Posts

Web Scraping Using R..!

In this blog, I’ll show you, How to Web Scrape using R..?

What is R..?

R is a programming language and its environment built for statistical analysis, graphical representation & reporting. R programming is mostly preferred by statisticians, data miners, and software programmers who want to develop statistical software.

R is also available as Free Software under the terms of the Free Software Foundation’s GNU General Public License in source code form.

Reasons to choose R

Reasons to choose R

Let’s begin our topic of Web Scraping using R.

Step 1- Select the website & the data you want to scrape.

I picked this website “https://www.alexa.com/topsites/countries/IN” and want to scrape data of Top 50 sites in India.

Data we want to scrape

Data we want to scrape

Step 2- Get to know the HTML tags using SelectorGadget.

In my previous blog, I already discussed how to inspect & find the proper HTML tags. So, now I’ll explain an easier way to get the HTML tags.

You have to go to Google chrome extension (chrome://extensions) & search SelectorGadget. Add it to your browser, it’s a quite good CSS selector.

Step 3- R Code

Evoking Important Libraries or Packages

I’m using RVEST package to scrape the data from the webpage; it is inspired by libraries like Beautiful Soup. If you didn’t install the package yet, then follow the code in the snippet below.

Step 4- Set the url of the website

Step 5- Find the HTML tags using SelectorGadget

It’s quite easy to find the proper HTML tags in which your data is present.

Firstly, I have to click on data using SelectorGadget which I want to scrape, it automatically selects the data which are similar to selected HTML tags. Before going forward, cross-check the selected values, are they correct or some junk data is also gets selected..? If you noticed our page has only 50 values, but you can see 156 values are selected.

Selection by SelectorGadget

Selection by SelectorGadget

So I need to remove unwanted values who get selected, once you click on them to deselect it, it turns red and others will turn yellow except our primary selection which turn to green. Now you can see only 50 values are selected as per our primary requirement but it’s not enough. I have to again cross-check that some required values are not exchanged with junk values.

If we satisfy with our selection then copy the HTML tag & include it into the code, else repeat this exercise.

Modified Selection by SelectorGadget

Step 6- Include the tag in our Code

After including the tags, our code is like this.

Code Snippet

If I run the code, values in each list object will be 50.

Data Stored in List Objects

Step 7- Creating DataFrame

Now, we create a dataframe with our list-objects. So for creating a dataframe, we always need to remember one thumb rule that is the number of rows (length of all the lists) should be equal, else we get an error.

Error appears when number of rows differs

Finally, Our DataFrame will look like this:

Our Final Data

Step 8- Writing our DataFrame to CSV file

We need our scraped data to be available locally for further analysis & model building or other purposes.

Our final piece of code to write it in CSV file is:

Writing to CSV file

Step 9- Check the CSV file

Data written in CSV file

Conclusion-

I tried to explain Web Scraping using R in a simple way, Hope this will help you in understanding it better.

Find full code on

https://github.com/vgyaan/Alexa/blob/master/webscrap.R

If you have any questions about the code or web scraping in general, reach out to me on LinkedIn!

Okay, we will meet again with the new exposer.

Till then,

Happy Coding..!

Determining Your Data Pipeline Architecture and Its Efficacy

Data analytics has become a central part of how many businesses operate. If you hope to stay competitive in today’s market, you need to take advantage of all your available data. For that, you’ll need an efficient data pipeline, which is often easier said than done.

If your pipeline is too slow, your data will be all but useless by the time it’s usable. Successful analytics require an optimized pipeline, and that looks different for every company. No matter your specific circumstances, though, a traditional approach will result in inefficiencies.

Creating the most efficient pipeline architecture will require you to change how you look at the process. By understanding each stage’s role and how they serve your goals, you can optimize your data analytics.

Understanding Your Data Needs

You can’t build an optimal data pipeline if you don’t know what you need from your data. If you spend too much time collecting and organizing information you won’t use, you’ll take time away from what you need. Similarly, if you only work to meet one team’s needs, you’ll have to go back and start over to help others.

Data analytics involves multiple stakeholders, all with individual needs and expectations that you should consider. Your data engineers need your pipeline to be accessible and scalable, while analysts require visual, relevant datasets. If you consider these aspects from the beginning, you can build a pipeline that works for everyone.

