anzahl der zu sortierenden Bilder wächst, wodurch die maximale Anzahl an zu sortierenden Bildern beschränkt wird. Eine Lösung stellt eine selbstsortierende Karte (Self Sorting Map / SSM) dar, deren Komplexität nur n log(n) beträgt.

Selbstsortierende Karten beginnen mit einer zufälligen Positionierung der Bilder auf der Karte. Diese Karte wird dann in 4×4-Blöcke aufgeteilt und für jeden Block wird der Mittelwert der zugehörigen Featurevektoren bestimmt. Als nächstes werden aus 2×2 benachbarten Blöcken jeweils vier korrespondierende Bild-Featurevektoren untersucht und ihre zugehörigen Bilder gegebenenfalls getauscht. Aus den 4! = 24 Anordnungsmöglichkeiten wird diejenige gewählt, die die Summe der quadrierten Differenzen zwischen den jeweiligen Featurevektoren und den Featuremittelwerten der Blöcke minimiert. Nach mehreren Iterationen wird jeder Block in vier kleinere Blöcke halber Breite und Höhe aufgeteilt und wiederum in der beschriebenen Weise überprüft, wie die Bildpositionen dieser kleineren Blöcke getauscht werden sollten. Dieser Vorgang wird solange wiederholt, bis die Blockgröße auf 1×1 Bild reduziert ist.

In der Visual-Computing Gruppe der HTW Berlin wurde untersucht, wie die Sortierqualität des SSM-Algorithmus verbessert werden kann. Anstatt die Mittelwerte der Featurevektoren als konstanten Durchschnittsvektor für den gesamten Block zu berechnen, verwenden wir gleitende Tiefpassfilter, die sich effizient mittels Integralbildern berechnen lassen. Hierdurch entstehen weichere Übergänge auf der sortierten Bilderkarte. Weiterhin wird die Blockgröße nicht für mehrere Iterationen konstant gehalten, sondern kontinuierlich zusammen mit dem Radius des Filterkernels reduziert. Durch die Verwendung von optimierten Algorithmen von “Linear Assignment” Algorithmen wird es weiterhin möglich, den optimalen Positionstausch nicht nur für jeweils vier Featurevektoren bzw. Bildern sondern für eine deutlich größere Anzahl zu überprüfen. All diese Maßnahmen führen zu einer deutlich verbesserten Sortierungsqualität bei gleicher Komplexität.

Effiziente Umsetzung für iOS

Wie so oft, liegen die softwaretechnischen Herausforderungen an ganz anderen Stellen, als man zunächst vermutet. Für eine effiziente Implementierung der zuvor beschriebenen Algorithmen, insbesondere der SSM, stellte es sich heraus, dass die Programmiersprache Swift, in der iOS Apps normaler Weise entwickelt werden, erheblich mehr Rechenzeit benötigt, als eine Umsetzung in der Sprache C. Im Zuge der stetigen Weiterentwicklung von Swift und dessen Compiler mag sich die Lücke zu C zwar immer weiter schließen, zum Zeitpunkt der Umsetzung war die Implementierung in C aber um einen Faktor vier schneller als in Swift. Hierbei liegt die Vermutung nahe, dass der Zugriff auf und das Umsortieren von Featurevektoren als native C-Arrays deutlich effektiver passiert, als bei der Verwendung von Swift-Arrays. Da Swift-Arrays Value-Type sind, kommt es in Swift vermutlich zu unnötigen Kopieroperationen der Fließkommazahlen in den einzelnen Featurevektoren.

Die Berechnung des Mobilenet-Anteils der Featurevektoren konnte sehr komfortabel mit Apples CoreML Machine Learning Framework umgesetzt werden. Hierbei ist zu beachten, dass es sich wie oben beschrieben, nicht um eine Klassifikation handelt, sondern um das Abgreifen der Aktivierungen einer tieferen Schicht. Für Klassifikationen findet man praktisch sofort nutzbare Beispiele, für den Zugriff auf die Aktivierungen waren jedoch Anpassungen notwendig, die bei der Portierung eines vortrainierten Mobilenet nach CoreML vorgenommen wurden. Das stellte sich als erheblich einfacher heraus, als der Versuch, auf die tieferen Schichten eines Klassifizierungsnetzes in CoreML zuzugreifen.

Für die Verwaltung der Bilder, ihrer Featurevektoren und ihrer Position in der sortieren Karte wird in Kiano eine eigene Datenstruktur verwendet, die es zu persistieren gilt. Es ist dem Nutzer ja nicht zuzumuten, bei jedem Start der App auf die Berechnung aller Featurevektoren zu warten. Die Strategie ist es hierbei, bereits bekannte Bilder zu identifizieren und deren Features nur dann neu zu berechnen, falls sich das Bild verändert hat. Die über Appels Photos Framework zur Verfügung gestellten local Identifier identifizieren dabei die Bilder. Veränderungen werden über das Modifikationsdatum eines Bildes detektiert. Die größte Herausforderung ist hierbei das Zeichnen der Karte. Die Benutzerinteraktion soll schnell und flüssig erscheinen, auf Animationen wie das Nachlaufen der Karte beim Verschieben möchte man nicht verzichten. Die Umsetzung geschieht hierbei nicht in OpenGL ES, welches ab iOS 12 ohnehin als deprecated bezeichnet wird. Auf der anderen Seite wird aber auch nicht der „Standardweg“ des Überschreibens der draw-Methode einer Ableitung von UIView gewählt. Letztes führt bekanntlich zu Performanceeinbußen. Insbesondere deshalb, weil das System sehr oft Backing-Images der Ansichten erstellt. Um die Kontrolle über das Neuzeichnen zu behalten, wird in Kiano ein eigenes Backing-Image implementiert, das auf Ebene des Core Animation Frameworks dem View als Layer zugweisen wird. Diesem Layer kann dann sehr komfortabel eine 3D-Transformation zugewiesen werden und man profitiert von der GPU-Beschleunigung, ohne OpenGL ES direkt verwenden zu müssen.

 

Trotz der Verwendung eines Core Animation Layers ist das Zeichnen der Karte immer noch sehr zeitaufwendig. Das liegt an der Tatsache, dass je nach Zoomstufe tausende von Bildern darzustellen sind, die alle über das Photos Framework angefordert werden müssen. Das Nadelöhr ist dann weniger das Zeichnen, als die Zeit, die vergeht, bis einem das Bild zur Verfügung gestellt wird. Diese Vorgänge sind praktisch alle nebenläufig. Zur Erinnerung: Ein Foto kann in der iCloud liegen und zum Zeitpunkt der Anfrage noch gar nicht (oder noch nicht in geeigneter Auflösung) heruntergeladen sein. Netzwerkbedingt gibt es keine Vorhersage, wann oder ob überhaupt das Bild zur Verfügung gestellt wird. In Kiano werden zum einen Bilder in sehr kleiner Auflösung gecached, zum anderen wird beim Navigieren auf der Karte im Hintergrund ein neues Kartenteil als Backing-Image vorbereitet, das dem Nutzer nach Fertigstellung angezeigt wird. Die vorberechneten Kartenteile sind dabei drei Mal so breit und drei Mal so hoch wie das Display, so dass man diese „Hintergrundaktivität“ beim Verschieben der Karte in der Regel nicht bemerkt. Nur wenn die Bewegung zu schnell wird oder die Bilder zu langsam „geliefert“ werden, erkennt man schwarze Flächen, die sich dann verzögert mit Bildern füllen.

