Tag Archive for: UIPath

How to reduce costs for Process Mining

Process mining has emerged as a powerful Business Process Intelligence discipline (BPI) for analyzing and improving business processes. It involves extracting data from source systems to gain insights into process behavior and uncover opportunities for optimization. While there are many approaches to create value with process mining, organizations often face challenges when it comes to the cost of implementing the necessary solution. In this article, we will highlight the key elements when it comes to process mining architectures as well as the most common mistakes, to help organizations leverage the power of process mining while maintain cost control.

Process Mining - Elements of Process Mining and their cost aspects

Process Mining – Elements of Process Mining and their cost aspects

Data Extraction for process mining

Most process mining projects underestimate the complexity of data extraction. Even for well-known sources like SAP-ERP’s, the extraction often consumes 50% of the first pilot’s resources. As a result, the extraction pipelines are often built with the credo of “asap” and this is where the cost-drama begins. Process Mining demands Big Data in 99% of the cases, releasing bad developed extraction jobs will end in big cost chunks down the value stream. Frequently organizations perform full loads of big SAP tables, causing source system performance impact, increasing maintenance, and moving hundred GB’s of data on daily basis without any new value. Other organizations fall for the connectors, provided by some process mining platform tools, promising time-to-value being the best. Against all odds the data is getting extracted then into costly third-party platforms where they can be only consumed by the platforms process mining tool itself. On top of that, these organizations often perform more than one Business Process Intelligence discipline, resulting in extracting the exact same data multiple times.

Process Mining - Data Extraction

Process Mining – Data Extraction

The data extraction for process mining should be well planed and match the data strategy of the organization. By considering lightweighted data preprocessing techniques organizations can save both time and money. When accepting the investment character of big data extractions, the investment should be done properly in the beginning and therefore cost beneficial in the long term.

Cloud-Based infrastructure with process mining?

Depending on the data strategy of one organization, one cost-effective approach to process mining could be to leverage cloud computing resources. Cloud platforms, such as Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure, or Google Cloud Platform (GCP), provide scalable and flexible infrastructure options. By using cloud services, organizations can avoid the upfront investment in hardware and maintenance costs associated with on-premises infrastructure. They can pay for resources on a pay-as-you-go basis, scaling up or down as needed, which can significantly reduce costs. When dealing with big data in the cloud, meeting the performance requirements while keeping cost control can be a balancing act, that requires a high skillset in cloud technologies. Depending the organization situation and data strategy, on premises or hybrid approaches should be also considered. But costs won’t decrease only migrating from on-premises to cloud and vice versa. What makes the difference is a smart ETL design capturing the nature of process mining data.

Process Mining Cloud Architecture on "pay as you go" base.

Process Mining Cloud Architecture on “pay as you go” base.

Storage for process mining data

Storing data is a crucial aspect of process mining, as in most cases big data is involved. Instead of investing in expensive data storage solutions, which some process mining solutions offer, organizations can opt for cost-effective alternatives. Cloud storage services like Amazon S3, Azure Blob Storage, or Google Cloud Storage provide highly scalable and durable storage options at a fraction of the cost of process mining storage systems. By utilizing these services, organizations can store large volumes of event data without incurring substantial expenses. Moreover, when big data engineering technics, consider profound process mining logics the storage cost cut down can be tremendous.

Process Mining - Infrastructure Cost Curve - On-Premise vs Cloud

Process Mining – Infrastructure Cost Curve: On-Premise vs Cloud

Process Mining Tools

While some commercial process mining tools can be expensive, there are several powerful more economical alternatives available. Tools like Process Science, ProM, and Disco provide comprehensive process mining capabilities without the hefty price tag. These tools offer functionalities such as event log import, process discovery, conformance checking, and performance analysis. Organizations often mismanage the fact, that there can and should be more then one process mining tool available. As expensive solutions like Celonis have their benefits, not all use cases make up for the price of these tools. As a result, these low ROI-use cases will eat up the margin, or (and that’s even more critical) little promising use cases won’t be investigated on and therefore high hanging fruits never discovered. Leveraging process mining tools can significantly reduce costs while still enabling organizations to achieve valuable process insights.