Start at the earliest stage — collection. You may be collecting data from every channel you can, which could result in an information overload. Focus instead on gathering things from the most relevant sources. At the same time, ensure you can add more channels if necessary in the future.

As you reorganize your pipeline, remember that analytics are only as good as your datasets. If you put more effort into organizing and scrubbing data, helpful analytics will follow. Focus on preparing data well, and the last few stages will be smoother.

Creating a Collaborative Pipeline

When structuring your pipeline, it’s easy to focus too much on the individual stages. While seeing things as rigid steps can help you visualize them, you need something more fluid in practice. If you want the process to run as smoothly as possible, it needs to be collaborative.

Look at the software development practice of DevOps, which doubles a team’s likelihood of exceeding productivity goals. This strategy focuses on collaboration across separate teams instead of passing things back and forth between them. You can do the same thing with your data pipeline.

Instead of dividing steps between engineers and analysts, make it a single, cohesive process. Teams will still focus on different areas according to their expertise, but they’ll reduce disruption by working together instead of independently. If workers can collaborate along every step, they don’t have to go back and forth.

Simultaneously, everyone should have clearly defined responsibilities. Collaboration doesn’t mean overstepping your areas of expertise. The goal here isn’t to make everyone handle everything but to ensure they understand each other’s needs.

Eliminating the time between steps also applies to your platform. Look for or build software that integrates both refinement and data preparation. If you have to export data to various programs, it will cause unnecessary bottlenecks.

Enabling Continuous Improvement

Finally, understand that restructuring your data pipeline isn’t a one-and-done job. Another principle you can adopt from DevOps is continuous development across all sides of the process. Your engineers should keep looking for better ways to structure data as your analysts search for new applications for this information.

Make sure you always measure your throughput and efficiency. If you tweak something and you notice the process starts to slow, revert to the older method. If your changes improve the pipeline, try something similar in another area.

Optimize Your Data Pipeline

Remember to start slow when optimizing your data pipeline. Changing too much at once can cause more disruptions than it avoids, so start small with an emphasis on scalability.

The specifics of your pipeline will vary depending on your needs and circumstances. No matter what these are, though, you can benefit from collaboration and continuous development. When you start breaking down barriers between different steps and teams, you unclog your pipeline.

How the Pandemic is Changing the Data Analytics Outsourcing Industry

While media pundits have largely focused on the impact of COVID-19 as far as human health is concerned, it hasn’t been particularly good for the health of automated systems either. As cybersecurity budgets plummet in the face of dwindling finances, computer criminals have taken the opportunity to increase attacks against high value targets.

In June, an online antique store suffered a data breach that contained over 3 million records, and it’s likely that a number of similar attacks have simply gone unpublished. Fortunately, data scientists are hard at work developing new methods of fighting back against these kinds of breaches. Budget constraints and a lack of personnel as a result of the pandemic continues to be a problem, but automation has helped to assuage the issue to some degree.

AI-Driven Data Storage Systems

Big data experts have long promoted the cloud as an ideal metaphor for the way that data is stored remotely, but as a result few people today consider the physical locations that this information is stored at. All data has to be located on some sort of physical storage device. Even so-called serverless apps have to be distributed from a server unless they’re fully deployed using P2P services.

Since software can never truly replace hardware, researchers are looking at refining the various abstraction layers that exist between servers and the clients who access them. Data warehousing software has enabled computer scientists to construct centralized data storage solutions that look like traditional disk locations. This gives users the ability to securely interact with resources that are encrypted automatically.

Background services based on artificial intelligence monitor virtual data warehouse locations, which gives specialists the freedom to conduct whatever analytics they deem necessary. In some cases, a data warehouse can even anonymize information as it’s stored, which can streamline workflows involved with the analysis process.

While this level of automation has proven useful, it’s still subject to some of the problems that have occurred as a result of the pandemic. Traditional supply chains are in shambles and a large percentage of technical workers are now telecommuting. If there’s a problem with any existing big data plans, then there’s often nobody around to do any work in person.

Living with Shifting Digital Priorities

Many businesses were in the process of outsourcing their data operations even before the pandemic, and the current situation is speeding this up considerably. Initial industry estimates had projected steady growth numbers for the data analytics sector through 2025. While the current figures might not be quite as bullish, it’s likely that sales of outsourcing contracts will remain high.