Vergleichbares passiert beim Hineinzoomen in die Karte. Der Nutzer sieht zunächst eine vergrößerte und damit unscharfe Version des aktuellen Kartenteils, während im Hintergrund ein Kartenteil in höherer Auflösung und mit weniger Bildern vorbereitet wird. In der Summe geht Kiano hier einen Kompromiss ein. Die Pixeldichte der Geräte würde eine schärfere Darstellung der Bilder auf der Karte erlauben. Allerdings müssten dann die Bilder in so höher Auflösung angefordert werden, dass eine flüssige Kartennavigation nicht mehr möglich wäre. So sieht der Nutzer in der Regel eine Karte mit Bildern in halber Auflösung gemessen an den physikalischen Pixeln seines Displays.

Ein anfangs unterschätzter Arbeitsaufwand bei der Umsetzung von Kiano liegt darin begründet, dass sich die Photo Library des Nutzers jederzeit während der Benutzung der App verändern kann. Bilder können durch Synchronisationen mit der iCloud oder mit iTunes verschwinden, sich in andere Alben bewegen, oder neue können auftauchen. Der Nutzer kann Bildschirmfotos machen. Das Photos Framework stellt komfortable Benachrichtigungen für solche Events zur Verfügung. Der Implementierung obliegt es dabei aber herauszubekommen, ob die Karte neu zu sortieren ist oder nicht, ob das gerade anzeigte Bild überhaupt noch existiert und was zu tun ist, wenn es verschwunden ist.

Zusammenfassend kann man feststellen, dass natürlich die Umsetzung der Algorithmen und die Darstellung dessen auf einer Karte zu den spannendsten Teilen der Arbeiten an Kiano zählen, dass aber der Umgang mit einer sich dynamisch ändernden Datenbasis nicht unterschätzt werden sollte.

Autoren

Prof. Dr. Klaus JungProf. Dr. Klaus Jung studierte Physik an der TU Berlin, wo er im Bereich der Mathematischen Physik promovierte. Bis 2008 arbeitete er als Leiter F&E bei der Firma LuraTech im Bereich der Dokumentenverarbeitung und Langzeitarchivierung. In der JPEG-Gruppe leitete er die deutsche Delegation bei der Standardisierung von JPEG2000. Seit 2008 ist er Professor für Medieninformatik an der HTW Berlin mit dem Schwerpunkt „Visual Computing“.

Prof. Dr. Kai Uwe Barthel

Prof. Dr. Kai Uwe Barthel studierte Elektrotechnik an der TU Berlin, bevor er Assistent am Institut für Nachrichtentechnik wurde und im Bereich Bildkompression promovierte. Seit 2001 ist er Professor der HTW Berlin. Hauptforschungsbereiche sind visuelle Bildsuche und automatisches Bildverstehen. 2009 gründete er die pixolution GmbH www.pixolution.de, ein Unternehmen, das Technologien für die visuelle Bildsuche anbietet.

I. Einführung in TensorFlow: Einleitung und Inhalt

 

 

 

1. Einleitung und Inhalt

Früher oder später wird jede Person, welche sich mit den Themen Daten, KI, Machine Learning und Deep Learning auseinander setzt, mit TensorFlow in Kontakt geraten. Für diejenigen wird der Zeitpunkt kommen, an dem sie sich damit befassen möchten/müssen/wollen.

Und genau für euch ist diese Artikelserie ausgelegt. Gemeinsam wollen wir die ersten Schritte in die Welt von Deep Learning und neuronalen Netzen mit TensorFlow wagen und unsere eigenen Beispiele realisieren. Dabei möchten wir uns auf das Wesentlichste konzentrieren und die Thematik Schritt für Schritt in 4 Artikeln angehen, welche wie folgt aufgebaut sind:

  1. In diesem und damit ersten Artikel wollen wir uns erst einmal darauf konzentrieren, was TensorFlow ist und wofür es genutzt wird.
  2. Im zweiten Artikel befassen wir uns mit der grundlegenden Handhabung von TensorFlow und gehen den theoretischen Ablauf durch.
  3. Im dritten Artikel wollen wir dann näher auf die Praxis eingehen und ein Perzeptron – ein einfaches künstliches Neuron – entwickeln. Dabei werden wir die Grundlagen anwenden, die wir im zweiten Artikel erschlossen haben.

Wenn ihr die Praxisbeispiele in den Artikeln 3 & 4 aktiv mit bestreiten wollt, dann ist es vorteilhaft, wenn ihr bereits mit Python gearbeitet habt und die Grundlagen dieser Programmiersprache beherrscht. Jedoch werden alle Handlungen und alle Zeilen sehr genau kommentiert, so dass es leicht verständlich bleibt.

Neben den Programmierfähigkeiten ist es hilfreich, wenn ihr euch mit der Funktionsweise von neuronalen Netzen auskennt, da wir im späteren Verlauf diese modellieren wollen. Jedoch gehen wir vor der Programmierung  kurz auf die Theorie ein und werden das Wichtigste nochmal erwähnen.

Zu guter Letzt benötigen wir für unseren Theorie-Teil ein Mindestmaß an Mathematik um die Grundlagen der neuronalen Netze zu verstehen. Aber auch hier sind die Anforderungen nicht hoch und wir sind vollkommen gut  damit bedient, wenn wir unser Wissen aus dem Abitur noch nicht ganz vergessen haben.

2. Ziele dieser Artikelserie

Diese Artikelserie ist speziell an Personen gerichtet, welche einen ersten Schritt in die große und interessante Welt von Deep Learning wagen möchten, die am Anfang nicht mit zu vielen Details überschüttet werden wollen und lieber an kleine und verdaulichen Häppchen testen wollen, ob dies das Richtige für sie ist. Unser Ziel wird sein, dass wir ein Grundverständnis für TensorFlow entwickeln und die Grundlagen zur Nutzung beherrschen, um mit diesen erste Modelle zu erstellen.

3. Was ist TensorFlow?

Viele von euch haben bestimmt von TensorFlow in Verbindung mit Deep Learning bzw. neuronalen Netzen gehört. Allgemein betrachtet ist TensorFlow ein Software-Framework zur numerischen Berechnung von Datenflussgraphen mit dem Fokus maschinelle Lernalgorithmen zu beschreiben. Kurz gesagt: Es ist ein Tool um Deep Learning Modelle zu realisieren.

Zusatz: Python ist eine Programmiersprache in der wir viele Paradigmen (objektorientiert, funktional, etc.) verwenden können. Viele Tutorials im Bereich Data Science nutzen das imperative Paradigma; wir befehlen Python also Was gemacht und Wie es ausgeführt werden soll. TensorFlow ist dahingehend anders, da es eine datenstrom-orientierte Programmierung nutzt. In dieser Form der Programmierung wird ein Datenfluss-Berechnungsgraph (kurz: Datenflussgraph) erzeugt, welcher durch die Zusammensetzung von Kanten und Knoten charakterisiert wird. Die Kanten enthalten Daten und können diese an Knoten weiterleiten. In den Knoten werden Operationen wie z. B. Addition, Multiplikation oder auch verschiedenste Variationen von Funktionen ausgeführt. Bekannte Programme mit datenstrom-orientierten Paradigmen sind Simulink, LabView oder Knime.

