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Simple RNN

Prerequisites for understanding RNN at a more mathematical level

Writing the A gentle introduction to the tiresome part of understanding RNN Article Series on recurrent neural network (RNN) is nothing like a creative or ingenious idea. It is quite an ordinary topic. But still I am going to write my own new article on this ordinary topic because I have been frustrated by lack of sufficient explanations on RNN for slow learners like me.

I think many of readers of articles on this website at least know that RNN is a type of neural network used for AI tasks, such as time series prediction, machine translation, and voice recognition. But if you do not understand how RNNs work, especially during its back propagation, this blog series is for you.

After reading this articles series, I think you will be able to understand RNN in more mathematical and abstract ways. But in case some of the readers are allergic or intolerant to mathematics, I tried to use as little mathematics as possible.

Ideal prerequisite knowledge:

  • Some understanding on densely connected layers (or fully connected layers, multilayer perception) and how their forward/back propagation work.
  •  Some understanding on structure of Convolutional Neural Network.

*In this article “Densely Connected Layers” is written as “DCL,” and “Convolutional Neural Network” as “CNN.”

1, Difficulty of Understanding RNN

I bet a part of difficulty of understanding RNN comes from the variety of its structures. If you search “recurrent neural network” on Google Image or something, you will see what I mean. But that cannot be helped because RNN enables a variety of tasks.

Another major difficulty of understanding RNN is understanding its back propagation algorithm. I think some of you found it hard to understand chain rules in calculating back propagation of densely connected layers, where you have to make the most of linear algebra. And I have to say backprop of RNN, especially LSTM, is a monster of chain rules. I am planing to upload not only a blog post on RNN backprop, but also a presentation slides with animations to make it more understandable, in some external links.

In order to avoid such confusions, I am going to introduce a very simplified type of RNN, which I call a “simple RNN.” The RNN displayed as the head image of this article is a simple RNN.

2, How Neurons are Connected

    \begin{equation*}   1 = 3 - 2 \end{equation*}

How to connect neurons and how to activate them is what neural networks are all about. Structures of those neurons are easy to grasp as long as that is about DCL or CNN. But when it comes to the structure of RNN, many study materials try to avoid showing that RNNs are also connections of neurons, as well as DCL or CNN(*If you are not sure how neurons are connected in CNN, this link should be helpful. Draw a random digit in the square at the corner.). In fact the structure of RNN is also the same, and as long as it is a simple RNN, and it is not hard to visualize its structure.

Even though RNN is also connections of neurons, usually most RNN charts are simplified, using blackboxes. In case of simple RNN, most study material would display it as the chart below.

But that also cannot be helped because fancier RNN have more complicated connections of neurons, and there are no longer advantages of displaying RNN as connections of neurons, and you would need to understand RNN in more abstract way, I mean, as you see in most of textbooks.

I am going to explain details of simple RNN in the next article of this series.

3, Neural Networks as Mappings

If you still think that neural networks are something like magical spider webs or models of brain tissues, forget that. They are just ordinary mappings.

If you have been allergic to mathematics in your life, you might have never heard of the word “mapping.” If so, at least please keep it in mind that the equation y=f(x), which most people would have seen in compulsory education, is a part of mapping. If you get a value x, you get a value y corresponding to the x.

But in case of deep learning, x is a vector or a tensor, and it is denoted with \boldsymbol{x} . If you have never studied linear algebra , imagine that a vector is a column of Excel data (only one column), a matrix is a sheet of Excel data (with some rows and columns), and a tensor is some sheets of Excel data (each sheet does not necessarily contain only one column.)

CNNs are mainly used for image processing, so their inputs are usually image data. Image data are in many cases (3, hight, width) tensors because usually an image has red, blue, green channels, and the image in each channel can be expressed as a hight*width matrix (the “height” and the “width” are number of pixels, so they are discrete numbers).

The convolutional part of CNN (which I call “feature extraction part”) maps the tensors to a vector, and the last part is usually DCL, which works as classifier/regressor. At the end of the feature extraction part, you get a vector. I call it a “semantic vector” because the vector has information of “meaning” of the input image. In this link you can see maps of pictures plotted depending on the semantic vector. You can see that even if the pictures are not necessarily close pixelwise, they are close in terms of the “meanings” of the images.

In the example of a dog/cat classifier introduced by François Chollet, the developer of Keras, the CNN maps (3, 150, 150) tensors to 2-dimensional vectors, (1, 0) or (0, 1) for (dog, cat).

Wrapping up the points above, at least you should keep two points in mind: first, DCL is a classifier or a regressor, and CNN is a feature extractor used for image processing. And another important thing is, feature extraction parts of CNNs map images to vectors which are more related to the “meaning” of the image.

Importantly, I would like you to understand RNN this way. An RNN is also just a mapping.

*I recommend you to at least take a look at the beautiful pictures in this link. These pictures give you some insight into how CNN perceive images.

4, Problems of DCL and CNN, and needs for RNN

Taking an example of RNN task should be helpful for this topic. Probably machine translation is the most famous application of RNN, and it is also a good example of showing why DCL and CNN are not proper for some tasks. Its algorithms is out of the scope of this article series, but it would give you a good insight of some features of RNN. I prepared three sentences in German, English, and Japanese, which have the same meaning. Assume that each sentence is divided into some parts as shown below and that each vector corresponds to each part. In machine translation we want to convert a set of the vectors into another set of vectors.

Then let’s see why DCL and CNN are not proper for such task.

  • The input size is fixed: In case of the dog/cat classifier I have mentioned, even though the sizes of the input images varies, they were first molded into (3, 150, 150) tensors. But in machine translation, usually the length of the input is supposed to be flexible.
  • The order of inputs does not mater: In case of the dog/cat classifier the last section, even if the input is “cat,” “cat,” “dog” or “dog,” “cat,” “cat” there’s no difference. And in case of DCL, the network is symmetric, so even if you shuffle inputs, as long as you shuffle all of the input data in the same way, the DCL give out the same outcome . And if you have learned at least one foreign language, it is easy to imagine that the orders of vectors in sequence data matter in machine translation.

*It is said English language has phrase structure grammar, on the other hand Japanese language has dependency grammar. In English, the orders of words are important, but in Japanese as long as the particles and conjugations are correct, the orders of words are very flexible. In my impression, German grammar is between them. As long as you put the verb at the second position and the cases of the words are correct, the orders are also relatively flexible.

