Posts

Data Dimensionality Reduction Series: Random Forest

Hello lovely individuals, I hope everyone is doing well, is fantastic, and is smiling more than usual. In this blog we shall discuss a very interesting term used to build many models in the Data science industry as well as the cyber security industry.

SUPER BASIC DEFINITION OF RANDOM FOREST:

Random forest is a form of Supervised Machine Learning Algorithm that operates on the majority rule. For example, if we have a number of different algorithms working on the same issue but producing different answers, the majority of the findings are taken into account. Random forests, also known as random selection forests, are an ensemble learning approach for classification, regression, and other problems that works by generating a jumble of decision trees during training.

When it comes to regression and classification, random forest can handle both categorical and continuous variable data sets. It typically helps us outperform other algorithms and overcome challenges like overfitting and the curse of dimensionality.

QUICK ANALOGY TO UNDERSTAND THINGS BETTER:

Uncle John wants to see a doctor for his acute abdominal discomfort, so he goes to his pals for recommendations on the top doctors in town. After consulting with a number of friends and family members, Atlas chooses to visit the doctor who received the highest recommendations.

So, what does this mean? The same is true for random forests. It builds decision trees from several samples and utilises their majority vote for classification and average for regression.

HOW BIAS AND VARIANCE AFFECTS THE ALGORITHM?

  1. BIAS
  • The algorithm’s accuracy or quality is measured.
  • High bias means a poor match
  1. VARIANCE
  • The accuracy or specificity of the match is measured.
  • A high variance means a weak match

We would like to minimise each of these. But, unfortunately we can’t do this independently, since there is a trade-off

EXPECTED PREDICTION ERROR = VARIANCE + BIAS^2 + NOISE^2

Bias vs Variance Tradeoff

HOW IS IT DIFFERENT FROM OTHER TWO ALGORITHMS?

Every other data dimensionality reduction method, such as missing value ratio and principal component analysis, must be built from the scratch, but the best thing about random forest is that it comes with built-in features and is a tree-based model that uses a combination of decision trees for non-linear data classification and regression.

Without wasting much time, let’s move to the main part where we’ll discuss the working of RANDOM FOREST:

WORKING WITH RANDOM FOREST:

As we saw in the analogy, RANDOM FOREST operates on the basis of ensemble technique; however, what precisely does ensemble technique mean? It’s actually rather straightforward. Ensemble simply refers to the combination of numerous models. As a result, rather than a single model, a group of models is utilised to create predictions.

ENSEMBLE TECHNIQUE HAS 2 METHODS:

Ensemble Learning: Bagging and Boosting

1] BAGGING

2] BOOSTING

Let’s dive deep to understand things better:

1] BAGGING:

LET’S UNDERSTAND IT THROUGH A BETTER VIEW:

Bagging simply helps us to reduce the variance in a loud datasets. It works on an ensemble technique.

  1. Algorithm independent : general purpose technique
  2. Well suited for high variance algorithms
  3. Variance reduction is achieved by averaging a group of data.
  4. Choose # of classifiers to build (B)

DIFFERENT TRAINING DATA:

  1. Sample Training Data with Replacement
  2. Same algorithm on different subsets of training data

APPLICATION :

  1. Use with high variance algorithms (DT, NN)
  2. Easy to parallelize
  3. Limitation: Loss of Interpretability
  4. Limitation: What if one of the features dominates?

SUMMING IT ALL UP:

  1. Ensemble approach = Bootstrap Aggregation.
  2. In bagging a random dataset is selected as shown in the above figure and then a model is built using those random data samples which is termed as bootstrapping.
  3. Now, when we train this random sample data it is not mendidate to select data points only once, while training the sample data we can select the individual data point more then once.
  4. Now each of these models is built and trained and results are obtained.
  5. Lastly the majority results are being considered.