Für das Verständnis von TensorFlow verrät uns der Name bereits erste Informationen über die Funktionsweise. In neuronalen Netzen bzw. in Deep-Learning-Netzen können Eingangssignale, Gewichte oder Bias verschiedene Erscheinungsformen haben; von Skalaren, zweidimensionalen Tabellen bis hin zu mehrdimensionalen Matrizen kann alles dabei sein. Diese Erscheinungsformen werden in Deep-Learning-Anwendungen allgemein als Tensoren bezeichnet, welche durch ein Datenflussgraph ‘fließen’. [1]

Abb.1 Namensbedeutung von TensorFlow: Links ein Tensor in Form einer zweidimensionalen Matrix; Rechts ein Beispiel für einen Datenflussgraph

 

4. Warum TensorFlow?

Wer in die Welt der KI einsteigen und Deep Learning lernen will, hat heutzutage die Qual der Wahl. Neben TensorFlow gibt es eine Vielzahl von Alternativen wie Keras, Theano, Pytorch, Torch, Caffe, Caffe2, Mxnet und vielen anderen. Warum also TensorFlow?

Das wohl wichtigste Argument besteht darin, dass TensorFlow eine der besten Dokumentationen hat. Google – Herausgeber von TensorFlow – hat TensorFlow stets mit neuen Updates beliefert. Sicherlich aus genau diesen Gründen ist es das meistgenutzte Framework. Zumindest erscheint es so, wenn wir die Stars&Forks auf Github betrachten. [3] Das hat zur Folge, dass neben der offiziellen Dokumentation auch viele Tutorials und Bücher existieren, was die Doku nur noch besser macht.

Natürlich haben alle Frameworks ihre Vor- und Nachteile. Gerade Pytorch von Facebook erfreut sich derzeit großer Beliebtheit, da die Berechnungsgraphen dynamischer Natur sind und damit einige Vorteile gegenüber TensorFlow aufweisen.[2] Auch Keras wäre für den Einstieg eine gute Alternative, da diese Bibliothek großen Wert auf eine einsteiger- und nutzerfreundliche Handhabung legt. Keras kann man sich als eine Art Bedienoberfläche über unsere Frameworks vorstellen, welche vorgefertigte neuronale Netze bereitstellt und uns einen Großteil der Arbeit abnimmt.

Möchte man jedoch ein detailreiches und individuelles Modell bauen und die Theorie dahinter nachvollziehen können, dann ist TensorFlow der beste Einstieg in Deep Learning! Es wird einige Schwierigkeiten bei der Gestaltung unserer Modelle geben, aber durch die gute Dokumentation, der großen Community und der Vielzahl an Beispielen, werden wir gewiss eine Lösung für aufkommende Problemstellungen finden.

 

Abb.2 Beliebtheit von DL-Frameworks basierend auf Github Stars & Forks (10.06.2018)

 

5. Zusammenfassung und Ausblick

Fassen wir das Ganze nochmal zusammen: TensorFlow ist ein Framework, welches auf der datenstrom-orientierten Programmierung basiert und speziell für die Implementierung von Machine/Deep Learning-Anwendungen ausgelegt ist. Dabei fließen unsere Daten durch eine mehr oder weniger komplexe Anordnung von Berechnungen, welche uns am Ende ein Ergebnis liefert.

Die wichtigsten Argumente zur Wahl von TensorFlow als Einstieg in die Welt des Deep Learnings bestehen darin, dass TensorFlow ausgezeichnet dokumentiert ist, eine große Community besitzt und relativ einfach zu lesen ist. Außerdem hat es eine Schnittstelle zu Python, welches durch die meisten Anwender im Bereich der Datenanalyse bereits genutzt wird.

Wenn ihr es bis hier hin geschafft habt und immer noch motiviert seid den Einstieg mit TensorFlow zu wagen, dann seid gespannt auf den nächsten Artikel. In diesem werden wir dann auf die Funktionsweise von TensorFlow eingehen und einfache Berechnungsgraphen aufbauen, um ein Grundverständnis von TensorFlow zu bekommen. Bleibt also gespannt!

Quellen

[1] Hope, Tom (2018): Einführung in TensorFlow: DEEP-LEARNING-SYSTEME PROGRAMMIEREN, TRAINIEREN, SKALIEREN UND DEPLOYEN, 1. Auflage

[2] https://www.marutitech.com/top-8-deep-learning-frameworks/

[3] https://github.com/mbadry1/Top-Deep-Learning

[4] https://www.bigdata-insider.de/was-ist-keras-a-726546/

Funktionsweise künstlicher neuronaler Netze

Künstliche neuronale Netze sind ein Spezialbereich des maschinellen Lernens, der sogar einen eigenen Trendbegriff hat: Deep Learning.
Doch wie funktioniert ein künstliches neuronales Netz überhaupt? Und wie wird es in Python realisiert? Dies ist Artikel 2 von 6 der Artikelserie –Einstieg in Deep Learning.

Gleich vorweg, wir beschränken uns hier auf die künstlichen neuronalen Netze des überwachten maschinellen Lernens. Dafür ist es wichtig, dass das Prinzip des Trainings und Testens von überwachten Verfahren verstanden ist. Künstliche neuronale Netze können aber auch zur unüberwachten Dimensionsreduktion und zum Clustering eingesetzt werden. Das bekannteste Verfahren ist das AE-Net (Auto Encoder Network), das hier aus der Betrachtung herausgenommen wird.

Beginnen wir mit einfach künstlichen neuronalen Netzen, die alle auf dem Perzeptron als Kernidee beruhen. Das Vorbild für künstliche neuronale Netze sind natürliche neuronale Netze, wie Sie im menschlichen Gehirn zu finden sind.

Perzeptron

Das Perzeptron (engl. Perceptron) ist ein „Klassiker“ unter den künstlichen neuronalen Netzen. Wenn von einem neuronalen Netz gesprochen wird, ist meistens ein Perzeptron oder eine Variation davon gemeint. Perzeptrons sind mehrschichtige Netze ohne Rückkopplung, mit festen Eingabe- und Ausgabeschichten. Es gibt keine absolut einheitliche Definition eines Perzeptrons, in der Regel ist es jedoch ein reines FeedForward-Netz mit einer Input-Schicht (auch Abtast-Schicht oder Retina genannt) mit statisch oder dynamisch gewichteten Verbindungen zur Ausgabe-Schicht, die (als Single-Layer-Perceptron) aus einem einzigen Neuron besteht. Das eine Neuron setzt sich aus zwei mathematischen Funktionen zusammen: Einer Berechnung der Nettoeingabe und einer Aktivierungsfunktion, die darüber entscheidet, ob die berechnete Nettoeingabe im Brutto nun “feuert” oder nicht. Es ist in seiner Ausgabe folglich binär: Man kann es sich auch als kleines Lämpchen vorstellen, so dass abhängig von den Eingabewerten und den Gewichtungen eine Nettoeingabe (Summe) bildet und eine Sprungfunktion darüber entscheidet, ob am Ende das Lämpchen leuchtet oder nicht. Dieses Konzept der Ausgabeerzeugung wird Forward-Propagation genannt.