That being said, firms are also shifting a large percentage of their IT spending dollars into cybersecurity projects. A recent survey found that 37 percent of business leaders said they were already going to cut their IT department budgets. The same study found that 28 percent of businesses are going to move at least some part of their data analytics programs abroad.

Those companies that can’t find an attractive outsourcing contract might start to patch their remote systems over a virtual private network. Unfortunately, this kind of technology has been strained to some degree in recent months. The virtual servers that power VPNs are flooded with requests, which in turn has brought them down in some instances. Neural networks, which utilize deep learning technology to improve themselves as time goes on, have proven more than capable of predicting when these problems are most likely to arise.

That being said, firms that deploy this kind of technology might find that it still costs more to work with automated technology on-premise compared to simply investing in an outsourcing program that works with these kinds of algorithms at an outside location.

Saving Money in the Time of Corona

Experts from Think Big Analytics pointed out how specialist organizations can deal with a much wider array of technologies than a small business ever could. Since these companies specialize in providing support for other organizations, they have a tendency to offer support for a large number of platforms.

These representatives recently opined that they could provide support for NoSQL, Presto, Apache Spark and several other emerging platforms at the same time. Perhaps most importantly, these organizations can work with Hadoop and other traditional data analysis languages.

Staffers working on data mining operations have long relied on languages like Hadoop and R to write scripts that they later use to automate the process of collecting and analyzing data. By working with an organization that already supports a language that companies rely on, they can avoid the need of changing up their existing operations.

This can help to drastically reduce the cost of migration, which is extremely important since many of the firms that need to migrate to a remote system are already suffering from budget problems. Assuming that some issues related to the pandemic continue to plague businesses for some time, it’s likely that these budget constraints will force IT departments to consider a migration even if they would have otherwise relied solely on a traditional colocation arrangement.

IT department staffers were already moving away from many rare platforms even before the COVID-19 pandemic hit, however, so this shouldn’t be as much of a herculean task as it sounds. For instance, the KNIME Analytics Platform has increased in popularity exponentially since it’s release in 2006. The fact that it supports over 1,000 plug-in modules has made it easy for smaller businesses to move toward the platform.

The road ahead isn’t going to be all that pleasant, however. COBOL and other antiquated languages still rule the roost at many governmental big data processing centers. At the same time, some small businesses have never even been able to put a big data plan into play in the first place. As the pandemic continues to wreak havoc on the world’s economy, however, it’s likely that there will be no shortage of organizations continuing to migrate to more secure third-party platforms backed by outsourcing contracts.

Simplify Vendor Onboarding with Automated Data Integration

Vendor onboarding is a key business process that involves collecting and processing large data volumes from one or multiple vendors. Business users need vendor information in a standardized format to use it for subsequent data processes. However, consolidating and standardizing data for each new vendor requires IT teams to write code for custom integration flows, which can be a time-consuming and challenging task.

In this blog post, we will talk about automated vendor onboarding and how it is far more efficient and quicker than manually updating integration flows.

Problems with Manual Integration for Vendor Onboarding

During the onboarding process, vendor data needs to be extracted, validated, standardized, transformed, and loaded into the target system for further processing. An integration task like this involves coding, updating, and debugging manual ETL pipelines that can take days and even weeks on end.

Every time a vendor comes on board, this process is repeated and executed to load the information for that vendor into the unified business system. Not just this, but because vendor data is often received from disparate sources in a variety of formats (CSV, Text, Excel), these ETL pipelines frequently break and require manual fixes.

All this effort is not suitable, particularly for large-scale businesses that onboard hundreds of vendors each month. Luckily, there is a faster alternative available that involves no code-writing.

Automated Data Integration

The manual onboarding process can be automated using purpose-built data integration tools.

To help you better understand the advantages, here is a step-by-step guide on how automated data integration for vendor onboarding works:

  1. Vendor data is retrieved from heterogeneous sources such as databases, FTP servers, and web APIs through built-in connectors available in the solution.
  2. The data from each file is validated by passing it through a set of predefined quality rules – this step helps in eliminating records with missing, duplicate, or incorrect data.
  3. Transformations are applied to convert input data into the desired output format or screen vendors based on business criteria. For example, if the vendor data is stored in Excel sheets and the business uses SQL Server for data storage, then the data has to be mapped to the relevant fields in the SQL Server database, which is the destination.
  4. The standardized, validated data is then loaded into a unified enterprise database that you can use as the source of information for business processes. In some cases, this can be a staging database where you can perform further filtering and aggregation to build a consolidated vendor database.
  5. This entire ETL pipeline (Step 1 through Step 4) can then be automated through event-based or time-based triggers in a workflow. For instance, you may want to run the pipeline once every day, or once a new file/data point is available in your FTP server.