We can even calculate  the error from this thing know as random forest OOB error:

RANDOM FORESTS: OOB ERROR  (Out-of-Bag Error) :

▪ From each bootstrapped sample, 1/3rd of it is kept aside as “Test”

▪ Tree built on remaining 2/3rd

▪ Average error from each of the “Test” samples is called “Out-of-Bag Error”

▪ OOB error provides a good estimate of model error

▪ No need for separate cross validation

2] BOOSTING:

Boosting in short helps us to improve our prediction by reducing error in predictive data analysis.

Weak Learner: only needs to generate a hypothesis with a training accuracy greater than 0.5, i.e., < 50% error over any distribution.

KEY INTUITION:

  1. Strong learners are very difficult to construct
  2. Constructing weaker Learners is relatively easy influence with the empirical squared improvement when assigned to the model

APPROACH OUTLINE:

  1. Start with a ML algorithm for finding the rough rules of thumb (a.k.a. “weak” or “base” algorithm)
  2. Call the base algorithm repeatedly, each time feeding it a different subset of the training examples
  3. The basic learning algorithm creates a new weak prediction rule each time it is invoked.
  4. After several rounds, the boosting algorithm must merge these weak rules into a single prediction rule that, hopefully, is considerably more accurate than any of the weak rules alone.

TWO KEY DETAILS :

  1. In each round, how is the distribution selected ?
  2. What is the best way to merge the weak rules into a single rule?

BOOSTING is classified into two types:

1] ADA BOOST

2] XG BOOST

As far as the Random forest is concerned it is said that it follows the bagging method, not a boosting method. As the name implies, boosting involves learning from others, which in turn increases learning. Random forests have trees that run in parallel. While creating the trees, there is no interaction between them.

Boosting helps us reduce the error by decreasing the bias whereas, on other hand, Bagging is a manner to decrease the variance within the prediction with the aid of generating additional information for schooling from the dataset using mixtures with repetitions to provide multi-sets of the original information.

How Bagging helps with variance – A Simple Example

BAGGED TREES

  1. Decision Trees have high variance
  2. The resultant tree (model) is determined by the training data.
  3. (Unpruned) Decision Trees tend to overfit
  4. One option: Cost Complexity Pruning

BAG TREES

  1. Sample with replacement (1 Training set → Multiple training sets)
  2. Train model on each bootstrapped training set
  3. Multiple trees; each different : A garden ☺
  4. Each DT predicts; Mean / Majority vote prediction
  5. Choose # of trees to build (B)

ADVANTAGES

Reduce model variance / instability.

RANDOM FOREST : VARIABLE IMPORTANCE

VARIABLE IMPORTANCE :

▪ Each time a tree is split due to a variable m, Gini impurity index of the parent node is higher than that of the child nodes

▪ Adding up all Gini index decreases due to variable m over all trees in the forest, gives a measure of variable importance

IMPORTANT FEATURES AND HYPERPARAMETERS:

  1. Diversity :
  2. Immunity to the curse of dimensionality :
  3. Parallelization :
  4. Train-Test split :
  5. Stability :
  6. Gini significance (or mean reduction impurity) :
  7. Mean Decrease Accuracy :

FEATURES THAT IMPROVE THE MODEL’S PREDICTIONS and SPEED :

  1. maximum_features :

Increasing max features often increases model performance since each node now has a greater number of alternatives to examine.

  1. n_estimators :

The number of trees you wish to create before calculating the maximum voting or prediction averages. A greater number of trees improves speed but slows down your code.

  1. min_sample_leaf :

If you’ve ever designed a decision tree, you’ll understand the significance of the minimal sample leaf size. A leaf is the decision tree’s last node. A smaller leaf increases the likelihood of the model collecting noise in train data.

  1. n_jobs :

This option instructs the engine on how many processors it is permitted to utilise.

  1. random_state :

This argument makes it simple to duplicate a solution. If given the same parameters and training data, a definite value of random state will always provide the same results.

  1. oob_score:

A random forest cross validation approach is used here. It is similar to the leave one out validation procedure, except it is significantly faster.