Process Mining Tool Landscape

Process Mining Tool Landscape (examples shown)

Collaboration

Another cost-saving aspect is to encourage collaboration within the organization itself. Most process mining initiatives require the input from process experts and often involve multiple stakeholders across different departments. By establishing cross-functional teams and supporting collaboration, organizations can share resources and distribute the cost burden. This approach allows for the pooling of expertise, reduces duplication of efforts, and facilitates knowledge exchange, all while keeping costs low.

Process Mining Team Structure

Process Mining Team Structure

Conclusion

Process mining offers tremendous potential for organizations seeking to optimize their business processes. While many organizations start process mining projects euphorically, the costs set an abrupt end to the party. Implementing a low-cost and collaborative architecture can help to create a sustainable value for the organization. By leveraging cloud-based infrastructure, cost-effective storage solutions, big data engineering techniques, process mining tools, well developed data extractions, lightweight data preprocessing techniques, and fostering collaboration, organizations can embark on process mining initiatives without straining their budgets. With the right approach, organizations can unlock the power of process mining and drive operational excellence without losing cost control.

One might argue that implementing process mining is not only about the costs. In the end each organization must consider the long-term benefits and return on investment (ROI). But with a cost controlled and sustainable process mining approach, return on investment is likely higher and less risky.

This article provides general information for process mining cost reduction. Specific strategic decisions should always consider the unique requirements and restrictions of individual organizations.

Interview Benjamin Aunkofer - Business Intelligence und Process Mining ohne Vendor-Lock-In

Interview – Business Intelligence und Process Mining ohne Vendor Lock-in!

Das Format Business Talk am Kudamm in Berlin führte ein Interview mit Benjamin Aunkofer zum Thema “Business Intelligence und Process Mining nachhaltig umsetzen”.

In dem Interview erklärt Benjamin Aunkofer, was gute Business Intelligence und Process Mining ausmacht und warum Unternehmen in jedem Fall daran arbeiten sollten, den gefürchteten Vendor Lock-In zu vermeiden, der gerade insbesondere bei Process Mining droht, jedoch leicht vermeidbar ist.

Nachfolgend das Interview auf Youtube sowie die schriftliche Form zum Nachlesen:


Interview – Process Mining, Business Intelligence und Vendor Lock

1 – Herr Aunkofer, wir wollen uns heute über Best Practice bei der Verarbeitung von Daten unterhalten. Welche Fehler sollten Unternehmen unbedingt vermeiden, wenn sie ihre Daten zur Modellierung aufbereiten?

Mittlerweile weiß ja bereits jeder Laie, dass die Datenaufbereitung und -Modellierung einen Großteil des Arbeitsaufwandes in der Datenanalyse einnehmen, sei es nun für Business Intelligence, also Reporting, oder für Process Mining. Für Data Science ja sowieso. Vor einen Jahrzehnt war es immer noch recht üblich, sich einfach ein BI Tool zu nehmen, sowas wie QlikView, Tableau oder PowerBI, mittlerweile gibt es ja noch einige mehr, und da direkt die Daten reinzuladen und dann halt loszulegen mit dem Aufbau der Reports.

Schon damals in Ansätzen, aber spätestens heute gilt es zu recht als Best Practise, die Datenanbindung an ein Data Warehouse zu machen und in diesem die Daten für die Reports aufzubereiten. Ein Data Warehouse ist eine oder eine Menge von Datenbanken.

Das hat den großen Vorteil, dass die Daten auf einer Ebene modelliert werden, für die es viele Experten gibt und die technologisch auch sehr mächtig ist, nicht auf ein Reporting Tool beschränkt ist.
Außerdem veraltet die Datenbanktechnologie nur sehr viel langsamer als die ganzen Tools, in denen Analysen stattfinden.