Why Build a Consolidated Database for Vendors?

Once the ETL pipeline runs, you will end up with a consolidated database with complete vendor information. The main benefit of having a unified database is that it would have filtered information regarding vendors.

Most businesses have a strict process for screening vendors that follows a set of predefined rules. For example, you may want to reject vendors that have a poor credit history automatically. With manual data integration, you would need to perform this filtering by writing code. Automated data integration allows you to apply pre-built filters directly within your ETL pipeline to flag or remove vendors with a credit score lower than the specified threshold.

This is just one example; you can perform a wide range of tasks at this level in your ETL pipeline including vendor scoring (calculated based on multiple fields in your data), filtering (based on rules applied to your data), and data aggregation (to add measures to your data) to build a robust vendor database for decision-making and subsequent processes.

Conclusion

Automated vendor onboarding offers cost-and-time benefits to your organization. Making use of enterprise-grade data integration tools ensures a seamless business-to-vendor data exchange without the need for reworking and upgrading your ETL pipelines.

Data Science Knowledge Stack – Was ein Data Scientist können muss

Was muss ein Data Scientist können? Diese Frage wurde bereits häufig gestellt und auch häufig beantwortet. In der Tat ist man sich mittlerweile recht einig darüber, welche Aufgaben ein Data Scientist für Aufgaben übernehmen kann und welche Fähigkeiten dafür notwendig sind. Ich möchte versuchen, diesen Konsens in eine Grafik zu bringen: Ein Schichten-Modell, ähnlich des OSI-Layer-Modells (welches übrigens auch jeder Data Scientist kennen sollte).
Ich gebe Einführungs-Seminare in Data Science für Kaufleute und Ingenieure und bei der Erläuterung, was wir in den Seminaren gemeinsam theoretisch und mit praxisnahen Übungen erarbeiten müssen, bin ich auf die Idee für dieses Schichten-Modell gekommen. Denn bei meinen Seminaren fängt es mit der Problemstellung bereits an, ich gebe nämlich Seminare für Data Science für Business Analytics mit Python. Also nicht beispielsweise für medizinische Analysen und auch nicht mit R oder Julia. Ich vermittle also nicht irgendein Data Science, sondern eine ganz bestimmte Richtung.

Ein Data Scientist muss bei jedem Data Science Vorhaben Probleme auf unterschiedlichsten Ebenen bewältigen, beispielsweise klappt der Datenzugriff nicht wie geplant oder die Daten haben eine andere Struktur als erwartet. Ein Data Scientist kann Stunden damit verbringen, seinen eigenen Quellcode zu debuggen oder sich in neue Data Science Pakete für seine ausgewählte Programmiersprache einzuarbeiten. Auch müssen die richtigen Algorithmen zur Datenauswertung ausgewählt, richtig parametrisiert und getestet werden, manchmal stellt sich dabei heraus, dass die ausgewählten Methoden nicht die optimalen waren. Letztendlich soll ein Mehrwert für den Fachbereich generiert werden und auch auf dieser Ebene wird ein Data Scientist vor besondere Herausforderungen gestellt.


english-flagRead this article in English:
“Data Science Knowledge Stack – Abstraction of the Data Scientist Skillset”


Data Science Knowledge Stack

Mit dem Data Science Knowledge Stack möchte ich einen strukturierten Einblick in die Aufgaben und Herausforderungen eines Data Scientists geben. Die Schichten des Stapels stellen zudem einen bidirektionalen Fluss dar, der von oben nach unten und von unten nach oben verläuft, denn Data Science als Disziplin ist ebenfalls bidirektional: Wir versuchen gestellte Fragen mit Daten zu beantworten oder wir schauen, welche Potenziale in den Daten liegen, um bisher nicht gestellte Fragen zu beantworten.