LET’S SEE THE STEPS INVOLVED IN IMPLEMENTATION OF RANDOM FOREST ALGORITHM:

Step1: Choose T- number of trees to grow

Step2: Choose m<p (p is the number of total features) —number of features used to calculate the best split at each node (typically 30% for regression, sqrt(p) for classification)

Step3: For each tree, choose a training set by choosing N times (N is the number of training examples) with replacement from the training set

Step4: For each node, calculate the best split, Fully grown and not pruned.

Step5: Use majority voting among all the trees

Following is a full case study and implementation of all the principles we just covered, in the form of a jupyter notebook including every concept and all you ever wanted to know about RANDOM FOREST.

GITHUB Repository for this blog article: https://gist.github.com/Vidhi1290/c9a6046f079fd5abafb7583d3689a410

Wieviele Trainungsbeispiele benötigen Lernverfahren? (1/2)

Kurz nach der Jahrtausendwende begann das Zeitalter der digitalen Daten. Seitdem übertrifft die Menge der digitalen Daten die der Analogen [HL11] und dem Maschinellen Lernen stehen enorme Datenmengen zur Verfügung. Unter dem Buzzword „big data“ wird dabei meist nur das reine Volumen gesehen, andere Faktoren, wie die Frequenz mit der die Daten zu verarbeiten sind und die Variabilität der Formate werden oft vernachlässigt, obwohl auch solche Daten unter „big data“ zusammengefasst werden. Betrachtet man das Volumen dann spielen zwei Faktoren eine zentrale Rolle, die das „big“ von „big data“ ausmachen: die Anzahl der Beispieldatensätze und – und dies wird häufig übersehen – die Anzahl der Eigenschaften mit denen die Beispieldaten beschrieben werden.
Wenn von „big data“ gesprochen wird, wird dabei oft angenommen, dass genügend Datensätze vorhanden sind. Für bestimmte Anwendungen jedoch, müssen die Daten in unterschiedliche Gruppen unterschieden werden, um beim Lernen nicht Äpfel und Birnen in einen Topf zu werfen. In solchen Fällen kann es leicht passieren, dass pro Gruppe zu wenig Beispieldaten vorhanden sind und die Frage an Bedeutung gewinnt: „Reichen die Datensätze eigentlich aus, um ein Vorhersagemodel mit einer gewissen Mindestgüte zu lernen?“.
Leider gibt es bisher keine einfache Antwort auf diese Frage, da diese neben der Anzahl der Eigenschaften – der Dimensionalität – der Daten, von der Struktur des Datenraums, der Verteilung der Daten in diesem Raum, dem verwendeten Lernverfahren, der Ausdrucksfähigkeit seiner Hypothesenrepräsentation und seiner endgültigen Parametrisierung abhängt. In der “Computational Learning Theory” wurden jedoch Ansätze zur Abschätzungen von Untergrenzen erarbeitet, die, unter der Annahme idealer Lernverfahren, zu mindestens eine Aussage über die benötigte Mindestmenge an Trainingsdaten gestatten.
Ziel dieses Beitrags ist es auf möglichst anschauliche Art und Weise anhand eines praktischen Beispiels zu zeigen, welchen Einfluss die Dimensionalität der Daten auf die Abschätzung der Anzahl der benötigten Beispiele für das Erlernen von Vorhersagemodellen – genauer einfachen Klassifikationsmodellen[1] – hat und welche Methoden hierfür existieren. In diesem ersten Teil liegt das Hauptaugenmerk auf endlichen Daten- und Hypothesenräumen und wir werden sehen, dass selbst für eine kleine Anzahl von Eigenschaften – sprich Dimensionen – nützliche Aussagen nur für sehr einfache Hypothesenrepräsentationen möglich sind. Im zweiten Teil werden wir einen Abschätzungsansatz betrachten, der die „Unterscheidungsstärke“ unterschiedlicher Lernverfahren berücksichtigt und mit dem auch Abschätzungen für unendliche Daten- und Hypothesenräume möglich werden.