Single-Layer-Perceptron

Auch wenn “Netz” für ein einzelnes Perzeptron mit seinem einen Neuron etwas übertrieben wirken mag, ist es doch die Grundlage für viele größere und mehrschichtige Netze.

Betrachten wir nun die Mathematik der Forward-Propagation.

Wir haben eine Menge an Eingabewerten x_0, x_1 \dots x_n. Wobei für x_0 als Bias-Input stets gilt: x_0 = 1,0. Der Bias-Input ist nur ein Platzhalter für das wichtige Bias-Gewicht.

    \[ x = \begin{bmatrix} x_0\\ x_1\\ x_2\\ x_3\\ \vdots\\ x_n \end{bmatrix} \]


Für jede Eingabevariable wird eine Gewichtsvariable benötigt: w_0, w_1 \dots w_n

    \[ w = \begin{bmatrix} w_0\\ w_1\\ w_2\\ w_3\\ \vdots\\ w_n \end{bmatrix} \]

Jedes Produkt aus Eingabewert und Gewichtung soll in Summe die Nettoeingabe z bilden. Hier zeigt sich z als lineare mathematische Funktion, die zwei-dimensional leicht als z = w_0 + w_1 \cdot x_1 mit w_0 als Y-Achsenschnitt wenn x_1 = 0.

    \[ z = w_0 \cdot x_0 + w_1 \cdot x_1 + \dots + w_n \cdot x_n \]

Die lineare Funktion wird nur durch die Sprungfunktion als sogenannte Aktivierungsfunktion zu einer binären Klasseneinteilung (siehe hierzu: Machine Learning – Regression vs Klassifikation), denn wenn z einen festzulegenden Schwellwert \theta überschreitet, liefert die Sprungfunktion \phi mit der Eingabe z einen anderen Wert als wenn dieser Schwellwert nicht überschritten wird.

(1)   \begin{equation*} \phi(z) = \begin{cases} 1 & \text{wenn } z \le \theta \\ -1 & \text{wenn } z < \theta \\ \end{cases} \end{equation*}

Die Definition dieser Aktivierungsfunktion ist der Kern der Klassifikation und viele erweiterte künstliche neuronale Netze unterscheiden sich im Wesentlichen vom Perzeptron dadurch, dass die Aktivierungsfunktion komplexer ist, als eine reine Sprungfunktion, beispielsweise als Sigmoid-Funktion (basierend auf der logistischen Funktion) oder die Tangens hyperbolicus (tanh) -Funktion. Mehr darüber dann im nächsten Artikel dieser Artikelserie, bleiben wir also bei der einfachen Sprungfunktion.

Künstliche neuronale Netze sind im Grunde nichts anderes als viel-dimensionale, mathematische Funktionen, die durch Schaltung als Neuronen nebeneinander (Neuronen einer Schicht) und hintereinander (mehrere Schichten) eine enorme Komplexität erfassen können. Die Gewichtungen sind dabei die Stellschraube, die die Form der mathematischen Funktion gestaltet, aus Geraden und Kurven, um eine Punktwolke zu beschreiben (Regression) oder um Klassengrenzen zu identifizieren (Klassifikation).

Eine andere Sichtweise auf künstliche neuronale ist die des Filters: Ein künstliches neuronales Netz nimmt alle Eingabe-Variablen entgegen (z. B. alle Pixel eines Bildes) und über ein Training werden die Gewichtungen (die Form des Filters) so gestaltet, dass der Filter immer zu richtigen Klasse (im Kontext der Bildklassifikation: die Objektklasse) führt.


Kommen wir nochmal kurz zurück zu der Berechnung der Nettoeingabe z. Da diese Schreibweise…

    \[ z = w_0 \cdot x_0 + w_1 \cdot x_1 + \dots + w_n \cdot x_n \]

… recht anstrengend ist, schreiben Fortgeschrittene der linearen Algebra lieber z = w^T \cdot x.

    \[ z = w^T \cdot x \]

Das hochgestellte T steht dabei für transponieren. Transponieren bedeutet, dass Spalten zu Zeilen werden – oder umgekehrt.

Beispielsweise befüllen wir zwei Vektoren x und w mit beispielhaften Inhalten:

Eingabewerte:

    \[ x = \begin{bmatrix} 5\\ 12\\ 30\\ 2 \end{bmatrix} \]

Gewichtungen:

    \[ w = \begin{bmatrix} 1\\ 2\\ 5\\ 12 \end{bmatrix} \]

Kann nun die Nettoeingabe z berechnet werden, denn der Gewichtungsvektor wird vom Spaltenvektor zum Zeilenvektor. So kann – mathematisch korrekt dargestellt – jedes Element des einen Vektors mit dem zugehörigen Element des anderen Vektors multipliziert werden, die dabei entstehenden Ergebniswerte werden summiert.

    \[ z = w^T \cdot x = \big[1\text{ }2\text{ }5\text{ }12\big] \cdot \begin{bmatrix} 5\\ 12\\ 30\\ 2 \end{bmatrix} = 1 \cdot 5 + 2 \cdot 12 + 5 \cdot 30 + 12 \cdot 2 = 203 \]


Zurück zur eigentlichen Aufgabe des künstlichen neuronalen Netzes: Klassifikation! (Regression, Clustering und Dimensionsreduktion blenden wir ja in diesem Artikel als Aufgabe aus 🙂

Das Perzeptron soll zwei Klassen trennen. Dafür sollen alle Eingaben richtig gewichtet werden, so dass die entstehende Nettoeingabe z die Sprungfunktion dann aktiviert, wenn der Datensatz nicht für die eine, sondern für die andere Klasse ausweist.

Da wir es mit einer linearen Funktion z zutun haben, ist die Konvergenz (= Passgenauigkeit des Models mit der Realität) eines Single-Layer-Perzeptrons nur für lineare Trennbarkeit möglich!

Training des Perzeptron-Netzes

Die Aufgabe ist nun, die richtigen Gewichte zu finden – und nicht nur irgendwelche richtigen, sondern genau die optimalen. Die Frage, die sich für jedes künstliche neuronale Netz stellt, ist die nach den richtigen Gewichtungen. Das Training eines Perzeptron ist vergleichsweise einfach, gerade weil es binär ist. Denn binär bedeutet auch, dass wenn eine falsche Antwort gegeben wurde, muss das jeweils andere mögliche Ergebnis korrekt sein.

Das Training eines Perzeptrons funktioniert wie folgt:

  1. Setze alle Gewichtungen auf den Wert 0,00
  2. Mit jedem Datensatz des Trainings
    1. Berechne den Ausgabewert \^{y}
    2. Vergleiche den Ausgabewert \^{y} mit dem tatsächlichen Ergebnis y
    3. Aktualisiere die Gewichtungen entgegen des Fehlers: w_i = w_i + \Delta w_i

Wobei die Gewichtsanpassung \Delta w_i entgegen des Fehlers (bzw. hin zur jeweils anderen möglichen Antwort) geschieht:

\Delta w_i = (\^{y}_j - y_j ) \cdot x_i

Anmerkung für die Experten: Die Schrittweite \eta blenden wir hier einfach mal aus. Bitte einfach von \eta = 1.0 ausgehen.