5, Sequence Data

We can say DCL and CNN are not useful when you want to process sequence data. Sequence data are a type of data which are lists of vectors. And importantly, the orders of the vectors matter. The number of vectors in sequence data is usually called time steps. A simple example of sequence data is meteorological data measured at a spot every ten minutes, for instance temperature, air pressure, wind velocity, humidity. In this case the data is recorded as 4-dimensional vector every ten minutes.

But this “time step” does not necessarily mean “time.” In case of natural language processing (including machine translation), which you I mentioned in the last section, the numberings of each vector denoting each part of sentences are “time steps.”

And RNNs are mappings from a sequence data to another sequence data.

*At least I found a paper on the RNN’s capability of universal approximation on many-to-one RNN task. But I have not found any papers on universal approximation of many-to-many RNN tasks. Please let me know if you find any clue on whether such approximation is possible. I am desperate to know that. 

6, Types of RNN Tasks

RNN tasks can be classified into some types depending on the lengths of input/output sequences (the “length” means the times steps of input/output sequence data).

If you want to predict the temperature in 24 hours, based on several time series data points in the last 96 hours, the task is many-to-one. If you sample data every ten minutes, the input size is 96*6=574 (the input data is a list of 574 vectors), and the output size is 1 (which is a value of temperature). Another example of many-to-one task is sentiment classification. If you want to judge whether a post on SNS is positive or negative, the input size is very flexible (the length of the post varies.) But the output size is one, which is (1, 0) or (0, 1), which denotes (positive, negative).

*The charts in this section are simplified model of RNN used for each task. Please keep it in mind that they are not 100% correct, but I tried to make them as exact as possible compared to those in other study materials.

Music/text generation can be one-to-many tasks. If you give the first sound/word you can generate a phrase.

Next, let’s look at many-to-many tasks. Machine translation and voice recognition are likely to be major examples of many-to-many tasks, but here name entity recognition seems to be a proper choice. Name entity recognition is task of finding proper noun in a sentence . For example if you got two sentences “He said, ‘Teddy bears on sale!’ ” and ‘He said, “Teddy Roosevelt was a great president!” ‘ judging whether the “Teddy” is a proper noun or a normal noun is name entity recognition.

Machine translation and voice recognition, which are more popular, are also many-to-many tasks, but they use more sophisticated models. In case of machine translation, the inputs are sentences in the original language, and the outputs are sentences in another language. When it comes to voice recognition, the input is data of air pressure at several time steps, and the output is the recognized word or sentence. Again, these are out of the scope of this article but I would like to introduce the models briefly.

Machine translation uses a type of RNN named sequence-to-sequence model (which is often called seq2seq model). This model is also very important for other natural language processes tasks in general, such as text summarization. A seq2seq model is divided into the encoder part and the decoder part. The encoder gives out a hidden state vector and it used as the input of the decoder part. And decoder part generates texts, using the output of the last time step as the input of next time step.

Voice recognition is also a famous application of RNN, but it also needs a special type of RNN.

*To be honest, I don’t know what is the state-of-the-art voice recognition algorithm. The example in this article is a combination of RNN and a collapsing function made using Connectionist Temporal Classification (CTC). In this model, the output of RNN is much longer than the recorded words or sentences, so a collapsing function reduces the output into next output with normal length.

You might have noticed that RNNs in the charts above are connected in both directions. Depending on the RNN tasks you need such bidirectional RNNs.  I think it is also easy to imagine that such networks are necessary. Again, machine translation is a good example.

And interestingly, image captioning, which enables a computer to describe a picture, is one-to-many-task. As the output is a sentence, it is easy to imagine that the output is “many.” If it is a one-to-many task, the input is supposed to be a vector.

Where does the input come from? I told you that I was obsessed with the beauty of the last vector of the feature extraction part of CNN. Surprisingly the the “beautiful” vector, which I call a “semantic vector” is the input of image captioning task (after some transformations, depending on the network models).

I think this articles includes major things you need to know as prerequisites when you want to understand RNN at more mathematical level. In the next article, I would like to explain the structure of a simple RNN, and how it forward propagate.

* I make study materials on machine learning, sponsored by DATANOMIQ. I do my best to make my content as straightforward but as precise as possible. I include all of my reference sources. If you notice any mistakes in my materials, please let me know (email: yasuto.tamura@datanomiq.de). And if you have any advice for making my materials more understandable to learners, I would appreciate hearing it.

Closing the AI-skills gap with Upskilling

Closing the AI-skills gap with Upskilling

Artificial Intelligent or as it is fancily referred as AI, has garnered huge popularity worldwide.  And given the career prospects it has, it definitely should. Almost everyone interested in technology sector has them rushing towards it, especially young and motivated fresh computer science graduates. Compared to other IT-related jobs AI pays way higher salary and have opportunities. According to a Glassdoor report, Data Scientist, one of the many related jobs, is the number one job with good salary, job openings and more. AI-related jobs include Data Scientists, Analysts, Machine Learning Engineer, NLP experts etc.

AI has found applications in almost every industry and thus it has picked up demand. Home assistants – Siri, Ok Google, Amazon Echo — chatbots, and more some of the popular applications of AI.

Increasing adoption of AI across Industry

The advantages of AI like increased productivity has increased its adoption among companies. According to Gartner, 37 percent of enterprise currently use AI in one way or the other. In fact, in the last four year adoption of AI technologies among companies has increased by 270 percent. In telecommunications, for instance, 52 percent of companies have chatbots deployed for better and smoother customer experience. Now, about 49 percent of businesses are now on their way to alter business models to integrate and adopt AI-driven processes. Further, industry leaders have gone beyond and voiced their concerns about companies that are lagging in AI adoption.

Unfortunately, it has been extremely difficult for employers to find right skilled or qualified candidates for AI-related positions. A reports suggests that there are total 300,000 AI professionals are available worldwide, while there’s demand for millions. In a recent survey conducted by Ernst & Young, 51 percent AI professionals told that lack of talent was the biggest impediment in AI adoption.