Anwendungsbeispiel

Betrachten wir das Beispiel eines Online-Shops, der Produkte über das Internet verkauft und dessen Produkte klassifiziert werden sollen. Wie die Produkte klassifiziert werden sollen ist für unsere Betrachtungen unerheblich, was wir aber im Kopf haben sollten: der Absatz unterschiedlicher Produkte folgt einer Potenzverteilung. Eine kleine Zahl von Produkten wird sehr häufig verkauft, so dass für sie viele Datensätze existieren (solche Produkte werden gewöhnlicher Weise in konventionellen Geschäften vertrieben, die nur begrenzte Lagerkapazitäten haben). Der Großteil der Produkte wird jedoch eher seltener umgesetzt (auch als „long tail“ bezeichnet), so dass die Anzahl ihrer Datensätze gering ist; u.U. so gering, dass für sie keine verlässlichen Vorhersagemodelle erlernbar sind.

Zur Illustration gehen wir davon aus, dass in dem Online-Shop Produkte von 500 Marken verkauft werden und diese Produkte neben ihrer Marke durch ihre Größe (10 mögliche Werte), ihre Farbe (20 mögliche Werte), die ersten drei Ebenen der Google Produktkategorien (auf der dritten Ebene 500 mögliche Werte) und ihren Preis (im Bereich 0,49 – 100 €) beschrieben werden.

In diesem Kontext besitzt die Antwort auf die Frage: „Wie viele Daten werden überhaupt für ein Lernverfahren benötigt?“ offensichtlich konkreten Nutzen,

  • da wir abschätzen können, ob für ein konkretes Produkt überhaupt ein sinnvolles Vorhersagemodell erlernbar ist,
  • da wir aus der Abschätzung auf die Dauer der Datensammlung schließen können und
  • um ggf. die Daten von selten verkauften Produkten inhaltlich oder zeitlich zu aggregieren.

Was uns vorweg klar sein sollte

Die Daten, die wir zum Erlernen von Vorhersagemodellen verwenden, werden durch Eigenschaften (normalerweise als Feature, in der Statistik auch als Variablen bezeichnet) beschrieben. Die Eigenschaften werden in beobachtete und abhängige Eigenschaften (im Maschinellen Lernen auch als Label bezeichnet) unterschieden. Die Wertebereiche der Eigenschaften können in endliche und unendliche Wertebereich unterschieden werden.

Wir können nicht erwarten, dass ein Lernverfahren ein 100%ig korrektes Modell erlernt. Lernverfahren versuchen durch einen induktiven Schluss aus Daten ein Vorhersagemodell zu ermitteln. Da die zur Verfügung stehende Datenmenge immer begrenzt sein wird und die Daten damit realistischer Weise unvollständig sein werden, Messfehler und Inkonsistenzen enthalten können, kann auch ein erlerntes Modell niemals 100%ig korrekt sein.

Viele unterschiedliche Modelle können konsistent mit den verfügbaren Daten sein. Ziel des Lernverfahrens ist es daher mit den verfügbaren Daten das bestmögliche Vorhersagemodell zu ermitteln.

Wir müssen in Kauf nehmen, dass unbekannte, zukünftige oder ungewöhnliche Daten zu fehlerhaften Vorhersagen führen. Zum Lernzeitpunkt ist nur ein Ausschnitt aller Daten verfügbar. Zukünftig erhobene Daten können Veränderungen unterliegen oder es können bisher noch nicht gesehene Fälle auftreten, auf die das erlernte Modell nicht mehr richtig passt.

Aus diesen Fakten ergibt sich die einzig realistische Annahme: ein gutes Lernverfahren soll mit großer Wahrscheinlichkeit eine gute Näherung des richtigen Vorhersagemodells erlernen.