\Delta w_i ist die Differenz aus der Prädiktion und dem tatsächlichen Ergebnis (Klasse). Alle Gewichtungen werden mit jedem Fehler gleichzeitig aktualisiert. Sind alle Gewichtungen aktualisiert, kommt der nächste Durchlauf (erneuter Vergleich zwischen \^{y} und y), nicht zu vergessen ist dabei natürlich die Abhängigkeit von den Eingabewerten x:

\Delta w_0 = (\^{y}_j - y_j ) \cdot x_0

\Delta w_2 = (\^{y}_j - y_j ) \cdot x_1

\Delta w_2 = (\^{y}_j - y_j) \cdot x_2

\Delta w_n = (\^{y}_j - y_j) \cdot x_n

Training eines Perzeptrons

Das Training im überwachten Lernen basiert immer auf der Idee, den Ausgabe-Fehler (die Differenz zwischen Prädiktion und tatsächlich korrektem Ergebnis) zu betrachten und die Klassifikationslogik an den richtigen Stellschrauben (bei neuronalen Netzen sind das die Gewichtungen) entgegen des Fehlers anzupassen.

Richtige Klassifikations-Situationen können True-Positives und True-Negatives darstellen, die zu keiner Gewichtsanpassung führen sollen:

True-Positive -> Klassifikation: 1 | korrekte Klasse: 1

\Delta w_i = (\^{y}_j - y_j) \cdot x_i = (1 - 1) \cdot x_i = 0

True-Negative-> Klassifikation: -1 | korrekte Klasse: -1

\Delta w_i = (\^{y}_j - y_j) \cdot x_i = (-1 - -1) \cdot x_i = 0

Falsche Klassifikationen erzeugen einen Fehler, der zu einer Gewichtsanpassung entgegen des Fehlers führen soll:

False-Positive -> Klassifikation: 1 | korrekte Klasse: -1

\Delta w_i = (\^{y}_j - y_j) \cdot x_i = (1 - -1) \cdot x_i = 2 \cdot x_i

False-Negative -> Klassifikation: -1 | korrekte Klasse: 1

\Delta w_i = (\^{y}_j - y_j) \cdot x_i = (-1 - 1) \cdot x_i = -2 \cdot x_i

Imaginäres Trainingsbeispiel eines Single-Layer-Perzeptrons (SLP)

Nehmen wir an, dass x_1 = 0,5 ist und das SLP irrtümlicherweise die Klasse \^{y_1} = -1 ausgewiesen hat, obwohl die korrekte Klasse y_1 = +1 wäre. (Und die Schrittweite lassen wir bei \eta = 1,0)

Dann passiert folgendes:

\Delta w_1 = (\^{y}_1 - y_1) \cdot x_1 = (-1 - 1) \cdot 0,5 = -2,0 \cdot 0,5 = -1,0

Die Gewichtung w_1 verringert sich entsprechend w_1 = w_1 + \Delta w_1 = w_1 - 1,0 und somit wird die Wahrscheinlichkeit größer, dass wenn bei der nächsten Iteration (j=1) wieder die Klasse +1 korrekt sei,  den Schwellwert \phi(z) zu unterschreiten und auf eben diese korrekte Klasse zu stoßen.

Die Aktualisierung der Gewichtung \Delta w_i ist proportional zu x_i. So würde beispielsweise ein neues x_1=2,0 (bei Iteration j=2) zu einer irrtümlichen Klassifikation \^(y_2) = -1 (y_2 = +1) führen, würde die Entscheidungsgrenze zur korrekten Prädiktion der Klasse beim nächsten Durchlauf (j = 3) an w_1 noch weiter in die gleiche Richtung verschoben werden:

\Delta w_1 = (\^{y}_2 - y_2) \cdot x_1 = (-1 - 1) \cdot 2,0 = -2,0 \cdot 2,0 = -4,0

Mehr zum Training von künstlichen neuronalen Netzen ist im nächsten Artikel dieser Artikelserie zu erfahren.

Single-Layer-Perzeptrons (SLP) – Beispiel mit der boolischen Trennung

Verlassen wir nun das Training des Perzeptrons und gehen einfach mal davon aus, dass die idealen Gewichte schon gefunden wurden und schauen uns nun an, was ein Perzeptron alles (nicht) kann. Denn nicht vergessen, es soll eigentlich Klassen unterscheiden bzw. die dafür nötigen Entscheidungsgrenzen finden.

Boolische Operatoren unterscheiden Fälle nach boolischen Werten. Sie sind ein beliebtes “Hello World” für die Einarbeitung in die lineare Entscheidungslogik eines Perzeptrons. Es gibt drei grundlegende boolische Vergleichsoperatoren: AND, OR und XOR

  x1     x2   AND OR XOR
0 0 0 0 0
0 1 0 1 1
1 0 0 1 1
1 1 1 1 0

Ein Perzeptron zur Lösung dieser Aufgabe bräuchte also zwei Dimensionen (+ Bias): x_1 und x_2
Und es müsste Gewichtungen haben, die dafür sorgen, dass die Vorhersage entsprechend der Logik AND, OR oder XOR mit \^{y} = \phi(z) = \phi (w_0 \cdot 1 + w_1 \cdot x_1 + w_2 \cdot x_2) funktioniert.

Dabei ist es wichtig, dass wir auch phi \phi als Sprungfunktion definieren. Sie könnte beispielsweise so aussehen, dass sie auf den Wert \phi(z) = 1 springt, wenn z > 0 ist, ansonsten aber \phi(z) = 0 bleibt.

Das Netz und die Gewichtungen (w-Setup) könnten für die AND- und die OR-Logik so aussehen:

Die Gewichtungen funktionieren beim SLP problemlos, denn wir haben es mit linear trennbaren Problemen zutun:

Kleiner Test gefällig? So nehmen wir uns erstmal die AND-Logik vor:

  • Wenn x1 = 0 und x2 = 0 ist, gilt: z = -1,5 \cdot 1 + 1 \cdot 0 + 1 \cdot 0 = - 1,5,
    wie erhalten als Prädiktion \phi(z) = \phi(-1,5) = 0
  • Wenn x1 = 1 und x2 = 0 ist, gilt: z = -1,5 \cdot 1 + 1 \cdot 1 + 1 \cdot 0 = - 0,5,
    wie erhalten als Prädiktion \phi(z) = \phi(-0,5) = 0
  • Wenn x1 = 1 und x2 = 1 ist, gilt: z = -1,5 \cdot 1 + 1 \cdot 1 + 1 \cdot 1 = + 0,5,
    wie erhalten als Prädiktion \phi(z) = \phi(0,5) = 1

Scheint zu funktionieren!