Further, O’Reilly, in 2018 conducted a survey, which found the lack of AI skills, among other things, was the major reason that was holding companies back from implementing AI.
The major reason for this is the lack of skills among people who aspire to get into AI-related jobs. According to a report, there demand for millions for jobs in AI. However, only a handful of qualified people are available.

Bridging the skill gap in AI-related jobs

Top companies and government around the world have taken up initiatives to close this gap. Google and Amazon, for instance, have dedicated facilities which trains in AI skills.  Google’s Brain Toronto is a dedicated facility to expand their talent in AI.  Similarly, Amazon has facility near University of Cambridge which is dedicated to AI. Most companies either already have a facility or are in the process of setting up one.

In addition to this, governments around the world are also taking initiatives to address the skill gap. For instance, government across the world are pushing towards AI advancement and are develop collaborative plans which aims at delivering more AI skilled professionals. Recently, the white house launched ai.gov which is further helping to promote AI in the US. The website will offer updates related to AI projects across different sectors.

Other than these, companies have taken this upon themselves to reskills their employees and prepare them for future roles. According to a report from Towards Data Science, about 63 percent of companies have in-house training programs to train employees in AI-related skills.

Overall, though there is demand for AI professionals, lack of skilled talent is a major problem.

Roles in Artificial Intelligence
Artificial Intelligence is the most dominant role for which companies hire across artificial Intelligence. Other than that, following are some of the popular roles:

  1. Machine learning Engineer: These are the people who make machines learn with complex algorithms. On advance level, Machine learning engineers are required to have good knowledge of computer vision. According to Indeed, in the last year, demand for Machine Learning Engineer has grown by 344 percent.
  2. NLP Experts: These experts are equipped with the understanding of making machines computer understand human language. Their expertise includes knowledge of how machines understand human language. Text-to-speech technologies are the common areas which require NLP experts. Demand for engineers who can program computers to understand human speech is growing continuously. It was the fast growing skills in Upwork’s list of in-demand freelancing skills. In Q4, 2016, it had grown 200 percent and since then has been on continuously growing.
  3. Big Data Engineers: This is majorly an analytics role. These gather huge amount of data available from sources and analyze it to derive insights and understand patter, which may be further used for machine learning, prediction modelling, natural language processing. In Mckinsey annual report 2018, it had reported that there was shortage of 190,000 big data professionals in the US alone.

Other roles like Data Scientists, Analysts, and more also in great demand. Then, again due to insufficient talent in the market, companies are struggling to hire for these roles.

Self-learning and upskilling
Artificial Intelligence is a continuously growing field and it has been advancing at a very fast pace, and it makes extremely difficult to keep up with in-demand skills. Hence, it is imperative to keep yourself up with demand of the industry, or it is just a matter of time before one becomes redundant.

On an individual level, learning new skills is necessary. One has to be agile and keep learning, and be ready to adapt new technologies. For this, AI training programs and certifications are ideal.  There are numerous AI programs which individuals can take to further learn new skills. AI certifications can immensely boost career opportunities. Certification programs offer a structured approach to learning which benefits in learning mostly practical and executional skills while keeping fluff away. It is more hands-on. Plus, certifications programs qualify only when one has passed practical test which is very advantageous in tech. AI certifications like AIE (Artificial Intelligence Engineer) are quite popular.

Online learning platforms also offer good a resource to learn artificial intelligence. Most schools haven’t yet adapted their curriculum to skill for AI, while most universities and grad schools are in their way to do so. In the meantime, online learning platforms offer a good way to learn AI skills, where one can start from basic and reach to advance skills.

Language Detecting with sklearn by determining Letter Frequencies

Of course, there are better and more efficient methods to detect the language of a given text than counting its lettes. On the other hand this is a interesting little example to show the impressing ability of todays machine learning algorithms to detect hidden patterns in a given set of data.

For example take the sentence:

“Ceci est une phrase française.”

It’s not to hard to figure out that this sentence is french. But the (lowercase) letters of the same sentence in a random order look like this:

“eeasrsçneticuaicfhenrpaes”

Still sure it’s french? Regarding the fact that this string contains the letter “ç” some people could have remembered long passed french lessons back in school and though might have guessed right. But beside the fact that the french letter “ç” is also present for example in portuguese, turkish, catalan and a few other languages, this is still a easy example just to explain the problem. Just try to guess which language might have generated this:

“ogldviisnntmeyoiiesettpetorotrcitglloeleiengehorntsnraviedeenltseaecithooheinsnstiofwtoienaoaeefiitaeeauobmeeetdmsflteightnttxipecnlgtetgteyhatncdisaceahrfomseehmsindrlttdthoaranthahdgasaebeaturoehtrnnanftxndaeeiposttmnhgttagtsheitistrrcudf”

While this looks simply confusing to the human eye and it seems practically impossible to determine the language it was generated from, this string still contains as set of hidden but well defined patterns from which the language could be predictet with almost complete (ca. 98-99%) certainty.

First of all, we need a set of texts in the languages our model should be able to recognise. Luckily with the package NLTK there comes a big set of example texts which actually are protocolls of the european parliament and therefor are publicly availible in 11 differen languages:

  •  Danish
  •  Dutch
  •  English
  •  Finnish
  •  French
  •  German
  •  Greek
  •  Italian
  •  Portuguese
  •  Spanish
  •  Swedish

Because the greek version is not written with the latin alphabet, the detection of the language greek would just be too simple, so we stay with the other 10 languages availible. To give you a idea of the used texts, here is a little sample:

“Resumption of the session I declare resumed the session of the European Parliament adjourned on Friday 17 December 1999, and I would like once again to wish you a happy new year in the hope that you enjoyed a pleasant festive period.
Although, as you will have seen, the dreaded ‘millennium bug’ failed to materialise, still the people in a number of countries suffered a series of natural disasters that truly were dreadful.”