Anzahl benötigter Trainingsfälle

Zur Abschätzung der Anzahl benötigter Trainingsfälle – als Beispielkomplexität (sample complexity) bezeichnet – wurden in der Computational Learning Theory unterschiedliche Ansätze entwickelt. Diese Ansätze beschreiben für idealisierte Lernverfahren unter welchen Bedingungen probabilistisch, approximativ, korrektes Lernen (PAC learning) effizient möglich ist. Grundlegend für die Einsetzbarkeit dieser Ansätze ist die Unterscheidung, ob das Lernen in einem endlichen oder unendlichen Hypothesenraum erfolgt, und ob das Lernverfahren konsistente Hypothesen oder nur näherungsweise Hypothesen, z.B. beim Vorliegen von Messfehlern, zu den Daten erlernen kann.

Endliche Datenräume

Sofern die Daten nur durch nominelle Eigenschaften mit endlichen Wertebereichen beschrieben werden[2], lässt sich die Größe des Datenraums relativ einfach bestimmen. Die folgende Tabelle beschreibt für die wichtigsten nominellen Eigenschaftstypen Größenfaktoren, die im Folgenden zur vereinheitlichten Darstellung verwendet werden:

Type
t
Fehlende Werte (NA) ? Größe des Wertebereichs
n
Größenfaktor g(t)
Boolean Nein 2 2
Boolean Ja 2 3
Nominal (Menge) Nein n_t n_t
Nominal (Menge) Ja n_t n_t+1

Die Größe eines endlichen d-dimensionalen Datenraums D kann allgemein mit folgender Formel bestimmt werden |D| = \prod_{i=1}^d{g(t_i)}.

Das Lernproblem besteht darin: aus einer Teilmenge von Trainingsbeispielen S  aus dem Datenraum D, i.e. S \subset D, die ein Trainer dem Lernverfahren vorgibt, um Zielkonzept c zu erlernen, eine Hypothese aus dem Hypothesenraum h \in H des Lernverfahrens zu ermitteln, welche (möglichst) alle positiven Beispiel S_p  umfasst und (möglichst) alle negativen Beispiele S_n  ausschließt.

Einfache Hypothesenrepräsentation

Die einfachste Hypothesenrepräsentation, in der Lernen, welches über einfaches Erinnern hinausgeht, sinnvoll ist, sind Disjunktionen von Bool’schen Eigenschaften. Eine Beispielanwendung für die diese Repräsentation Sinn macht, ist das Erkennen von Spam-Emails anhand des Vorliegens unterschiedlicher alternativer Eigenschaften, die Spam-Emails charakterisieren. Der Hypothesenraum dieser Sprache besitzt eine Größe von |H| = 2^d [FoDS18]. Ein Beispiel für ein verbreitetes Lernverfahren, das eine Hypothesenrepräsentation dieses Typs nutzt, ist Naive Bayes.

Beliebige nominelle Eigenschaften können durch One-Hot- oder Dummy-Encoding als Bool’sche Variablen kodiert werden. Damit ergibt sich zum Erlernen von Disjunktionen kodierter, Bool’scher Eigenschaften die Größe des Hypothesenraums als |H| = 2^{\sum_{i=1}^d{g(t_i)}}.

Um unser Produktbeispiel in dieser Sprache zu repräsentieren, müssen die Eigenschaften geeignet kodiert werden, z.B. durch One-Hot- oder Dummy-Encoding, bei dem jeder Wert einer Eigenschaft durch eine neue bool’sche Variable kodiert wird. Hieraus ergeben sich im Fall von One-Hot-Encoding 500+10+20+500+9941=10.971 und im Fall von Dummy-Encoding 499+9+19+499+9940=10.966 neue Bool’sche Eigenschaften.

Eigenschaftsvektoren (Feature-Vektoren, bzw. Konjunktionen von Eigenschaften) stellen die nächstkomplexere Repräsentationssprache dar, die, solange sie nicht um ein Konstrukt zur Verallgemeinerung erweitert wird, sehr unspektakulär ist, da Beispiele mit ihr lediglich erinnert werden. Erst wenn ein „don’t care“-Symbol, wie z.B. „?“, für beliebige Eigenschaftswerte hinzugefügt wird, wird die extremste Form von Generalisierung möglich, die von einzelnen Werten gleich auf alle Werte generalisiert [ML97]. Durch das „don’t care“-Symbol wird der Größenfaktor g um einen weiteren Wert erhöht. Für diese Repräsentation beträgt die Größe des Hypothesenraums  über rein bool‘schen Eigenschaften (inkl. „don’t care“)  |H| = 3^d und für allgemeine endliche Eigenschaften|H| = \prod_{i=1}^d{(g(t_i)+1)}. Diese Repräsentation ist sehr eingeschränkt und erlaubt es nur einzelne und keine kombinierten Konzepte zu erlernen. Sie ist daher eigentlich nur von theoretischem Interesse und wird – soweit bekannt – in keinem praktisch eingesetzten Lernverfahren genutzt.