Der Data Science Knowledge Stack besteht aus sechs Schichten:

Database Technology Knowledge

Ein Data Scientist arbeitet im Schwerpunkt mit Daten und die liegen selten direkt in einer CSV-Datei strukturiert vor, sondern in der Regel in einer oder in mehreren Datenbanken, die ihren eigenen Regeln unterliegen. Insbesondere Geschäftsdaten, beispielsweise aus dem ERP- oder CRM-System, liegen in relationalen Datenbanken vor, oftmals von Microsoft, Oracle, SAP oder eine Open-Source-Alternative. Ein guter Data Scientist beherrscht nicht nur die Structured Query Language (SQL), sondern ist sich auch der Bedeutung relationaler Beziehungen bewusst, kennt also auch das Prinzip der Normalisierung.

Andere Arten von Datenbanken, sogenannte NoSQL-Datenbanken (Not only SQL)  beruhen auf Dateiformaten, einer Spalten- oder einer Graphenorientiertheit, wie beispielsweise MongoDB, Cassandra oder GraphDB. Einige dieser Datenbanken verwenden zum Datenzugriff eigene Programmiersprachen (z. B. JavaScript bei MongoDB oder die graphenorientierte Datenbank Neo4J hat eine eigene Sprache namens Cypher). Manche dieser Datenbanken bieten einen alternativen Zugriff über SQL (z. B. Hive für Hadoop).

Ein Data Scientist muss mit unterschiedlichen Datenbanksystemen zurechtkommen und mindestens SQL – den Quasi-Standard für Datenverarbeitung – sehr gut beherrschen.

Data Access & Transformation Knowledge

Liegen Daten in einer Datenbank vor, können Data Scientists einfache (und auch nicht so einfache) Analysen bereits direkt auf der Datenbank ausführen. Doch wie bekommen wir die Daten in unsere speziellen Analyse-Tools? Hierfür muss ein Data Scientist wissen, wie Daten aus der Datenbank exportiert werden können. Für einmalige Aktionen kann ein Export als CSV-Datei reichen, doch welche Trennzeichen und Textqualifier können verwendet werden? Eventuell ist der Export zu groß, so dass die Datei gesplittet werden muss.
Soll eine direkte und synchrone Datenanbindung zwischen dem Analyse-Tool und der Datenbank bestehen, kommen Schnittstellen wie REST, ODBC oder JDBC ins Spiel. Manchmal muss auch eine Socket-Verbindung hergestellt werden und das Prinzip einer Client-Server-Architektur sollte bekannt sein. Auch mit synchronen und asynchronen Verschlüsselungsverfahren sollte ein Data Scientist vertraut sein, denn nicht selten wird mit vertraulichen Daten gearbeitet und ein Mindeststandard an Sicherheit ist zumindest bei geschäftlichen Anwendungen stets einzuhalten.

Viele Daten liegen nicht strukturiert in einer Datenbank vor, sondern sind sogenannte unstrukturierte oder semi-strukturierte Daten aus Dokumenten oder aus Internetquellen. Auch hier haben wir es mit Schnittstellen zutun, ein häufiger Einstieg für Data Scientists stellt beispielsweise die Twitter-API dar. Manchmal wollen wir Daten in nahezu Echtzeit streamen, beispielsweise Maschinendaten. Dies kann recht anspruchsvoll sein, so das Data Streaming beinahe eine eigene Disziplin darstellt, mit der ein Data Scientist schnell in Berührung kommen kann.

Programming Language Knowledge

Programmiersprachen sind für Data Scientists Werkzeuge, um Daten zu verarbeiten und die Verarbeitung zu automatisieren. Data Scientists sind in der Regel keine richtigen Software-Entwickler, sie müssen sich nicht um Software-Sicherheit oder -Ergonomie kümmern. Ein gewisses Basiswissen über Software-Architekturen hilft jedoch oftmals, denn immerhin sollen manche Data Science Programme in eine IT-Landschaft integriert werden. Unverzichtbar ist hingegen das Verständnis für objektorientierte Programmierung und die gute Kenntnis der Syntax der ausgewählten Programmiersprachen, zumal nicht jede Programmiersprache für alle Vorhaben die sinnvollste ist.

Auf dem Level der Programmiersprache gibt es beim Arbeitsalltag eines Data Scientists bereits viele Fallstricke, die in der Programmiersprache selbst begründet sind, denn jede hat ihre eigenen Tücken und Details entscheiden darüber, ob eine Analyse richtig oder falsch abläuft: Beispielsweise ob Datenobjekte als Kopie oder als Referenz übergeben oder wie NULL-Werte behandelt werden.