Train and Test

The following code imports the nessesary modules and reads the sample texts from a set of text files into a pandas.Dataframe object and prints some statistics about the read texts:

from pathlib import Path
import random
from collections import Counter, defaultdict
import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
from sklearn.neighbors import *
from matplotlib import pyplot as plt
from mpl_toolkits import mplot3d
%matplotlib inline


def read(file):
    '''Returns contents of a file'''
    with open(file, 'r', errors='ignore') as f:
        text = f.read()
    return text

def load_eu_texts():
    '''Read texts snipplets in 10 different languages into pd.Dataframe

    load_eu_texts() -> pd.Dataframe
    
    The text snipplets are taken from the nltk-data corpus.
    '''
    basepath = Path('/home/my_username/nltk_data/corpora/europarl_raw/langs/')
    df = pd.DataFrame(columns=['text', 'lang', 'len'])
    languages = [None]
    for lang in basepath.iterdir():
        languages.append(lang.as_posix())
        t = '\n'.join([read(p) for p in lang.glob('*')])
        d = pd.DataFrame()
        d['text'] = ''
        d['text'] = pd.Series(t.split('\n'))
        d['lang'] = lang.name.title()
        df = df.append(d.copy(), ignore_index=True)
    return df

def clean_eutextdf(df):
    '''Preprocesses the texts by doing a set of cleaning steps
    
    clean_eutextdf(df) -> cleaned_df
    '''
    # Cuts of whitespaces a the beginning and and
    df['text'] = [i.strip() for i in df['text']]
    # Generate a lowercase Version of the text column
    df['ltext'] = [i.lower() for i in df['text']]

    # Determining the length of each text
    df['len'] = [len(i) for i in df['text']]
    # Drops all texts that are not at least 200 chars long
    df = df.loc[df['len'] > 200]
    return df

# Execute the above functions to load the texts
df = clean_eutextdf(load_eu_texts())

# Print a few stats of the read texts
textline = 'Number of text snippplets: ' + str(df.shape[0])
print('\n' + textline + '\n' + ''.join(['_' for i in range(len(textline))]))
c = Counter(df['lang'])
for l in c.most_common():
    print('%-25s' % l[0] + str(l[1]))
df.sample(10)
Number of text snippplets: 56481
________________________________
French                   6466
German                   6401
Italian                  6383
Portuguese               6147
Spanish                  6016
Finnish                  5597
Swedish                  4940
Danish                   4914
Dutch                    4826
English                  4791
lang	len	text	ltext
135233	Finnish	346	Vastustan sitä , toisin kuin tämän parlamentin...	vastustan sitä , toisin kuin tämän parlamentin...
170400	Danish	243	Desuden ødelægger det centraliserede europæisk...	desuden ødelægger det centraliserede europæisk...
85466	Italian	220	In primo luogo , gli accordi di Sharm el-Sheik...	in primo luogo , gli accordi di sharm el-sheik...
15926	French	389	Pour ce qui est concrètement du barrage de Ili...	pour ce qui est concrètement du barrage de ili...
195321	English	204	Discretionary powers for national supervisory ...	discretionary powers for national supervisory ...
160557	Danish	304	Det er de spørgmål , som de lande , der udgør ...	det er de spørgmål , som de lande , der udgør ...
196310	English	355	What remains of the concept of what a company ...	what remains of the concept of what a company ...
110163	Portuguese	327	Actualmente , é do conhecimento dos senhores d...	actualmente , é do conhecimento dos senhores d...
151681	Danish	203	Dette er vigtigt for den tillid , som samfunde...	dette er vigtigt for den tillid , som samfunde...
200540	English	257	Therefore , according to proponents , such as ...	therefore , according to proponents , such as ...

Above you see a sample set of random rows of the created Dataframe. After removing very short text snipplets (less than 200 chars) we are left with 56481 snipplets. The function clean_eutextdf() then creates a lower case representation of the texts in the coloum ‘ltext’ to facilitate counting the chars in the next step.
The following code snipplet now extracs the features – in this case the relative frequency of each letter in every text snipplet – that are used for prediction:

def calc_charratios(df):
    '''Calculating ratio of any (alphabetical) char in any text of df for each lyric
    
    calc_charratios(df) -> list, pd.Dataframe
    '''
    CHARS = ''.join({c for c in ''.join(df['ltext']) if c.isalpha()})
    print('Counting Chars:')
    for c in CHARS:
        print(c, end=' ')
        df[c] = [r.count(c) for r in df['ltext']] / df['len']
    return list(CHARS), df

features, df = calc_charratios(df)

Now that we have calculated the features for every text snipplet in our dataset, we can split our data set in a train and test set:

def split_dataset(df, ratio=0.5):
    '''Split the dataset into a train and a test dataset
    
    split_dataset(featuredf, ratio) -> pd.Dataframe, pd.Dataframe
    '''
    df = df.sample(frac=1).reset_index(drop=True)
    traindf = df[:][:int(df.shape[0] * ratio)]
    testdf = df[:][int(df.shape[0] * ratio):]
    return traindf, testdf

featuredf = pd.DataFrame()
featuredf['lang'] = df['lang']
for feature in features:
    featuredf[feature] = df[feature]
traindf, testdf = split_dataset(featuredf, ratio=0.80)

x = np.array([np.array(row[1:]) for index, row in traindf.iterrows()])
y = np.array([l for l in traindf['lang']])
X = np.array([np.array(row[1:]) for index, row in testdf.iterrows()])
Y = np.array([l for l in testdf['lang']])

After doing that, we can train a k-nearest-neigbours classifier and test it to get the percentage of correctly predicted languages in the test data set. Because we do not know what value for k may be the best choice, we just run the training and testing with different values for k in a for loop:

def train_knn(x, y, k):
    '''Returns the trained k nearest neighbors classifier
    
    train_knn(x, y, k) -> sklearn.neighbors.KNeighborsClassifier
    '''
    clf = KNeighborsClassifier(k)
    clf.fit(x, y)
    return clf

def test_knn(clf, X, Y):
    '''Tests a given classifier with a testset and return result
    
    text_knn(clf, X, Y) -> float
    '''
    predictions = clf.predict(X)
    ratio_correct = len([i for i in range(len(Y)) if Y[i] == predictions[i]]) / len(Y)
    return ratio_correct

print('''k\tPercentage of correctly predicted language
__________________________________________________''')
for i in range(1, 16):
    clf = train_knn(x, y, i)
    ratio_correct = test_knn(clf, X, Y)
    print(str(i) + '\t' + str(round(ratio_correct * 100, 3)) + '%')
k	Percentage of correctly predicted language
__________________________________________________
1	97.548%
2	97.38%
3	98.256%
4	98.132%
5	98.221%
6	98.203%
7	98.327%
8	98.247%
9	98.371%
10	98.345%
11	98.327%
12	98.3%
13	98.256%
14	98.274%
15	98.309%

As you can see in the output the reliability of the language classifier is generally very high: It starts at about 97.5% for k = 1, increases for with increasing values of k until it reaches a maximum level of about 98.5% at k ≈ 10.