Interessanter ist eine Verallgemeinerung dieser Repräsentationssprache, die k-CNF (konjunktive Normalform), die aus einer Konjunktion von Disjunktionen der Länge k besteht, die sowohl polynomielle Beispiel- als auch Zeitkomplexität besitzt [ML97] und für die ein effizienter Algorithmus existiert. Diese Repräsentation lässt sich auch auf einen d-dimensionalen Eigenschaftsvektor übertragen, in dem für jede Eigenschaft Generalisierungen über beliebige Teilmengen erlaubt werden. Die Größe des Hypothesenraums dieser Sprache beträgt |H| = \prod_{i=1}^d{2^{g(t_i)}} = 2^{\sum_{i=1}^d{g(t_i)}}. Mit dieser Sprache können alle Eigenschaften zwar separat auf beliebige Teilmengen generalisiert werden, Korrelationen zwischen Eigenschaften werden jedoch nicht berücksichtigt.

Für Repräsentationssprachen, die keinerlei Einschränkungen machen, besitzt der Hypothesenraum für Daten mit d bool‘schen Eigenschaften eine Größe von |H| = 2^{2^d}. Auf beliebige endliche Eigenschaften übertragen, kann diese Aussage zu |H| = 2^{|D|} = 2^{\prod_{i=1}^d{g(t_i)}} verallgemeinert werden.

Wie aus diesen Abschätzungen ersichtlich wird, hat die Dimensionalität d der Daten einen direkten Einfluss auf die Größe des Hypothesenraums und damit auf die Anzahl der von einem Lernverfahren zu berücksichtigenden Konzepte.

Realistische Hypothesenrepräsentation

Bis auf einfache Disjunktionen bool’scher Eigenschaften, sind einfache Hypothesenrepräsentationen entweder zu ausdrucksschwach, so dass nützliche Konzepte kaum ausdrückbar sind, oder zu ausdrucksstark, so dass Lernen in vertretbarer nicht-exponentieller Zeit nicht möglich ist. Die gängigen Lernverfahren, wie k-Nearest Neighbors, Naive Bayes, Decision Trees, Random Forrests, AdaBoost, XGBoost, Logistic Regression, Support Vector Machines und Neuronale Netze, etc. beschränken durch spezifische Annahmen (inductive bias) den Hypothesenraum, um so nützliche Konzepte in vernünftiger Zeit zu erlernen.

Leider lassen sich nur für wenige der real eingesetzten Verfahren Abschätzungen für die Größe des Hypothesenraums finden.

Verfahren |H| Parameter
Boolean-coded Naive Bayes 2^{\sum_{i=1}^d{g(t_i)}}
Boolean-coded Decision Trees[3] 2^{\sum_{i=1}^d{g(t_i)}}
Boolean-coded Decision Trees with limited depth [4] 2(2^k-1)(1+log_2{⁡\sum_{i=1}^d{g(t_i)}} ) +1 k = Tiefenbegrenzung

Lernen eines zu allen Trainingsdaten konsistenten Konzepts (aka Overfitting)

Unter der Annahme eines idealen Lernalgorithmus, kann die Größe des Hypothesenraums dazu verwendet werden die Anzahl der Trainingsdaten m die ein „konsistenter Lernalgorithmus“[5] benötigt, um ein beliebiges Konzept mit einem maximalen Fehler \epsilon und einer Unsicherheit \delta (bzw. einer Wahrscheinlichkeit von 1 - \delta ) zu erlernen, abgeschätzt werden mit[6]

    \[m \geq \frac{1}{\epsilon}(ln{(|H|)} + ln{(\frac{1}{\delta})})\]