Im Process Mining sind ja nun noch viele Erstinitiativen aktiv und da kommen die Unternehmen nun erst so langsam auf den Trichter, dass so ein Data Warehouse hier ebenfalls sinnvoll ist. Und sie liegen damit natürlich vollkommen richtig.

2 – Warum ist es so wichtig einen Vendor Lock zu umgehen?

Na die ganze zuvor genannte Arbeit für die Datenaufbereitung möchte man keinesfalls in so einem Tool haben, das vor allem für die visuelle Analyse gemacht wird und viel schnelleren Entwicklungszyklen sowie einem spannenden Wettbewerb unterliegt. Sind die ganzen Anbindungen der Datenquellen, also z. B. dem ERP, CRM usw., sowie die Datenmodelle für BI oder Process Mining direkt an das Tool gebunden, dann fällt es schwer z. B. von PowerBI nach Tableau oder SuperSet zu wechseln, von Celonis nach Signavio oder welches Tool auch immer. Die Migrationsaufwände sind dann ein ziemlicher Showstopper.

Bei Datenbanken sind Migrationen auch nicht immer ein Spaß, die Aufwände jedoch absehbarer und vor allem besteht selten die Notwendigkeit dazu, die Datenbanktechnologie zu wechseln. Das ist quasi die neutrale Zone.

3 – Bei der Nutzung von Daten fallen oft die Begriffe „Process Mining“ und „Business Intelligence“. Was ist darunter zu verstehen und was sind die Unterschiede zwischen PM und BI?

Business Intelligence, oder BI, geht letztendlich um die zur Verfügungstellung von guten Reports für das Management bis hin zu jeden Mitarbeiter des Unternehmens, manchmal aber sogar bis zum Kunden oder Lieferanten, die in Unternehmensprozesse inkludiert werden sollen. BI ist gewissermaßen schon seit zwei Jahrzehnten ein Trend, entwickelt sich aber auch immer weiter, mit immer größeren Datenmengen, in Echtzeit usw.

Process Mining ist im Grunde eng mit der BI verwandt, man kann auch sagen, dass es ein BI für Prozessanalysen ist. Bei Process Mining nehmen wir uns die Log-Daten von operativen IT-Systemen vor, in denen Unternehmensprozesse erfasst sind. Vornehmlich ERP-Systeme, CRM-Systeme, Dokumentenmangement-Systeme usw.
Die Daten bereiten wir in sogenannte Event Logs, also Prozessprotokolle, auf und laden sie dann ein eines der vielen Process Mining Tools, egal in welches. In diesen Tools kann man dann Prozess wirklich visuell betrachten, filtern und analysieren, rekonstruiert aus den Daten, spiegeln sie die tatsächlichen operativen Vorgänge wieder.

Auch bei Process Mining tut sich gerade viel, Machine Learning hält Einzug ins Process Mining, Prozesse können immer granularer analysiert werden, auch unstrukturierte Daten können unter Einsatz von AI mit in die Analyse einbezogen werden usw.
Der Markt bereinigt sich übrigens auch dadurch, dass Tool für Tool von größeren Software-Häusern aufgekauft werden. Also der Tool-Markt ist gerade ganz krass im Wandel und das wird die nächsten Jahre auch so bleiben.

4 – Wie ist denn die Best Practice bei der Speicherung, Aufbereitung und Modellierung von Daten?

BI und Process Mining sind eigentlich eher Methoden der Datenanalytik als einfach nur Tools. Es ist ein komplexes System. Ganz klar hierfür ist der Aufbau eines Data Warehouses, dass aus Datensicht quasi so eine Art Middleware ist und Daten zentral allen Tools bereitstellt. Viele Unternehmen haben ja um einiges mehr als nur ein Tool im Haus, die kann man dann auch alle weiterhin nutzen.

Was gerade zum Trend wird, ist der Aufbau eines Data Lakehouses. Ein Lakehouse inkludiert auch clevere Art und Weise auch einen Data Lake.