Und dann die OR-Logik mit

  • Wenn x1 = 0 und x2 = 0 ist, gilt: z = -0,5 \cdot 1 + 1 \cdot 0 + 1 \cdot 0 = - 0,5,
    wie erhalten als Prädiktion \phi(z) = \phi(-0,5) = 0
  • Wenn x1 = 1 und x2 = 0 ist, gilt: z = -0,5 \cdot 1 + 1 \cdot 1 + 1 \cdot 0 = + 0,5,
    wie erhalten als Prädiktion \phi(z) = \phi(0,5) = 1
  • Wenn x1 = 1 und x2 = 1 ist, gilt: z = -0,5 \cdot 1 + 1 \cdot 1 + 1 \cdot 1 = + 1,5,
    wie erhalten als Prädiktion \phi(z) = \phi(1,5) = 1

Super! Jedoch stellt sich nun die Frage, wie das XOR-Problem zu lösen ist, denn das bedingt sowohl die Grenzen von AND als auch jene des OR-Operators.

Multi-Layer-Perzeptron (MLP) bzw. (Deep) Feed Forward (FF) Net

Denn ein XOR kann mathematisch auch so korrekt beschrieben werden: x_1 \text{ xor } x_2 = (x_1 \text{ and } \neg x_2) \text{ or } (\neg x_1 \text{ and } x_2)

Testen wir es aus!

  • Wenn x1 = 0 und x2 = 0 ist, gilt:
    z_1 = w_{10} \cdot 1 + w_{11} \cdot x1 + w_{12} \cdot  x2 = -0.5 \cdot 1 + 1,0 \cdot 0 - 1,0 \cdot 0 = -0,5 und somit \phi(z_1) = \phi(-0,5) = 0
    z_2 = w_{20} \cdot 1 + w_{21} \cdot x1 + w_{22} \cdot  x2 = -0.5 \cdot 1 - 1,0 \cdot 0 + 1,0 \cdot 0 = -0,5 und somit \phi(z_2) = \phi(-0,5) = 0
    z_3 = w_{30} \cdot 1 + w_{31} \cdot \phi(z_1) + w_{32} \cdot \phi(z_2) = -0,5 \cdot 1 + 1,0 \cdot 0 + 1,0 \cdot 0 = -0,5 und somit \phi(z_3) = \phi(-0,5) = 0
  • Wenn x1 = 1 und x2 = 0 ist, gilt:
    z_1 = w_{10} \cdot 1 + w_{11} \cdot x1 + w_{12} \cdot  x2 = -0.5 \cdot 1 + 1,0 \cdot 1 - 1,0 \cdot 0 = 0,5 und somit \phi(z_1) = \phi(0,5) = 1
    z_2 = w_{20} \cdot 1 + w_{21} \cdot x1 + w_{22} \cdot  x2 = -0.5 \cdot 1 - 1,0 \cdot 1 + 1,0 \cdot 0 = -1,5 und somit \phi(z_2) = \phi(-1,5) = 0
    z_3 = w_{30} \cdot 1 + w_{31} \cdot \phi(z_1) + w_{32} \cdot \phi(z_2) = -0,5 \cdot 1 + 1,0 \cdot 1 + 1,0 \cdot 0 = 0,5 und somit \phi(z_3) = \phi(0,5) = 1
  • Wenn x1 = 0 und x2 = 1 ist, gilt:
    z_1 = w_{10} \cdot 1 + w_{11} \cdot x1 + w_{12} \cdot  x2 = -0.5 \cdot 1 + 1,0 \cdot 0 - 1,0 \cdot 1 = -1,5 und somit \phi(z_1) = \phi(-1,5) = 0
    z_2 = w_{20} \cdot 1 + w_{21} \cdot x1 + w_{22} \cdot  x2 = -0.5 \cdot 1 - 1,0 \cdot 0 + 1,0 \cdot 1 = 0,5 und somit \phi(z_2) = \phi(0,5) = 1
    z_3 = w_{30} \cdot 1 + w_{31} \cdot \phi(z_1) + w_{32} \cdot \phi(z_2) = -0,5 \cdot 1 + 1,0 \cdot 0 + 1,0 \cdot 1 = 0,5 und somit \phi(z_3) = \phi(0,5) = 1
  • Wenn x1 = 1 und x2 = 1 ist, gilt:
    z_1 = w_{10} \cdot 1 + w_{11} \cdot x1 + w_{12} \cdot  x2 = -0.5 \cdot 1 + 1,0 \cdot 1 - 1,0 \cdot 1 = -1,5 und somit \phi(z_1) = \phi(-0,5) = 0
    z_2 = w_{20} \cdot 1 + w_{21} \cdot x1 + w_{22} \cdot  x2 = -0.5 \cdot 1 - 1,0 \cdot 1 + 1,0 \cdot 1 = 0,5 und somit \phi(z_2) = \phi(-0,5) = 0
    z_3 = w_{30} \cdot 1 + w_{31} \cdot \phi(z_1) + w_{32} \cdot \phi(z_2) = -0,5 \cdot 1 + 1,0 \cdot 0 + 1,0 \cdot 0 = -0,5 und somit \phi(z_3) = \phi(-0,5) = 0

Es funktioniert!

Mehrfachklassifikation mit dem Perzeptron

Ein Perzeptron-Netz klassifiziert binär, die Ausgabe beschränkt sich auf 1 oder -1 bzw. 0 oder 1.

Jedoch wird in der Praxis oftmals eine One-vs-All (OvA) bzw. One-vs-Rest (OvR) Klassifikation implementiert. In diesem Fall steht die 1 für die Erkennung einer konkreten Klasse, während alle anderen übrigen Klassen als negativ betrachtet werden.

Um jede Klasse erkennen zu können, werden n Klassifizierer (= n Perzeptron-Netze) benötigt. Jedes Perzeptron-Netz ist auf die Erkennung einer bestimmten Klasse trainiert.

Adaline – Oder: die Limitation des Perzeptrons

Das Perzeptron wird nur über eine Sprungfunktion aktiviert. Das schränkt die Feinabstimmung des Trainings enorm ein. Besser sind Aktivierungen über stetige Funktionen, die dann nämlich differenzierbar (ableitbar) sind. Das ergibt eine konvexe Fehlerfunktion mit einem eindeutigen Minimum. Der Adaline-Algorithmus (ADAptive Linear NEuron) erweitert die Idee des Perzeptrons um genau diese Idee. Der wesentliche Fortschritt der Adaline-Regel gegenüber der des Perzeptrons ist demnach, dass die Aktualisierung der Gewichtungen nicht wie beim Perzeptron auf einer einfachen Sprungfunktion, sondern auf einer linearen, stetigen Aktivierungsfunktion beruht.

Single-Layer-Adaline

Wie ein künstliches neuronales Netz mit der Kategorie Adaline trainiert werden kann, wird im nächsten Artikel dieser Artikelserie erläutert.

Weiterführende Netz-Konzepte (CNN und RNN)

Wer bereits mit Frameworks wie TensorFlow in das Deep Learning eingestiegen ist, hat möglicherweise schon erweiterte Konzepte der künstlichen neuronalen Netze kennen gelernt. Die CNNs (Convolutional Neuronal Network) sind im Moment die Wahl für die Verarbeitung von hochdimensionalen Aufgaben, beispielsweise die Bilderkennung (Computer Vision) und Texterkennung (NLP). Das CNN erweitert die Möglichkeiten mit neuronalen Netzen deutlich, indem ein Netz zur Dimensionsreduktion vorgeschaltet wird, im Kern steckt jedoch weiterhin die Idee der MLPs. Beim Einsatz in der Bilderkennung funktionieren CNNs vereinfacht gesprochen so, dass der vorgeschaltete Netzbereich die Millionen Bildpixel sektorweise ausliest (Convolution, Faltung durch Auslesen über Sektoren, die sich gegenseitig überlappen), verdichtet (Pooling, beispielsweise über nicht-lineare Funktionen wie max()) und dann – nach diesem Prozedere – ähnlich eim MLP klassifiziert.