Nehmen wir für unser Beispielszenario an Produkt A wird stündlich im Durchschnitt 100 mal verkauft und Produkt B wird jeden Tag im Schnitt nur 10 mal verkauft.  Zur Vereinfachung nehmen wir weiter an, die Produkte werden jeden Tag – egal ob Wochentag oder Wochenende – nur zwischen 6:00 und 20:00 Uhr verkauft. Pro Monat erhalten wir für Produkt A 42.000 Datensätze und für Produkt B 300 Datensätze.

Der Datenraum D hat eine Größe von |D| = 500*10*20*500*9941 \approx 497 Mrd. Punkten. Mit einer einfachen bool’schen Kodierung ergibt sich d = 500+10+20+500+9951 = 10.971 und |H| = 2^{10.961}.

Wollten wir Datensätze dieser Produkte mit einem Fehler \epsilon von maximal 10% und einer maximalen Unsicherheit \delta = 5% – wie auch immer – klassifizieren, so würden wir für den Einsatz von Naive Bayes oder unbegrenzten DecisionTrees mindestens 76.145 Datensätze benötigen. Weder die monatlichen Daten von Produkt A noch Produkt B würden ausreichen.

Mit einem tiefenbeschränkten Entscheidungsbaum-Verfahren mit 5 Stufen, sind, ungeachtet der Qualität des Lernergebnisses, die Daten von Produkt A und B ausreichend, um die Anforderungen an \epsilon und \delta einzuhalten, da nur mindestens 91 Datensätze benötigt werden.

Ein, dieser Abschätzung zugrundeliegender, idealer Lernalgorithmus, ist jedoch für praktische Anwendungen unrealistisch, da er zwar für die Trainingsdaten ein konsistentes Konzept ermitteln würde, welches aber bei unbekannten, neuen Daten versagen kann. Der angenommene Lernalgorithmus unterliegt der „Überanpassung“ (overfitting).

Nichts desto trotz ist diese Abschätzungsformel hilfreich, da sie eine Aussage erlaubt, wie viele Trainingsbeispiele im besten Fall ausreichen, um mit einem idealen Lernverfahren ein Konzept mit einem maximalen Fehler von \epsilon und einer Unsicherheit von höchstens \delta zu erlernen, das in der genutzten Hypothesenrepräsentation ausdrückbar ist.

Agnostisches Lernen eines Konzeptes, das möglichst gut zu den Trainingsdaten passt

Überanpassung wollen wir in der Regel vermeiden, damit die erlernten Vorhersagemodelle auch auf unbekannte, fehlerbehaftete oder teilweise inkonsistente Daten anwendbar sind. Anders ausgedrückt: das zu erlernende Konzept c kann etwas außerhalb des Hypothesenraums liegen, der durch das eingesetzte Lernverfahren erfasst wird. Dies bedeutet, dass wir im Hypothesenraum des Lernverfahrens nur eine Näherung c' erlernen können, die möglichst gut sein sollte. Solch ein – als agnostisch bezeichnetes – Lernverfahren muss daher bestrebt sein den Fehler zwischen den Trainingsdaten und dem Fehler der sich durch das Erlernen der Näherung c' ergibt möglichst klein zu halten.

Auch hierfür kann, unter der Annahme eines idealen Lernalgorithmus, die Größe des Hypothesenraums dazu verwendet werden die Anzahl der Trainingsdaten m die ein „agnostisches Lernverfahren“ benötigt, um eine gute Näherung an das zu erlernende Konzept in einem endlichen Hypothesenraum mit einem maximalen Fehler \epsilon und einer Unsicherheit \delta (bzw. einer Wahrscheinlichkeit von 1 - \delta) zu erlernen, abgeschätzt werden mit[6]

    \[m \geq \frac{1}{2\epsilon^2}(ln{(|H|)} + ln{(\frac{2}{\delta})})\]

Auf das Beispiel angewendet müsste sich – unter der Annahme gleicher Rahmenbedingungen – die Mindestzahl von Trainingsbeispielen auf m = 490 belaufen. D.h. die Daten von Produkt A könnten zum Lernen der Klassifikation verwendet werden, die Datenmenge für Produkt B wäre jedoch nicht ausreichend.