Den Unterschied kann man sich wie folgt vorstellen: Ein Data Warehouse ist wie das Regel zu Hause mit den Ordnern zum Abheften aller wichtigen Dokumente, geordnet nach … Ordner, Rubrik, Sortierung nach Datum oder alphabetisch. Allerdings macht es auch große Mühe, diese Struktur zu verwalten, alles ordentlich abzuheften und sich überhaupt erstmal eine Logik dafür zu erarbeiten. Ein Data Lake ist dann sowas wie die eine böse Schublade, die man eigentlich gar nicht haben möchte, aber in die man dann alle Briefe, Dokumente usw. reinwirft, bei denen man nicht weiß, ob man diese noch braucht. Die Inhalte des Data Lakes sind bestenfalls etwas vorsortiert, aber eigentlich hofft man ja nicht, da wieder irgendwas drin wiederfinden zu müssen.

5 – Sie haben ja einen guten Marktüberblick: Wie gut sind deutsche Unternehmen in diesen Bereichen aufgestellt?

Grundsätzlich schon mal gar nicht so schlecht, wie oft propagiert wird. In beinahe jedem deutschen Unternehmen existiert mittlerweile ein Data Warehouse sowie Initiativen zur Einführung von BI, Process Mining und Data Science bzw. KI, in Konzernen natürlich stets mehrere. Was ich oft vermisse, ist so eine gesamtheitliche Sicht auf die Dinge, es gibt ja viele Nischenexperten, die sich auf eines dieser Themen stürzen, es aber nicht in Verbindung zu den anderen Themen betrachten. Z. B. steht auch KI nicht für sich alleine, sondern kann sowohl der Business Intelligence als auch Process Mining über den Querverweis befähigen, z. B. zur Berücksichtigung von unstrukturierten Daten, oder ausbauen mit Vorhersagen, z. B. Umsatz-Forecasts. Das ist alles eine Datenevolution, vom ersten Report von Unternehmenskennzahlen über die Analyse von Prozessen bis hin zu KI-getriebenen Vorhersagesystemen.

6 – Wo sehen Sie den größten Nachholbedarf?

Da mache ich es kurz: Unternehmen brauchen Datenstrategien und ein Big Picture, wie sie Daten richtig nutzen, dabei dann auch die unterschiedlichen Methoden der Nutzung dieser Daten richtig kombinieren.

Sehen Sie die zwei anderen Video-Interviews von Benjamin Aunkofer:

Interview Benjamin Aunkofer – Datenstrategien und Data Teams entwickeln!

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Process Mining Tools – Artikelserie

Process Mining ist nicht länger nur ein Buzzword, sondern ein relevanter Teil der Business Intelligence. Process Mining umfasst die Analyse von Prozessen und lässt sich auf alle Branchen und Fachbereiche anwenden, die operative Prozesse haben, die wiederum über operative IT-Systeme erfasst werden. Um die zunehmende Bedeutung dieser Data-Disziplin zu verstehen, reicht ein Blick auf die Entwicklung der weltweiten Datengenerierung aus: Waren es 2010 noch 2 Zettabytes (ZB), sind laut Statista für das Jahr 2020 mehr als 50 ZB an Daten zu erwarten. Für 2025 wird gar mit einem Bestand von 175 ZB gerechnet.

Hier wird das Datenvolumen nach Jahren angezeit

Abbildung 1 zeigt die Entwicklung des weltweiten Datenvolumen (Stand 2018). Quelle: https://www.statista.com/statistics/871513/worldwide-data-created/

Warum jetzt eigentlich Process Mining?

Warum aber profitiert insbesondere Process Mining von dieser Entwicklung? Der Grund liegt in der Unordnung dieser Datenmenge. Die Herausforderung der sich viele Unternehmen gegenübersehen, liegt eben genau in der Analyse dieser unstrukturierten Daten. Hinzu kommt, dass nahezu jeder Prozess Datenspuren in Informationssystemen hinterlässt. Die Betrachtung von Prozessen auf Datenebene birgt somit ein enormes Potential, welches in Anbetracht der Entwicklung zunehmend an Bedeutung gewinnt.

Was war nochmal Process Mining?