 

Eine andere erweiterte Form sind RNNs (Recurrent Neuronal Network), die ebenfalls auf der Idee des MLPs basieren, dieses Konzept jedoch dank Rückverbindungen (Neuronen senden an vorherige Schichten) und Selbstverbindungen (Neuronen senden an sich selbst) wiederum auf den Kopf stellen.

 

Dennoch ist es für das tiefere Verständnis von CNNs und RNNs essenziell, dass vorher das Konzept des MLPs verstanden ist. Es ist die einfachste Form der auch heute noch am meisten eingesetzten und sehr mächtigen Netz-Topologien.

Im Jahr 2016 hatte Fjodor van Veen von asimovinstitute.org hatte – dankenswerterweise – mal eine Zusammenstellung von Netz-Topologien erstellt, auf die ich heute noch immer mal wieder einen Blick werfe:

Künstliche neuronale Netze – Topologie-Übersicht von Fjodor van Veen

Buchempfehlungen

Die folgenden Bücher nutze ich für mein Selbststudium von Machine Learning und Deep Learning und sind teilweise Gedankenvorlagen auch für diesen Artikel gewesen:

 

Machine Learning mit Python und Scikit-Learn und TensorFlow: Das umfassende Praxis-Handbuch für Data Science, Predictive Analytics und Deep Learning (mitp Professional) Deep Learning mit Python und Keras: Das Praxis-Handbuch vom Entwickler der Keras-Bibliothek(mitp Professional)

 

How To Remotely Send R and Python Execution to SQL Server from Jupyter Notebooks

Introduction

Did you know that you can execute R and Python code remotely in SQL Server from Jupyter Notebooks or any IDE? Machine Learning Services in SQL Server eliminates the need to move data around. Instead of transferring large and sensitive data over the network or losing accuracy on ML training with sample csv files, you can have your R/Python code execute within your database. You can work in Jupyter Notebooks, RStudio, PyCharm, VSCode, Visual Studio, wherever you want, and then send function execution to SQL Server bringing intelligence to where your data lives.

This tutorial will show you an example of how you can send your python code from Juptyter notebooks to execute within SQL Server. The same principles apply to R and any other IDE as well. If you prefer to learn through videos, this tutorial is also published on YouTube here:


 

Environment Setup Prerequisites

  1. Install ML Services on SQL Server

In order for R or Python to execute within SQL, you first need the Machine Learning Services feature installed and configured. See this how-to guide.

  1. Install RevoscalePy via Microsoft’s Python Client

In order to send Python execution to SQL from Jupyter Notebooks, you need to use Microsoft’s RevoscalePy package. To get RevoscalePy, download and install Microsoft’s ML Services Python Client. Documentation Page or Direct Download Link (for Windows).

After downloading, open powershell as an administrator and navigate to the download folder. Start the installation with this command (feel free to customize the install folder): .\Install-PyForMLS.ps1 -InstallFolder “C:\Program Files\MicrosoftPythonClient”

Be patient while the installation can take a little while. Once installed navigate to the new path you installed in. Let’s make an empty folder and open Jupyter Notebooks: mkdir JupyterNotebooks; cd JupyterNotebooks; ..\Scripts\jupyter-notebook

Create a new notebook with the Python 3 interpreter:

 

To test if everything is setup, import revoscalepy in the first cell and execute. If there are no error messages you are ready to move forward.

Database Setup (Required for this tutorial only)

For the rest of the tutorial you can clone this Jupyter Notebook from Github if you don’t want to copy paste all of the code. This database setup is a one time step to ensure you have the same data as this tutorial. You don’t need to perform any of these setup steps to use your own data.

  1. Create a database

Modify the connection string for your server and use pyodbc to create a new database.

  1. Import Iris sample from SkLearn

Iris is a popular dataset for beginner data science tutorials. It is included by default in sklearn package.

  1. Use RecoscalePy APIs to create a table and load the Iris data

(You can also do this with pyodbc, sqlalchemy or other packages)

Define a Function to Send to SQL Server

Write any python code you want to execute in SQL. In this example we are creating a scatter matrix on the iris dataset and only returning the bytestream of the .png back to Jupyter Notebooks to render on our client.

Send execution to SQL

Now that we are finally set up, check out how easy sending remote execution really is! First, import revoscalepy. Create a sql_compute_context, and then send the execution of any function seamlessly to SQL Server with RxExec. No raw data had to be transferred from SQL to the Jupyter Notebook. All computation happened within the database and only the image file was returned to be displayed.

While this example is trivial with the Iris dataset, imagine the additional scale, performance, and security capabilities that you now unlocked. You can use any of the latest open source R/Python packages to build Deep Learning and AI applications on large amounts of data in SQL Server. We also offer leading edge, high-performance algorithms in Microsoft’s RevoScaleR and RevoScalePy APIs. Using these with the latest innovations in the open source world allows you to bring unparalleled selection, performance, and scale to your applications.

Learn More

Check out SQL Machine Learning Services Documentation to learn how you can easily deploy your R/Python code with SQL stored procedures making them accessible in your ETL processes or to any application. Train and store machine learning models in your database bringing intelligence to where your data lives.

Other YouTube Tutorials:

Interview – Die Bedeutung von Machine Learning für das Data Driven Business

Um das Optimum aus ihren Daten zu holen, müssen Unternehmen Data Analytics vorantreiben, um Entscheidungsprozesse für Innovation und Differenzierung stärker zu automatisieren. Die Data Science scheint hier der richtige Ansatz zu sein, ist aber ein neues und schnelllebiges Feld, das viele Sackgassen kennt. Cloudera Fast Forward Labs unterstützt Unternehmen dabei sich umzustrukturieren, Prozesse zu automatisieren und somit neue Innovationen zu schaffen.

Alice Albrecht ist Research Engineer bei Cloudera Fast Forward Labs. Dort widmet sie sich der Weiterentwicklung von Machine Learning und Künstlicher Intelligenz. Die Ergebnisse ihrer Forschungen nutzt sie, um ihren Kunden konkrete Ratschläge und funktionierende Prototypen anzubieten. Bevor sie zu Fast Forward Labs kam, arbeitete sie in Finanz- und Technologieunternehmen als Data Science Expertin und Produkt Managerin. Alice Albrecht konzentriert sich nicht nur darauf, Maschinen “coole Dinge” beizubringen, sondern setzt sich auch als Mentorin für andere Wissenschaftler ein. Während ihrer Promotion der kognitiven Neurowissenschaften in Yale untersuchte Alice, wie Menschen sensorische Informationen aus ihrer Umwelt verarbeiten und zusammenfassen.

english-flagRead this article in English:
“Interview – The Importance of Machine Learning for the Data Driven Business”


Data Science Blog: Frau Albrecht, Sie sind eine bekannte Keynote-Referentin für Data Science und Künstliche Intelligenz. Während Data Science bereits im Alltag vieler Unternehmen angekommen ist, scheint Deep Learning der neueste Trend zu sein. Ist Künstliche Intelligenz für Unternehmen schon normal oder ein überbewerteter Hype?