Using the Classifier to predict languages of texts

Now that we have trained and tested the classifier we want to use it to predict the language of example texts. To do that we need two more functions, shown in the following piece of code. The first one extracts the nessesary features from the sample text and predict_lang() predicts the language of a the texts:

def extract_features(text, features):
    '''Extracts all alphabetic characters and add their ratios as feature
    
    extract_features(text, features) -> np.array
    '''
    textlen = len(text)
    ratios = []
    text = text.lower()
    for feature in features:
        ratios.append(text.count(feature) / textlen)
    return np.array(ratios)

def predict_lang(text, clf=clf):
    '''Predicts the language of a given text and classifier
    
    predict_lang(text, clf) -> str
    '''
    extracted_features = extract_features(text, features)
    return clf.predict(np.array(np.array([extracted_features])))[0]

text_sample = df.sample(10)['text']

for example_text in text_sample:
    print('%-20s'  % predict_lang(example_text, clf) + '\t' + example_text[:60] + '...')
Italian             	Auspico che i progetti riguardanti i programmi possano contr...
English             	When that time comes , when we have used up all our resource...
Portuguese          	Creio que o Parlamento protesta muitas vezes contra este mét...
Spanish             	Sobre la base de esta posición , me parece que se puede enco...
Dutch               	Ik voel mij daardoor aangemoedigd omdat ik een brede consens...
Spanish             	Señor Presidente , Señorías , antes que nada , quisiera pron...
Italian             	Ricordo altresì , signora Presidente , che durante la preced...
Swedish             	Betänkande ( A5-0107 / 1999 ) av Berend för utskottet för re...
English             	This responsibility cannot only be borne by the Commissioner...
Portuguese          	A nossa leitura comum é que esse partido tem uma posição man...

With this classifier it is now also possible to predict the language of the randomized example snipplet from the introduction (which is acutally created from the first paragraph of this article):

example_text = "ogldviisnntmeyoiiesettpetorotrcitglloeleiengehorntsnraviedeenltseaecithooheinsnstiofwtoienaoaeefiitaeeauobmeeetdmsflteightnttxipecnlgtetgteyhatncdisaceahrfomseehmsindrlttdthoaranthahdgasaebeaturoehtrnnanftxndaeeiposttmnhgttagtsheitistrrcudf"
predict_lang(example_text)
'English'

The KNN classifier of sklearn also offers the possibility to predict the propability with which a given classification is made. While the probability distribution for a specific language is relativly clear for long sample texts it decreases noticeably the shorter the texts are.

def dict_invert(dictionary):
    ''' Inverts keys and values of a dictionary
    
    dict_invert(dictionary) -> collections.defaultdict(list)
    '''
    inverse_dict = defaultdict(list)
    for key, value in dictionary.items():
        inverse_dict[value].append(key)
    return inverse_dict

def get_propabilities(text, features=features):
    '''Prints the probability for every language of a given text
    
    get_propabilities(text, features)
    '''
    results = clf.predict_proba(extract_features(text, features=features).reshape(1, -1))
    for result in zip(clf.classes_, results[0]):
        print('%-20s' % result[0] + '%7s %%' % str(round(float(100 * result[1]), 4)))


example_text = 'ogldviisnntmeyoiiesettpetorotrcitglloeleiengehorntsnraviedeenltseaecithooheinsnstiofwtoienaoaeefiitaeeauobmeeetdmsflteightnttxipecnlgtetgteyhatncdisaceahrfomseehmsindrlttdthoaranthahdgasaebeaturoehtrnnanftxndaeeiposttmnhgttagtsheitistrrcudf'
print(example_text)
get_propabilities(example_text + '\n')
print('\n')
example_text2 = 'Dies ist ein kurzer Beispielsatz.'
print(example_text2)
get_propabilities(example_text2 + '\n')
ogldviisnntmeyoiiesettpetorotrcitglloeleiengehorntsnraviedeenltseaecithooheinsnstiofwtoienaoaeefiitaeeauobmeeetdmsflteightnttxipecnlgtetgteyhatncdisaceahrfomseehmsindrlttdthoaranthahdgasaebeaturoehtrnnanftxndaeeiposttmnhgttagtsheitistrrcudf
Danish                  0.0 %
Dutch                   0.0 %
English               100.0 %
Finnish                 0.0 %
French                  0.0 %
German                  0.0 %
Italian                 0.0 %
Portuguese              0.0 %
Spanish                 0.0 %
Swedish                 0.0 %


Dies ist ein kurzer Beispielsatz.
Danish                  0.0 %
Dutch                   0.0 %
English                 0.0 %
Finnish                 0.0 %
French              18.1818 %
German              72.7273 %
Italian              9.0909 %
Portuguese              0.0 %
Spanish                 0.0 %
Swedish                 0.0 %

Background and Insights

Why does a relative simple model like counting letters acutally work? Every language has a specific pattern of letter frequencies which can be used as a kind of fingerprint: While there are almost no y‘s in the german language this letter is quite common in english. In french the letter k is not very common because it is replaced with q in most cases.

For a better understanding look at the output of the following code snipplet where only three letters already lead to a noticable form of clustering:

projection='3d')
legend = []
X, Y, Z = 'e', 'g', 'h'

def iterlog(ln):
    retvals = []
    for n in ln:
        try:
            retvals.append(np.log(n))
        except:
            retvals.append(None)
    return retvals

for X in ['t']:
    ax = plt.axes(projection='3d')
    ax.xy_viewLim.intervalx = [-3.5, -2]
    legend = []
    for lang in [l for l in df.groupby('lang') if l[0] in {'German', 'English', 'Finnish', 'French', 'Danish'}]:
        sample = lang[1].sample(4000)

        legend.append(lang[0])
        ax.scatter3D(iterlog(sample[X]), iterlog(sample[Y]), iterlog(sample[Z]))

    ax.set_title('log(10) of the Relativ Frequencies of "' + X.upper() + "', '" + Y.upper() + '" and "' + Z.upper() + '"\n\n')
    ax.set_xlabel(X.upper())
    ax.set_ylabel(Y.upper())
    ax.set_zlabel(Z.upper())
    plt.legend(legend)
    plt.show()