Folgerung

Mit diesem ersten Beitrag haben wir anhand eines kleinen realen Beispiels gezeigt, wie sich für einen idealen Lernalgorithmus über die Betrachtung der Größe endlicher Hypothesenräume, die Mindestanzahl der benötigten Trainingsbeispiel abschätzen lässt.

Auch wenn es sich hierbei um eine idealisierte Betrachtung handelt, erlauben solche Abschätzungen Aussagen darüber, wann Lernverfahren nur mit einem größeren Fehler behaftet einsetzbar sind.

Diese Betrachtung erstreckte sich bisher nur über endliche Eigenschaften und berücksichtigt die Komplexität der Hypothesenrepräsentation – eine der wesentlichen Eigenschaften eines Lernverfahrens – noch nicht. Dies wird Thema des zweiten Teils sein, in dem wir sehen werden, wie sich Abschätzung auf der Basis der – sogenannten – Vapnik-Chervonenkis-Dimension (VC-Dimension) für viele gängige Klassen von Lernverfahren einsetzen lassen.

Fußnoten

[1] Wir betrachten hierbei nur rein binäre, binomiale resp. Bool’sche Klassifikationsprobleme, deren Aussagen sich jedoch auch auf multinomiale Klassifikation und reell-wertige Vorhersagemodelle übertragen lassen (siehe [ESL09], Seite 238).

[2] Unendlich, überabzählbare Eigenschaften lassen sich in Abhängigkeit vom Anwendungsproblem und der erforderlichen Genauigkeit oft diskretisieren und als ordinale Daten oder Intervalle ganzer Zahlen repräsentieren, wie z.B. Alter, Körpergröße, Längen, Temperatur, und Zeitintervalle usw., wenn es ausreichend ist diese mit einer Genauigkeit von Jahren, cm, mm, Zehntelgrad oder Sekunden zu erfassen.

[3] Vollausgebaute Decision Trees unterliegen der Gefahr der „Überanpassung“ (overfitting) und werden in der Regel gestutzt, um dies zu vermeiden. Die Abschätzung stellt daher die Obergrenze dar.

[4] http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~guestrin/Class/10701/slides/learningtheory-bigpicture.pdf  und https://www.autonlab.org/_media/tutorials/pac05.pdf (Letzter Zugriff: 10.3.2018)

[5] Ein „konsistenter Lernalgorithmus“ erlernt Hypothesen, die – wann immer möglich – perfekt zu den Trainingsdaten passen [ML97].

[6] Details zur Ableitung der beschriebenen Untergrenzen finden sich u.a. in [ML97], [FoML12] oder [FoDS18].

Referenzen

[HL11] „The World’s Technological Capacity to Store, Communicate, and Compute Information“, M. Hilbert, P. López, Science 332, 60, 2011, http://www.uvm.edu/pdodds/files/papers/others/2011/hilbert2011a.pdf (letzter Zugriff: 14. März 2018)

[ESL09] “The Elements of Statistical Learning”, T. Hastie, R. Tibshirani, J. Friedman, 2nd Edition, Springer, 2009.

[ML97] „Machine Learning“, T. Mitchell, McGraw-Hill, 1997.

[FoML12] „Foundations of Machine Learning“, M. Mohri, A. Rostamizadeh, A. Talwalkar, The MIT Press, 2012.

[FoDS18] „Foundations of Data Science“, A. Blum, J. Hopcroft, R. Kannan, Cornell University, https://www.cs.cornell.edu/jeh/book.pdf, Jan. 4th, 2018 (letzter Zugriff: 14. März 2018)