Ich würde sagen, nichts von beidem stimmt. Data Science ist inzwischen zwar weit verbreitet, aber die Unternehmen haben immer noch Schwierigkeiten, diese neue Disziplin in ihr bestehendes Geschäft zu integrieren. Ich denke nicht, dass Deep Learning mittlerweile Teil des Business as usual ist – und das sollte es auch nicht sein. Wie jedes andere Tool, braucht auch die Integration von Deep Learning Modellen in die Strukturen eines Unternehmens eine klar definierte Vorgehensweise. Alles andere führt ins Chaos.

Data Science Blog: Nur um sicherzugehen, worüber wir reden: Was sind die Unterschiede und Überschneidungen zwischen Data Analytics, Data Science, Machine Learning, Deep Learning und Künstlicher Intelligenz?

Hier bei Cloudera Fast Forward Labs verstehen wir unter Data Analytics das Sammeln und Addieren von Daten – meist für schnelle Diagramme und Berichte. Data Science hingegen löst Geschäftsprobleme, indem sie sie analysiert, Prozesse mit den gesammelten Daten abgleicht und anschließend entsprechende Vorgänge prognostiziert. Beim Machine Learning geht es darum, Probleme mit neuartigen Feedbackschleifen zu lösen, die sich mit der Anzahl der zur Verfügung stehenden Daten noch detaillierter bearbeiten lassen. Deep Learning ist eine besondere Form des Machine Learnings und ist selbst kein eigenständiges Konzept oder Tool. Künstliche Intelligenz zapft etwas Komplizierteres an, als das, was wir heute sehen. Hier geht es um weit mehr als nur darum, Maschinen darauf zu trainieren, immer wieder dasselbe zu tun oder begrenzte Probleme zu lösen.

Data Science Blog: Und wie können wir hier den Kontext zu Big Data herstellen?

Theoretisch gesehen gibt es Data Science ja bereits seit Jahrzehnten. Die Bausteine für modernes Machine Learning, Deep Learning und Künstliche Intelligenz basieren auf mathematischen Theoremen, die bis in die 40er und 50er Jahre zurückreichen. Die Herausforderung bestand damals darin, dass Rechenleistung und Datenspeicherkapazität einfach zu teuer für die zu implementierenden Ansätze waren. Heute ist das anders. Nicht nur die Kosten für die Datenspeicherung sind erheblich gesunken, auch Open-Source-Technologien wie etwa Apache Hadoop haben es möglich gemacht, jedes Datenvolumen zu geringen Kosten zu speichern. Rechenleistung, Cloud-Lösungen und auch hoch spezialisierte Chip-Architekturen, sind jetzt auch auf Anfrage für einen bestimmten Zeitraum verfügbar. Die geringeren Kosten für Datenspeicherung und Rechenleistung sowie eine wachsende Liste von Tools und Ressourcen, die über die Open-Source-Community verfügbar sind, ermöglichen es Unternehmen jeder Größe, von sämtlichen Daten zu profitieren.

Data Science Blog: Was sind die Herausforderungen beim Einstieg in Data Science?

Ich sehe zwei große Herausforderungen: Eine davon ist die Sicherstellung der organisatorischen Ausrichtung auf Ergebnisse, die die Data Scientists liefern werden (und das Timing für diese Projekte).  Die zweite Hürde besteht darin, sicherzustellen, dass sie über die richtigen Daten verfügen, bevor sie mit dem Einstellen von Data Science Experten beginnen. Das kann “tricky” sein, wenn man im Unternehmen nicht bereits über Know-how in diesem Segment verfügt. Daher ist es manchmal besser, im ersten Schritt einen Data Engineer oder Data Strategist einzustellen, bevor man mit dem Aufbau eines Data Science Team beginnt.

Data Science Blog: Es gibt viele Diskussionen darüber, wie man ein datengesteuertes Unternehmen aufbauen kann. Geht es bei Data Science nur darum, am Ende das Kundenverhalten besser zu verstehen?

Nein “Data Driven” bedeutet nicht nur, die Kunden besser zu verstehen – obwohl das eine Möglichkeit ist, wie Data Science einem Unternehmen helfen kann. Abgesehen vom Aufbau einer Organisation, die sich auf Daten und Analysen stützt, um Entscheidungen über das Kundenverhalten oder andere Aspekte zu treffen, bedeutet es, dass Daten das Unternehmen und seine Produkte voranbringen.

Data Science Blog: Die Zahl der Technologien, Tools und Frameworks nimmt zu, was zu mehr Komplexität führt. Müssen Unternehmen immer auf dem Laufenden bleiben oder könnte es ebenso hilfreich sein, zu warten und Pioniere zu imitieren?

Obwohl es generell für Unternehmen nicht ratsam ist, pauschal jede neue Entwicklung zu übernehmen, ist es wichtig, dass sie mit den neuen Rahmenbedingungen Schritt halten. Wenn ein Unternehmen wartet, um zu sehen, was andere tun, und deshalb nicht in neue Entwicklungen investiert, haben sie den Anschluss meist schon verpasst.

Data Science Blog: Global Player verfügen meist über ein großes Budget für Forschung und den Aufbau von Data Labs. Mittelständische Unternehmen stehen immer unter dem Druck, den Break-Even schnell zu erreichen. Wie können wir die Wertschöpfung von Data Science beschleunigen?

Ein Team zu haben, das sich auf ein bestimmtes Set von Projekten konzentriert, die gut durchdacht und auf das Geschäft ausgerichtet sind, macht den Unterschied aus. Data Science und Machine Learning müssen nicht auf Forschung und Innovation verzichten, um Werte zu schaffen. Der größte Unterschied besteht darin, dass sich kleinere Teams stärker bewusst sein müssen, wie sich ihre Projektwahl in neue Rahmenbedingungen und ihre besonderen akuten und kurzfristigen Geschäftsanforderungen einfügt.

Data Science Blog: Wie hilft Cloudera Fast Forward Labs anderen Unternehmen, den Einstieg in Machine Learning zu beschleunigen?

Wir beraten Unternehmen, basierend auf ihren speziellen Bedürfnissen, über die neuesten Trends im Bereich Machine Learning und Data Science. Und wir zeigen ihnen, wie sie ihre Datenteams aufbauen und strukturieren können, um genau die Fähigkeiten zu entwickeln, die sie benötigen, um ihre Ziele zu erreichen.

Data Science Blog: Zum Schluss noch eine Frage an unsere jüngeren Leser, die eine Karriere als Datenexperte anstreben: Was macht einen guten Data Scientist aus? Arbeiten sie lieber mit introvertierten Coding-Nerds oder den Data-loving Business-Experten?

Ein guter Data Scientist sollte sehr neugierig sein und eine Liebe für die Art und Weise haben, wie Daten zu neuen Entdeckungen und Innovationen führen und die nächste Generation von Produkten antreiben können.  Menschen, die im Data Science Umfeld erfolgreich sind, kommen nicht nur aus der IT. Sie können aus allen möglichen Bereichen kommen und über die unterschiedlichsten Backgrounds verfügen.