 

Even though every single letter frequency by itself is not a very reliable indicator, the set of frequencies of all present letters in a text is a quite good evidence because it will more or less represent the letter frequency fingerprint of the given language. Since it is quite hard to imagine or visualize the above plot in more than three dimensions, I used a little trick which shows that every language has its own typical fingerprint of letter frequencies:

legend = []
fig = plt.figure(figsize=(15, 10))
plt.axes(yscale='log')
    
langs = defaultdict(list)

for lang in [l for l in df.groupby('lang') if l[0] in set(df['lang'])]:
    for feature in 'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz':
        langs[lang[0]].append(lang[1][feature].mean())

mean_frequencies = {feature:df[feature].mean() for feature in 'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz'}
for i in langs.items():
    legend.append(i[0])
    j = np.array(i[1]) / np.array([mean_frequencies[c] for c in 'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz'])
    plt.plot([c for c in 'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz'], j)
plt.title('Log. of relative Frequencies compared to the mean Frequency in all texts')
plt.xlabel('Letters')
plt.ylabel('(log(Lang. Frequencies / Mean Frequency)')
plt.legend(legend)
plt.grid()
plt.show()

What more?

Beside the fact, that letter frequencies alone, allow us to predict the language of every example text (at least in the 10 languages with latin alphabet we trained for) with almost complete certancy there is even more information hidden in the set of sample texts.

As you might know, most languages in europe belong to either the romanian or the indogermanic language family (which is actually because the romans conquered only half of europe). The border between them could be located in belgium, between france and germany and in swiss. West of this border the romanian languages, which originate from latin, are still spoken, like spanish, portouguese and french. In the middle and northern part of europe the indogermanic languages are very common like german, dutch, swedish ect. If we plot the analysed languages with a different colour sheme this border gets quite clear and allows us to take a look back in history that tells us where our languages originate from:

legend = []
fig = plt.figure(figsize=(15, 10))
plt.axes(yscale='linear')
    
langs = defaultdict(list)
for lang in [l for l in df.groupby('lang') if l[0] in {'German', 'English', 'French', 'Spanish', 'Portuguese', 'Dutch', 'Swedish', 'Danish', 'Italian'}]:
    for feature in 'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz':
        langs[lang[0]].append(lang[1][feature].mean())

colordict = {l[0]:l[1] for l in zip([lang for lang in langs], ['brown', 'tomato', 'orangered',
                                                               'green', 'red', 'forestgreen', 'limegreen',
                                                               'darkgreen', 'darkred'])}
mean_frequencies = {feature:df[feature].mean() for feature in 'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz'}
for i in langs.items():
    legend.append(i[0])
    j = np.array(i[1]) / np.array([mean_frequencies[c] for c in 'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz'])
    plt.plot([c for c in 'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz'], j, color=colordict[i[0]])
#     plt.plot([c for c in 'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz'], i[1], color=colordict[i[0]])
plt.title('Log. of relative Frequencies compared to the mean Frequency in all texts')
plt.xlabel('Letters')
plt.ylabel('(log(Lang. Frequencies / Mean Frequency)')
plt.legend(legend)
plt.grid()
plt.show()

As you can see the more common letters, especially the vocals like a, e, i, o and u have almost the same frequency in all of this languages. Far more interesting are letters like q, k, c and w: While k is quite common in all of the indogermanic languages it is quite rare in romanic languages because the same sound is written with the letters q or c.
As a result it could be said, that even “boring” sets of data (just give it a try and read all the texts of the protocolls of the EU parliament…) could contain quite interesting patterns which – in this case – allows us to predict quite precisely which language a given text sample is written in, without the need of any translation program or to speak the languages. And as an interesting side effect, where certain things in history happend (or not happend): After two thousand years have passed, modern machine learning techniques could easily uncover this history because even though all these different languages developed, they still have a set of hidden but common patterns that since than stayed the same.

Sentiment Analysis using Python

One of the applications of text mining is sentiment analysis. Most of the data is getting generated in textual format and in the past few years, people are talking more about NLP. Improvement is a continuous process many product based companies leverage these text mining techniques to examine the sentiments of the customers to find about what they can improve in the product. This information also helps them to understand the trend and demand of the end user which results in Customer satisfaction.

As text mining is a vast concept, the article is divided into two subchapters. The main focus of this article will be calculating two scores: sentiment polarity and subjectivity using python. The range of polarity is from -1 to 1(negative to positive) and will tell us if the text contains positive or negative feedback. Most companies prefer to stop their analysis here but in our second article, we will try to extend our analysis by creating some labels out of these scores. Finally, a multi-label multi-class classifier can be trained to predict future reviews.

Without any delay let’s deep dive into the code and mine some knowledge from textual data.

There are a few NLP libraries existing in Python such as Spacy, NLTK, gensim, TextBlob, etc. For this particular article, we will be using NLTK for pre-processing and TextBlob to calculate sentiment polarity and subjectivity.

import pandas as pd
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
%matplotlib inline  
import nltk
from nltk import word_tokenize, sent_tokenize
from nltk.corpus import stopwords
from nltk.stem import LancasterStemmer, WordNetLemmatizer, PorterStemmer
from wordcloud import WordCloud, STOPWORDS
from textblob import TextBlob

The dataset is available here for download and we will be using pandas read_csv function to import the dataset. I would like to share an additional information here which I came to know about recently. Those who have already used python and pandas before they probably know that read_csv is by far one of the most used function. However, it can take a while to upload a big file. Some folks from  RISELab at UC Berkeley created Modin or Pandas on Ray which is a library that speeds up this process by changing a single line of code.

amz_reviews = pd.read_csv("1429_1.csv")

After importing the dataset it is recommended to understand it first and study the structure of the dataset. At this point we are interested to know how many columns are there and what are these columns so I am going to check the shape of the data frame and go through each column name to see if we need them or not.

amz_reviews.shape
(34660, 21)

amz_reviews.columns
Index(['id', 'name', 'asins', 'brand', 'categories', 'keys', 'manufacturer',
       'reviews.date', 'reviews.dateAdded', 'reviews.dateSeen',
       'reviews.didPurchase', 'reviews.doRecommend', 'reviews.id',
       'reviews.numHelpful', 'reviews.rating', 'reviews.sourceURLs',
       'reviews.text', 'reviews.title', 'reviews.userCity',
       'reviews.userProvince', 'reviews.username'],
      dtype='object')