Data Science Tool & Library Knowledge

Hat ein Data Scientist seine Daten erstmal in sein favorisiertes Tool geladen, beispielsweise in eines von IBM, SAS oder in eine Open-Source-Alternative wie Octave, fängt seine Kernarbeit gerade erst an. Diese Tools sind allerdings eher nicht selbsterklärend und auch deshalb gibt es ein vielfältiges Zertifizierungsangebot für diverse Data Science Tools. Viele (wenn nicht die meisten) Data Scientists arbeiten überwiegend direkt mit einer Programmiersprache, doch reicht diese alleine nicht aus, um effektiv statistische Datenanalysen oder Machine Learning zu betreiben: Wir verwenden Data Science Bibliotheken, also Pakete (Packages), die uns Datenstrukturen und Methoden als Vorgabe bereitstellen und die Programmiersprache somit erweitern, damit allerdings oftmals auch neue Tücken erzeugen. Eine solche Bibliothek, beispielsweise Scikit-Learn für Python, ist eine in der Programmiersprache umgesetzte Methodensammlung und somit ein Data Science Tool. Die Verwendung derartiger Bibliotheken will jedoch gelernt sein und erfordert für die zuverlässige Anwendung daher Einarbeitung und Praxiserfahrung.

Geht es um Big Data Analytics, also die Analyse von besonders großen Daten, betreten wir das Feld von Distributed Computing (Verteiltes Rechnen). Tools (bzw. Frameworks) wie Apache Hadoop, Apache Spark oder Apache Flink ermöglichen es, Daten zeitlich parallel auf mehren Servern zu verarbeiten und auszuwerten. Auch stellen diese Tools wiederum eigene Bibliotheken bereit, für Machine Learning z. B. Mahout, MLlib und FlinkML.

Data Science Method Knowledge

Ein Data Scientist ist nicht einfach nur ein Bediener von Tools, sondern er nutzt die Tools, um seine Analyse-Methoden auf Daten anzuwenden, die er für die festgelegten Ziele ausgewählt hat. Diese Analyse-Methoden sind beispielweise Auswertungen der beschreibenden Statistik, Schätzverfahren oder Hypothesen-Tests. Etwas mathematischer sind Verfahren des maschinellen Lernens zum Data Mining, beispielsweise Clusterung oder Dimensionsreduktion oder mehr in Richtung automatisierter Entscheidungsfindung durch Klassifikation oder Regression.

Maschinelle Lernverfahren funktionieren in der Regel nicht auf Anhieb, sie müssen unter Einsatz von Optimierungsverfahren, wie der Gradientenmethode, verbessert werden. Ein Data Scientist muss Unter- und Überanpassung erkennen können und er muss beweisen, dass die Vorhersageergebnisse für den geplanten Einsatz akkurat genug sind.

Spezielle Anwendungen bedingen spezielles Wissen, was beispielsweise für die Themengebiete der Bilderkennung (Visual Computing) oder der Verarbeitung von menschlicher Sprache (Natural Language Processiong) zutrifft. Spätestens an dieser Stelle öffnen wir die Tür zum Deep Learning.

Fachexpertise

Data Science ist kein Selbstzweck, sondern eine Disziplin, die Fragen aus anderen Fachgebieten mit Daten beantworten möchte. Aus diesem Grund ist Data Science so vielfältig. Betriebswirtschaftler brauchen Data Scientists, um Finanztransaktionen zu analysieren, beispielsweise um Betrugsszenarien zu erkennen oder um die Kundenbedürfnisse besser zu verstehen oder aber, um Lieferketten zu optimieren. Naturwissenschaftler wie Geologen, Biologen oder Experimental-Physiker nutzen ebenfalls Data Science, um ihre Beobachtungen mit dem Ziel der Erkenntnisgewinnung zu machen. Ingenieure möchten die Situation und Zusammenhänge von Maschinenanlagen oder Fahrzeugen besser verstehen und Mediziner interessieren sich für die bessere Diagnostik und Medikation bei ihren Patienten.