Process Mining ist eine Analysemethodik, welche dazu befähigt, aus den abgespeicherten Datenspuren der Informationssysteme eine Rekonstruktion der realen Prozesse zu schaffen. Diese Prozesse können anschließend als Prozessflussdiagramm dargestellt und ausgewertet werden. Die klassischen Anwendungsfälle reichen von dem Aufspüren (Discovery) unbekannter Prozesse, über einen Soll-Ist-Vergleich (Conformance) bis hin zur Anpassung/Verbesserung (Enhancement) bestehender Prozesse. Mittlerweile setzen viele Firmen darüber hinaus auf eine Integration von RPA und Data Science im Process Mining. Und die Analyse-Tiefe wird zunehmen und bis zur Analyse einzelner Klicks reichen, was gegenwärtig als sogenanntes „Task Mining“ bezeichnet wird.

Hier wird ein typischer Process Mining Workflow dargestellt

Abbildung 2 zeigt den typischen Workflow eines Process Mining Projektes. Oftmals dient das ERP-System als zentrale Datenquelle. Die herausgearbeiteten Event-Logs werden anschließend mittels Process Mining Tool visualisiert.

In jedem Fall liegt meistens das Gros der Arbeit auf die Bereitstellung und Vorbereitung der Daten und der Transformation dieser in sogenannte „Event-Logs“, die den Input für die Process Mining Tools darstellen. Deshalb arbeiten viele Anbieter von Process Mining Tools schon länger an Lösungen, um die mit der Datenvorbereitung verbundenen zeit -und arbeitsaufwendigen Schritte zu erleichtern. Während fast alle Tool-Anbieter vorgefertigte Protokolle für Standardprozesse anbieten, gehen manche noch weiter und bieten vollumfängliche Plattform Lösungen an, welche eine effiziente Integration der aufwendigen ETL-Prozesse versprechen. Der Funktionsumfang der Process Mining Tools geht daher mittlerweile deutlich über eine reine Darstellungsfunktion hinaus und deckt ggf. neue Trends sowie optimierte Einsteigerbarrieren mit ab.

Motivation dieser Artikelserie

Die Motivation diesen Artikel zu schreiben liegt nicht in der Erläuterung der Methode des Process Mining. Hierzu gibt es mittlerweile zahlreiche Informationsquellen. Eine besonders empfehlenswerte ist das Buch „Process Mining“ von Will van der Aalst, einem der Urväter des Process Mining. Die Motivation dieses Artikels liegt viel mehr in der Betrachtung der zahlreichen Process Mining Tools am Markt. Sehr oft erlebe ich als Data-Consultant, dass Process Mining Projekte im Vorfeld von der Frage nach dem „besten“ Tool dominiert werden. Diese Fragestellung ist in Ihrer Natur sicherlich immer individuell zu beantworten. Da individuelle Projekte auch einen individuellen Tool-Einsatz bedingen, beschäftige ich mich meist mit einem großen Spektrum von Process Mining Tools. Daher ist es mir in dieser Artikelserie ein Anliegen einen allgemeingültigen Überblick zu den üblichen Process Mining Tools zu erarbeiten. Dabei möchte ich mich nicht auf persönliche Erfahrungen stützen, sondern die Tools anhand von Testdaten einem praktischen Vergleich unterziehen, der für den Leser nachvollziehbar ist.

Um den Umfang der Artikelserie zu begrenzen, werden die verschiedenen Tools nur in Ihren Kernfunktionen angewendet und verglichen. Herausragende Funktionen oder Eigenschaften der jeweiligen Tools werden jedoch angemerkt und ggf. in anderen Artikeln vertieft. Das Ziel dieser Artikelserie soll sein, dem Leser einen ersten Einblick über die am Markt erhältlichen Tools zu geben. Daher spricht dieser Artikel insbesondere Einsteiger aber auch Fortgeschrittene im Process Mining an, welche einen Überblick über die Tools zu schätzen wissen und möglicherweise auch mal über den Tellerand hinweg schauen mögen.