 

There are so many columns which are not useful for our sentiment analysis and it’s better to remove these columns. There are many ways to do that: either just select the columns which you want to keep or select the columns you want to remove and then use the drop function to remove it from the data frame. I prefer the second option as it allows me to look at each column one more time so I don’t miss any important variable for the analysis.

columns = ['id','name','keys','manufacturer','reviews.dateAdded', 'reviews.date','reviews.didPurchase',
          'reviews.userCity', 'reviews.userProvince', 'reviews.dateSeen', 'reviews.doRecommend','asins',
          'reviews.id', 'reviews.numHelpful', 'reviews.sourceURLs', 'reviews.title']

df = pd.DataFrame(amz_reviews.drop(columns,axis=1,inplace=False))

Now let’s dive deep into the data and try to mine some knowledge from the remaining columns. The first step we would want to follow here is just to look at the distribution of the variables and try to make some notes. First, let’s look at the distribution of the ratings.

df['reviews.rating'].value_counts().plot(kind='bar')

Graphs are powerful and at this point, just by looking at the above bar graph we can conclude that most people are somehow satisfied with the products offered at Amazon. The reason I am saying ‘at’ Amazon is because it is just a platform where anyone can sell their products and the user are giving ratings to the product and not to Amazon. However, if the user is satisfied with the products it also means that Amazon has a lower return rate and lower fraud case (from seller side). The job of a Data Scientist relies not only on how good a model is but also on how useful it is for the business and that’s why these business insights are really important.

Data pre-processing for textual variables

Lowercasing

Before we move forward to calculate the sentiment scores for each review it is important to pre-process the textual data. Lowercasing helps in the process of normalization which is an important step to keep the words in a uniform manner (Welbers, et al., 2017, pp. 245-265).

## Change the reviews type to string
df['reviews.text'] = df['reviews.text'].astype(str)

## Before lowercasing 
df['reviews.text'][2]
'Inexpensive tablet for him to use and learn on, step up from the NABI. He was thrilled with it, learn how to Skype on it 
already...'

## Lowercase all reviews
df['reviews.text'] = df['reviews.text'].apply(lambda x: " ".join(x.lower() for x in x.split()))
df['reviews.text'][2] ## to see the difference
'inexpensive tablet for him to use and learn on, step up from the nabi. he was thrilled with it, learn how to skype on it 
already...'

Special characters

Special characters are non-alphabetic and non-numeric values such as {!,@#$%^ *()~;:/<>|+_-[]?}. Dealing with numbers is straightforward but special characters can be sometimes tricky. During tokenization, special characters create their own tokens and again not helpful for any algorithm, likewise, numbers.

## remove punctuation
df['reviews.text'] = df['reviews.text'].str.replace('[^ws]','')
df['reviews.text'][2]
'inexpensive tablet for him to use and learn on step up from the nabi he was thrilled with it learn how to skype on it already'

Stopwords

Stop-words being most commonly used in the English language; however, these words have no predictive power in reality. Words such as I, me, myself, he, she, they, our, mine, you, yours etc.

stop = stopwords.words('english')
df['reviews.text'] = df['reviews.text'].apply(lambda x: " ".join(x for x in x.split() if x not in stop))
df['reviews.text'][2]
'inexpensive tablet use learn step nabi thrilled learn skype already'

Stemming

Stemming algorithm is very useful in the field of text mining and helps to gain relevant information as it reduces all words with the same roots to a common form by removing suffixes such as -action, ing, -es and -ses. However, there can be problematic where there are spelling errors.

st = PorterStemmer()
df['reviews.text'] = df['reviews.text'].apply(lambda x: " ".join([st.stem(word) for word in x.split()]))
df['reviews.text'][2]
'inexpens tablet use learn step nabi thrill learn skype alreadi'

This step is extremely useful for pre-processing textual data but it also depends on your goal. Here our goal is to calculate sentiment scores and if you look closely to the above code words like ‘inexpensive’ and ‘thrilled’ became ‘inexpens’ and ‘thrill’ after applying this technique. This will help us in text classification to deal with the curse of dimensionality but to calculate the sentiment score this process is not useful.

Sentiment Score

It is now time to calculate sentiment scores of each review and check how these scores look like.

## Define a function which can be applied to calculate the score for the whole dataset

def senti(x):
    return TextBlob(x).sentiment  

df['senti_score'] = df['reviews.text'].apply(senti)

df.senti_score.head()

0                                   (0.3, 0.8)
1                                (0.65, 0.675)
2                                   (0.0, 0.0)
3    (0.29545454545454547, 0.6492424242424243)
4                    (0.5, 0.5827777777777777)
Name: senti_score, dtype: object

As it can be observed there are two scores: the first score is sentiment polarity which tells if the sentiment is positive or negative and the second score is subjectivity score to tell how subjective is the text.

In my next article, we will extend this analysis by creating labels based on these scores and finally we will train a classification model.

Sentiment Analysis using Python

One of the applications of text mining is sentiment analysis. Most of the data is getting generated in textual format and in the past few years, people are talking more about NLP. Improvement is a continuous process and many product based companies leverage these text mining techniques to examine the sentiments of the customers to find about what they can improve in the product. This information also helps them to understand the trend and demand of the end user which results in Customer satisfaction.

As text mining is a vast concept, the article is divided into two subchapters. The main focus of this article will be calculating two scores: sentiment polarity and subjectivity using python. The range of polarity is from -1 to 1(negative to positive) and will tell us if the text contains positive or negative feedback. Most companies prefer to stop their analysis here but in our second article, we will try to extend our analysis by creating some labels out of these scores. Finally, a multi-label multi-class classifier can be trained to predict future reviews.

Without any delay let’s deep dive into the code and mine some knowledge from textual data.