Damit ein Data Scientist einen bestimmten Fachbereich mit seinem Wissen über Daten, Tools und Analyse-Methoden ergebnisorientiert unterstützen kann, benötigt er selbst ein Mindestmaß an der entsprechenden Fachexpertise. Wer Analysen für Kaufleute, Ingenieure, Naturwissenschaftler, Mediziner, Juristen oder andere Interessenten machen möchte, muss eben jene Leute auch fachlich verstehen können.

Engere Data Science Definition

Während die Data Science Pioniere längst hochgradig spezialisierte Teams aufgebaut haben, suchen beispielsweise kleinere Unternehmen eher den Data Science Allrounder, der vom Zugriff auf die Datenbank bis hin zur Implementierung der analytischen Anwendung das volle Aufgabenspektrum unter Abstrichen beim Spezialwissen übernehmen kann. Unternehmen mit spezialisierten Daten-Experten unterscheiden jedoch längst in Data Scientists, Data Engineers und Business Analysts. Die Definition für Data Science und die Abgrenzung der Fähigkeiten, die ein Data Scientist haben sollte, schwankt daher zwischen der breiteren und einer engeren Abgrenzung.

Die engere Betrachtung sieht vor, dass ein Data Engineer die Datenbereitstellung übernimmt, der Data Scientist diese in seine Tools lädt und gemeinsam mit den Kollegen aus dem Fachbereich die Datenanalyse betreibt. Demnach bräuchte ein Data Scientist kein Wissen über Datenbanken oder APIs und auch die Fachexpertise wäre nicht notwendig…

In der beruflichen Praxis sieht Data Science meiner Erfahrung nach so nicht aus, das Aufgabenspektrum umfasst mehr als nur den Kernbereich. Dieser Irrtum entsteht in Data Science Kursen und auch in Seminaren – würde ich nicht oft genug auf das Gesamtbild hinweisen. In Kursen und Seminaren, die Data Science als Disziplin vermitteln wollen, wird sich selbstverständlich auf den Kernbereich fokussiert: Programmierung, Tools und Methoden aus der Mathematik & Statistik.

Kontrolle und Steuerung von Spark Applikationen über REST

Apache Spark erfreut sich zunehmender Beliebtheit in der Data Science Szene da es in Geschwindigkeit und Funktionalität eine immense Verbesserung bzw. Erweiterung des reinen Hadoop MapReduce Programmiermodells ist. Jedoch bleibt Spark ebenso wie Hadoop eine Technologie für Experten. Es erfordert zumindest Kenntnisse von Unix-Skripten und muss über die Command-Line gesteuert werden. Die vorhandenen Weboberflächen bieten nur sehr rudimentäre Einblicke in den Status von Spark Applikationen:

spark basic ui

Der Spark JobServer ist ein Open-Source Projekt, das eine REST-Schnittstelle (Representational State Transfer) für Spark anbietet. (In diesem YouTube Video wird anschaulich erläutert, was ein REST API ist und wozu es verwendet werden kann.) Vereinfacht gesagt, ermöglicht es der JobServer, Spark über diese REST-Schnittstelle als Webservice zu nutzen. Es ist möglich, über den JobServer Spark Kontexte und Applikationen (Jobs) zu managen und Kontexte über verschiedene Aufrufe der REST-Schnittstelle hinweg wiederzuverwenden. Jar Files mit Job Implementierungen können vorab über die gleiche Schnittstelle installiert werden, so dass es z.B. möglich ist, auch sehr feingranulare Jobs über die Schnittstelle zu steuern (vollständige Liste der Features).

Der Spark JobServer ist bereits bei verschiedenen Organisationen (u.a. Netflix, Zed Worldwide, KNIME, Azavea und Maana) im Einsatz. Diese Nutzer des JobServers verwenden ihn meist versteckt „unter der Haube“, um so ihre jeweiligen Werkzeuge Big-Data tauglich zu machen. So nutzt KNIME ab dem nächsten Release (Oktober 2015) den JobServer. Anwendern können dann Spark Jobs über eine grafische Oberfläche bequem von ihrem lokalen Rechner aus starten, monitoren und stoppen. In der folgenden Abbildung sehen Sie, wie Trainingsdaten auf den Server hochgeladen werden, um daraus verschiedene Machine Learning Modelle zu erstellen. Diese Modelle können dann auf Testdaten angewandt werden, die z.B. aus einer HIVE-Tabelle nach Spark importiert werden:

spark knime hive jobs

Jeder der dargestellten Knoten mit der Überschrift „Spark ***“, wie z.B. „Spark Decision Tree“, ist ein Spark Job im Sinne des JobServers. Weitere Beispiele für Spark Jobs sind verschiedene Vorverarbeitungsaufgaben wie das Sampling einer Tabelle oder ein Join über mehrere Tabellen.