Die Tools

Die Gruppe der zu betrachteten Tools besteht aus den folgenden namenhaften Anwendungen:

Die Auswahl der Tools orientiert sich an den „Market Guide for Process Mining 2019“ von Gartner. Aussortiert habe ich jene Tools, mit welchen ich bisher wenig bis gar keine Berührung hatte. Diese Auswahl an Tools verspricht meiner Meinung nach einen spannenden Einblick von verschiedene Process Mining Tools am Markt zu bekommen.

Die Anwendung in der Praxis

Um die Tools realistisch miteinander vergleichen zu können, werden alle Tools die gleichen Datengrundlage benutzen. Die Datenbasis wird folglich über die gesamte Artikelserie hinweg für die Darstellungen mit den Tools genutzt. Ich werde im nächsten Artikel explizit diese Datenbasis kurz erläutern.

Das Ziel der praktischen Untersuchung soll sein, die Beispieldaten in die verschiedenen Tools zu laden, um den enthaltenen Prozess zu visualisieren. Dabei möchte ich insbesondere darauf achten wie bedienbar und anpassungsfähig/flexibel die Tools mir erscheinen. An dieser Stelle möchte ich eindeutig darauf hinweisen, dass dieser Vergleich und seine Bewertung meine Meinung ist und keineswegs Anspruch auf Vollständigkeit beansprucht. Da der Markt in Bewegung ist, behalte ich mir ferner vor, diese Artikelserie regelmäßig anzupassen.

Die Kriterien

Neben der Bedienbarkeit und der Anpassungsfähigkeit der Tools möchte ich folgende zusätzliche Gesichtspunkte betrachten:

  • Bedienbarkeit: Wie leicht gehen die Analysen von der Hand? Wie einfach ist der Einstieg?
  • Anpassungsfähigkeit: Wie flexibel reagiert das Tool auf meine Daten und Analyse-Wünsche?
  • Integrationsfähigkeit: Welche Schnittstellen bringt das Tool mit? Läuft es auch oder nur in der Cloud?
  • Skalierbarkeit: Ist das Tool dazu in der Lage, auch große und heterogene Daten zu verarbeiten?
  • Zukunftsfähigkeit: Wie steht es um Machine Learning, ETL-Modeller oder Task Mining?
  • Preisgestaltung: Nach welchem Modell bestimmt sich der Preis?

Die Datengrundlage

Die Datenbasis bildet ein Demo-Datensatz der von Celonis für die gesamte Artikelserie netter Weise zur Verfügung gestellt wurde. Dieser Datensatz bildet einen Versand Prozess vom Zeitpunkt des Kaufes bis zur Auslieferung an den Kunden ab. In der folgenden Abbildung ist der Soll Prozess abgebildet.

Hier wird die Variante 1 der Demo Daten von Celonis als Grafik dargestellt

Abbildung 4 zeigt den gewünschten Versand Prozess der Datengrundlage von dem Kauf des Produktes bis zur Auslieferung.

Die Datengrundlage besteht aus einem 60 GB großen Event-Log, welcher lokal in einer Microsoft SQL Datenbank vorgehalten wird. Da diese Tabelle über 600 Mio. Events beinhaltet, wird die Datengrundlage für die Analyse der einzelnen Tools auf einen Ausschnitt von 60 Mio. Events begrenzt. Um die Performance der einzelnen Tools zu testen, wird jedoch auf die gesamte Datengrundlage zurückgegriffen. Der Ausschnitt der Event-Log Tabelle enthält 919 verschiedene Varianten und weisst somit eine ausreichende Komplexität auf, welche es mit den verschiednene Tools zu analysieren gilt.

Folgender Veröffentlichungsplan gilt für diese Artikelserie und wird mit jeder Veröffentlichung verlinkt:

  1. Celonis
  2. PAFnow
  3. MEHRWERK
  4. Fluxicon Disco
  5. Lana Labs (erscheint demnächst)
  6. Signavio (erscheint demnächst)
  7. Process Gold (erscheint demnächst)
  8. Aris Process Mining der Software AG (erscheint demnächst)