There are a few NLP libraries existing in Python such as Spacy, NLTK, gensim, TextBlob, etc. For this particular article, we will be using NLTK for pre-processing and TextBlob to calculate sentiment polarity and subjectivity.

import pandas as pd
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
%matplotlib inline  
import nltk
from nltk import word_tokenize, sent_tokenize
from nltk.corpus import stopwords
from nltk.stem import LancasterStemmer, WordNetLemmatizer, PorterStemmer
from wordcloud import WordCloud, STOPWORDS
from textblob import TextBlob

The dataset is available here for download and we will be using pandas read_csv function to import the dataset. I would like to share an additional information here which I came to know about recently. Those who have already used python and pandas before they probably know that read_csv is by far one of the most used function. However, it can take a while to upload a big file. Some folks from  RISELab at UC Berkeley created Modin or Pandas on Ray which is a library that speeds up this process by changing a single line of code.

amz_reviews = pd.read_csv("1429_1.csv")

After importing the dataset it is recommended to understand it first and study the structure of the dataset. At this point we are interested to know how many columns are there and what are these columns so I am going to check the shape of the data frame and go through each column name to see if we need them or not.

amz_reviews.shape
(34660, 21)

amz_reviews.columns
Index(['id', 'name', 'asins', 'brand', 'categories', 'keys', 'manufacturer',
       'reviews.date', 'reviews.dateAdded', 'reviews.dateSeen',
       'reviews.didPurchase', 'reviews.doRecommend', 'reviews.id',
       'reviews.numHelpful', 'reviews.rating', 'reviews.sourceURLs',
       'reviews.text', 'reviews.title', 'reviews.userCity',
       'reviews.userProvince', 'reviews.username'],
      dtype='object')

 

There are so many columns which are not useful for our sentiment analysis and it’s better to remove these columns. There are many ways to do that: either just select the columns which you want to keep or select the columns you want to remove and then use the drop function to remove it from the data frame. I prefer the second option as it allows me to look at each column one more time so I don’t miss any important variable for the analysis.

columns = ['id','name','keys','manufacturer','reviews.dateAdded', 'reviews.date','reviews.didPurchase',
          'reviews.userCity', 'reviews.userProvince', 'reviews.dateSeen', 'reviews.doRecommend','asins',
          'reviews.id', 'reviews.numHelpful', 'reviews.sourceURLs', 'reviews.title']

df = pd.DataFrame(amz_reviews.drop(columns,axis=1,inplace=False))

Now let’s dive deep into the data and try to mine some knowledge from the remaining columns. The first step we would want to follow here is just to look at the distribution of the variables and try to make some notes. First, let’s look at the distribution of the ratings.

df['reviews.rating'].value_counts().plot(kind='bar')

Graphs are powerful and at this point, just by looking at the above bar graph we can conclude that most people are somehow satisfied with the products offered at Amazon. The reason I am saying ‘at’ Amazon is because it is just a platform where anyone can sell their products and the user are giving ratings to the product and not to Amazon. However, if the user is satisfied with the products it also means that Amazon has a lower return rate and lower fraud case (from seller side). The job of a Data Scientist relies not only on how good a model is but also on how useful it is for the business and that’s why these business insights are really important.

Data pre-processing for textual variables

Lowercasing

Before we move forward to calculate the sentiment scores for each review it is important to pre-process the textual data. Lowercasing helps in the process of normalization which is an important step to keep the words in a uniform manner (Welbers, et al., 2017, pp. 245-265).

## Change the reviews type to string
df['reviews.text'] = df['reviews.text'].astype(str)

## Before lowercasing 
df['reviews.text'][2]
'Inexpensive tablet for him to use and learn on, step up from the NABI. He was thrilled with it, learn how to Skype on it 
already...'

## Lowercase all reviews
df['reviews.text'] = df['reviews.text'].apply(lambda x: " ".join(x.lower() for x in x.split()))
df['reviews.text'][2] ## to see the difference
'inexpensive tablet for him to use and learn on, step up from the nabi. he was thrilled with it, learn how to skype on it 
already...'

Special characters

Special characters are non-alphabetic and non-numeric values such as {!,@#$%^ *()~;:/<>|+_-[]?}. Dealing with numbers is straightforward but special characters can be sometimes tricky. During tokenization, special characters create their own tokens and again not helpful for any algorithm, likewise, numbers.

## remove punctuation
df['reviews.text'] = df['reviews.text'].str.replace('[^ws]','')
df['reviews.text'][2]
'inexpensive tablet for him to use and learn on step up from the nabi he was thrilled with it learn how to skype on it already'

Stopwords

Stop-words being most commonly used in the English language; however, these words have no predictive power in reality. Words such as I, me, myself, he, she, they, our, mine, you, yours etc.

stop = stopwords.words('english')
df['reviews.text'] = df['reviews.text'].apply(lambda x: " ".join(x for x in x.split() if x not in stop))
df['reviews.text'][2]
'inexpensive tablet use learn step nabi thrilled learn skype already'

Stemming

Stemming algorithm is very useful in the field of text mining and helps to gain relevant information as it reduces all words with the same roots to a common form by removing suffixes such as -action, ing, -es and -ses. However, there can be problematic where there are spelling errors.

st = PorterStemmer()
df['reviews.text'] = df['reviews.text'].apply(lambda x: " ".join([st.stem(word) for word in x.split()]))
df['reviews.text'][2]
'inexpens tablet use learn step nabi thrill learn skype alreadi'

This step is extremely useful for pre-processing textual data but it also depends on your goal. Here our goal is to calculate sentiment scores and if you look closely to the above code words like ‘inexpensive’ and ‘thrilled’ became ‘inexpens’ and ‘thrill’ after applying this technique. This will help us in text classification to deal with the curse of dimensionality but to calculate the sentiment score this process is not useful.

Sentiment Score

It is now time to calculate sentiment scores of each review and check how these scores look like.

## Define a function which can be applied to calculate the score for the whole dataset

def senti(x):
    return TextBlob(x).sentiment  

df['senti_score'] = df['reviews.text'].apply(senti)

df.senti_score.head()

0                                   (0.3, 0.8)
1                                (0.65, 0.675)
2                                   (0.0, 0.0)
3    (0.29545454545454547, 0.6492424242424243)
4                    (0.5, 0.5827777777777777)
Name: senti_score, dtype: object

As it can be observed there are two scores: the first score is sentiment polarity which tells if the sentiment is positive or negative and the second score is subjectivity score to tell how subjective is the text. The whole code is available here.

In my next article, we will extend this analysis by creating labels based on these scores and finally we will train a classification model.