Spark kann über den JobServer im Standalone-, Mesos- oder im Yarn-Client-Modus angesteuert werden. Eine sehr hilfreiche Erweiterung der eigentlichen Spark-Funktionalität bietet der JobServer über die sogenannten „Named RDDs“ an. Ein Resilient Distributed Dataset (RDD) ist im Prinzip ein Datensatz bzw. eine Tabelle in Spark. „Named RDDs“ erlauben die Weiterverwendung von RDDs über einzelne Jobs hinweg. So kann man Jobs modularer aufbauen und leichter Zwischenergebnisse inspizieren.

Ich kann aus eigener Erfahrung sagen, dass der JobServer die geeignete Middleware zwischen einer benutzerfreundlichen Oberfläche und Spark ist. Die Open-Source Community ist hier sehr aktiv und der JobServer lässt sich bei Bedarf gut erweitern.

Von Rohdaten zu entscheidungsrelevanten Informationen mit Microsoft Self Service BI

Ganz still und leise, ja fast geräuschlos führte Microsoft in Office 2010 „by the backdoor“ eine Reihe von kostenlosen AddIns ein. Diese AddIns unterstützen die Anbindung von heterogenen Datenquellen, deren Kombination, Anreicherung, Modellierung und Visualisierung. Microsoft faßt diese AddIns unter dem Begriff Power BI zusammen: Excel Power Query, Excel Power Pivot, Excel Power View, Excel Power Map. Diese Power BI Tools können sich durchaus mit anderen am Markt verfügbaren BI Tools messen. Die Vorteile liegen auf der Hand, sie sind kostenlos und die Akzeptanz von Excel in Unternehmen kann als gegeben vorausgesetzt werden. Geschäftsrelevante Daten können mit Hilfe dieses tool sets effizient in entscheidungsrelevante Informationen „in Form“ gebracht werden: ETL (Einlesen, Transformieren, Laden), DI (Daten Integration), DQ (Datenqualität), Data Visualization, BI Themen, welche ausreichend abgedeckt werden. Ein kostenloses Tool Set, wie gemacht für den Fachanwender. Unter Self Service BI versteht man die Bereitstellung einer IT Umgebung für den Fachanwender, durch deren Hilfe er oder sie weitestgehend unabhängig von der IT Daten beschaffen, Analysen erstellen und Berichte erzeugen kann. Dieses agile Business Intelligence Konzept ermöglicht dem Fachanwender schnelles und effizientes Agieren auf sich ändernde Anforderungen steuerungsrelevante Kennzahlen betreffend. Ein probates Mittel ist Self Service BI bei regelmäßig wiederkehrenden Entscheidungen. Im Folgenden soll das Prinzip der Selbstbedienung anhand eines konkreten Beispiels aus dem Einkauf näher beleuchtet werden. Dabei werden die einzelnen Phasen (ETL, Modellierung, interaktive Auswertung) und Funktionen (DAX Funktionen) eines typischen Self Service Prozesses von Excel Power Pivot dargestellt. Das Datenmodell wurde mit Excel 2013 erstellt. Ab Office 2013 ist Power BI bereits im Auslieferungszustand vorhanden. Read more

Automatisierte Extraktion von Rohstoffpreisen aus HTML basierten Dokumenten

Ein im ETL-Kontext häufiger Anwendungsfall ist die periodische Extraktion beliebiger Zeichenketten aus heterogenen Datenquellen. Ziel dieses Artikel ist, am Beispiel der beiden Industriemetalle Aluminium und Kupfer zu demonstrieren, wie mit vergleichsweise geringem Aufwand ein Monitoring von Rohstroffpreisen realisiert werden kann. Die tragende Technologie im Hinblick des Extraktionsprozesses wird hierbei die vielseitige Programmiersprache PHP sein. Die Speicherung der Rohstoffpreise wird MongoDB übernehmen und zur Koordinierung der einzelnen Elemente findet ein wenige Zeilen umfassendes Bash-Script, welches periodisch vom cron Daemon gestartet wird, Verwendung. Read more